Late Pleistocene exploration and settlement of the Americas by modern humans
North and South America were the last continents to be explored and settled by modern humans at the end of the Pleistocene. Genetic data, derived from contemporary populations and ancient individuals, show that the first Americans originated from Asia and after several population splits moved south of the continental ice sheets that covered Canada sometime between ~17.5 and ~14.6 thousand years (ka) ago. Archaeological evidence shows that geographically dispersed populations lived successfully, using biface, blade, and osseous technologies, in multiple places in North and South America between ~15.5 and ~14 ka ago. Regiona...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Waters, M. R. Tags: Anthropology, Online Only review Source Type: news

Protein interaction networks revealed by proteome coevolution
Residue-residue coevolution has been observed across a number of protein-protein interfaces, but the extent of residue coevolution between protein families on the whole-proteome scale has not been systematically studied. We investigate coevolution between 5.4 million pairs of proteins in Escherichia coli and between 3.9 millions pairs in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We find strong coevolution for binary complexes involved in metabolism and weaker coevolution for larger complexes playing roles in genetic information processing. We take advantage of this coevolution, in combination with structure modeling, to predict protein-...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cong, Q., Anishchenko, I., Ovchinnikov, S., Baker, D. Tags: Biochemistry reports Source Type: news

Ancient cattle genomics, origins, and rapid turnover in the Fertile Crescent
Genome-wide analysis of 67 ancient Near Eastern cattle, Bos taurus, remains reveals regional variation that has since been obscured by admixture in modern populations. Comparisons of genomes of early domestic cattle to their aurochs progenitors identify diverse origins with separate introgressions of wild stock. A later region-wide Bronze Age shift indicates rapid and widespread introgression of zebu, Bos indicus, from the Indus Valley. This process was likely stimulated at the onset of the current geological age, ~4.2 thousand years ago, by a widespread multicentury drought. In contrast to genome-wide admixture, mitochond...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Verdugo, M. P., Mullin, V. E., Scheu, A., Mattiangeli, V., Daly, K. G., Maisano Delser, P., Hare, A. J., Burger, J., Collins, M. J., Kehati, R., Hesse, P., Fulton, D., Sauer, E. W., Mohaseb, F. A., Davoudi, H., Khazaeli, R., Lhuillier, J., Rapin, C., Ebra Tags: Anthropology, Genetics reports Source Type: news

How cow genomes have moo-ved
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics twis Source Type: news

A near-fatal Valley Fever case opens doors to new treatment method
Of the 8,000 Californians who will contract Valley Fever this year, most will recover without treatment, and those with more serious cases will require an antifungal medication that clears the infection. But a few will experience a life-threatening form of the disease that ravages the body for reasons unknown.Now, an experimental treatment used by physicians atUCLA Mattel Children ’s Hospital that cured a 4-year-old boy may provide an explanation — and a method for manipulating the immune system to combat not just Valley Fever, but a host of infections.In February 2018, the Gonzalez-Martinez family traveled 200...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Biotech rockstars snag top posts at fast-growing Peninsula company
A fast-growing Peninsula genetic diseases drug developer has signed up a trio of biotech rock stars with r ésumés crisscrossing Genentech Inc., 23andMe Inc., UCSF and high-profile Bay Area startups. Richard Scheller, Frank McCormick and Charles Homcy have joined BridgeBio Pharma Inc. (NASDAQ: BBIO) over the past six months, as the Palo Alto company moves a series of experimental drugs focused on genet ic diseases through clinical trials. BridgeBio last month grossed at least $348 million through… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 10, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Biotech rockstars snag top posts at fast-growing Peninsula company
A fast-growing Peninsula genetic diseases drug developer has signed up a trio of biotech rock stars with r ésumés crisscrossing Genentech Inc., 23andMe Inc., UCSF and high-profile Bay Area startups. Richard Scheller, Frank McCormick and Charles Homcy have joined BridgeBio Pharma Inc. (NASDAQ: BBIO) over the past six months, as the Palo Alto company moves a series of experimental drugs focused on genet ic diseases through clinical trials. BridgeBio last month grossed at least $348 million through… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 10, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Parents of son diagnosed with crippling disease fight for mandatory genetic screening
Shane Philipps, 17 months, from Haddon Heights, New Jersey, was diagnosed at 10 months, with Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a disease which weakens the physical muscles. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Impaired learning linked to family history of Alzheimer's
(eLife) Adults with a first-degree relative with Alzheimer's disease perform more poorly on online paired-learning tasks than adults without such a family history, and this impairment appears to be exacerbated by having diabetes or a genetic variation in the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene linked to the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Epic research endeavor reveals cause of deadly digestive disease in children
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Nearly 10 years ago, a group of Israeli clinical researchers emailed Berkeley Lab geneticist Len Pennacchio to ask for his team's help in solving the mystery of a rare inherited disease that caused extreme, and sometimes fatal, chronic diarrhea in children. Now, following an arduous investigative odyssey that expanded our understanding of regulatory sequences in the human genome, the multinational scientific group has announced the discovery of the genetic explanation for this disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change
(Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg) A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. It has been bred by a research team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), which crossed a common variety with various types of wild barley. The researchers then planted the new lines of barley in five very different locations around the world, observed the growth of the plants and analysed their genetic make-up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic breakthrough in cereal crops could help improve yields worldwide
(Clemson University) A team of Clemson University scientists has achieved a breakthrough in the genetics of senescence in cereal crops with the potential to dramatically impact the future of food security in the era of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 10, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MyHeritage Launches Health-Related Genetic Test, Ignites Debate
Its screen for selected variants of some disease-linked genes gives customers an incomplete picture of their risk - do they know? (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 9, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Environment May Be Main Factor in Norway ’ s Obesity Epidemic
Rise in obesity since 1960s seen in both genetically predisposed, nonpredisposed people (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - July 9, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Journal, Source Type: news

