Matter: In This Doctor ’ s Office, a Physical Exam Like No Other
Genetic and molecular analysis of 109 volunteers turned up hidden health problems in about half of them. Critics say the approach amounted to ‘ carpet-bombing ’ the body. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Medicine and Health Proteins Blood Doctors Source Type: news

Fish catch color with rods
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Vignieri, S. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Wnt signaling out on a limb
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Genetics, Immunology twis Source Type: news

Genomics breeds new legal questions
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Couzin-Frankel, J. Tags: Genetics, Scientific Community, Science and Policy In Depth Source Type: news

Vision using multiple distinct rod opsins in deep-sea fishes
Vertebrate vision is accomplished through light-sensitive photopigments consisting of an opsin protein bound to a chromophore. In dim light, vertebrates generally rely on a single rod opsin [rhodopsin 1 (RH1)] for obtaining visual information. By inspecting 101 fish genomes, we found that three deep-sea teleost lineages have independently expanded their RH1 gene repertoires. Among these, the silver spinyfin (Diretmus argenteus) stands out as having the highest number of visual opsins in vertebrates (two cone opsins and 38 rod opsins). Spinyfins express up to 14 RH1s (including the most blueshifted rod photopigments known),...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Musilova, Z., Cortesi, F., Matschiner, M., Davies, W. I. L., Patel, J. S., Stieb, S. M., de Busserolles, F., Malmstrom, M., Torresen, O. K., Brown, C. J., Mountford, J. K., Hanel, R., Stenkamp, D. L., Jakobsen, K. S., Carleton, K. L., Jentoft, S., Marshal Tags: Evolution, Genetics reports Source Type: news

LMBR1L regulates lymphopoiesis through Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling
In this study, we detected severely impaired development of all lymphoid lineages in mice, resulting from an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–induced mutation in the limb region 1–like gene (Lmbr1l), which encodes a membrane-spanning protein with no previously described function in immunity. The interaction of LMBR1L with glycoprotein 78 (GP78) and ubiquitin-associated domain–containing protein 2 (UBAC2) attenuated Wnt signaling in lymphocytes by preventing the maturation of FZD6 and LRP6 through ubiquitination within the endoplasmic reticulum and by stabilizing "destruction complex" proteins. LMBR1L-defic...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Choi, J. H., Zhong, X., McAlpine, W., Liao, T.-C., Zhang, D., Fang, B., Russell, J., Ludwig, S., Nair-Gill, E., Zhang, Z., Wang, K.-w., Misawa, T., Zhan, X., Choi, M., Wang, T., Li, X., Tang, M., Sun, Q., Yu, L., Murray, A. R., Moresco, E. M. Y., Beutler, Tags: Genetics, Immunology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

SGD turns 25!
25 years ago the SGD (The Saccharomyces Genome Database) went online.  Happy Birthday SGD! SGD provides comprehensive integrated biological information for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae along with search and analysis tools to explore these data, enabling the discovery of functional relationships between sequence and gene products in fungi and higher organisms. SGD collaborates with WormBase on several database-related projects including the Alliance of Genome Resources.  Check it out! (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - May 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication external website news Alliance of Genome Resources SGD Source Type: news

Teenager recovers from near death in world-first GM virus treatment
Bacteria-killing viruses known as phages offer hope of solution to antibiotic resistanceA British teenager has made a remarkable recovery after being the first patient in the world to be given a genetically engineered virus to treat a drug-resistant infection.Isabelle Holdaway, 17, nearly died after a lung transplant left her with an intractable infection that could not be cleared with antibiotics. After a nine-month stay at Great Ormond Street hospital, she returned to her home in Kent for palliative care, but recovered after her consultant teamed up with a US laboratory to develop the experimental therapy.Continue readin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Antibiotics Science Society UK news Health Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection
Treatment with genetically altered bacteriophages — viruses that attack bacteria — may have halted a patient's near-fatal infection, hinting at new ways to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria.(Image credit: Courtesy of Jo Holdaway) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Viral Cocktail Treats Deadly Bacteria in Teen
Tweaking the genomes of two phages and combining them with a third phage helped to clear a persistent Mycobacterium infection in the patient. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News Source Type: news

Genetically Modified Viral Cocktail Treats Deadly Bacteria in Teen
Tweaking the genomes of two phages and combining them with a third phage helped to clear a persistent Mycobacterium infection in the patient. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 8, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Short WormBase downtime yesterday
WormBase went down at 2.54pm ET yesterday. The problem was caused ironically by a fault recovery mechanism that was introduced recently. The fault recovery mechanism takes faulty servers out of service and replaces them with healthy ones. The process involves two components:the detection of faulty servers and the creation of new ones. Two simultaneous problems in the two components lead to the failure. A false positive in detecting the faulty server caused the sever to be taken out of service, and a missing hard drive snapshot caused the failure to start new servers. To avoid such future occurrences we are looking into way...
Source: WormBase - May 8, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication news Source Type: news

