Getting DNA sequence from JBrowse
There are two ways that users can download DNA sequence from JBrowse: in relation to a feature, like a gene, or by specific sequence coordinates. Getting Sequence for a Gene or Transcript To get the sequence for a gene, open any of the “Curated Genes” tracks and right click or control click on the feature and select “View Sequence” from the resulting popup menu. If you are using the main “Curated Genes” track, you’ll get a dialog box asking which transcript you want to view. It does this because it needs to know what subfeatures like exons and introns can be shown. If you’re ...
Source: WormBase - March 19, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Scott Cain Tags: brief communication news tutorials jbrowse Source Type: news

From body to brain and back again —how the hormone leptin utilizes brain cell circuits to regulate appetite, calorie burning, and glucose levels
Scientists have used a new genetic tool in mice to map out the cellular brain circuits used by the hormone leptin to control energy balance (calories consumed versus calories burned) and blood glucose (sugar) levels.  (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 19, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Story of discovery: discoveries moving towards understanding and personalized treatment of inflammatory bowel disease
Researchers have discovered ways in which the bacteria and other microbes that reside in the gut —the gut microbial community or microbiome—can affect risk of IBD, and efforts such as NIDDK’s IBD Genetics Consortium are shedding new light on the genetic foundations of the disease. (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 19, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

DNA from 200-Year-Old Pipe Connects Enslaved Woman to West Africa
Genetic material from old artifacts can link people to their ancestral communities and potentially help descendants find their roots. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Scientists grow 'mini-brain on the move' that can contract muscle
Cambridge researchers grew ‘organoid’ that spontaneously connected to spinal cordScientists have grown a miniature brain in a dish with a spinal cord and muscles attached, an advance that promises to accelerate the study of conditions such as motor neurone disease.The lentil-sized grey blob of human brain cells were seen to spontaneously send out tendril-like connections to link up with the spinal cord and muscle tissue, which was taken from a mouse. The muscles were then seen to visibly contract under the control of the so-called brain organoid.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Biology Genetics Motor neurone disease Epilepsy Society Schizophrenia Mental health University of Cambridge Stem cells Source Type: news

Some Viruses May Infect by Inserting Different Portions of Genetic Material
Viruses that infect plants and occasionally insects appear to cause infection with a divide-and-conquer strategy, multiplying separate segments of genetic material in different host cells. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 18, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Zika study may 'supercharge' vaccine research
(University of Queensland) Scientists looking at the genetics of Zika virus have found a way to fast-track research which could lead to new vaccines.The study, led by The University of Queensland and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, used a new technique to uncover Zika mutations that help foster virus replication in mosquito hosts, while hindering its ability to replicate in mammals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New research explores value-based medicine, integrative health, and whole systems research
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Two decades ago, the popular movement for integrative health practices prompted researchers to advance 'whole systems research' (WSR). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC researchers report on trends in hospital breastfeeding policies
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study from the CDC showed modest improvement in optimal hospital breastfeeding policy from 2009 to 2015, with more than 2 times as many hospitals having a model breastfeeding policy and increases in early initiation of breastfeeding and limitation of non-breast milk feeds of breastfed infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expansion of transposable elements offers clue to genetic paradox
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) A research group led by Professor GUO Yalong from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with SONG Ge, and Sureshkumar Balasubramanian from the School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia, has revealed that transposable element insertions could potentially help species with limited genetic variation adapt to novel environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

DNA from 200-year-old pipe sheds light on life of enslaved African woman
US archaeologists trace roots of woman to modern-day Sierra Leone as part of ongoing ancestry researchArchaeologists used DNA taken from a broken clay pipe stem found in Maryland to build a picture of an enslaved woman who died around 200 years ago and had origins in modern-day Sierra Leone. One researcher called the work “a mind-blower”.Related:El Norte review: an epic and timely history of Hispanic North AmericaContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Martin Pengelly Tags: Slavery Maryland US news American civil war Africa Sierra Leone World news Archaeology Genetics Science Source Type: news

A Possible Alzheimer ’ s Treatment With Clicks and Flashes? It Worked on Mice
Researchers hope the techniques can be applied to help people with Alzheimer ’ s. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAM BELLUCK Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Animal Cognition Brain Mice Genetic Engineering Cell (Journal) Massachusetts Institute of Technology your-feed-science Source Type: news

