Illuminating the genome
(Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research) Development of a new molecular visualisation method, RNA-guided endonuclease -- in situ labelling (RGEN-ISL) for the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated labelling of genomic sequences in nuclei and chromosomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Could CRISPR Diagnostics Provide a Valuable Weapon in the Fight against Pandemic Flu?
The flu season is up and running in the Northern Hemisphere, and early signs in both the United States and Europe are that the effects might not be quite as severe as the brutal 2017/18 season. The United States is predominantly seeing H1N1 circulating, while monitoring in Europe has identified co-circulation of H1N1 and H3N2—both varieties of Influenza A that should be covered by the seasonable vaccine. What if they weren’t though? Influenza A can be found in both human and animal populations, and it evolves rapidly through genetic mutation. Each year many humans rely on their country&a...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Wilkins Tags: IVD Source Type: news

NHGRI researchers map the brain to find links between genes and ADHD
When it comes to Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), genetics do make an impact, but it is not easily pinned down. Many common but subtle differences in our DNA come together to have a huge influence on creating one of ADHD's cardinal symptoms: hyperactivity-impulsivity. In a study published in the January 30 issue ofMolecular Psychiatry, NHGRI researchers examined people with ADHD to map brain connections, called white matter tracts, tied to the disorder. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - March 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Amgen Announces 2019 Second Quarter Dividend
THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., March 7, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced that its Board of Directors declared a $1.45 per share dividend for the second quarter of 2019. The dividend will be paid on June 7, 2019, to all stockholders of record as of the close of business on May 17, 2019. About Amgen Amgen is committed to unlocking the potential of biology for patients suffering from serious illnesses by discovering, developing, manufacturing and delivering innovative human therapeutics. This approach begins by using tools like advanced human genetics to unravel the complexities of disease and understan...
Source: Amgen News Release - March 7, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Do Skinny People Have Faster Metabolisms? Not Really
(CNN) — It might seem counterintuitive, but generally speaking, skinny people don’t have faster metabolisms than people who weigh more. In fact, the bigger your body, the more calories you burn. Basal (or resting) metabolism refers to the total number of calories all the cells in the body need to stay alive and functioning. “Your resting metabolic rate is typically described as the total number of calories your body needs while at rest. This is made up of basic functions like supporting your vital organs, muscle and fat tissue and the energy that is required to break down food we eat,” said Martin B...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN metabolism Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Genes may contribute to marital satisfaction
When at least one partner within a married couple had the GG oxytocin gene receptor variant, the spouses reported greater feelings of marital satisfaction and security. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is insomnia genetic?
Studies in twins have identified a genetic component in insomnia. New research implicates hundreds of genes, but stress also plays a role. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sleep / Sleep Disorders / Insomnia Source Type: news

GMO scientist admits to worrying about the negative side effects of GM potatoes
(Natural News) It’s extremely rare to hear a scientist criticize his very own, highly profitable discovery. The creator of genetically modified potatoes is now coming clean about the hidden dangers of the technology. Once blinded by his ambition, Caius Rommens now admits, “I somehow managed to ignore the almost daily experience that GM potatoes were... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neuron Pod:  Will Alsop's intergalactic porcupine of knowledge
Based on a nerve cell, the architect ’s posthumous addition to London’s Blizard laboratory complex is so lovable, you almost want to give it a cuddleThrusting its bristly bottom out into the road, a curious spiny creature has landed in the backstreets of Whitechapel, London. Standing like an intergalactic porcupine, covered with long glowing quills that sway gently in the breeze, it is a startling thing to encounter in this unremarkable corner of hospital buildings and curry houses.This is the £2mNeuron Pod, one of the last posthumous works of architectWill Alsop, who proves that he is still eminently cap...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Oliver Wainwright Tags: Architecture Will Alsop Science London Research Art and design Culture Queen Mary, University of London Schools Neuroscience Biology Genetics Higher education UK news Source Type: news

