Phys Ed: To Move Is to Thrive. It ’ s in Our Genes.
A need and desire to be in motion may have been bred into our DNA before we even became humans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Tags: Genetics and Heredity DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Exercise Weight Medicine and Health Source Type: news

NHS to fund drug that prolongs lives of children with muscle-wasting disease
Spinraza to be made available to spinal muscular atrophy patientsA drug that could prolong the lives of children with a rare muscle-wasting disease has been approved by the NHS in England after lengthy negotiations with the manufacturer over the high price.Spinraza could help between 600 and 1,200 children and adults in England and Wales who have the genetic condition spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). It affects the nerves in the spinal cord, making muscles weaker and causing problems with movement, breathing and swallowing. It can shorten the life expectancy of babies and toddlers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: NHS Health Society UK news Pharmaceuticals industry Business Drugs Science Source Type: news

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells
(University of Michigan) A new way to cleanly separate out cancer cells from a blood sample enables comprehensive genetic profiling of the cancer cells, which could help doctors target tumors and monitor treatments more effectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First ever treatment for children with rare muscle-wasting condition
The NHS will provide a promising new treatment that can prolong the lives of children with a rare genetic condition under a deal with the manufacturer. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - May 15, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Mitochondrial DNA, a powerful tool to decipher ancient human civilization from domestication to music, and to uncover historical murder cases - Merheb M, Matar R, Hodeify R, Siddiqui SS, Vazhappilly CG, Marton J, Azharuddin S, Al Zouabi H.
Mitochondria are unique organelles carrying their own genetic material, independent from that in the nucleus. This review will discuss the nature of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and its levels in the cell, which are the key elements to consider when trying to... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Rare genetic variations may contribute to PCOS
New research published in theJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismhas identified rare genetic variations that may contribute to the heritability of PCOS.Endocrinology Advisor (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - May 14, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Early term infants less likely to breastfeed
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new, prospective study provides evidence that 'early term' infants (those born at 37-38 weeks) are less likely than full-term infants to be breastfeed within the first hour and at one month after birth. The early-term infants also had lower exclusive breastfeeding and lower breastfeeding intensity during the first 72 hours in the hospital and at one month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is a broadly effective dengue vaccine even possible?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Dengue is on the rise, with about 20,000 patients dying each year from this mosquito-borne disease, yet despite ongoing efforts a broadly effective dengue vaccine is not available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Predictive association of smoking with depressive symptoms: a longitudinal study of adolescent twins - Ranjit A, Buchwald J, Latvala A, Heikkil ä K, Tuulio-Henriksson A, Rose RJ, Kaprio J, Korhonen T.
We examined the longitudinal association of cigarette smoking with subsequent depressive symptoms during adole... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Researchers identify faster, more effective drug combination regimens to treat tuberculosis
Tuberculosis is a potentially deadly though curable disease. Each year about 10 million people develop active cases, and 1.6 million people die. In addition, about 1.7 billion people around the world are infected with TB bacteria, which can lie dormant for weeks to years, then become active and cause disease in up to 10 percent of those who are infected.Today, people who contract tuberculosis typically take a course of drugs for six to eight months. However, the length of treatment means some patients don ’t stick with the therapy or may develop adverse effects from drug toxicity. Some may develop resistance to the d...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 13, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Experimental Agent Offers First Hope for Rare Genetic Disorder Experimental Agent Offers First Hope for Rare Genetic Disorder
An experimental agent promises to improve the lives of patients with Angelman syndrome, a rare genetic disorder for which there are no approved therapies and that carries a high, unmet medical need.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Nipple reconstruction techniques could be improved with 3D scaffolds
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Nipple and areola reconstruction is a common breast reconstruction technique, especially for breast cancer patients after mastectomy. However, tissue for grafting is a limiting factor, and there is no gold standard method. Correspondingly, researchers are continuously exploring new methods for the expansion of patient-matched tissue samples and the improvement of cosmetic outcome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long-term consequences of Zika virus infection
(Society for Neuroscience) Mice exposed to the Zika virus during later stages of gestation present behaviors reminiscent of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, according to a study of genetically diverse animals. The findings, published in JNeurosci, suggest children exposed to the virus during the 2015-16 epidemic may harbor increased risk for developmental disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 13, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New recommendations for a thyroid and cardiovascular disease research agenda
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) New Recommendations for a Thyroid and Cardiovascular Disease Research Agenda have been co-published in Thyroid ® and Circulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow: ‘Changing the way that you think is cognitively costly’
In her new book, the scientist examines the role of fate in our lives, how our politics are formed and sniffing out Mr RightDr Hannah Critchlow is a neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge. Her debut book,The Science of Fate, examines how much of our life is predetermined at birth and to what extent we are in control of our destiny.How has the slow march of scientific researchaffected our concept of fate? On one hand, we know more about how genetics drives our lives, yet we also have more good evidence for things that we can do to shape our own outcomes.This concept of fate and destiny has around since the Greeks &nd...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

