Genetic variants may influence poststroke recovery
(University of Gothenburg) Our genes may have a bearing not only on our stroke risk, but probably also on how well we recover after stroke. For the first time, in international collaboration, scientists at the University of Gothenburg and elsewhere have identified common genetic variants that are associated with outcome after ischemic stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study questions value of genetic risk scores
(Wiley) What's known as the genome-wide polygenic score, or GPS, combines information from many thousands of genetic markers, each with only a minimal effect, to produce an overall assessment of disease risk based on an individual's entire genetic background. While a recent publication claimed that the GPS could be used by doctors to identify patients at high risk of conditions such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes, a new Annals of Human Genetics study casts doubt on these claims. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A key player in the maturation of sexual organs
(Friedrich Miescher Institute) Puberty is a period of extensive changes of body morphology and function. As much as we are familiar with these life-altering changes, relatively little is known about what sets the whole process in motion. Thanks to studies in the tiny worm C. elegans, the group of Helge Gro ß hans is getting closer to understanding how the onset of puberty is genetically controlled. Recently they uncovered a mechanism that initiates sexual organ maturation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In vivo data show effects of spaceflight microgravity on stem cells and tissue regeneration
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new review of data from 12 spaceflight experiments and simulated microgravity studies has shown that microgravity does not have a negative effect on stem-like cell-dependent tissue regeneration in newts, but in some tissues regeneration is faster and more robust. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NCCN: More Genetic Testing to Inform Prostate Cancer Management
Updated prostate cancer guidelines reflect the importance of tumor genetic testing and genomically-informed disease management. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 25, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

Wealth may be less to do with hard work or luck and more to do with your genes, study suggests 
An analysis of 286,000 Britons showed that the genetic make-up of those who earned over £100,000 differed from those on low incomes, a new study has suggested. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ambry Genetics to Develop Custom Assays Targeted to Patients with...
Investigating new testing options to identify patients for clinical trials.(PRWeb March 25, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/ambry_genetics_to_develop_custom_assays_targeted_to_patients_with_hereditary_ovarian_cancer/prweb16160917.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - March 25, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Genetic rickets improves more with burosumab than standard care, study finds
(The Endocrine Society) Burosumab, a new injectable medicine to treat X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), an inherited form of rickets, demonstrates superior improvements in rickets and other outcomes compared with conventional therapy in an international, phase 3 clinical trial in children. Results from what investigators called the first head-to-head study comparing the new drug with conventional treatment for this rare disease will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2019, the Endocrine Society's annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sharing Mayo Clinic: A new heart and new adventures for Elise
A lifesaving heart transplant at Mayo Clinic helped Elise Campbell break free from the physical limitations of a rare genetic heart condition she had lived with since she was 14. Now Elise is relishing the opportunity to enjoy experiences she never thought possible. Elise Campbell was 14 when doctors in her home state of Iowa [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 24, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Potentially Disruptive Medtech Company Wins FDA Nod for HF Therapy
One of the 16 promising medtech companies in the private sector, as named in a Canaccord Genuity analyst report, earlier this year, has just received approval for its heart failure therapy. Impulse Dynamics noted it nabbed a nod from FDA for the Optimizer Smart System. The Orangeburg, NY-based company’s technology delivers Cardiac Contractility Modulation (CCM). Through CGM an electrical pulse is delivered during the absolute refractory period, which is just after heart contracts. In contrast to a pacemaker or defibrillator, CCM works by modulating the strength of the heart muscle contraction rather than ...
Source: MDDI - March 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Are genetic tests useful to predict cancer?
The health secretary ’s call for tests to be rolled out on NHS was met with controversyThe health secretary, Matt Hancock, this weekshared his shock at discovering that he is at greater than average risk for prostate cancer, despite having no family history of the disease.The revelation came after he took a predictive genetic test that assesses risk for 16 common diseases, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma and breast and prostate cancers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Cancer UK news Matt Hancock NHS Health Cancer research Medical research Genetics Science Source Type: news

Important Dates for the 22nd International C. elegans Conference
The abstract submission deadline for the 22nd International C. elegans Conference is March 28th! The conference will be held June 20-24, 2019 at UCLA. For more information visit the conference website. Abstract Submission Deadline: March 28 Submit an abstract Registration Discounted early registration: April 30 Discounted advance registration: May 1 – June 17 Register for the conference Housing Reservations Deadline: May 15 Make a housing reservation (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - March 23, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Todd Harris Tags: meetings news Source Type: news

