Community matters: GxE interactions predicting childhood aggression and violent behavior - Sattler LJ, Thomas KA, Vaughn MG, Almeida J, White LA, Waldman MR.
PURPOSE Aggression in childhood is a common precursor to youth violence, yet few studies have examined the extent to which genetic and environmental factors interact (GxE) to influence aggression by male and female children.This secondary analysis of data... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Preclinical biotech Stoke Therapeutics plans $86M IPO
An RNA-altering startup, led by some of the brains behind Biogen and Sarepta Therapeutics' blockbuster products, is hoping to raise $86 million in an IPO, the company disclosed Thursday. Stoke Therapeutics Inc. is developing RNA-targeting treatments that it hopes can jumpstart protein production in a handful of genetic diseases like a rare form of epilepsy called Dravet's Syndrome. It is also exploring potential therapies for liver, central nervous system, eye and kidney diseases. The preclinical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 23, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Dog ownership could be down to genes
A study of tens of thousands of identical and nonidentical twins in Sweden suggests that genetic makeup could be a strong factor in choosing to own a dog. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

Most At-Risk Opt Out of Genetic Testing for Huntington Disease
THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 -- The vast majority of people at risk for Huntington disease (HD) choose not to be tested preemptively, mainly because there is no cure for the disease, according to a study published online May 15 in Clinical Genetics. Karen... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Variation of FTO gene linked to weight gain and obesity in children
(The Obesity Society) Researchers have discovered that children who do not have obesity, but who are at risk for the chronic disease due to a common genetic variant eat more, according to a new study to be published in the June 2019 issue of Obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New stimulant formulations emerging to better treat ADHD
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A comprehensive new review of the expanding scope of stimulants available to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) serves as a valuable guide to clinicians as they choose from among the many new drug formulations and technologies available to treat this complex disorder. The wide-ranging review is published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do physicians properly advise women with dense breasts on cancer risk?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown that more than half of physicians -- primary care doctors and specialists -- may be unaware that dense breasts are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, and nearly half reported not being aware of laws requiring physicians to inform women about mammography-related breast density risks and supplemental screening options. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a zebrafish could help solve the mysteries of genetic brain disease
(Ohio State University) A close look at the rapidly developing zebrafish embryo is helping neuroscientists better understand the potential underpinnings of brain disorders, including autism and schizophrenia. The new study, published online this month in the journal eNeuro, points to a 'clustering' of cellular interactions in the brain that may disrupt normal development and brain health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? In a study led by Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin, an international team of researchers studied the genome of the alpine marmot. Results were unexpected: the species was found to be the least genetically diverse of any wild mammal studied to date. The alpine marmot has lost its genetic diversity during ice-age related climate events and been unable to recover its diversity since. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children's Tumor Foundation launches NF2 accelerator to combat rare genetic disorder
(Children's Tumor Foundation) The Children's Tumor Foundation has announced a significant research initiative dedicated to finding effective treatments for NF2, along with a substantial investment of $2.3 million in this effort. Called the 'NF2 Accelerator Initiative,' this undertaking is dedicated to bringing NF2 treatments to clinic by expanding the drug pipeline for NF2, improving drug selection through the development of innovative testing models, and the development of gene therapy options that address the underlying causes of NF2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Better gene knockout in aneuploid cell lines
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables convenient and effective genome editing in diploid cell lines based on the isolation and expansion of edited single-cell clones. However, this approach is ineffective for aneuploid cell lines, and a group has now reported an improved method for genome editing based on multiple rounds of modification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Overview of Genetic Test Development for Inflammatory Diseases, New...
In a live session on Tuesday, June 11, 2019 at 1pm EDT, join featured speaker Dr. Chase Spurlock, Chief Executive Officer of IQuity as he provides an overview of current genetic test development for...(PRWeb May 23, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/overview_of_genetic_test_development_for_inflammatory_diseases_new_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16332878.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Germline selection shapes human mitochondrial DNA diversity
Approximately 2.4% of the human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome exhibits common homoplasmic genetic variation. We analyzed 12,975 whole-genome sequences to show that 45.1% of individuals from 1526 mother–offspring pairs harbor a mixed population of mtDNA (heteroplasmy), but the propensity for maternal transmission differs across the mitochondrial genome. Over one generation, we observed selection both for and against variants in specific genomic regions; known variants were more likely to be transmitted than previously unknown variants. However, new heteroplasmies were more likely to match the nuclear genetic ancest...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wei, W., Tuna, S., Keogh, M. J., Smith, K. R., Aitman, T. J., Beales, P. L., Bennett, D. L., Gale, D. P., Bitner-Glindzicz, M. A. K., Black, G. C., Brennan, P., Elliott, P., Flinter, F. A., Floto, R. A., Houlden, H., Irving, M., Koziell, A., Maher, E. R., Tags: Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Heteroplasmy incidence in mitochondrial DNA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics twis Source Type: news