One-off injection may drastically reduce heart attack risk
Doctors hope to trial gene therapy on people with rare disorder in next three yearsWhy researchers are turning to gene therapy to treat heart failureDoctors in the US have announced plans for a radical gene therapy that aims to drastically reduce the risk of heart attack, the world ’s leading cause of death, with a one-off injection.The researchers hope to trial the therapy within the next three years in people with a rare genetic disorder that makes them prone to heart attacks in their 30s and 40s. If the treatment proves safe and effective in the patients, doctors will seek approval to offer the jab to a wider popu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Gene editing Heart attack Science Society Source Type: news

Fraudster who used ice cream to lure seniors is sentenced
A New Jersey man who defrauded Medicare by using the promise of ice cream to lure senior citizens into genetic testing was sentenced Friday to more than four years in prison (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing and Primary Care: A 10-question Quiz
How much do you know about the increasingly popular direct-to-consumer genetic testing? Find out with this 10-question quiz.   (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - May 10, 2019 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Sydney Jennings Source Type: news

An appreciation of Sydney Brenner
See this beautiful appreciation of Sydney Brenner by Peter Lawrence in DEVELOPMENT.   (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - May 10, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication community news research community Sydney Brenner Source Type: news

Stress may cause heart arrhythmia, even without genetic risk
Emotional stress may trigger an irregular heart beat, which can lead to a more serious heart condition later in life, new research shows. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene therapy experts plan to slash heart attack risk with jab
Doctors hope to offer one-off injection to wider population if trial on people with rare genetic disorder is successfulWhy researchers are turning to gene therapy to treat heart failureDoctors in the US have announced plans for a radical gene therapy that aims to slash the risk of heart attack, the world ’s leading cause of death, with a one-off injection.The researchers hope to trial the therapy within the next three years in people with a rare genetic disorder that makes them prone to heart attacks in their 30s and 40s. If the treatment proves safe and effective in the patients, doctors will seek approval to offer ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Gene editing Heart attack Science Society Source Type: news

Genetic epidemiology of liability for alcohol-induced blacking and passing out - Davis CN, S.ske WS, Martin NG, Agrawal A, Lynskey MT.
BACKGROUND: Individuals differ in their sensitivity to alcohol's physiological effects, including blacking and passing out. Blackouts are periods of impaired memory formation when an individual engages in activities they later cannot recall, while passing ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The 4 Types of Doctors Visits You Should Make For a Long, Healthy Life
Prevention is often called the best medicine — but research has shown that millions of Americans are not getting the preventive care they should to live long, healthy lives. Obstacles like inadequate access to care and financial barriers can keep people away from the doctor, but anxiety and feeling like care is unnecessary are also common deterrents. “There are a lot of things that every person could do to stay healthy, and this could help people to feel better, improve their quality of life and help them to live longer,” says Dr. Alex Krist, a professor of family medicine at Virginia Commonwealth Univer...
Source: TIME: Health - May 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Longevity public health Source Type: news

Popularity of Direct-To-Consumer Genetic Tests Still Growing, Regardless of Concerns from Provider and Privacy Organizations
For blood brothers Quest and LabCorp this is good news, since the two medical laboratory companies perform most of the testing for the biggest DTC genetic test developers Should clinical laboratories be concerned about direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests? Despite alerts from healthcare organizations about the accuracy of DTC genetic testing—as well as calls from privacy […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - May 10, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology 23andMe anatomic pathology Ancestry Anne Wojcicki clinical laboratory Source Type: news