Novartis confident of Zolgensma supply, calls $2 million price 'speculation'
Novartis is confident it has adequate production capacity for its Zolgensma gene therapy should regulators this month approve the drug for multiple forms of the genetic disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the Swiss drugmaker said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Intelligence can link to health and aging
(University of Missouri-Columbia) For over 100 years, scientists have sought to understand what links a person's general intelligence, health and aging. In a new study, a University of Missouri scientist suggests a model where mitochondria, or small energy producing parts of cells, could form the basis of this link. This insight could provide valuable information to researchers studying various genetic and environmental influences and alternative therapies for age-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Analysis of historical specimens determines single origin of Australian potato pest
(American Phytopathological Society) In a recently published study, Jacqueline Edwards and colleagues used the PCN cyst reference collection held by Crop Health Services, Agriculture Victoria, to examine the genetic variability of Victorian PCN populations. They discovered very little differentiation between the distinct PCN populations, suggesting a single localized introduction into Victoria followed by limited spread to nearby areas. They also discovered that Australian PCN appears genetically distinct from previous populations sampled worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The secrets of secretion: isolating eucalyptus genes for oils, biofuel
(Michigan Technological University) Close genetic analysis of 480 blue mallee eucalyptus plants provides clues to modify cultivars for greater yield, whether for essential oils or jet fuel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New chapter in WormBook, GENETICS, on sensing of physical stimuli in C. elegans
Check out the new chapter in WormBook, GENETICS–‘How Caenorhabditis elegans Senses Mechanical Stress, Temperature, and Other Physical Stimuli‘ by Miriam Goodman and Piali Sengupta. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - May 7, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication external website news paper of interest wormbook Source Type: news

Brother, 18, and sister, 14, receive life-saving kidney transplants from same donor on same day
Ava Shepperd 14, and her brother John Ben, 18, were both diagnosed with a rare, genetic disorder called cystinosis that caused an amino acid to buildup in the body and damages organs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eight-month-old boy is first in California to be diagnosed with rare, genetic disorder with no cure
JT Borofka, eight months of Salinas, California, was diagnosed with TPI, a rare genetic disorder due to a shortage of red blood cells that results in death from complications such a respiratory failure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene-editing startup backed by Google Ventures raises $58M
Google Ventures-backed Verve Therapeutics — which has its headquarters in Cambridge, Mass, and reserarch labs at the Pennovation Center in West Philadelphia — raised $58 million. The company is focused on using gene editing to treat and prevent heart disease. Among Verve’s co-founders are Dr. Kiran Musunuru, an associate professor o f cardiovascular medicine and genetics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Musunuru is serving as Verve’s scientific advisor.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 7, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: John George Source Type: news

Want to know what's happening with your health in real time? This Boulder company seeks to do just that.
The company will have to convince customers that they don ’t need a genetics test, they need a protein-based one. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 7, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Jensen Werley Source Type: news

One in five men has a gene that makes prostate cancer more deadly
Up to one in five men with prostate cancer may have a genetic quirk which worsens their chances of survival and makes them more likely to relapse. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccine for African swine fever may save our bacon
(Frontiers) Wild boar can be immunized against African Swine Fever by a new vaccine delivered to the animals in their food. This is the first report of a promising inoculation against this deadly disease, which is a worldwide threat to the swine industry. The study shows immunity can be passed on via contact, but further studies need to examine how this occurs, the safety of repeated administration and its genetic stability as it is passed on. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Climate change -- early spring: Predicting budburst with genetics
(University of Montreal) Tree and shrub genetics can be used to produce more accurate predictions of when leaves will burst bud in the spring, according to a Canada-US study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents at elevated risk for engaging in polysubstance use
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) In a new study among adolescents in the United States, lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents were more likely than heterosexual adolescents to be polysubstance users versus non-users across multiple classes of use: experimental users, marijuana-alcohol users, tobacco-alcohol users, medium-frequency three-substance users, and high-frequency three-substance users. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart Problems Are Killing More Americans —Even Younger Ones. Here’s How to Reduce Your Risk
The heart health of younger Americans may be declining, even after years of medical progress. Heart disease is, and has for years been, the leading cause of death among American men and women. But for decades, medical and therapeutic advances were enough to drive down cardiovascular death rates. More recently, however, that progress has stalled and the trend has begun to reverse, with certain populations seeing rising rates of some heart issues. In a new research letter published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, which was based on national death certificate data, researchers charted an increase in hear...
Source: TIME: Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Researchers Use Genetics To Understand Why Many People Love Coffee, Beer
BOSTON (CBS) — Why is it that some people love beer and coffee while others prefer soda? Turns out your preferences for different beverages may be determined by your genes. Researchers at Northwestern University surveyed more than 300,000 people in the United Kingdom about their drink preference. Do they prefer bitter beverages like coffee, tea, grapefruit juice, and liquor or sweet ones like soda and juice? They then examined their genes. They suspected that variations in our taste genes would determine our drink preferences, but what they found is that beverage preference has less to do with taste and more to do wi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Beverages Dr. Mallika Marshall drinking alcohol Source Type: news