Exposure to common virus may increase risk for type 1 diabetes
Researchers say there may be triggers to the genetically linked type 1 diabetes, finding in a recent study that coxsackievirus may be one of those triggers. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Technology Saves Those With Genetic Heart Disease
BOSTON (CBS) – We’ve all heard the tragic tales of teens and young adults collapsing while playing sports from a rare heart condition. Now, a father-son team in Boston has developed a strategy to save those patients most at risk. “It was devastating.”  Kevin Whelan recalled the moment he learned his oldest brother, Kyle, collapsed and died. He was only 26 years old. Kyle had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, a genetic disease of the heart and the most common cause of sudden death in otherwise healthy young people. But Kyle wasn’t the only one in the family with it.  His father and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Source Type: news

New Strategy Saving Those With Genetic Heart Disease
BOSTON (CBS) – We’ve all heard the tragic tales of teens and young adults collapsing while playing sports from a rare heart condition. Now, a father-son team in Boston has developed a strategy to save those patients most at risk. “It was devastating.”  Kevin Whelan recalled the moment he learned his oldest brother, Kyle, collapsed and died. He was only 26 years old. Kyle had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, a genetic disease of the heart and the most common cause of sudden death in otherwise healthy young people. But Kyle wasn’t the only one in the family with it.  His father and...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Source Type: news

Genetically Personalized Fruit Flies Screen for Cancer Drugs
Fly avatars bearing multiple genetic changes akin to those of a cancer patient lead to a tailor-made treatment that has shrunk the patient's tumors. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Blood Banks Could Help Screen for Hereditary High Cholesterol
WEDNESDAY, May 22, 2019 -- More than 1 million Americans have a genetic condition that pushes their cholesterol to dangerously high levels, but many don't know it. Now, researchers offer a possible way to get more people with so-called familial... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRISPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Noel King Source Type: news

Genetic discovery may improve corn quality, yields
(Rutgers University) Researchers may be able to improve corn yields and nutritional value after discovering genetic regulators that synthesize starch and protein in the widely eaten grain, according to a Rutgers-led study. The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could benefit millions of people who rely on corn for nutrition in South America, Africa and elsewhere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Life-threatening genetic cholesterol condition could be found through blood donations
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Blood donation programs represent a unique opportunity as a public health portal to screen for diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Defects in heart valve cilia during fetal development cause mitral valve prolapse
(Medical University of South Carolina) Genetic mutations in heart valve cells of the developing fetus lead to mitral valve prolapse, report a global collaborative of researchers, including Medical University of South Carolina investigators, in today's Science Translational Medicine. These mutations or genetic variations cause defects in antenna-like cellular structures called primary cilia. This finding of a developmental cause for the disease highlights the importance of early intervention and may lead to the rethinking of treatment guidelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Using fruit flies to identify new treatment for a colorectal cancer patient
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Erdem Bangi and colleagues demonstrate a new approach to developing personalized therapy for a patient with treatment-resistant colorectal cancer: using a fruit fly genetically modified with a patient's own cancer mutations to test candidate treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dog Person? It May Be in Your Genes
Scientists calculated that genetics is responsible for 57 percent of dog ownership in women and 51 percent in men. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Genetics and Heredity Twins Dogs Source Type: news

Your DNA Might Determine Whether You're a Dog Lover
TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 -- Could a love for canines be contained in your genes? New research from Europe suggests that's so after comparing the genetic makeup of more than 35,000 twin pairs with dog ownership. The researchers concluded that genetic... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