Maternal verbal aggression in early infancy and child's internalizing symptoms: interaction by common oxytocin polymorphisms - Smarius LJCA, Strieder TGA, Doreleijers TAH, Vrijkotte TGM, Zafarmand MH, de Rooij SR.
This study examined whether maternal verbally aggressive behavior in early infancy interacts with oxytocin polymorphisms in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Video Game May Help Identify Preclinical Alzheimer's Video Game May Help Identify Preclinical Alzheimer's
Spatial navigation ability as measured by a virtual reality computer game can potentially identify people at high genetic risk of risk developing Alzheimer's disease.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - May 9, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Genetically modified virus saves teen's life, offers hope in fight against antibiotic resistance
Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway, 17, has faced not one but two unrelenting threats to her life. Diagnosed at 11 months of age with cystic fibrosis, the progressive genetic disease that causes lung infections and breathing impairment, Isabelle has also combated an on-again, off-again infection caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria since age 8. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Nature vs. nurture: What fuels obesity, diabetes?
Researchers explain that lifestyle choices can change how our genes behave without altering our genetic code, driving obesity and diabetes. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Health Highlights: May 9, 2019
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Precision Medicine Finds Hidden Health Problems in Study A deep dive into patients'genetic and molecular makeup revealed a number of medical... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 9, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Genetic therapy heals damage caused by heart attack
Researchers from King's College London have found that therapy that can induce heart cells to regenerate after a heart attack. Myocardial infarction, more commonly known as a heart attack, caused by the sudden blocking of one of the cardiac coronary arteries, is the main cause of heart failure, a condition that now affects over 23 million population in the world, according to the World Health Organisation. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - May 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

First randomized controlled trial of FMT for obesity shows potential progress
(Digestive Disease Week) Using capsules filled with fecal matter from a lean donor, researchers successfully changed some of the composition of the gut microbiota of patients with obesity, a possible step toward a new treatment for weight loss. In the first randomized controlled trial of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in metabolically healthy people with obesity, researchers presenting at Digestive Disease Week ® (DDW) 2019 said they were encouraged they could induce changes among the trillions of microorganisms and their genetic material within the intestinal tract. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New treatment could become first targeted therapy designed for 'untreatable' childhood brain cancer
(Institute of Cancer Research) A new type of drug that targets a genetic weakness in an untreatable childhood brain cancer could become the first ever treatment designed to target the disease.The prototype treatment could also offer hope for patients with the rare and devastating 'stone man syndrome' -- in which muscles and ligaments turn to bone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peering into the past, scientists discover bacteria transformed a viral threat to survive
(Indiana University) A study led by Indiana University researchers reports the first known evidence of bacteria stealing genetic material from their own worst enemy, bacteriophages, and transforming it to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 9, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Personalized 'Eye-in-a-Dish' models reveal genetic underpinnings of macular degeneration
(University of California - San Diego) Using stem cells derived from six people, UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers recapitulated retinal cells in the lab. This 'eye-in-a-dish' model allowed them to identify genetic variants that cause age-related macular degeneration, a common cause of vision loss. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Will MSC micropellets outperform single cells for cartilage regeneration?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Repair of cartilage injuries or defects is aided by the introduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be incorporated into hydrogels to amplify their effects. In a new report, researchers directly compared chondrogenic induction by hydrogels that were prepared using MSCs either as single cell suspensions or as 100-500-cell micropellets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetics Society of America awards 2019 GSA Medal to Anne Villeneuve
(Genetics Society of America) The Genetics Society of America (GSA) is pleased to announce that Anne Villeneuve, PhD, of Stanford University is the recipient of the 2019 Genetics Society of America Medal. Villeneuve is recognized for her research on the mechanisms governing chromosome inheritance during sexual reproduction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Matter: In This Doctor ’ s Office, a Physical Exam Like No Other
Genetic and molecular analysis of 109 volunteers turned up hidden health problems in about half of them. Critics say the approach amounted to ‘ carpet-bombing ’ the body. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Medicine and Health Proteins Blood Doctors Source Type: news

Fish catch color with rods
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Wnt signaling out on a limb
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Genetics, Immunology twis Source Type: news

Genomics breeds new legal questions
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Couzin-Frankel, J. Tags: Genetics, Scientific Community, Science and Policy In Depth Source Type: news