Cystic Fibrosis: How Gunnar Esiason Is Making A Difference
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a fatal and progressive genetic disorder that affects the lungs and pancreas. It results in persistent lung infections--due to production of thick mucous--which also impair the ability to breathe. I recently spoke with Gunnar Esiason, a CF advocate and patient. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robert Glatter, MD, Contributor Source Type: news

How genetic testing is changing depression treatment
Can you imagine starting a new business venture without having done research to guide your investment? You may have considered what’s worked in the past, but market forces are constantly changing. Further, what may have worked for one target audience may be completely different for another. It is why good businesses research the market, audiences, and products before introducing a new venture. That same research-based approach is now being applied to depression treatment. Traditionally, treatment… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 22, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Mark Verratti Source Type: news

Man who didn't hit puberty until he was 20 due to rare genetic disorder
Jared Gale, 38, of Utah, spent years perplexed as to why his body wasn't developing as it should be - leaving him looking 10 years old at 18 - before he was diagnosed with Kallmann Syndrome. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A social bacterium with versatile habits
(ETH Zurich) Related individuals of a soil bacterial species live in cooperative groups and exhibit astonishing genetic and behavioral diversity. ETH researchers recently published these findings in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

From body to brain and back again —how the hormone leptin utilizes brain cell circuits to regulate appetite, calorie burning, and glucose levels
Scientists have used a new genetic tool in mice to map out the cellular brain circuits used by the hormone leptin to control energy balance (calories consumed versus calories burned) and blood glucose (sugar) levels.  (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

New tool reveals insights into maturation of red blood cells
Using detailed genetic data along with a recently developed analytical tool called “population balance analysis” (PBA), investigators have developed models capable of predicting the mature blood cell type of early stage (progenitor) blood cells.  (Source: NIDDK News)
Source: NIDDK News - March 22, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Study reveals the evolution of brain tumours
New treatments needed for glioblastomas Related items fromOnMedica New targeted drug could help treat advanced cancers Brain cancer research to receive £45m funding boost Genetic risk model could guide prostate cancer screening Cancer survival rates not improved much in a decade Combined treatment works best for anal cancer (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 22, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Diversity Missing in Genetic Studies Diversity Missing in Genetic Studies
European populations are overrepresented in genetic and genomic studies, contributing to healthcare inequities.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - March 21, 2019 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

"Impossible Burger" is just THAT, because it's GMO
(Natural News) What do you get when you genetically modify soybean roots in a top secret laboratory, cram it into a new “burger” and then sell that Franken-burger as “plant-based” to a bunch of health-minded consumers? You get $250 million richer from investors who like the marketing scam of the new bloody “vegetarian” impossible burger... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: High-fat diet causes trans-generational health problems, impacting humans for generations to come
(Natural News) The human race is constantly evolving at the genetic level. Epi-genetic factors are always influencing the genetic expression within the individual. Families pass on a firm DNA sequence from parent to offspring, but certain external factors and intra-cellular activities can affect genetic expression. These phenotype alterations in gene expression can also be passed... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another Promising Alzheimer ’ s Drug Trial Ends In Failure: ‘ This One Hurts ’
(CNN) — It’s another devastating blow in the search for a treatment for patients living with Alzheimer’s disease. Pharmaceutical giant Biogen and its Japanese partner Eisai announced Thursday they were halting two phase three clinical trials of a drug that targets the buildup in the brain of beta-amyloid, one of two proteins that researchers believe contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s. The drug, called aducanumab, was the most promising candidate in a field that has been littered with failures. It was so promising that the company was running two phase three trials simultaneously, said neur...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Alzheimer's Disease CNN Source Type: news

Book Review: Borderline Bodies:  Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders
“The body,” says Clara Mucci, “is the essential go-between in the relationship between the self and other.” In personality disorders, this relationship between the self and the other is especially troubled. However, this “other” can be the body itself. Mucci describes psychosomatic disorders as an outcome of the “problematic junction between mind and body.” The body can also act as an imprinting device in which earlier generations transmit their trauma onto us. In her new book, Borderline Bodies: Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders, Mucci places the body at the...
Source: Psych Central - March 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews Disorders Family General Genetics Memory and Perception Parenting Personality Psychology Psychotherapy Relationships & Love Trauma Treatment Affect Regulation Theory for Personality Disorders Body books on somati Source Type: news