Developmental Biologist Suzanne Eaton Found Dead in Greece
Eaton studied morphology and growth during development at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 9, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

BioMarin Appoints Pharmaceutical Veteran and Former J and J Executive, Liz McKee Anderson, to Board of Directors
SAN RAFAEL, Calif., July 9, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- BioMarin Pharmaceutical Inc. (Nasdaq:BMRN), a global leader in providing therapies for rare genetic diseases, today announced the appointment of pharmaceutical veteran and forme... Biopharmaceuticals, Personnel BioMarin Pharmaceutical, valoctocogene roxaparvovec, hemophilia A, gene therapy (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - July 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Girl born with no IRISES in her eyes, has to wear sunglasses to protect her from blinding sunlight
Rhiannon Kay, from Norfolk, doesn't have the coloured part of the eye, which is what helps the pupil control the amount of light entering the eye. It's caused by a rare genetic condition called aniridia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Environment May Be Main Factor in Norway's Obesity Epidemic
TUESDAY, July 9, 2019 -- Environment most likely remains the main contributor to the obesity epidemic in Norway, given that body mass index (BMI) has increased for both genetically predisposed and nonpredisposed people since the 1960s, according to... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 9, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Google attacks health, nutrition and organics, but supports Antifa terrorism and violence
(Natural News) If the world’s most well-known search engine platform ever gets its ways, everyone on the planet will identify as LGBTQ; consume only genetically-modified (GMO) fake food; use 5G “smart” phones everywhere they go; and wear face masks while violently attacking conservatives in the streets. This would appear to be Google’s far-left agenda for... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial for new anti-obesity drug ready to launch at University of Alberta
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) The Alberta Diabetes Institute will host a new clinical trial for an anti-obesity drug targeting people with rare genetic conditions that contribute to their obesity. Led by Andrea Haqq, clinical scientist at the ADI and associate professor in the University of Alberta's Department of Pediatrics, the drug trial will also be tied to a genetic study already underway attempting to create a more comprehensive picture of the genes that are linked to obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thorsten Hoppe to present at the 6th Ageing Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Thorsten Hoppe, Ph.D., Head of the Research Laboratory on Ageing at the CECAD and Institute for Genetics, to present at the 6th Ageing Research for Drug Discovery Forum in Basel, Switzerland (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diversity enhances genomic analyses
By exploring the genomes of non-European people, researchers identified new genetic variants associated with conditions like kidney disease and diabetes. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - July 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The L-type amino acid transporter LAT1 inhibits osteoclastogenesis and maintains bone homeostasis through the mTORC1 pathway
L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), which is encoded by solute carrier transporter 7a5 (Slc7a5), plays a crucial role in amino acid sensing and signaling in specific cell types, contributing to the pathogenesis of cancer and neurological disorders. Amino acid substrates of LAT1 have a beneficial effect on bone health directly and indirectly, suggesting a potential role for LAT1 in bone homeostasis. Here, we identified LAT1 in osteoclasts as important for bone homeostasis. Slc7a5 expression was substantially reduced in osteoclasts in a mouse model of ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis. The osteoclast-specific deletion of ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - July 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ozaki, K., Yamada, T., Horie, T., Ishizaki, A., Hiraiwa, M., Iezaki, T., Park, G., Fukasawa, K., Kamada, H., Tokumura, K., Motono, M., Kaneda, K., Ogawa, K., Ochi, H., Sato, S., Kobayashi, Y., Shi, Y.-B., Taylor, P. M., Hinoi, E. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Similarities of small cell cancers to blood cancers could lead to better treatments
An interdisciplinary team of UCLA scientists has found that small cell neuroendocrine cancers from a range of tissues have a common molecular signature and share drug sensitivities with blood cancers. The discoveries could improve the diagnoses of these aggressive cancers and lead to the development of new treatments that build upon the lessons learned from successful blood cancer therapies.The study, led by senior authors  Thomas Graeber and Dr. Owen Witte,  both of the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research and Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 8, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Type 1 diabetes misdiagnosis in one third of patients
Genetic testing is recommended to avoid misdiagnosis of type 1 diabetes in new research published in theJournal of Clinical Investigation.Medscape (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - July 8, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Broad Institute ’s New $50 Genetic Test Could Predict a Person’s Risk for Obesity from Birth through Adulthood
With nearly 40% of American adults considered obese, a ‘polygenic score for obesity’ could be a positive development for clinical laboratories Obesity often is stigmatized as a condition blamed solely on lifestyle choices and overeating. But is that true for all people? Now, a polygenic score for obesity developed by the Broad Institute may enable […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - July 8, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Pathology Source Type: news