National Institutes of Health launches $9 million genetic testing center at UC Davis
The federal government ’s medical research agency is launching a new center to develop genetic editing tools with the University of California Davis.  The National Institutes of Health is funding the new center with a $9 million grant announced Monday. Those dollars are earmarked for primate research projects to impro ve the safety and efficacy of genetic editing tools. The new center has been dubbed the UC Davis Nonhuman Primate Testing Center for Evaluation of Somatic Cell Genome Editing Tools. The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 21, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Felicia Alvarez Source Type: news

DNA test proves former care worker is entitled to £50m country estate
Jordan Adlard Rogers inherits 1,536-acre Cornwall estate after proving owner was his fatherA former care worker has inherited a £50m country estate after a DNA test proved he was the son of its deceased owner.Jordan Adlard Rogers, 31, found out his father was the aristocrat Charles Rogers after his death in 2018 and has now moved into the 1,536-acre Penrose estate in Cornwall, which his family has lived in for generations.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Amy Walker Tags: Cornwall UK news Genetics Science Source Type: news

Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) A team led by Ivaylo Ivanov of Georgia State University used the 200-petaflop IBM AC922 Summit system, the world's smartest and most powerful supercomputer, to develop an integrative model of the transcription preinitiation complex (PIC), a complex of proteins vital to gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Can Next-Gen Sequencing Save Money in Lung Cancer Genetic Testing?
A computer modeling analysis studied the use of NGS and its costs in patients with metastatic non –small-cell lung cancer. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - May 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news

Developing biosecurity tool to detect genetically engineered organisms in the wild
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) If a genetically or synthetically engineered organism gets into the environment, how will we tell it apart from the millions of naturally occurring microorganisms? Recently, the US government and research scientists have identified a need for new tools that can detect engineered organisms that have been accidentally or intentionally released beyond the lab. With scientists from Raytheon and other universities, WPI chemical engineer Eric Young is helping develop a detection tool based on DNA signatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian scientists synthesized protein to enrich stock-raising feed
(Far Eastern Federal University) Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS) have developed an effective technology for the synthesis of protein from amaranth grains and mushroom mycelium to enrich a stock-raising feed. To do this, they used genetic engineering methods, inserted into the fungus strain an element of amaranth DNA containing a storage protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

IRF2 transcriptionally induces GSDMD expression for pyroptosis
Gasdermin-D (GSDMD) is cleaved by caspase-1, caspase-4, and caspase-11 in response to canonical and noncanonical inflammasome activation. Upon cleavage, GSDMD oligomerizes and forms plasma membrane pores, resulting in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, pyroptotic cell death, and inflammatory pathologies, including periodic fever syndromes and septic shock—a plague on modern medicine. Here, we showed that IRF2, a member of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of transcription factors, was essential for the transcriptional activation of GSDMD. A forward genetic screen with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)&...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kayagaki, N., Lee, B. L., Stowe, I. B., Kornfeld, O. S., O'Rourke, K., Mirrashidi, K. M., Haley, B., Watanabe, C., Roose-Girma, M., Modrusan, Z., Kummerfeld, S., Reja, R., Zhang, Y., Cho, V., Andrews, T. D., Morris, L. X., Goodnow, C. C., Bertram, E. M., Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Phoenix genetic test maker gets $15M in funding; bioscience leader joins board
The latest capital infusion comes several months after a previous $9 million raise, all of which is funding the company to develop a test to ensure cancer patients can get more personalized medical care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 20, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

Phoenix genetic test maker gets $15M in funding; bioscience leader joins board
The latest capital infusion comes several months after a previous $9 million raise, all of which is funding the company to develop a test to ensure cancer patients can get more personalized medical care. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 20, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