High Testosterone Levels Are Bad News for the Heart
THURSDAY, March 7, 2019 -- High testosterone levels can drastically increase a man's risk of heart failure and stroke-causing blood clots, a new study reports. Men with a genetic predisposition to high testosterone levels have a nearly eightfold... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 7, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New research on the role of connectomics in brain development
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers are analyzing brain connectomes to understand how normal and abnormal interactions between functional brain networks affect healthy brain development and contribute to disorders such as epilepsy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetics Society of America grants 2019 Elizabeth W. Jones Award to Bruce Weir
(Genetics Society of America) Bruce Weir, PhD, of the University of Washington in Seattle is the recipient of the 2019 Genetics Society of America (GSA) Elizabeth W. Jones Award for Excellence in Education, in recognition of his work training thousands of researchers in the rigorous use of statistical analysis methods for genetic and genomic data. The Jones Award recognizes individuals or groups that have had a significant, sustained impact on genetics education at any level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First FDA-Recognized Public Genetic Variant Database: ClinGen
In the March issue ofThe Genomics Landscape, NHGRI Director Dr. Eric Green details NHGRI's Clinical Genome (ClinGen) Resource becoming the first FDA-recognized Public Human Genetic Variant Database. Other topics include a new video highlighting an NHGRI Story: Patients and Researchers Working Together; Gene Ontology Resource Turns 20; Applications for ASHG-NHGRI Policy and Fellowships now being accepted; Bruce Tromberg appointed as new NIBIB director; and Noni Byrnes appointed as new CSR director. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - March 7, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

China tightens rules on gene editing
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Normile, D. Tags: Cell Biology, Genetics In Depth Source Type: news

USPSTF: Screen At-risk Women for BRCA-related Cancer
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently posted for comment a draft recommendation statement and draft evidence review on risk assessment, genetic counseling and genetic testing for BRCA-related cancer in women. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - March 6, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

New Data From Amgen To Be Presented At ACC.19 Continues To Build Evidence For Repatha ® (evolocumab) Across Multiple Patient Populations
Results From TAUSSIG Study Reinforce Repatha's Safety and Efficacy in Patients With Genetic Risk of High Cholesterol Several Real-World Evidence Studies Highlight Continued Unmet Need and Suboptimal Treatment of High-Risk Cardiovascular Disease Patients THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., March 6, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN) today announced the presentation of nine cardiovascular scientific research abstracts, including safety and efficacy results from the largest and longest open label study of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) patients (TAUSSIG),1  as well as a sub-analysis from the Repatha...
Source: Amgen News Release - March 6, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Vertex cystic fibrosis triple combo therapy succeeds in important trials
Vertex Pharmaceuticals Inc on Wednesday said its triple-combination treatment for cystic fibrosis led to significant lung function improvement in two late-stage studies, paving the way for a therapy that could eventually address 90 percent of people with the life-shortening genetic condition. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Sleep Is Critical for the Zebrafish Brain to Repair DNA Damage
Neurons can only efficiently fix genetic injuries when the animals are asleep. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 6, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Scientists identify genetic factors that may cause some people to become obese
(Rockefeller University) New research on leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, reveals a previously unknown mechanism that may be responsible for at least 10 percent of obesity cases. The findings could help identify individuals with treatable forms of the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How viruses outsmart their host cells
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Viruses depend on host cells for replication, but how does a virus induce its host to transcribe its own genetic information alongside that of the virus, thus producing daughter viruses? For decades, researchers have been studying a type of bacteriophage known as 'lambda' to try and find an answer to this question. Using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a research group from Charit é -- Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin has now successfully deciphered this process. Their findings have been published in Molecular Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gut microbiota helps to maintain core body temperature under cold exposure
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research group led by Professor John R. Speakman from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, has revealed the important role of gut microbiota in thermoregulation -- the way animals respond to cold exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Effects of spaceflight on heart cell formation from stem cells
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers used time-lapse imaging to show that mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) grown during spaceflight differentiated into cardiomyocytes significantly faster than similar cells grown at Earth's gravity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Translocation of bighorn sheep in Arizona has positive genetic outcomes
(University of Wyoming) Research shows it is possible to re-establish bighorn sheep populations without a reduction of genetic diversity over a short period and without erosion of ancestral lineage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alzheimer's-like symptoms reversed in mice, USC researchers say
(University of Southern California) A diet containing compounds found in green tea and carrots reversed Alzheimer's-like symptoms in mice genetically programmed to develop the disease, USC researchers say (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineered microbe may be key to producing plastic from plants
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) With a few genetic tweaks, a type of soil bacteria with an appetite for hydrocarbons shows promise as a biological factory for converting a renewable -- but frustratingly untapped -- bounty into a replacement for ubiquitous plastics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting more mileage from microsatellites
(Botanical Society of America) Researchers at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, are using a next-generation sequencing genotyping approach to find insight into the evolutionary history of the carob tree -- an economically important species with a long history in the Mediterranean. They describe the optimized molecular tools used to identify additional molecular variation in carob DNA markers and investigate the species' genetic diversity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Simulated extravehicular activity   science operations for Mars exploration
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study describes the Science Operations component and new results from NASA's Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains (BASALT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

