Mayo Clinic Q and A: Genetic testing and antidepressants
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I've heard that genetic testing can help determine which antidepressant would be best for me. How does this work? ANSWER: Genetic testing is available to help narrow down your antidepressant options, ideally reducing the need for a sometimes prolonged trial-and-error period while settling on an antidepressant regimen. Although these tests can't tell [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 4, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

' Unprecedented' Results in Biliary Tract Cancer'Unprecedented' Results in Biliary Tract Cancer
Experts were impressed with results from a phase 3 study of a targeted agent in a subgroup of patients with cholangiocarcinoma with genetic mutations.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - October 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Breast cancer: Call for genetic screening for all
Offering tests for gene mutations would save hundreds of lives each year, a study suggests. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Image of the Day: Poison Tolerance
Genetically engineered Drosophila withstand toxins common in monarch butterflies ’ diet. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 3, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Danielle Rizzo’s donor-conceived sons both have autism. Should someone be held responsible?
A number of Post readers have asked how common it is for serious genetic issues to be linked to donor sperm. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - October 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ariana Eunjung Cha Source Type: news

Inception of memories that guide vocal learning in the songbird
Animals learn many complex behaviors by emulating the behavior of more experienced individuals. This essential, yet still poorly understood, form of learning relies on the ability to encode lasting memories of observed behaviors. We identified a vocal-motor pathway in the zebra finch where memories that guide learning of song-element durations can be implanted. Activation of synapses in this pathway seeds memories that guide learning of song-element duration and can override learning from social interactions with other individuals. Genetic lesions of this circuit after memory formation, however, do not disrupt subsequent s...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zhao, W., Garcia-Oscos, F., Dinh, D., Roberts, T. F. Tags: Development, Neuroscience r-articles Source Type: news

Stochastic antagonism between two proteins governs a bacterial cell fate switch
Cell fate decision circuits must be variable enough for genetically identical cells to adopt a multitude of fates, yet ensure that these states are distinct, stably maintained, and coordinated with neighboring cells. A long-standing view is that this is achieved by regulatory networks involving self-stabilizing feedback loops that convert small differences into long-lived cell types. We combined regulatory mutants and in vivo reconstitution with theory for stochastic processes to show that the marquee features of a cell fate switch in Bacillus subtilis—discrete states, multigenerational inheritance, and timing of com...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lord, N. D., Norman, T. M., Yuan, R., Bakshi, S., Losick, R., Paulsson, J. Tags: Engineering, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Researchers identify molecular process that could accelerate recovery from nerve injuries
Twenty million Americans suffer from peripheral nerve injuries, which can be caused by traumas such as combat wounds and motorcycle crashes as well as medical disorders including diabetes. These injuries can have a devastating impact on quality of life, resulting in loss of sensation, motor function and long-lasting nerve pain. The body is capable of regenerating damaged nerves, but this process is slow and incomplete.Now, researchers at the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA have discovered a molecular process that controls the rate at which nerves grow both duri...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

These Butterflies Evolved to Eat Poison. How Could That Have Happened?
Scientists have unraveled the sequence of gene mutations that enabled the monarch butterfly to thrive on toxic milkweed. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Flies Insects Genetics and Heredity Evolution (Biology) Butterflies and Moths Biology and Biochemistry Poisoning and Poisons Hazardous and Toxic Substances Drug Resistance (Microbial) Nature (Journal) University of California, Berkeley Source Type: news

AHA News: Entertainment Exec Mathew Knowles: I Have Breast Cancer
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 2, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Entertainment executive Mathew Knowles has fought off breast cancer via a mastectomy and is planning another because testing uncovered a genetic mutation with potentially life-altering... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Vacancy for an Assistant Professor in Diabetes Complications
The University of Iowa, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, is seeking an Assistant Professor in the Research Track in the field of Diabetes Complications.Applicants are required to have a PhD degree. Applicants are also required to have expertise in the areas of Inflammation and ischemia, using both in vitro and in vivo methodologies.  Expertise in cell biological, immunological, and molecular biological techniques such as ELISA, flow cytometry, antibody-based protein analyses, PCR (end point and real-time quantitative PCR), immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy is high...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - October 2, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Video » Elisa Dumett, Ph.D., Winner of the 2018 NIMH Three-Minute Talks Competition
Elisa Dumett Torres, Ph.D., winner of the 2018 NIMH Three-Minute Talks Competition, presents her three minute talk on viewing hippocampal functional coupling through the lens of environmental factor of urbanicity and the genetic factor BDNF. Her study provides a template for exploring the effects of gene environment interactions for general brain function and how this might be altered in psychiatric illness. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - October 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Video » Franchesca Kuhney, Ph.D., Winner of the 2018 NIMH Three-Minute Talks Competition
Franchesca Kuhney, Ph.D., winner of the 2018 NIMH Three-Minute Talks Competition, presents her three minute talk on hippocampus and amygdala volume across development in Willaims Syndrome. Her study begins to shed light on the complex neuro genetic mechanisms underlying adolescent brain development as a whole. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - October 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

