Come and talk to WormBase staff at the IWM 2019!
It’s that year again when worm breeders and worm lovers will be at UCLA from June 20th-24th for the International Worm Meeting. WormBase will be there in full force and will participate in several events–talks, workshops and booths. WormBase staff will be at our booth during the poster sessions in Pauley Pavilion, come talk to us and feel free to ask any questions related to data and data querying and give us your suggestions and comments. Also, take the opportunity to visit the microPublication booth and find out how to micropublish your results. WormBase related events at IWM 2019 include– Thursda...
Source: WormBase - June 3, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication community meetings news Source Type: news

Their Children Were Conceived With Donated Sperm. It Was the Wrong Sperm.
As genetic testing becomes more widespread, parents are finding that sperm used in artificial insemination did not come from the donors they chose. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jacqueline Mroz Tags: Sperm Frauds and Swindling Genetics and Heredity Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Infertility Reproduction (Biological) Sperm donation Pregnancy and Childbirth your-feed-science Source Type: news

Scientists reveal unexpected consequences of gene-edited babies
In 2018, Chinese scientist He Jiankui, Ph.D., altered the DNA of two human embryos, which lead to genetic changes that he claimed to be benign —but now new research says otherwise. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - June 3, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Psychosocial motivators for moderate drinking among young Asian flushers in Singapore - Kim HK, Lim Si En R, Wong Kang Min D.
Asians are more susceptible to alcohol flush syndrome and its associated health risks because they are genetically predisposed towards it. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, this research examined the psychosocial factors associated with moderate a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Genetic Mutation that Prevents HIV Infection Tied to Earlier Death
Those with two copies of the delta32 allele in the CCR5 gene are 21 percent more likely to die by age 76, although it's not clear why. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 3, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Seattle Genetics, Astellas drug rapidly shrinks tumors in bladder cancer study
An experimental drug developed by Seattle Genetics Inc and Astellas Pharma Inc led to significant, rapid tumor shrinkage in patients with advanced bladder cancer who had been previously treated with immunotherapy and chemotherapy in a midstage trial, according to data presented on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Amgen drug shows high response rate in small lung and colon cancer trial
An experimental Amgen Inc drug that targets a specific genetic mutation significantly reduced tumor size in half of evaluated patients with advanced lung cancer in a small, early-stage trial, researchers said on Monday, sending the U.S. biotechnology company's share up nearly 6 percent. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Gene mutation meant to protect from HIV 'raises risk of early death'
China accuses gene-edit scientist of chasing fame as US research links mutation to shorter life expectancyA genetic mutation that a Chinese scientist tried to create in twin girls born last year, in the hope of protecting them against HIV, has been found to raise the risk of an early death.He Jiankui at the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen sparked aninternational outcry in November when he announced the birth of twin girls, Lulu and Nana, after he edited the DNA in their embryos.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Gene editing World news Genetics Biology Source Type: news

Scientists edit chicken genes to make them resistant to bird flu
Scientists in Britain have used gene-editing techniques to stop bird flu spreading in chicken cells grown in a lab - a key step towards making genetically-altered chickens that could halt a human flu pandemic. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

A Pioneering Treatment for Uncontrollable Hunger
A special diet and growth hormones may offer hope for children with Prader-Willi syndrome. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jane E. Brody Tags: Prader-Willi Syndrome Genetics and Heredity Children and Childhood Parenting Weight Source Type: news

SYNGO Consortium releases public data resource for universal reference in synapse research
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Disruptions to the brain's synapses lie at the root of many disorders. The international SYNGO Consortium, which brings together 15 laboratories and the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium, has now released SYNGO 1.0 -- a portal that aims to represent current scientific knowledge about the genetic architecture of the synapse. In Neuron, researchers use SYNGO 1.0 to show that synaptic genes are much more likely than other brain-expressed genes to bear mutations associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn receives $12 million grant to study connection between radiation and immunotherapies
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) From understanding the genetics of cancer cells to improving cellular therapies and incorporating new methods of radiation therapy, a $12 million grant will help researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania pursue the next generation of cancer treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New genetic weapons challenge sickle cell disease
(Rice University) Researchers advancing gene-editing techniques to help patients with sickle cell disease discover an unexpected boost in fetal hemoglobin production, which mutes the effect of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lithium boosts muscle strength in mice with rare muscular dystrophy
(Washington University School of Medicine) Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that lithium improves muscle size and strength in mice with a rare form of muscular dystrophy that causes weakness in the shoulders and hips. The findings, published April 18 in Neurology Genetics, could lead to a drug for the disabling condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Montana State computer scientists help expand horizon of genetics research
(Montana State University) Backed by a $662,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, the project has developed advanced computational methods for comparing genomes and identifying genes of interest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 3, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Genetic information can encourage women to accept preventive cancer treatment
CHICAGO ?-- Studies show that the risk of breast cancer can be reduced by half through the use of a five-year course of tamoxifen or raloxifene, and also by aromatase inhibitors. Nevertheless, women at high risk of breast cancer have a low acceptance of preventive medicine. A new study by Mayo Clinic and collaborators at [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News - June 3, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Olaparib Delays Progression in BRCA-Mutated Pancreatic Cancer Olaparib Delays Progression in BRCA-Mutated Pancreatic Cancer
"It is our duty to search for this genetic mutation in all patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer so we can identify those people who can benefit," says Suzanne Cole, UT Southwestern Medical Center.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Olaparib Delays Progression in BRCA Pancreatic Cancer Olaparib Delays Progression in BRCA Pancreatic Cancer
"It is our duty to search for this genetic mutation in all patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer so we can identify those people who can benefit," says Suzanne Cole, UT Southwestern Medical Center.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - June 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Entrepreneurs offer $10m for cracking mystery of DNA
Scientists challenged to create genetic code from simple chemicals (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - June 2, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Candidate to run global food body will 'not defend' EU stance on GM
Catherine Geslain-Lan éelle tells US she would be more open to its interests in UN roleEurope ’s candidate to run the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), which guides policymakers around the world, has promised the US she will “not defend the EU position” in resisting the global spread of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).In a bid for US support, Catherine Geslain-Lan éelle told senior US officials at a meeting in Washington on 15 May that under her leadership the FAO would be more open to American interests and accepting of GMO and gene editing, according to a US officia...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julian Borger in Washington and Felicity Lawrence Tags: GM Farming United Nations US news Environment Pesticides World news Science Source Type: news