Vision using multiple distinct rod opsins in deep-sea fishes
Vertebrate vision is accomplished through light-sensitive photopigments consisting of an opsin protein bound to a chromophore. In dim light, vertebrates generally rely on a single rod opsin [rhodopsin 1 (RH1)] for obtaining visual information. By inspecting 101 fish genomes, we found that three deep-sea teleost lineages have independently expanded their RH1 gene repertoires. Among these, the silver spinyfin (Diretmus argenteus) stands out as having the highest number of visual opsins in vertebrates (two cone opsins and 38 rod opsins). Spinyfins express up to 14 RH1s (including the most blueshifted rod photopigments known),...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Musilova, Z., Cortesi, F., Matschiner, M., Davies, W. I. L., Patel, J. S., Stieb, S. M., de Busserolles, F., Malmstrom, M., Torresen, O. K., Brown, C. J., Mountford, J. K., Hanel, R., Stenkamp, D. L., Jakobsen, K. S., Carleton, K. L., Jentoft, S., Marshal Tags: Evolution, Genetics reports Source Type: news

LMBR1L regulates lymphopoiesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling
In this study, we detected severely impaired development of all lymphoid lineages in mice, resulting from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–induced mutation in the limb region 1–like gene (Lmbr1l), which encodes a membrane-spanning protein with no previously described function in immunity. The interaction of LMBR1L with glycoprotein 78 (GP78) and ubiquitin-associated domain–containing protein 2 (UBAC2) attenuated Wnt signaling in lymphocytes by preventing the maturation of FZD6 and LRP6 through ubiquitination within the endoplasmic reticulum and by stabilizing "destruction complex" proteins. LMBR1L-defic...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Choi, J. H., Zhong, X., McAlpine, W., Liao, T.-C., Zhang, D., Fang, B., Russell, J., Ludwig, S., Nair-Gill, E., Zhang, Z., Wang, K.-w., Misawa, T., Zhan, X., Choi, M., Wang, T., Li, X., Tang, M., Sun, Q., Yu, L., Murray, A. R., Moresco, E. M. Y., Beutler, Tags: Genetics, Immunology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

SGD turns 25!
25 years ago the SGD (The Saccharomyces Genome Database) went online.  Happy Birthday SGD! SGD provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms. SGD collaborates with WormBase on several database-related projects including the Alliance of Genome Resources.  Check it out! (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - May 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication external website news Alliance of Genome Resources SGD Source Type: news

Teenager recovers from near death in world-first GM virus treatment
Bacteria-killing viruses known as phages offer hope of solution to antibiotic resistanceA British teenager has made a remarkable recovery after being the first patient in the world to be given a genetically engineered virus to treat a drug-resistant infection.Isabelle Holdaway, 17, nearly died after a lung transplant left her with an intractable infection that could not be cleared with antibiotics. After a nine-month stay at Great Ormond Street hospital, she returned to her home in Kent for palliative care, but recovered after her consultant teamed up with a US laboratory to develop the experimental therapy.Continue readin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Antibiotics Science Society UK news Health Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection
Treatment with genetically altered bacteriophages — viruses that attack bacteria — may have halted a patient's near-fatal infection, hinting at new ways to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria.(Image credit: Courtesy of Jo Holdaway) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Viral Cocktail Treats Deadly Bacteria in Teen
Tweaking the genomes of two phages and combining them with a third phage helped to clear a persistent Mycobacterium infection in the patient. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Viral Cocktail Treats Deadly Bacteria in Teen
Tweaking the genomes of two phages and combining them with a third phage helped to clear a persistent Mycobacterium infection in the patient. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Short WormBase downtime yesterday
WormBase went down at 2.54pm ET yesterday. The problem was caused ironically by a fault recovery mechanism that was introduced recently. The fault recovery mechanism takes faulty servers out of service and replaces them with healthy ones. The process involves two components:the detection of faulty servers and the creation of new ones. Two simultaneous problems in the two components lead to the failure. A false positive in detecting the faulty server caused the sever to be taken out of service, and a missing hard drive snapshot caused the failure to start new servers. To avoid such future occurrences we are looking into way...
Source: WormBase - May 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication news Source Type: news

Novartis confident of Zolgensma supply, calls $2 million price 'speculation'
Novartis is confident it has adequate production capacity for its Zolgensma gene therapy should regulators this month approve the drug for multiple forms of the genetic disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the Swiss drugmaker said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Intelligence can link to health and aging
(University of Missouri-Columbia) For over 100 years, scientists have sought to understand what links a person's general intelligence, health and aging. In a new study, a University of Missouri scientist suggests a model where mitochondria, or small energy producing parts of cells, could form the basis of this link. This insight could provide valuable information to researchers studying various genetic and environmental influences and alternative therapies for age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news