E.coli is engineered to produce the chemical that makes magic mushrooms 'trippy'
A team from Miami University genetically engineered the bacteria to churn out the psychoactive chemical psilocybin. This is increasingly being tested as a treatment for psychiatric disorders. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Polygenic risk for psychiatric disorder and singleness in patients with severe mental illness and controls - Hjorth øj C, Uddin MJ, Hougaard DM, Sørensen HJ, Nordentoft M.
We aimed to investigate whether the polygenic risk score (PRS) for schizophrenia influences time in couple relationships for patients with severe mental illness and controls. We combined the nationwide Danish registers with genetic information from dried n... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Human Reference Genome Doesn't Capture Full Genetic Diversity
A new analysis of 1,000 Swedes uncovers a chromosome's worth of novel DNA sequences--much of them ancient--underscoring the need for a more diverse reference genome. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

' You ’ re Not the Father': A Moral Dilemma in Genetic Testing'You ’ re Not the Father': A Moral Dilemma in Genetic Testing
Amid the rise of genetic testing, doctors weigh an ethical dilemma: whether to tell patients who their biological fathers are -- or aren'tMedscape Family Medicine (Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pediatrics Headlines - October 1, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Pediatrics Article Source Type: news

Rare Genetic Disease: Models and Mechanisms
The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research, and to highlight the challenges and advantages in utilizing specific model organisms. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored Webinars Source Type: news

Is Melatonin Safe to Take Every Night?
Americans aren’t sleeping well. Roughly 80% of U.S. adults say they struggle to fall asleep at least one night a week, according to a recent Consumer Reports survey. And research has found that sleep problems are also on the rise among adolescents. While the causes of America’s sleep woes are up for debate, there’s little disagreement about America’s favorite remedy: Melatonin, by far the country’s most-used sleep aid. What is Melatonin? Melatonin is a hormone that plants and animals, including humans, produce naturally. The melatonin sold in over-the-counter pills is synthetic, but chemically...
Source: TIME: Health - October 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized anti-oxidants drug safety inflammation medicine melatonin Source Type: news

Genetic Risk for Alzheimer's Disease Linked to Highly Active Brains
A growing body of evidence supports the theory that neural hyperactivity and hyperconnectivity precede the pathological changes that lead to neurodegeneration. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Notebook Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Replication Refutes Study Linking Neuroimaging to Genetics
The original experiment found brain activity as measured by fMRI was tied to particular genetic variants. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 30, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

CRISPR gene editing startup Beam Therapeutics plans $100M IPO
Mere months after raising $135 million from investors, another gene editing startup co-founded by MIT researcher Feng Zhang is preparing to go public.   Cambridge’s Beam Therapeutics filed documents with the SEC after markets closed Friday disclosing its plan to launch on Nasdaq and raise at least $100 million. The company plans to use the stock ticker “BEAM."  The two-year-old startup is one of multiple local companies hoping to leverage the tool CRISPR to alter the genetic causes of disease.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Blood test picks up on more 20 types of cancer with 99.4% accuracy
Harvard scientists created a test that looks for genetic changes associated with cancer's development. It was tried on blood samples collected from patients with different types of the disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Skin-cells-turned-to-heart-cells help unravel genetic underpinnings of cardiac function
Genome-wide association studies have uncovered more than 500 genetic variants linked to heart function, everything from heart rate to irregular rhythms that can lead to stroke, heart failure or other complications. But since most of these variations fall into areas of the genome that don't encode proteins, exactly how they influence heart function has remained unclear. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

South Africa: A DNA Test Could Save Your Life, but Potentially Also Hand You a Life Sentence
[Daily Maverick] Genetic testing provides a glimpse into your future. It identifies the elements and environments you should avoid, as it puts your wellbeing at risk. But you could also learn some scary facts, such as the high chance of your developing serious conditions such as early-onset Alzheimer's or incurable rare cancer. Whether you dare a drive down DNA lane as I did or choose to play the odds of ignorant bliss, genetic screening is life-changing stuff. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 30, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Adolescent mental health centre for Cardiff University
Researchers wants to find out how much social media, genetics and the environment impact on young people's mental health. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk-free mouth-swab DNA test reveals if surgery patients are at risk of scarring badly
French medical company BILHI Genetics has become the first to develop a first-of-its-kind test that, it says, is able to identify genes linked to a risk of keloid scars. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Targeted Amgen drug has low response rate in colon cancer in study
An experimental Amgen Inc drug that targets a specific genetic mutation shrank tumors in just one of 12 patients with advanced colorectal cancer who were given the highest dose in a small, early-stage trial, the company said on Saturday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Will genome sequencing bring precision medicine for all?
The health secretary wants to introduce genetic screening to the NHS – but many firms are already selling cheap testing kitsThe buzz phrase among a small army of biotech companies looking to get a foothold in the ever-expanding health market is “personalised medicine” or, as it’s also known, “precision medicine”. At the core of this concept is the understanding that we are all different, with different biological make-ups and different environments. Therefore a one-size-fits-all approach to diagnostics and treatment is long out o f date.One of our most important areas of difference, and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Science Genetics Biology NHS DNA database Health Matt Hancock Medical research Cancer research Heart disease Source Type: news