Human Genomics Research Has A Diversity Problem
Studies on the genetics of human diseases have focused largely on people of European descent. Researchers say this lack of diversity is bad science and exacerbates health inequities. (Image credit: Mint Images/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan Lambert Source Type: news

Lack of Diversity in Genetic Datasets is Risky for Treating Disease
Certain populations have been historically underrepresented in genome sequencing studies, but the NIH, private clinics, and 23andMe and other companies are trying to fix that. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Older Age at Puberty Linked to Lower Odds of Multiple Sclerosis
THURSDAY, March 21, 2019 -- Older genetically predicted age at puberty is associated with reduced odds of multiple sclerosis (MS), although the correlation seems to be dependent on body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online March... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 21, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Genetics Society of America awards 2019 Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal to Daniel Hartl
(Genetics Society of America) Daniel Hartl, PhD, of Harvard University is the recipient of the 2019 Genetics Society of America (GSA) Thomas Hunt Morgan Medal for his influential contributions to experimental and theoretical genetics research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study in mice examines impact of reused cooking oil on breast cancer progression
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) New study in mice by University of Illinois researchers finds that the compounds in thermally abused cooking oils may trigger genetic, biochemical changes that hasten the progression of late-stage breast cancer, promoting tumor cells' growth and proliferation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The evolution of brain tumors
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center found in a recent study that only three different genetic alterations drive the early development of malignant glioblastomas. At least one of these three cancer drivers was present in all tumors investigated. The tumors develop for up to seven years before they become noticeable as symptoms and are diagnosed. However, in contrast to their early development, glioblastomas, which return after therapy, share no concurrent genetic alterations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High-fructose corn syrup enhances tumor growth in a mouse model of intestinal cancer
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) In a new study, researchers have found that consumption of high-fructose corn syrup can enhance tumor growth in mice that are genetically predisposed to develop intestinal cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New mechanism identified for influenza-induced bacterial superinfections
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have described a new mechanism by which influenza A viruses (IAV) alter the host immune system and make them more or less susceptible to often deadly co-occurring bacterial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Genetic test for cognitive performance developed by Air Force
(TechLink) Genetic analysis provides objective data for recruiters filling complex jobs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health secretary wants NHS to roll out genetic tests to detect diseases
Matt Hancock hails ‘game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he was at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue reading... (Source: ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics NHS Health policy Matt Hancock & wellbeing Science Race Life and style Politics Public services policy Society Biology UK news Conservatives Source Type: news

Genetic testing ‘will save NHS time & money ’ - Hancock
Increasing numbers of worried patients will visit GPs to discuss borderline results, warns RCGP Related items fromOnMedica Doctors campaign against ‘too much medicine’ Experts urge radical action on mental health crises Wealthy tech companies creating ‘digital divide’ in health Difficult patients really are harder to diagnose Social prescribing workers to ease GP pressure (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 21, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Parallel adaptation of rabbit populations to myxoma virus
In the 1950s the myxoma virus was released into European rabbit populations in Australia and Europe, decimating populations and resulting in the rapid evolution of resistance. We investigated the genetic basis of resistance by comparing the exomes of rabbits collected before and after the pandemic. We found a strong pattern of parallel evolution, with selection on standing genetic variation favoring the same alleles in Australia, France, and the United Kingdom. Many of these changes occurred in immunity-related genes, supporting a polygenic basis of resistance. We experimentally validated the role of several genes in viral...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alves, J. M., Carneiro, M., Cheng, J. Y., Lemos de Matos, A., Rahman, M. M., Loog, L., Campos, P. F., Wales, N., Eriksson, A., Manica, A., Strive, T., Graham, S. C., Afonso, S., Bell, D. J., Belmont, L., Day, J. P., Fuller, S. J., Marchandeau, S., Palmer, Tags: Evolution, Genetics r-articles Source Type: news