After Selling Her Genetic Data Mining Software Company, A 32-Year-Old CEO Relaunches It With A Microsoft Partnership
Country-scale genome sequencing projects are producing “the largest datasets on the planet,” Spiral Genetics CEO Adina Mangubat says. Spiral’s goal is to make sense of them. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 15, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Kincaid, Forbes Staff Source Type: news

The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula reconstructed
(Spanish National Research Council (CSIC)) An international study co-led by researchers from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE) and Harvard University (USA) has developed a genetic map of the Iberian Peninsula covering the last 8,000 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What is the real link between bacterial vaginosis and HIV risk in women?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) An international team of researchers presents a comprehensive and renewed focus on the common, yet poorly understood condition of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and how the microbial make-up of the vagina can affect a woman's risk of acquiring HIV and AIDS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New peer-reviewed journal PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research announced
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers announces the launch of PHAGE: Therapy, Applications, and Research, the only peer-reviewed publication dedicated to the burgeoning field of bacteriophage research and its applications in medicine, agriculture, aquaculture, veterinary applications, animal production, food safety, and food production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pregnancies Tied to Breast Cancer Odds for High-Risk Women Pregnancies Tied to Breast Cancer Odds for High-Risk Women
Having more than one pregnancy has long been linked to lower odds of breast cancer, and a new study suggests that may hold true even for some women with genetic mutations that put them at high risk for these malignancies.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Matter: A History of the Iberian Peninsula, as Told by Its Skeletons
With an analysis of DNA from nearly 300 fossilized remains, scientists are peering into human prehistory in the region. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Skeletons Archaeology and Anthropology Basques Current Biology (Journal) Harvard University Oxford University Reich, David E (1974- ) Spain Portugal Europe Source Type: news

Matter: The Story of the Iberian Peninsula, Told in DNA
With an analysis of nearly 300 skeletons from various periods, scientists are peering into human prehistory in the region. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Skeletons Archaeology and Anthropology Basques Current Biology (Journal) Harvard University Oxford University Reich, David E (1974- ) Spain Portugal Europe Source Type: news

Flashing Lights and Sounds Improve Memory and Learning Skills in Mice
Researchers hope the techniques can be applied to help people with Alzheimer ’ s. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAM BELLUCK Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Animal Cognition Brain Mice Genetic Engineering Cell (Journal) Massachusetts Institute of Technology your-feed-science Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New PTSD blood test could aid prevention and treatment
A groundbreaking new blood test for genetic biomarkers of PTSD could improve accuracy of diagnosis, precision of treatment, and prediction of future risk. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anxiety / Stress Source Type: news

CDC says whooping cough has mutated, making the vaccine less effective 
A new report from the CDC has found that the bacteria that causes whooping cough, Bordetella pertussis, has undergone genetic changes between 2000 and 2013. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

23andMe Offers Customers New Diabetes Risk Score 23andMe Offers Customers New Diabetes Risk Score
The personal genetics company has collaborated with artificial intelligence platform Lark Health to push diabetes prevention to customers of its Health& Ancestry service.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - March 14, 2019 Category: Cardiology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Genomics Could Improve Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer
THURSDAY, March 14, 2019 -- It's one of the toughest cancers to beat. But new research suggests that identifying the genetics of pancreatic cancer in individual patients could boost survival for some. The five-year survival rate for pancreatic... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 14, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Speed limit on DNA-making sets pace for life's first steps
(Princeton University, Engineering School) Fruit flies make for stingy mothers, imparting only a portion of the genetic building blocks their offspring need to survive. The rest must be produced by the fertilized egg in its first few steps of growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What makes a cell turn cancerous?
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) CHLA researcher David Cobrinik, MD, PhD receives $1.6M grant to study how genetic changes cause retinoblastoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genetic Shifts in Bordetella May Explain Surge in Pertussis Genetic Shifts in Bordetella May Explain Surge in Pertussis
The recent uptick in whooping cough may be explained, in part, by genetic shifts in Bordetella that reduce the efficacy of the pertussis vaccine, according to a new study.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - March 14, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

The genomic landscape of pediatric cancers: Implications for diagnosis and treatment
The past decade has witnessed a major increase in our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of childhood cancer. Genomic sequencing studies have highlighted key differences between pediatric and adult cancers. Whereas many adult cancers are characterized by a high number of somatic mutations, pediatric cancers typically have few somatic mutations but a higher prevalence of germline alterations in cancer predisposition genes. Also noteworthy is the remarkable heterogeneity in the types of genetic alterations that likely drive the growth of pediatric cancers, including copy number alterations, gene fusions, enhancer hij...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sweet-Cordero, E. A., Biegel, J. A. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases special/review Source Type: news