23andMe and AirBnB:Is Cultural Identity A Market To Explore For Consumer Genetic-Testing Companies?
23andMe and AirBnB announce their new partnership, but they are by no means the first. Does, and should, a cultural heritage market sit in direct-to-consumer genetic tests, and their associated partners? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Maxine Mackintosh, Contributor Source Type: news

23andMe and AirBnB: Is Cultural Identity A Market For Consumer Genetic-Testing Companies?
23andMe and AirBnB announce their new partnership, but they are by no means the first. Does, and should, a cultural heritage market sit in direct-to-consumer genetic tests, and their associated partners? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Maxine Mackintosh, Contributor Source Type: news

Africa: New Fungi Show Promise in Fighting Malaria
[The Conversation Africa] Bed nets. Insecticides. Sterile and genetically modified insects. Now scientists are adding a genetically engineered toxic fungus to the arsenal of weapons to wipe out mosquitoes that carry the malaria parasite. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - May 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Africa: Laboratory Fungus 'Kills 99 Percent of Malaria Mosquitoes'
[East African] A fungus - genetically enhanced to produce spider toxin - can rapidly kill huge numbers of the mosquitoes that spread malaria, a study suggests. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - May 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIDCR Science News - May 2019
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. Nanoparticle Robots Sweep Away Biofilms NIDCR-supported scientists create microscopic cleaning crew NIH Research Matters • May 7, 2019 Mouth Microbes: The Helpful & the Harmful NIDCR-supported researchers study oral bacteria to find ways to keep our mouths healthyNIH News in Health • May 2019 New Genetic Engineering Strategy Makes Human-Made DNA InvisibleThe Forsyth Institut...
Source: NIDCR Science News - May 31, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Science News: Nano-robots clear biofilms | Microbes in our mouths
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. Nanoparticle Robots Sweep Away Biofilms NIDCR-supported scientists create microscopic cleaning crew NIH Research Matters • May 7, 2019 Mouth Microbes: The Helpful & the Harmful NIDCR-supported researchers study oral bacteria to find ways to keep our mouths healthyNIH News in Health • May 2019 New Genetic Engineering Strategy Makes Human-Made DNA InvisibleThe Forsyth Institut...
Source: NIDCR Science News - May 31, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Genetic changes link paternal smoking to childhood asthma
When an unborn child is exposed to paternal tobacco smoke, their risk of developing asthma increases greatly compared to those who aren't. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mosquito-killing spider juice offers malaria hope
Scientists have genetically modified a fungus to make it produce the same lethal toxin as is found in the funnel web spiderA genetically modified fungus that kills malaria-carrying mosquitoes could provide a breakthrough in the fight against the disease, according to researchers.Trials in Burkina Faso found that a fungus, modified so that it produces spider toxin, quickly killed large numbers of mosquitos that carry malaria.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 31, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Rebecca Ratcliffe Tags: Global health Global development Malaria World news Burkina Faso Africa Genetics Science Biology Medical research Source Type: news

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital Identify Ways That CRISPR DNA Base Editors Sometimes Unintentionally Alter RNA
These “off-target” genetic alterations demonstrate that certain CRISPR base editors need further refinement in a research finding of interest to pathologists Could CRISPR DNA-editing technology unintentionally effect RNA as well? A new study conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) suggests that it can. Clinical laboratories doing genetic testing will want to understand why this research […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - May 31, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations Source Type: news