Factors influencing meiotic recombination revealed by whole-genome sequencing of single sperm
We report an approach for single-cell whole-genome DNA sequencing by which we sequenced 217 individual hybrid mouse sperm, providing a kilobase-resolution genome-wide map of crossovers. Combining this map with molecular assays measuring stages of recombination, we identified factors that affect crossover probability, including PRDM9 binding on the non-initiating template homolog and telomere proximity. These factors also influence the time for sites of recombination-initiating DNA double-strand breaks to find and engage their homologs, with rapidly engaging sites more likely to form crossovers. We show that chromatin envir...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hinch, A. G., Zhang, G., Becker, P. W., Moralli, D., Hinch, R., Davies, B., Bowden, R., Donnelly, P. Tags: Genetics, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Sequencing and the single sperm
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Genetics twis Source Type: news

Locating myxomatosis resistance
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Hope for people with disease that turns tissue to BONE as three drugs enter clinical trial
Three drugs have entered clinical trials as potential therapies for those with fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva, a genetic condition that turns dasmaged tissue and muscle into bone. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists narrow in on cells that drive immune response to cancer
New research by the Yale Systems Biology Institute advances the genetic understanding of cancer cells and the science of immunotherapy treatment. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Africa: Study Taps Genes in Sewage to Track Drug Resistance
[SciDev.Net] Dar es Salaam -Studying genetic materials recovered from untreated sewerage can help identify and curb antimicrobial resistance in human populations worldwide, a study suggests. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 20, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Health secretary wants NHS to rollout genetic tests to detect diseases
Matt Hancock claims technology is ‘a game-changer’ but critics raise racial bias and ‘fatalism’ concernsThe health secretary is calling for predictive genetic tests for common cancers and heart disease to be rolled out on the NHS without delay.Matt Hancock, speaking at the Royal Society on Wednesday, revealed he recently took a commercial genetic test that showed he is at heightened risk of developing prostate cancer, saying he was shocked by the result. Hancock called for a national debate about the ethical issues around testing for diseases, some of which could not readily be treated.Continue read...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Matt Hancock NHS Science UK news Race Health Source Type: news

CRISPR/Cas libraries open new avenues in cancer research
(Goethe University Frankfurt) CRISPR/Cas enables the targeted deactivation of genes by cutting DNA at pre-determined sites. This is accomplished by providing the Cas enzyme with a genetic zip code. Using an entire library of zip codes, it is then possible to simultaneously probe multiple sites within the genome, for example to determine which genes are essential for cancer cell survival. This could revolutionize drug discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 20, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Tracing the genetic origins of insecticide resistance in malaria-transmitting mosquitoes
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Researchers have identified a single genetic alteration in a malaria-transmitting mosquito species that confers resistance to a widely used insecticide, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

As if by magic: TGen develops program that lights up cancer-causing mutations
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) By conjuring the spell 'Lumos!' wizards in the mythical world of Harry Potter could light up the tip of their magic wands and illuminate their surroundings. So, too, does LumosVar, a computer program developed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), 'light up' cancer-causing genetic Var-ients, or mutations, illuminating how physicians might best treat their patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transformation of VA to 'whole health' model featured in JACM special issue
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) As medical delivery organizations seek to meet the Triple Aim, address social determinants of health, and move from volume to value, a leading-edge effort is the 'whole health' model in the US Veterans Administration (VA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

W.H.O. Panel Demands a Registry for Human Gene Editing
The panel, established after a Chinese experiment produced embryo-edited babies, said all human genome editing research should be listed in a registry. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAM BELLUCK Tags: your-feed-science Genetics and Heredity Genetic Engineering Research World Health Organization He Jiankui Source Type: news

Got cancer? Same company that manufactured Vietnam War's Agent Orange and Holocaust's poisonous gas makes deadly American medicine and food
(Natural News) “How could this have happened to me?” Those are usually the first words out of someone’s mouth when they find out from an oncologist that they have some form of cancer. “I’m a good person.” “I don’t deserve this.” “Maybe it’s genetic.” One of those perplexing statements usually follows next. Most Americans simply... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Brain Wave Stimulation Help Alzheimer & #039;s Patients?
Massachusetts Institute of Technology researchers are using a unique combination of light and sound to improve cognitive and memory impairments similar to those seen in Alzheimer's patients. The noninvasive treatment works by inducing brain waves known as gamma oscillations and so far the team has only performed the treatment on mice.  “When we combine visual and auditory stimulation for a week, we see the engagement of the prefrontal cortex and a very dramatic reduction of amyloid,” said Li-Huei Tsai, director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Lear...
Source: MDDI - March 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news