Surgical implications of rising heroin abuse
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) With heroin abuse on the rise in the United States, related surgical complications are also increasing, including severe infections and complications related to heroin injection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Studying reintroduction of bull trout with simulations
(Virginia Tech) Their project is one of the first to use an advanced computer model to simulate the genetic and demographic outcomes of the reintroduction by projecting 200 years into the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CNIO researchers identify a new gene involved in the development of a rare endocrine tumour
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are very rare neuroendocrine tumours and also the most hereditary form of all types of cancer. Researchers have for the first time linked mutations in the DLST gene with the development of such tumors. In addition to the importance of this finding for the future therapies, the discovery can broaden the number of families that may benefit from genetic counselling for prevention, detection and monitoring of these cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pancreatic Cancer Collective funds two AI teams to identify high-risk populations
(Stand Up To Cancer) The Pancreatic Cancer Collective, the strategic partnership of Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer, announced two teams to identifying high-risk pancreatic cancer populations: one using molecular and genetic data from datasets to develop new and accessible ways to identify high-risk individuals; one applying machine learning analysis to real world data comprising radiological images, electronic medical records, and information collected by physicians. Each team will receive up to $1 million over two years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists find genetic mutation that makes woman feel no pain
Discovery in 71-year-old Jo Cameron may aid development of new pain relief treatmentsDoctors have identified a new mutation in a woman who is barely able to feel pain or stress after a surgeon who was baffled by her recovery from an operation referred her for genetic testing.Jo Cameron, 71, has a mutation in a previously unknown gene which scientists believe must play a major role in pain signalling, mood and memory. The discovery has boosted hopes of new treatments for chronic pain which affects millions of people globally.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science UK news Genetics Human biology Source Type: news

Human impact erodes chimpanzee behavioral diversity
Chimpanzees possess a large number of behavioral and cultural traits among nonhuman species. The "disturbance hypothesis" predicts that human impact depletes resources and disrupts social learning processes necessary for behavioral and cultural transmission. We used a dataset of 144 chimpanzee communities, with information on 31 behaviors, to show that chimpanzees inhabiting areas with high human impact have a mean probability of occurrence reduced by 88%, across all behaviors, compared to low-impact areas. This behavioral diversity loss was evident irrespective of the grouping or categorization of behaviors. The...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kühl, H. S., Boesch, C., Kulik, L., Haas, F., Arandjelovic, M., Dieguez, P., Bocksberger, G., McElreath, M. B., Agbor, A., Angedakin, S., Ayimisin, E. A., Bailey, E., Barubiyo, D., Bessone, M., Brazzola, G., Chancellor, R., Cohen, H., Coupland, C. Tags: Anthropology, Ecology reports Source Type: news

Slide-seq: A scalable technology for measuring genome-wide expression at high spatial resolution
Spatial positions of cells in tissues strongly influence function, yet a high-throughput, genome-wide readout of gene expression with cellular resolution is lacking. We developed Slide-seq, a method for transferring RNA from tissue sections onto a surface covered in DNA-barcoded beads with known positions, allowing the locations of the RNA to be inferred by sequencing. Using Slide-seq, we localized cell types identified by single-cell RNA sequencing datasets within the cerebellum and hippocampus, characterized spatial gene expression patterns in the Purkinje layer of mouse cerebellum, and defined the temporal evolution of ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rodriques, S. G., Stickels, R. R., Goeva, A., Martin, C. A., Murray, E., Vanderburg, C. R., Welch, J., Chen, L. M., Chen, F., Macosko, E. Z. Tags: Genetics, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Gene expression at fine scale
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

600 years ’ supply of cystic fibrosis drug destroyed in price row
8,000 packs of Orkambi go out of date during standoff between maker and NHSNearly 8,000 packs of Orkambi, the breakthrough medicine for cystic fibrosis, have been destroyed by the manufacturer while it has been in a stand-off with the NHS over the high price it wants to charge for the drug.The US company Vertex has distributed 80,000 packs of Orkambi around Europe from its base in the UK since the drug was licensed in 2015. Other European countries with smaller numbers of people affected by the genetic disease have agreed to a high price, sometimes in order to give access to patients before negotiating downwards.Continue r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Cystic fibrosis Society NHS Health Drugs Science UK news Source Type: news