An H.I.V. Cure: Answers to 4 Key Questions
Translating the latest success against the AIDS virus into a practical treatment will take years — if it happens at all. Here are answers to some of the most pressing questions raised by the news. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: APOORVA MANDAVILLI Tags: your-feed-science Immunotherapy Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Transplants Genetics and Heredity Viruses Genetic Engineering Brown, Timothy Ray Research Source Type: news

A Man May Be Cleared of HIV for the Second Time in History. Here ’s What That Means
A man in London has become only the second person to achieve remission from HIV infection, researchers from the UK reported Tuesday. The therapy responsible has worked on only one other person who is considered to be “cured” of HIV: Timothy Ray Brown, who still does not show signs of the virus in his body after more than 10 years. Here’s what to know about the landmark case. How did it happen? In a letter published in the journal Nature, researchers led by Ravindra Gupta from the University of Cambridge London and Imperial College London and his colleagues say that they used a treatment similar to the one...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized HIV/AIDS Source Type: news

Dandruff could be key to Crohn's disease: Scientists discover the fungus also resides in the gut
LA researchers discovered that the fungus commonly found in human hair follicles resides in the gut. In most, it is harmless, but in some people with a certain genetic make-up, it causes a reaction. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleep helps to repair damaged DNA in neurons, scientists find
Chromosomes ’ movement when the brain is resting allows cells to mend DNAErnest Hemingway prized sleep for good reason. Not one to dwell on rest and recuperation, the novelist saw snoozing as a form of damage limitation. “I love sleep,” he once said. “My life has the tendency to fall apart when I’m awake.”The author ’s observation may be truer than he imagined. Scientists have discovered that broken DNA builds up in brain cells in the daytime and repair work reverses the damage only during sleep.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Science Sleep Biology Source Type: news

Targeting Blood-Clotting Pathway Improves Mesothelioma Treatment
A team of researchers at the Cancer and Vascular Biology Research Center in Haifa, Israel, and the Langone Medical Center in New York collaborated on research of a common blood-clotting pathway. Targeting this pathway may offer a unique avenue for improving existing mesothelioma treatments. Researchers said the standard first-line chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma — a combination of Alimta (pemetrexed) and cisplatin — offers little benefit to most mesothelioma patients. “This treatment regimen confers a median progression-free survival of 5.7 months,” according to the study published ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 5, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Source Type: news