Feds Crack Down on Physicians, Others in $2.1B Genetic Testing Scam Feds Crack Down on Physicians, Others in $2.1B Genetic Testing Scam
U.S. federal agents raided genetic testing laboratories, and 35 people were criminally charged in four states in a crackdown on genetic testing fraud that officials said on Friday caused $2.1 billion in losses to federal healthcare insurance programs.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Dozens charged in Medicare scam targeting seniors
A CBS News investigation found recruiters entice seniors to submit a DNA sample for a "free" genetic cancer risk test. Then, Medicare gets the bill (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

U.S. agents raid genetic testing labs, charge 35 in Medicare fraud probe
U.S. federal agents raided genetic testing laboratories, and 35 people were criminally charged in four states in a crackdown on genetic testing fraud that officials said on Friday caused $2.1 billion in losses to federal healthcare insurance programs. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

U.S. charges 35 people in massive healthcare fraud take-down involving genetic tests
U.S. authorities unveiled criminal charges against 35 individuals on Friday, as part of a sweeping crackdown into genetic testing fraud schemes that they said caused federal health insurance programs to lose more than $2.1 billion. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Purple corn is an ancient superfood that can fight diabetes and obesity
(Natural News) When it comes to superfoods, corn may be the last thing most people think of. After all, it is one of the most genetically modified crops in the States. But locally grown, organic corn does have nutritional benefits, and researchers from the University of Illinois developed new kinds of purple corn (Zea mays L.) to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He Lost His Arms, His Legs and His Nose to a Rare Infection. Are His Pit Bull Ellie ’s Licks to Blame?
(WEST BEND, Wis.) — It’s hard to regard Ellie as a menace. When Greg Manteufel is frustrated or feeling down, she sits by him. At night, she sleeps under his covers. At dinner, she’s there next to him, knowing he’ll throw something her way. She belies the stereotype of the vicious pit bull. “We love her like she’s our daughter,” he said of the dog. And yet, Ellie may be the reason Manteufel, 49, nearly died. Gravely ill, he lost parts of his arms and legs, as well as the skin of his nose and part of his upper lip. The cause was capnocytophaga (cap-noh-seye-TOE’-fah-gah), a ge...
Source: TIME: Health - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARRIE ANTLFINGER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease onetime Source Type: news

Scientists in United Kingdom Manipulate DNA to Create a Synthetic Bacteria That Could Be Immune to Infections
Use of synthetic genetics to replicate an infectious disease agent is a scientific accomplishment that many microbiologists and clinical laboratory managers expected would happen Microbiologists and infectious disease doctors are quite familiar with Escherichia coli (E. coli). The bacterium has caused much human sickness and even death around the globe, and its antibiotic resistant strains […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - September 27, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory News Laboratory Pathology anatomic pathology Benjamin A. Blount PhD clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence group Dark Report DNA E. coli Imp Source Type: news

Researchers find genetic link in rare reaction to pet germ
Love and loss: Standing by a pitbull that may have caused a man to lose parts of his limbs and could cause him severe illness again (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Hope for millions with hearing loss as scientists find 44 genes linked to age-related deafness
Researchers from King's College London and UCL found 44 strands of DNA were linked to loss of hearing in people over 40 after analysing genetic data from more than 250,000 participants. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Special Report: New frontier in health fraud - Genetic tests of the elderly
The genetic-screening sales reps turn out at health fairs, houses of religion, parks and elder enclaves, offering seniors a chance to learn if they or their loved ones are at risk of developing cancer. All they need, the reps say, is a free cheek swab. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Men who have children via fertility treatments may more likely to develop prostate cancer 
Scientists analysed more than a million men who fathered children between 1994 and 2014 in Sweden. Genetic 'abnormalities' on the Y chromosome may be to blame for both infertility and prostate cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deconstructing the sources of genotype-phenotype associations in humans
Efforts to link variation in the human genome to phenotypes have progressed at a tremendous pace in recent decades. Most human traits have been shown to be affected by a large number of genetic variants across the genome. To interpret these associations and to use them reliably—in particular for phenotypic prediction—a better understanding of the many sources of genotype-phenotype associations is necessary. We summarize the progress that has been made in this direction in humans, notably in decomposing direct and indirect genetic effects as well as population structure confounding. We discuss the natural next s...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Young, A. I., Benonisdottir, S., Przeworski, M., Kong, A. Tags: Genetics special/review Source Type: news