Human gene editing must be guided by all
The whole species must inform the debate before any genetic revolution is unleashed (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - March 27, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Heating up tumors could make CAR T therapy more effective, study finds
UCLAZhen GuFINDINGSA preclinical study led by scientists at theUCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center suggests that heating solid tumors during CAR T-cell therapy can enhance the treatment ’s success.The researchers found that when a heating technique called photothermal ablation was combined with the infusion of CAR T cells, it suppressed melanoma tumor growth for up to 20 days in mice. Among the mice that were treated with the combination, 33 percent were still tumor free after the 20-day mark.BACKGROUNDT cells that have been genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR, have successfully been us...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 27, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

My Gene Counsel, Ambry Genetics team up to offer re-testing for certain D2C genetic test users
A study last year showed that D2C tests have a false positive rate as high as 40 percent. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - March 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

New muscular disease: Myoglobinopathy
(IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute) Institute (IDIBELL) led by Dr. Montse Oliv é have described in Nature Communications a new muscular disease caused by a mutation in the myoglobin gene. The study has been possible thanks to a collaboration with a group of geneticists from the University of Western Australia (UWA), led by Prof. Nigel Laing, and researchers from the Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New cryptic bird species discovered
(Louisiana State University) Through persistent detective work and advances in genetic sequencing technology, Louisiana State University Museum of Natural Science researchers have discovered a new species of bird on Borneo -- the Cream-eyed Bulbul, or Pycnonotus pseudosimplex. Their discovery was published recently in the scientific journal, the Bulletin of the British Ornithologists' Club. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 27, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NCBI at the ACMG meeting in Seattle next week (April 2-6, 2019)
In about a week, NCBI staff will join GeneReviews® on their home turf, Seattle, at the Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting hosted by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). While there we will have an exhibit booth (#531) where you … Continue reading → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - March 26, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New ClinVar conferences Genetic Testing Registry MedGen Medical Genetic Summaries Source Type: news

Genetic and environmental overlap between substance use and delinquency in adolescence: an analysis by same-sex twins - Boisvert DL, Connolly EJ, Vaske JC, Armstrong TA, Boutwell BB.
During adolescence, many teens begin to experiment with substances and engage in delinquent behavior. The current study seeks to examine whether and to what extent genetic and environmental factors contribute to the association between substance use (i.e.,... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Genetic predictor of current suicidal ideation in US service members deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan - Zhang L, Hu XZ, Benedek DM, Fullerton CS, Forsten RD, Naifeh JA, Li X.
OBJECTIVE: Suicide is one of the ten leading causes of death in United States and the suicide rate in the military population has increased since the start of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. However, few biomarkers for current suicidal ideation (CSI) have b... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

C. elegans roundworms 'harvest' an essential coenzyme from the bacteria they consume
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A study conducted in C.elegans nematode roundworms may lead to improved treatment of a rare human genetic disorder that causes severe neurological symptoms leading to death in early childhood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using connectomics to understand epilepsy
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Abnormalities in structural brain networks and how brain regions communicate may underlie a variety of disorders, including epilepsy, which is one focus of a two-part Special Issue on the Brain Connectome in Brain Connectivity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic tagging may help conserve the world's wildlife
(University of Alberta) Tracking animals using DNA signatures are ideally suited to answer the pressing questions required to conserve the world's wildlife, providing benefits over invasive methods such as ear tags and collars, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Speciation: Birds of a feather...
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Carrion crows and hooded crows are almost indistinguishable genetically, and hybrid offspring are fertile. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists now show that the two forms have remained distinct largely owing to the dominant role of plumage color in mate choice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Using the EHR to Find Missed Genetic Causes of Short Stature Using the EHR to Find Missed Genetic Causes of Short Stature
Dr Dauber talks about two studies that demonstrate how algorithms built into the EHR can help reduce missed genetic causes of short stature.Endocrine Society (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Commentary Source Type: news

Study reveals key details about bacterium that increases risk for stomach cancer
More than half of the people in the world host colonies of a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori in their stomachs.Although it ’s harmless to many, H. pylori can cause stomach cancer as well as ulcers and other gastric conditions. Doctors tend to prescribe multiple antibiotics to defeat the microbe, but that strategy can lead to antibiotic-resistant superbugs.Now, afinding by UCLA scientists may lead to a better approach. The researchers have determined the molecular structure of a protein that enables H. pylori to stay alive in the stomach, and elucidated the mechanism by which that protein works.Z. Hong Zhou, the ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 25, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The Interplay Between Genetics, Cognition and Schizophrenia The Interplay Between Genetics, Cognition and Schizophrenia
How might impairments in cognition mediate the influence of the polygenic risk score on schizophrenia liability?Brain (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Cambridge's Bluebird Bio begins operations at Durham facility, plans to hire new workers
Cambridge-based Bluebird Bio's newest manufacturing family in Durham is operational – but its CEO says says more growth is already expected. On Friday, Bluebird (Nasdaq: BLUE) executives – along with Gov. Roy Cooper and Secretary of Commerce Tony Copeland – officially opened the 125,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Durham. The company, which is developing a pipeline of gene therapy products for the treatment of genetic diseases and cancer, purchased the facility in late 2017 for … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 25, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Seth Thomas Gulledge Source Type: news