Risk factors and an early prediction model for persistent methamphetamine-related psychiatric symptoms - Zhang Y, Sun Y, Yu Z, Sun Y, Chang X, Lu L, Chang S, Shi J.
Methamphetamine (MA)-related psychiatric symptoms (MAP) are serious comorbidities of MA use and result in many social problems such as violence and suicide. We investigated the sociodemographic and genetic risk factors for persistent MAP of MA users (MUs) ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Meet the Clinical Endocrinology Trust Visiting Professor for 2019
Professor Jérôme Bertherat will be joining our plenary lecturers atSfE BES this year as the Clinical Endocrinology Trust Visiting Professor. You can apply to host him at your institution for a day.He will be touring up to 5 endocrine centres in the UK during the week commencing Sunday 3 November. The programme for the day visit is entirely up to you and may, if travel schedule allows, involve an evening dinner. All costs for the visit except travel and accommodation are borne by the host institution.Professor Bertherat is professor of Endocrinology at Paris Descartes Universi...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 5, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Could genetic breakthrough finally help take the sting out of mouth ulcers?
A large breakthrough has been made in the genetic understanding of mouth ulcers which could provide potential for a new drug to prevent or heal the painful lesions. Mouth ulcers affect up to 25 per cent of young adults and a higher proportion of children. Previous research has shown that mouth ulcers are partially heritable, but until now there has been little evidence linking specific genes or genomic regions to mouth ulcers. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 5, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Dental School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Health Sciences, Population Health Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Fertility: Pollution can harm quality of sperm cells - how to boost sperm health
FERTILITY: Male infertility can be caused by genetic factors and medical history, but did you know it can also be caused by environmental pollution? Express.co.uk spoke to fertility specialist Dr Ferran Garcia, who outlined the worst pollutants for fertility, where you may encounter them, and what you can do to boost sperm quality. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could genetic breakthrough finally help take the sting out of mouth ulcers?
(University of Bristol) A large breakthrough has been made in the genetic understanding of mouth ulcers which could provide potential for a new drug to prevent or heal the painful lesions. Mouth ulcers affect up to 25 percent of young adults and a higher proportion of children. Previous research has shown that mouth ulcers are partially heritable, but until now there has been little evidence linking specific genes or genomic regions to mouth ulcers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The cancer-causing contaminant in everyday food
(World Scientific) Acrylamide is described as 'extremely hazardous' and 'probably carcinogenic to humans.' Its presence in popular foods, including fried, baked, roasted and toasted potato and cereal products, as well as coffee, has become one of the most difficult issues facing the food industry, its supply chain, retailers and regulators. Written by internationally-renowned experts in the field, this book covers the issue from crop genetics to agronomy, biotechnology, food processing and regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetic 'usual suspects' identified in researchers' new list
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) After analyzing tens of thousands of data samples, researchers have created a list of genes that ranks them based on how frequently they are implicated in specific diseases. The list may prove invaluable for future research and drug discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘London Patient’ Appears to Become the Second Person Ever Cured of AIDS
Doctors say a British man who previously tested positive for HIV might be the second person ever to be cured of the AIDS virus. Reuters reports that the man, whose identity has not been revealed, has tested negative for the virus almost three years after he received a bone marrow transplant from a donor with an HIV-resistant genetic mutation. The man stopped taking antiretroviral drugs 18 months ago. “There is no virus there that we can measure. We can’t detect anything,” Ravindra Gupta, the doctor who co-lead the man’s treatment team, told Reuters. The man, who has been dubbed the “London pat...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized health HIV/AIDS onetime overnight Source Type: news

‘London Patient’ Appears to Become the Second Person Ever Cured of HIV
Doctors say a British man who previously tested positive for HIV might be the second person ever to be cured of the virus that causes AIDS. Reuters reports that the man, whose identity has not been revealed, has tested negative for the virus almost three years after he received a bone marrow transplant from a donor with an HIV-resistant genetic mutation. The man stopped taking antiretroviral drugs 18 months ago. “There is no virus there that we can measure. We can’t detect anything,” Ravindra Gupta, the doctor who co-lead the man’s treatment team, told Reuters. The man, who has been dubbed the &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia Tags: Uncategorized health HIV/AIDS onetime overnight Source Type: news