The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula over the past 8000 years
We assembled genome-wide data from 271 ancient Iberians, of whom 176 are from the largely unsampled period after 2000 BCE, thereby providing a high-resolution time transect of the Iberian Peninsula. We document high genetic substructure between northwestern and southeastern hunter-gatherers before the spread of farming. We reveal sporadic contacts between Iberia and North Africa by ~2500 BCE and, by ~2000 BCE, the replacement of 40% of Iberia’s ancestry and nearly 100% of its Y-chromosomes by people with Steppe ancestry. We show that, in the Iron Age, Steppe ancestry had spread not only into Indo-European–speak...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Olalde, I., Mallick, S., Patterson, N., Rohland, N., Villalba-Mouco, V., Silva, M., Dulias, K., Edwards, C. J., Gandini, F., Pala, M., Soares, P., Ferrando-Bernal, M., Adamski, N., Broomandkhoshbacht, N., Cheronet, O., Culleton, B. J., Fernandes, D., Laws Tags: Anthropology, Genetics reports Source Type: news

Acoel genome reveals the regulatory landscape of whole-body regeneration
Whole-body regeneration is accompanied by complex transcriptomic changes, yet the chromatin regulatory landscapes that mediate this dynamic response remain unexplored. To decipher the regulatory logic that orchestrates regeneration, we sequenced the genome of the acoel worm Hofstenia miamia, a highly regenerative member of the sister lineage of other bilaterians. Epigenomic profiling revealed thousands of regeneration-responsive chromatin regions and identified dynamically bound transcription factor motifs, with the early growth response (EGR) binding site as the most variably accessible during Hofstenia regeneration. Comb...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gehrke, A. R., Neverett, E., Luo, Y.-J., Brandt, A., Ricci, L., Hulett, R. E., Gompers, A., Ruby, J. G., Rokhsar, D. S., Reddien, P. W., Srivastava, M. Tags: Evolution, Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Defective degradation as disease mechanism
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Cell Biology, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Genomics of the Iberian Peninsula
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Mysterious males
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Acoel-regeneration regulatory landscapes
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Males as somatic investment in a parthenogenetic nematode
We report the reproductive strategy of the nematode Mesorhabditis belari. This species produces only 9% males, whose sperm is necessary to fertilize and activate the eggs. However, most of the fertilized eggs develop without using the sperm DNA and produce female individuals. Only in 9% of eggs is the male DNA utilized, producing sons. We found that mixing of parental genomes only gives rise to males because the Y-bearing sperm of males are much more competent than the X-bearing sperm for penetrating the eggs. In this previously unrecognized strategy, asexual females produce few sexual males whose genes never reenter the f...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Grosmaire, M., Launay, C., Siegwald, M., Brugiere, T., Estrada-Virrueta, L., Berger, D., Burny, C., Modolo, L., Blaxter, M., Meister, P., Felix, M.-A., Gouyon, P.-H., Delattre, M. Tags: Evolution, Genetics reports Source Type: news

RIT1 oncoproteins escape LZTR1-mediated proteolysis
RIT1 oncoproteins have emerged as an etiologic factor in Noonan syndrome and cancer. Despite the resemblance of RIT1 to other members of the Ras small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), mutations affecting RIT1 are not found in the classic hotspots but rather in a region near the switch II domain of the protein. We used an isogenic germline knock-in mouse model to study the effects of RIT1 mutation at the organismal level, which resulted in a phenotype resembling Noonan syndrome. By mass spectrometry, we detected a RIT1 interactor, leucine zipper–like transcription regulator 1 (LZTR1), that acts as an adaptor for p...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Castel, P., Cheng, A., Cuevas-Navarro, A., Everman, D. B., Papageorge, A. G., Simanshu, D. K., Tankka, A., Galeas, J., Urisman, A., McCormick, F. Tags: Cell Biology, Genetics reports Source Type: news

Experts Call for Halt to Gene Editing That Results in'Designer Babies'Experts Call for Halt to Gene Editing That Results in'Designer Babies '
Top scientists and ethicists from seven countries on Wednesday called for a global moratorium on gene editing of human eggs, sperm or embryos that would result in genetically-altered babies after a rogue Chinese researcher last year announced the birth of the world's first gene-edited twins.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