First proof-of-concept demonstrates genetic sex selection in mammals
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) A new Tel Aviv University study reveals a genetic system in mammals that enables two animals to mate and produce only females. A similar system based on identical principles would produce only males. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does genetic testing pose psychosocial risks?
(The Hastings Center) For the last quarter century, researchers have been asking whether genetic information might have negative psychosocial effects. Anxiety, depression, disrupted relationships, and heightened stigmatization have all been posited as possible outcomes--but not consistently found. What accounts for the discrepancy? A new special report published by The Hastings Center explores this question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Key early steps for origin of life occur under a variety of conditions
(Penn State) Potential precursors to life on Earth form from a variety of complex mixtures, according to a team of scientists who say this could point to the development of building blocks crucial to forming genetic molecules for the origins of life on Earth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UTA researchers identify genetic pathway that could enhance survival of coral
(University of Texas at Arlington) Three researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have made a groundbreaking discovery that could enhance the ability of reef-building corals to survive a rapidly warming and disease-filled ocean. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UBC scientists find high mutation rates within huge, old-growth trees
(University of British Columbia) UBC scientists found the first evidence of the tremendous genetic variation that can accumulate in some of our tallest trees. They found that an old-growth Sitka spruce could have up to 100,000 genetic differences in DNA sequence between the base of the tree and the tip of the crown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tracing the roots: Mapping a vegetable family tree for better food
(University of Missouri-Columbia) In the new study, a team of multi-institution scientists led by the University of Missouri challenged prior theories of the origins of three vegetables -- canola, rutabaga and Siberian kale -- by mapping the genetic family tree of these leafy greens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Treatment target pinpointed for liver cancer in teens and young adults
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) New findings show how a genetically aberrant, fused protein molecule, created by a liver cell mutation, promotes a rare, difficult to treat, cancer in young people. By screening several drug combinations, researchers found a set that targeted both the fused protein and the enzymes that it recruits. In the lab, this mix of drugs slowed down uncontrolled growth of mouse cells engineered to carry the cancer-causing mutation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cardiologist Eric Topol: 'AI can restore the care in healthcare'
The doctor, geneticist and author talks about his new book on the future of our relationship with medicineEric Topol is an American cardiologist and geneticist – among his many roles he is founder and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in California. He has previously published two books on the potential for big data and tech to transform medicine, with his third,Deep Medicine, looking at the role that artificial intelligence might play. He has served on the advisory boards of many healthcare companies, and last year published a report into how the NHS needs to change if it is to embrace digital...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Technology Health, mind and body books Science and nature books Culture Source Type: news

Child maltreatment and adult sexual assault victimization: genetic and environmental associations - Pezzoli P, Antfolk J, Kronlund E, Santtila P.
Despite the pervasiveness of adult sexual assault (ASA), evidence-based knowledge on the risk factors for sexual victimization is insufficient. Here, we investigated the etiology of ASA in a population-based Finnish twin sample. Specifically, we estimated ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Some With Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed; Call for Genetic Screening Some With Type 1 Diabetes Misdiagnosed; Call for Genetic Screening
An in-depth study of Joslin Medalists suggests some thought to have had type 1 diabetes for 50 years may have been misdiagnosed and may be able to come off insulin and take oral glucose lowering drugs instead.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - July 5, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