Tests on London patient offer hope of HIV 'cure'
Man becomes second person in world to be cleared of virus after stem cell donationA man in Britain has become the second known adult worldwide to be cleared of HIV after he received a bone marrow transplant from a virus-resistant donor, his doctors said.Almost three years after receiving bone marrow stem cells from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that resists HIV infection – and more than 18 months after he came off antiretroviral drugs – highly sensitive tests still show no trace of the man’s previous HIV infection.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Reuters Tags: Aids and HIV Society Health Medical research London UK news Science Source Type: news

Desynchronization of the molecular clock contributes to the heterogeneity of the inflammatory response
Heterogeneity in the behavior of genetically and developmentally equivalent cells is becoming increasingly appreciated. There are several sources of cellular heterogeneity, including both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. We found that some aspects of heterogeneity in the response of macrophages to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were due to intercellular desynchronization of the molecular clock, a cell-intrinsic oscillator. We found that the ratio of the relative expression of two clock genes, Nfil3 and Dbp, expressed in opposite phases of the clock, determined the fraction of cells that produced the cytokine IL-12p40 in ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - March 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Allen, N. C., Philip, N. H., Hui, L., Zhou, X., Franklin, R. A., Kong, Y., Medzhitov, R. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Read About AIBS's Policy Achievements in 2018
The AIBS Public Policy Office has released its annual report for 2018. The report documents our achievements in science policy. Highlights include: Helped 165 scientists become more effective advocates for science after they completed an AIBS Communications Training Boot Camp or Science Policy Training course. Increased awareness of the needs of the biological sciences community by facilitating 102 meetings between scientists and lawmakers. Successfully opposed Administration-proposed cuts to research funding. Helped secure Arizona State Board of Education rejection of proposed science standards removing climate...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Chemotherapy workers face risks, reduced with safe handling
Analysis finds moderate level of evidence that workplace exposure is associated with increased risk of miscarriage and genetic damage (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - March 4, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Ghrelin and aggressive behaviours-evidence from preclinical and human genetic studies - Vestlund J, Winsa-J örnulf J, Hovey D, Lundström S, Lichtenstein P, Anckarsäter H, Studer E, Suchankova P, Westberg L, Jerlhag E.
Aggressive behaviour is of crucial importance in the defence for limited resources including food and mates and involves central serotonin as well as dopamine signalling. As ghrelin modulates food intake and sexual behaviour we initially investigated the h... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

GMO scientists think they've discovered the "God gene" for plant yields… but could accidentally create a food crop WIPEOUT
(Natural News) Plant geneticists are now saying they’ve uncovered the power of genome editing through a new application of CRISPR technology. The scientists from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory say they have mobilized CRISPR-Cas9 tech to rapidly produce variants of the tomato plant engineered to display three key agricultural traits: fruit size, branching structure and plant... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The girl who will never grow up because of rare genetic condition
Penny Stewart, from Blyth in Northumberland, was just two years old when she was robbed of her movement and speech. She was diagnosed with Rett syndrome after two years of tests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A common genetic signature has been discovered among three cancer prone rare skin diseases
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) A group of researchers lead by a lecturer from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), Marcela del R í o, from the CIEMAT, the Rare Diseases Networking Biomedical Research Centre (Initials in Spanish: CIBERER-- ISCIII) and Fundaci ó n Jim é nez D í az has identified a common genetic signature among three rare skin diseases or genodermatoses: recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa, Kindler syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. In the near future, these findings will allow efficient and safe evidence-based therapeutic approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First genetic clue for elusive pediatric liver disease
(Emory Health Sciences) A nationwide consortium of researchers has identified the first genetic defect linked to biliary atresia, a mysterious liver disease that is the leading cause for liver transplantation in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news