'Miracle' girl born with ultra-rare genetic deformity defies parents and doctors
Charlotte Patt, from Wisconsin in the US, was born with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome, a condition believed to have only been recorded in around 50 people around the world. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Birth Control Pills May Fail In Women With Certain Genetic Variant
BOSTON (CBS) – While birth control pills are one of the most effective ways to prevent pregnancy, they don’t work 100 percent of the time. The small failure rate was largely thought to be due to human error, like a woman missing a dose. But a new study from the University of Colorado finds that some women may be more likely to get pregnant on the pill due to their genetics, not their forgetfulness. Researchers looked at 350 women with hormonal implants, like Nexplanon, which are small plastic strips placed in a woman’s upper arm that slowly release hormones to prevent pregnancy. They found that women with...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local birth control Dr. Mallika Marshall HealthWatch Source Type: news

NIH and top scientists call for moratorium on gene-edited babies
Scientists and ethicists from seven nations on Wednesday called for a moratorium on gene-editing experiments designed to alter heritable traits in human babies.It's the latest alarm sounded by researchers who have been both excited and unnerved by thepowerful genetic engineering technique known... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Joel Achenbach Source Type: news

Experts Are Calling for a Ban on Gene Editing of Human Embryos. Here ’s Why They’re Worried
In November 2018, Chinese biophysicist Jiankui He stunned the world when he announced that he had used a controversial gene-editing technology, called CRISPR, to genetically alter the genes in embryos and give them immunity to HIV. The embryos were transferred to the woman who provided the eggs to create them, and twin girls were born. The move, considered highly experimental and unethical by most scientists around the world, prompted intense debate in the scientific community about not just the implications for the twins, but for society as well. When applied to human eggs, sperm and embryos, gene-editing technologies, of...
Source: TIME: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Genetics Source Type: news

Scientists call for global moratorium on gene editing of embryos
Crispr ‘tops list’ of recent scientific discoveries with massive consequences for humanity, says lead proponentLeading scientists have called for a global moratorium on the use ofpowerful DNA editing tools to make genetically modified children.The move is intended to send a clear signal to maverick researchers, and the scientific community more broadly, that any attempt to rewrite the DNA of sperm, eggs or embryos destined for live births is not acceptable.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Gene editing Genetics Medical research Biology World news Source Type: news

Proposal for global moratorium on editing of inherited DNA is met with criticism
Researchers and ethicists, including the scientist who pioneered and patented CRISPR gene-editing technology, are calling for a global moratorium on human germline editing -- changes made to inherited DNA, the genetic material in sperm, eggs or embryos that can be passed on to the next generation. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experts call for halt to gene editing that results in 'designer babies'
Top scientists and ethicists from seven countries on Wednesday called for a global moratorium on gene editing of human eggs, sperm or embryos that would result in genetically-altered babies after a rogue Chinese researcher last year announced the birth of the world's first gene-edited twins. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Tenneessee restricts use of Monsanto herbicide dicamba as damage to food crops spreads
(Natural News) Monsanto remains unfazed with Tennessee’s recently imposed restrictions against its dicamba pesticides. The state officially became the fourth in the nation to ban or limit the use of dicamba after evidence was presented suggesting that drifting from the herbicide compromised surrounding crops not genetically modified to withstand it. Tennessee followed Illinois, Kansas, and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnancies tied to breast cancer odds for high-risk women
(Reuters Health) - Having more than one pregnancy has long been linked to lower odds of breast cancer, and a new study suggests that may hold true even for some women with genetic mutations that put them at high risk for these malignancies. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Distinct Clinical Subgroups In Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Distinct Clinical Subgroups In Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer
Patients 18 to 29 years of age and those with IBD are genetically unique and require special consideration, say researchers.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - March 13, 2019 Category: Pathology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Some women metabolise contraceptive hormones more efficiently
A study, published inObstetrics and Gynecology, reports on a genetic variant that promotes faster breakdown of hormones, and may lead to reduced effectiveness of contraception in women.Guardian (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 13, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

FDA OKs Import of Genetically Engineered Salmon
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - March 13, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

ZEB1 throttles therapeutic target, protecting KRAS-mutant lung cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A cellular identity switch protects a cancer-promoting genetic pathway from targeted therapy, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported in Science Translational Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news