Genetic roots of multiple sclerosis
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases twis Source Type: news

Ultrasound imaging of gene expression in mammalian cells
The study of cellular processes occurring inside intact organisms requires methods to visualize cellular functions such as gene expression in deep tissues. Ultrasound is a widely used biomedical technology enabling noninvasive imaging with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, no genetically encoded molecular reporters are available to connect ultrasound contrast to gene expression in mammalian cells. To address this limitation, we introduce mammalian acoustic reporter genes. Starting with a gene cluster derived from bacteria, we engineered a eukaryotic genetic program whose introduction into mammalian cells resul...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Farhadi, A., Ho, G. H., Sawyer, D. P., Bourdeau, R. W., Shapiro, M. G. Tags: Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Multiple sclerosis genomic map implicates peripheral immune cells and microglia in susceptibility
We analyzed genetic data of 47,429 multiple sclerosis (MS) and 68,374 control subjects and established a reference map of the genetic architecture of MS that includes 200 autosomal susceptibility variants outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), one chromosome X variant, and 32 variants within the extended MHC. We used an ensemble of methods to prioritize 551 putative susceptibility genes that implicate multiple innate and adaptive pathways distributed across the cellular components of the immune system. Using expression profiles from purified human microglia, we observed enrichment for MS genes in these brain-r...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium, Patsopoulos, Baranzini, Santaniello, Shoostari, Cotsapas, Wong, Beecham, James, Replogle, Vlachos, McCabe, Pers, Brandes, White, Keenan, Cimpean, Winn, Panteliadis, Robbins, Andlauer, Zarzycki, Dubois, Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Mobilizing Mutations: Human Genetics in the Age of Patient Advocacy
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Tags: books Source Type: news

Mapping human cell phenotypes to genotypes with single-cell genomics
The cumulative activity of all of the body’s cells, with their myriad interactions, life histories, and environmental experiences, gives rise to a condition that is distinctly human and specific to each individual. It is an enduring goal to catalog our human cell types, to understand how they develop, how they vary between individuals, and how they fail in disease. Single-cell genomics has revolutionized this endeavor because sequencing-based methods provide a means to quantitatively annotate cell states on the basis of high-information content and high-throughput measurements. Together with advances in stem cell bio...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Camp, J. G., Platt, R., Treutlein, B. Tags: Genetics special/review Source Type: news

Translational genomics and precision medicine: Moving from the lab to the clinic
Translational genomics aims to improve human health by building on discoveries made through genetics research and applying them in the clinical setting. This progress has been made possible by technological advances in genomics and analytics and by the digital revolution. Such advances should enable the development of prognostic markers, tailored interventions, and the design of prophylactic preventive approaches. We are at the cusp of predicting disease risk for some disorders by means of polygenic risk scores integrated with classical epidemiological risk factors. This should lead to better risk stratification and clinic...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zeggini, E., Gloyn, A. L., Barton, A. C., Wain, L. V. Tags: Genetics special/review Source Type: news

Making males in a fruit fly pest
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Development, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Understanding fertility in young and old
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Purnell, B. A. Tags: Genetics twis Source Type: news

Maleness-on-the-Y (MoY) orchestrates male sex determination in major agricultural fruit fly pests
In insects, rapidly evolving primary sex-determining signals are transduced by a conserved regulatory module controlling sexual differentiation. In the agricultural pest Ceratitis capitata (Mediterranean fruit fly, or Medfly), we identified a Y-linked gene, Maleness-on-the-Y (MoY), encoding a small protein that is necessary and sufficient for male development. Silencing or disruption of MoY in XY embryos causes feminization, whereas overexpression of MoY in XX embryos induces masculinization. Crosses between transformed XY females and XX males give rise to males and females, indicating that a Y chromosome can be transmitte...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 26, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Meccariello, A., Salvemini, M., Primo, P., Hall, B., Koskinioti, P., Dalikova, M., Gravina, A., Gucciardino, M. A., Forlenza, F., Gregoriou, M.-E., Ippolito, D., Monti, S. M., Petrella, V., Perrotta, M. M., Schmeing, S., Ruggiero, A., Scolari, F., Giordan Tags: Development, Genetics reports Source Type: news