NIH scientists link genetics to risk of high blood pressure among blacks
Study team identified 17 variants in the ARMC5 gene that were associated with high blood pressure by analyzing genetic research databases that include those of African descent. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - July 5, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Are Paint Fumes a Health Concern? Here ’s What the Latest Science Says
If you’re one of the many homeowners considering using this summer to repaint your house or apartment, you might have been concerned to hear that, according to a just-published study in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine, women exposed to common paint chemicals at work are more likely to have a child with autism spectrum disorder. Further, the greater the exposure, the greater the autism risk, the study found. These risks remained even after the researchers adjusted their data to account for other potential autism factors, such as a woman’s smoking history, alcohol habits, and age at the time...
Source: TIME: Health - July 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Russian scientist plans to use controversial DNA editing to stop babies inheriting deafness
Denis Rebrikov, a biologist working in Moscow, said he thinks he can use CRISPR gene editing to repair the DNA of babies born to couples who both carry genetic defects which cause deafness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cross Section: Giles Yeo – Science Weekly podcast
Why do some of us pile on the pounds, while others seem to get away with it?Hannah Devlin speaks toDr Giles Yeo about some of the latest findings from the field of obesity research – fromthe role of our genes and how heritable our weight is, tohow, as a society, we ’ve become overweight and what we can do about it.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Hannah Devlin and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Obesity Society Health Genetics Source Type: news

Canine companion helps man with rare genetic disorder that leaves him confined to a wheelchair
Matthew Lafleur, 33, from Opelousas, Louisiana, was diagnosed with Friedreich's Ataxia when he was 11 years old. He now gets around with the help of his new service dog named Zeego. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How a unique gene mutation may drive autism
Working with animal models and analyzing human genetic information, researchers discover how one gene may be key to the development of autism. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Autism Source Type: news

Genetics interact with environment to increase BMI across population
Prevention strategies could be especially helpful for people with a genetic predisposition to obesity – but aren’t enough Related items fromOnMedica More global deaths from poor diet than from smoking Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 WHO dietary fat guidance fails to consider crucial evidence Type 2 diabetes in 10 times more young people than realised Solid fuel cooking linked to higher respiratory death rate (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA reveals a multistep spread of the first herders into sub-Saharan Africa
We present genome-wide data from 41 individuals associated with Later Stone Age, Pastoral Neolithic (PN), and Iron Age contexts in what are now Kenya and Tanzania to examine the genetic impacts of the spreads of herding and farming. Our results support a multiphase model in which admixture between northeastern African–related peoples and eastern African foragers formed multiple pastoralist groups, including a genetically homogeneous PN cluster. Additional admixture with northeastern and western African–related groups occurred by the Iron Age. These findings support several movements of food producers while reje...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Prendergast, M. E., Lipson, M., Sawchuk, E. A., Olalde, I., Ogola, C. A., Rohland, N., Sirak, K. A., Adamski, N., Bernardos, R., Broomandkhoshbacht, N., Callan, K., Culleton, B. J., Eccles, L., Harper, T. K., Lawson, A. M., Mah, M., Oppenheimer, J., Stewa Tags: Anthropology, Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structured spike series specify gene expression patterns for olfactory circuit formation
Neural circuits emerge through the interplay of genetic programming and activity-dependent processes. During the development of the mouse olfactory map, axons segregate into distinct glomeruli in an olfactory receptor (OR)–dependent manner. ORs generate a combinatorial code of axon-sorting molecules whose expression is regulated by neural activity. However, it remains unclear how neural activity induces OR-specific expression patterns of axon-sorting molecules. We found that the temporal patterns of spontaneous neuronal spikes were not spatially organized but were correlated with the OR types. Receptor substitution e...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nakashima, A., Ihara, N., Shigeta, M., Kiyonari, H., Ikegaya, Y., Takeuchi, H. Tags: Development, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Regulating genetic biohacking
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zettler, P. J., Guerrini, C. J., Sherkow, J. S. Tags: Scientific Community, Science and Policy p-forum Source Type: news

A glycine-specific N-degron pathway mediates the quality control of protein N-myristoylation
The N-terminal residue influences protein stability through N-degron pathways. We used stability profiling of the human N-terminome to uncover multiple additional features of N-degron pathways. In addition to uncovering extended specificities of UBR E3 ligases, we characterized two related Cullin-RING E3 ligase complexes, Cul2ZYG11B and Cul2ZER1, that act redundantly to target N-terminal glycine. N-terminal glycine degrons are depleted at native N-termini but strongly enriched at caspase cleavage sites, suggesting roles for the substrate adaptors ZYG11B and ZER1 in protein degradation during apoptosis. Furthermore, ZYG11B ...
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Timms, R. T., Zhang, Z., Rhee, D. Y., Harper, J. W., Koren, I., Elledge, S. J. Tags: Genetics, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

East African genetics and pastoralism
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Anthropology, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Glycine N-degron regulation revealed
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Genetics, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

CRISPR patent fight revived
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - July 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. Tags: Genetics, Scientific Community In Depth Source Type: news