Understanding gene interactions holds key to personalized medicine, scientists say
(University of Toronto) Scientists outline a new framework for studying gene function -- not in isolation, gene by gene, but as a network, to understand how multiple genes and genetic background influence trait inheritance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic variants may influence poststroke recovery
(University of Gothenburg) Our genes may have a bearing not only on our stroke risk, but probably also on how well we recover after stroke. For the first time, in international collaboration, scientists at the University of Gothenburg and elsewhere have identified common genetic variants that are associated with outcome after ischemic stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study questions value of genetic risk scores
(Wiley) What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background. While a recent publication claimed that the GPS could be used by doctors to identify patients at high risk of conditions such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, a new Annals of Human Genetics study casts doubt on these claims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A key player in the maturation of sexual organs
(Friedrich Miescher Institute) Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function. As much as we are familiar with these life-altering changes, relatively little is known about what sets the whole process in motion. Thanks to studies in the tiny worm C. elegans, the group of Helge Gro ß hans is getting closer to understanding how the onset of puberty is genetically controlled. Recently they uncovered a mechanism that initiates sexual organ maturation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In vivo data show effects of spaceflight microgravity on stem cells and tissue regeneration
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new review of data from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has shown that microgravity does not have a negative effect on stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but in some tissues regeneration is faster and more robust. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NCCN: More Genetic Testing to Inform Prostate Cancer Management
Updated prostate cancer guidelines reflect the importance of tumor genetic testing and genomically-informed disease management. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 25, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

Wealth may be less to do with hard work or luck and more to do with your genes, study suggests 
An analysis of 286,000 Britons showed that the genetic make-up of those who earned over £100,000 differed from those on low incomes, a new study has suggested. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ambry Genetics to Develop Custom Assays Targeted to Patients with...
Investigating new testing options to identify patients for clinical trials.(PRWeb March 25, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/ambry_genetics_to_develop_custom_assays_targeted_to_patients_with_hereditary_ovarian_cancer/prweb16160917.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - March 25, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Genetic rickets improves more with burosumab than standard care, study finds
(The Endocrine Society) Burosumab, a new injectable medicine to treat X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), an inherited form of rickets, demonstrates superior improvements in rickets and other outcomes compared with conventional therapy in an international, phase 3 clinical trial in children. Results from what investigators called the first head-to-head study comparing the new drug with conventional treatment for this rare disease will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sharing Mayo Clinic: A new heart and new adventures for Elise
A lifesaving heart transplant at Mayo Clinic helped Elise Campbell break free from the physical limitations of a rare genetic heart condition she had lived with since she was 14. Now Elise is relishing the opportunity to enjoy experiences she never thought possible. Elise Campbell was 14 when doctors in her home state of Iowa [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 24, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Potentially Disruptive Medtech Company Wins FDA Nod for HF Therapy
One of the 16 promising medtech companies in the private sector, as named in a Canaccord Genuity analyst report, earlier this year, has just received approval for its heart failure therapy. Impulse Dynamics noted it nabbed a nod from FDA for the Optimizer Smart System. The Orangeburg, NY-based company’s technology delivers Cardiac Contractility Modulation (CCM). Through CGM an electrical pulse is delivered during the absolute refractory period, which is just after heart contracts. In contrast to a pacemaker or defibrillator, CCM works by modulating the strength of the heart muscle contraction rather than ...
Source: MDDI - March 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Are genetic tests useful to predict cancer?
The health secretary ’s call for tests to be rolled out on NHS was met with controversyThe health secretary, Matt Hancock, this weekshared his shock at discovering that he is at greater than average risk for prostate cancer, despite having no family history of the disease.The revelation came after he took a predictive genetic test that assesses risk for 16 common diseases, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma and breast and prostate cancers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Cancer UK news Matt Hancock NHS Health Cancer research Medical research Genetics Science Source Type: news