Killifish Survive Polluted Waters Thanks to Genes from Another Fish
Gulf killifish have made a stunning comeback in Houston with the help of genetic mutations imported from interspecies mating with Atlantic killifish. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

I grew up eating turkey dinosaurs and tinned spaghetti. Have my kids paid a genetic price?
Some families hand down money to the next generation; others bequeath fat. Guess which mine didMy nana once said: “You can never be too rich or too thin.” I don’t think she’ll mind me saying that she’s never been too much of either. Nevertheless, her sage words have become something of a family motto, so we decided to have them written in Latin beneath our heraldic crest (a pair of hair-straighteners mantling a brimming ashtray, leopard-skin shield). Unfortunately none of us can read Latin, so the translation turns out to be something like: “The rich man is either too thin or too much, n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Charlotte Church Tags: Genetics Poverty Diets and dieting Class issues Source Type: news

I grew up eating turkey dinosaurs and tinned spaghetti. Have my kids paid a genetic price? | Charlotte Church
Some families hand down money to the next generation; others bequeath fat. Guess which mine didMy nana once said: “You can never be too rich or too thin.” I don’t think she’ll mind me saying that she’s never been too much of either. Nevertheless, her sage words have become something of a family motto, so we decided to have them written in Latin beneath our heraldic crest (a pair of hair-straighteners mantling a brimming ashtray, leopard-skin shield). Unfortunately none of us can read Latin, so the translation turns out to be something like: “The rich man is either too thin or too much, n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Charlotte Church Tags: Genetics Poverty Diets and dieting Class issues Source Type: news

New disease discovered by CU Anschutz researchers
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A new immunodeficiency disease caused by a novel genetic mutation has been identified by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus providing unique insights into cell biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is This Sarcoidosis?
Discussion Sarcoidosis is rare and is even rarer in the pediatric age group. Sarcoidosis is seen in all ages with an estimated prevalence is 10-40/100,000 in the U.S. population. Pediatric sarcoidosis has an estimated incidence of 0.2/100,000 per year. For the pediatric age range it is more likely from 9-15 years of age. In adults it commonly presents between 20-39 years but bimodal distribution is also reported. Women are more likely to have sarcoidosis than men. African American females have the highest risk, and usually present slightly older, especially in the 4th decade of life. African American women are also more li...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 6, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Brothers have the same deadly disease but only 1 gets what their parents hope is life-saving treatment
Two young brothers, both with a deadly genetic disease, could face two very different futures because only one has access to cutting-edge medication. Health advocates blame Canada's broken drug evaluation and funding system, which leaves many patients without access to the medication they need. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Identification of gene ontology and pathways implicated in suicide behavior: systematic review and enrichment analysis of GWAS studies - Gonz ález-Castro TB, Tovilla-Zárate CA, Genis-Mendoza AD, Juárez-Rojop IE, Nicolini H, López-Narváez ML, Martínez-Magaña JJ.
Multiple large-scale studies such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed to identify genetic contributors to suicidal behaviors (SB). We aimed to summarize and analyze the information obtained in SB GWAS, to explore the biological pr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Genetic test solves mystery of family bleeding disorder
The Riggs family had a bleeding disorder that spanned three generations and affected the health of multiple family members. They never knew the cause of it, the long term risks associated with it, or the impact it may have on future generations -- until a genetic test revealed the answer. Finding the clues to the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - May 4, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

You Will Never Smell My World the Way I Do
Scientists find that whiskey ’ s smokiness, the smell of beets and lily of the valley perfume can be utterly different depending on your genetic wiring. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: HEATHER MURPHY Tags: Smell (Olfaction) Genetics and Heredity Vegetables Perfumes and Fragrances Whiskey Source Type: news

Caster Semenya: a questionable ruling and a worrying precedent | Letters
The ruling against Caster Semenya is discriminatory, arguesMalcolm Ferguson-Smith, whileJane Singer says it breaches the founding spirit of the Olympics.Sarah Mulholland fears for the futureIt is far from clear that testosterone is responsible for the athletic success of Caster Semenya and Dutee Chand (Caster Semenya loses testosterone legal case but may launch new appeal, 2 May). They are elite female athletes whose high level of testosterone is genetic and due to failure of the tissues to respond to testosterone secreted by the testes. Therefore treatment to reduce testosterone is unlikely to affect their condition, alth...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Caster Semenya Sport Athletics Olympic Games Sport politics Gender Genetics Biology Science IAAF Women Source Type: news