MyHeritage expands into health-focused DNA testing
The Israel-based company is offering 11 genetic risk tests, three polygenic risk tests  and 15 carrier status reports. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - May 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Reneo Pharmaceuticals Raises $50 Million to Develop Therapeutics to Treat Genetic Mitochondrial Diseases
SAN DIEGO, May 20, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Reneo Pharmaceuticals, a clinical stage pharmaceutical company, today announced that it has completed a $50 million Series A financing to develop therapies for diseases associated with d... Biopharmaceuticals, Venture Capital Reneo Pharmaceuticals, mitochondrial diseases (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Exploring Family Predisposition
The National Cancer Institute has opened a clinical trial using mesothelioma patients and their family members to explore predisposition to the cancer and potential solutions to negating it. The trial is a follow up to an earlier study of a genetic mutation that creates susceptibility to various cancers but a longer-than-normal survival with platinum-based chemotherapy treatment. “This is an important, long-term study that could have implications not only for a patient, but for family members, too,” Dr. Raffit Hassan, NCI senior investigator told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “Progress can be m...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 20, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Synthetic biologists hack bacterial sensors
(Rice University) Synthetic biologists have hacked bacterial sensing with a plug-and-play system that could be used to mix-and-match tens of thousands of sensory inputs and genetic outputs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Causes Macrocephaly?
Discussion “Macrocephaly is defined as [an occipitofrontal circumference or head circumference, OFC ] of> 2 standard deviations above the mean or above the 97th percentage for a given age, and gender, or when serial measurement shows progressive enlargement, crossing of one or more major percentiles, or when there is an increase in OFC> 2 cm/month in the first 6 months of life.” Megalencephaly is enlargement of the brain parenchyma. The OFC should be measured using a non-elastic tape which surrounds the head along the line of the glabella and posterior occipital protrusion. There are ethnic differences f...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 20, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Predictive links between genetic vulnerability to depression and trajectories of warmth and conflict in the mother-adolescent and father-adolescent relationships - Brouillard C, Brendgen M, Vitaro F, Dionne G, Boivin M.
The present study used a genetically informed design of twins raised in the same family (375 monozygotic and 290 dizygotic twins; 50.2% girls) to examine the association between adolescents' genetic risk for depressive symptoms and the course of the parent... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

A Rare Genetic Mutation Leads to Cancer. The Fix May Already Be in the Drugstore.
A common dietary supplement may help overcome mutations in the Pten gene. Should patients take it? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Kolata Tags: Breast Cancer Genetics and Heredity Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Clinical Trials Dietary Supplements and Herbal Remedies Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center Boston Children ' s Hospital Science (Journal) Source Type: news

UC Davis features micropublications
microPublication.org publishes brief, novel findings, negative and/or reproduced results, and results which may lack a broader scientific narrative. Each article is peer reviewed and assigned a DOI. Included data is curated and, upon publication, deposited in third party referential databases (when available). Recently UC Davis featured an article, ‘Small Science Snippets: Micropubs Help Share Discoveries‘ about how one of their researchers used a micropublication to publish their results. Micropublish your results today! (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - May 17, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication community external website news micropublication Source Type: news

Clinical trial at IU School of Medicine improves treatment of genetic rickets
(Indiana University) A new study shows a drug developed in conjuction with investigators at Indiana University School of Medicine to alleviate symptoms of a rare musculoskeletal condition is significantly more effective than conventional therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Owning a dog is influenced by our genetic make-up
(Uppsala University) A team of Swedish and British scientists have studied the heritability of dog ownership using information from 35,035 twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry. The new study suggests that genetic variation explains more than half of the variation in dog ownership, implying that the choice of getting a dog is heavily influenced by an individual's genetic make-up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genomic Data Carve A New Path For Consumers, Clinical Trials
Genetic testing has changed drastically over the past decade with improvements to technology, turn-around-time, and scope of tests available. Millions of people have had genetic testing and mountains of baseline data now exist. Using these data effectively is the next challenge in front of us. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 16, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellen Matloff, Contributor Source Type: news

Cystic fibrosis scandal: Little Eve makes 65 roses in plea for life-saving drugs
A TODDLER with cystic fibrosis will deliver a bunch of 65 roses to Prime Minister Theresa May today, to plead for life-saving drugs to be available on the NHS. Eve Jones, one, was born with the cruel, deteriorating genetic condition, but wonder drug Orkambi could add decades to her life. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Latest T-Cell Study Opens for Mesothelioma Patients
Sarah Cannon Research Institute in Nashville, Tennessee, and MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston have opened a much-anticipated clinical trial involving a novel T-cell therapy for patients with mesothelioma. The two institutions are establishing dosage levels and measuring efficacy of TC-210, a type of immunotherapy that targets mesothelin, a cell surface protein highly expressed in several cancers. The study also is open to patients with certain types of bile duct, ovarian and non-small cell lung cancer. Participation is based upon individual levels of mesothelin expression. Researchers at the two centers are hoping to ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 16, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news