Important Dates for the 22nd International C. elegans Conference
The abstract submission deadline for the 22nd International C. elegans Conference is March 28th! The conference will be held June 20-24, 2019 at UCLA. For more information visit the conference website. Abstract Submission Deadline: March 28 Submit an abstract Registration Discounted early registration: April 30 Discounted advance registration: May 1 – June 17 Register for the conference Housing Reservations Deadline: May 15 Make a housing reservation (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - March 23, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Todd Harris Tags: meetings news Source Type: news

Cystic Fibrosis: How Gunnar Esiason Is Making A Difference
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a fatal and progressive genetic disorder that affects the lungs and pancreas. It results in persistent lung infections--due to production of thick mucous--which also impair the ability to breathe. I recently spoke with Gunnar Esiason, a CF advocate and patient. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD, Contributor Source Type: news

How genetic testing is changing depression treatment
Can you imagine starting a new business venture without having done research to guide your investment? You may have considered what’s worked in the past, but market forces are constantly changing. Further, what may have worked for one target audience may be completely different for another. It is why good businesses research the market, audiences, and products before introducing a new venture. That same research-based approach is now being applied to depression treatment. Traditionally, treatment… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Mark Verratti Source Type: news

Man who didn't hit puberty until he was 20 due to rare genetic disorder
Jared Gale, 38, of Utah, spent years perplexed as to why his body wasn't developing as it should be - leaving him looking 10 years old at 18 - before he was diagnosed with Kallmann Syndrome. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A social bacterium with versatile habits
(ETH Zurich) Related individuals of a soil bacterial species live in cooperative groups and exhibit astonishing genetic and behavioral diversity. ETH researchers recently published these findings in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

From body to brain and back again —how the hormone leptin utilizes brain cell circuits to regulate appetite, calorie burning, and glucose levels
Scientists have used a new genetic tool in mice to map out the cellular brain circuits used by the hormone leptin to control energy balance (calories consumed versus calories burned) and blood glucose (sugar) levels.  (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

New tool reveals insights into maturation of red blood cells
Using detailed genetic data along with a recently developed analytical tool called “population balance analysis” (PBA), investigators have developed models capable of predicting the mature blood cell type of early stage (progenitor) blood cells.  (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Study reveals the evolution of brain tumours
New treatments needed for glioblastomas Related items fromOnMedica New targeted drug could help treat advanced cancers Brain cancer research to receive £45m funding boost Genetic risk model could guide prostate cancer screening Cancer survival rates not improved much in a decade Combined treatment works best for anal cancer (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 22, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Diversity Missing in Genetic Studies Diversity Missing in Genetic Studies
European populations are overrepresented in genetic and genomic studies, contributing to healthcare inequities.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

"Impossible Burger" is just THAT, because it's GMO
(Natural News) What do you get when you genetically modify soybean roots in a top secret laboratory, cram it into a new “burger” and then sell that Franken-burger as “plant-based” to a bunch of health-minded consumers? You get $250 million richer from investors who like the marketing scam of the new bloody “vegetarian” impossible burger... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: High-fat diet causes trans-generational health problems, impacting humans for generations to come
(Natural News) The human race is constantly evolving at the genetic level. Epi-genetic factors are always influencing the genetic expression within the individual. Families pass on a firm DNA sequence from parent to offspring, but certain external factors and intra-cellular activities can affect genetic expression. These phenotype alterations in gene expression can also be passed... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another Promising Alzheimer ’ s Drug Trial Ends In Failure: ‘ This One Hurts ’
(CNN) — It’s another devastating blow in the search for a treatment for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease. Pharmaceutical giant Biogen and its Japanese partner Eisai announced Thursday they were halting two phase three clinical trials of a drug that targets the buildup in the brain of beta-amyloid, one of two proteins that researchers believe contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. The drug, called aducanumab, was the most promising candidate in a field that has been littered with failures. It was so promising that the company was running two phase three trials simultaneously, said neur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Source Type: news

Book Review: Borderline Bodies:  Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders
“The body,” says Clara Mucci, “is the essential go-between in the relationship between the self and other.” In personality disorders, this relationship between the self and the other is especially troubled. However, this “other” can be the body itself. Mucci describes psychosomatic disorders as an outcome of the “problematic junction between mind and body.” The body can also act as an imprinting device in which earlier generations transmit their trauma onto us. In her new book, Borderline Bodies: Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders, Mucci places the body at the...
Source: Psych Central - March 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family General Genetics Memory and Perception Parenting Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Trauma Treatment Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders Body books on somati Source Type: news