New Study From Invitae Highlights the Importance of Multigene Genetic Testing for Uterine Cancer Patients
Results from one of the largest datasets in uterine cancer presented at The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting SAN FRANCISCO, May 3, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Resear... Diagnostics, Oncology Invitae Corp, precision medicine, uterine cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What the wheat genome tells us about wars
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) First they mapped the genome of wheat; now they have reconstructed its breeding history. Joining forces with other European researchers, scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen have examined the genetic diversity of wheat varieties in the WHEALBI study. By doing so, they discovered which cereals our ancestors cultivated, where today's wheat comes from, and what the Cold War has to do with it all. The results were recently published in the journal Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Experimental Agent Shows Promise in Slowing Genetic Form of ALS Experimental Agent Shows Promise in Slowing Genetic Form of ALS
Researchers successfully target elevated levels of a harmful protein, offering hope to people with a genetic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - May 3, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Fast-Paced Compelling Topics at Atlantic Pulse: The Atlantic Summit on Health Care, Boston
by Deb Gordon, Janice McCallum, Danny Sands On Tuesday, April 30, a roomful of health care insiders enjoyed a series of rapid-fire, TED-esque talks, interviews, and panels by leading health care voices at The Atlantic Summit on Health Care (#AtlanticPulse). Several SPM members attended the forum, and we reflected on the most salient themes we took away. Time’s Up, health care! The power and value of diversity was on display throughout the day, as was evidence that health care has a long way to go before the professionals in Esther Choo and Janice McCallum the field reflect the full heterogeneity of American patient...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - May 2, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danny Sands, MD Tags: General Source Type: news

Why Making A 'Designer Baby' Would Be Easier Said Than Done
Ethical concerns aside, the genetic ingredients for human traits are so complex that editing a few embryonic genes is unlikely to have much effect — or achieve the fantasy of enhancing humans.(Image credit: BlackJack3D/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Spring GEMS meeting focuses on mechanisms
Risks of e-cigs and vaping, role of oxidative stress in cancer, and more were featured by the Genetics and Environmental Mutagenesis Society. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - May 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

'Hacking Darwin' Explores Genetic Engineering — And What It Means To Be Human
The waters of genetic meddling are murky; in a new book, technology futurist Jamie Metzl reviews where we've been in the past as a guideline for where we might be headed.(Image credit: Sourcebooks) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marcelo Gleiser Source Type: news

One Regeneron drug, billions in sales, millions in salaries
That's the sales revenue for blockbuster eye drug Eylea in 2018, according Regeneron's annual report, released earlier this year. We've written plenty over the years about the manufacturer's growth from a few hundred people in Rensselaer County to more than 2,600 — with more on the way. Eylea, used to treat macular degeneration, has become the company's flagship product, and is one of the best-selling drugs in the world. A list produced by industry publication Genetic Engineering& Biotechnology … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 2, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Todd Kehoe Source Type: news

Researchers find gene for urethral obstruction
(University of Bonn) Even before birth, an obstructed urethra can cause a variety of issues in the unborn child, ranging from mild urinary problems to kidney failure. This highly variable disease is called LUTO (lower urinary tract obstruction). Especially boys are affected. An international team of researchers led by the University of Bonn has now discovered a first gene involved in this rare disease. The results are now published in the " American Journal of Human Genetics " . (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Make room on the couch: Worms suffer from PTSD, too
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Dr. Alon Zaslaver at Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Genetics Department discovered that even a very basic animal life form like the C. elegans worm has the ability to learn from past experiences. Further, Zaslaver and his team pinpointed the exact neurons that store these memories and the physiological changes the worms undergo when they retrieve memories to cope with future hardships. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers crack the peanut genome
(University of Georgia) Working to understand the genetics of peanut disease resistance and yield, researchers led by scientists at the University of Georgia have uncovered the peanut's unlikely and complicated evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study reveals link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria
(Cornell University) A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations. People with a high number of copies of a gene called AMY1, which expresses a salivary enzyme for breaking down starch, correlated strongly with a certain profile of gut and mouth bacteria, according to a new Cornell University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA geneticist Dr. Jonathan Flint named to Royal Society of London
Psychiatrist Dr. Jonathan Flint has been named a fellow of the Royal Society, an academy that includes some of the world ’s most eminent scientists. He is among 51 scientists named as a fellow of the Royal Society in 2019.Flint is a professor-in-residence of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and a senior scientist at the Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics at the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. A world-renowned expert in the genetic determinants of depression, the U.K.-born Flint is part of the executive team of theUCLA Depr...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 2, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news