Changes to immune genes link paternal smoking with childhood asthma
(Frontiers) New research shows that children exposed to paternal tobacco smoking before birth are more likely to develop asthma - and that associated changes to immune genes predict the level of risk.Published in Frontiers in Genetics to coincide with the WHO's World No Tobacco Day, the study reinforces the risks of either parent smoking -- and according to the authors, could provide DNA targets for the early prediction and reversal of tobacco smoking-associated childhood asthma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can cannabinoids help treat obsessive-compulsive disorder?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The body's endocannabinoid system, due to the critical role it plays in regulating neurotransmitter signaling, is an enticing target for drug development against disorders associated with anxiety, stress, and repetitive behaviors, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A comprehensive new review article that provides an overview of this complex system, endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids, results of animal studies and human trials to date, and recommendations for future directions is published in Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Is leukemia hereditary?
Leukemia is a genetic condition, but in most cases, it is not hereditary. In this article, we explore the links between leukemia and family history, genetics, and lifestyle and environmental factors. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Leukemia Source Type: news

GM fungus rapidly kills 99% of malaria mosquitoes, study suggests
A fungus has been genetically modified with spider venom to kill the mosquitoes that spread malaria. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - May 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Genetically Modify Fungus To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Malaria
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about muscle atrophy
Muscle atrophy can occur due to poor nutrition, age, and genetics. Symptoms vary, and treatment may include physical therapy, functional electric stimulation, or surgery. Learn more about muscle atrophy here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Muscular Dystrophy / ALS Source Type: news

New HRS Consensus on Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy New HRS Consensus on Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy
A new consensus statement provides guidance on evaluation and management of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, including clinically relevant information on genetics and disease mechanisms.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - May 30, 2019 Category: Cardiology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Spark CEO Marrazzo: Philadelphia will shine at BIO 2019
Thousands of biotech leaders, researchers and entrepreneurs will be in Philadelphia next week at the BIO International Convention. While there will be a myriad of discussions about the latest industry developments and breakthroughs, one of the more compelling stories will be the rise of Philadelphia as the hotbed for gene and cell therapy innovation and the potential for the city to capitalize on this moment to sustain its position as the leader in genetic medicine -- the future of healthcare. … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 30, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jeff Marrazzo Source Type: news

Complete Genomics Files Lawsuit Against Illumina
Illumina is back in court. Albeit, this time the San Francisco-based company is on the other side of litigation. A patent infringement lawsuit was filed against Illumina by Complete Genomics, a U.S. subsidiary of MGI. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court of the State of Delaware.  And yes, before we continue it should be noted that MGI is a sequencing equipment business subsidiary of BGI Group. Earlier this month, Illumina filed a patent lawsuit against BGI. Complete Genomics’ lawsuit alleges that a number of genetic sequencers and related reagents from Illumina, including the Nova...
Source: MDDI - May 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

NIH awards $9.5M grant for MRI autism study
The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded a five-year $9.5 million...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI may speed up diagnosis of autism MRI shows surprisingly high blood flow in those with autism MRI connects autism with deficit in brain reward pathway DTI-MRI finds abnormal brain connections in autistic kids MRI reveals key brain differences in people with genetic autism (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 30, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Crispr gene-editing will change the way Americans eat - here's what's coming
The technology will be labeled and subject to stringent health and environment review in the EU, but not in the US, where produce could be radically changedSoon, soybeans will be bred to yield oil without dangerous trans fats. Lettuce will be grown to handle warmer, drier fields. Wheat to contain less gluten. And pigs bred to resist deadly viruses. Someday, maybe even strawberry plants whose delicate berries can bepicked by machine instead of by hand.Ten years ago,such genetic changes would have been considered science fiction – or so far off into the future of breeding as to be almost unimaginable. But gene editing,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Karen Weintraub Tags: Gene editing Food Science Genetics US news World news Source Type: news

Crispr gene-editing will change the way Americans eat – here's what's coming
The technology will be labeled and subject to stringent health and environment review in the EU, but not in the US, where produce could be radically changedSoon, soybeans will be bred to yield oil without dangerous trans fats. Lettuce will be grown to handle warmer, drier fields. Wheat to contain less gluten. And pigs bred to resist deadly viruses. Someday, maybe even strawberry plants whose delicate berries can bepicked by machine instead of by hand.Ten years ago,such genetic changes would have been considered science fiction – or so far off into the future of breeding as to be almost unimaginable. But gene editing,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Karen Weintraub Tags: Gene editing Food Science Genetics US news World news Source Type: news

DNA tests for patients move closer with genome analysis advance
(University of Edinburgh) Diseases caused by genetic changes could be detected more readily thanks to an advance in DNA analysis software developed by experts at the University of Edinburgh and the European Bioinformatics Institute at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Significant 'knowledge gap' exists in use of genetic testing to decide cancer treatment
(Georgetown University Medical Center) A survey conducted by Georgetown investigators found a significant knowledge and practice gap among community oncologists in the understanding and usage of genetic testing in determining patients' treatment plans and potential clinical trial outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

To curb infection, bacteria direct their defenses against themselves
(Rockefeller University) To fight off invading viruses, bacteria have evolved a slew of creative defense tactics. New research shows that in some cases, microbes go to great lengths to keep an infection from spreading, even destroying bits of their own genetic material. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers restore beta-cell function by deleting old cells
(Joslin Diabetes Center) Joslin researchers confirmed similarly increased proportion of aged beta-cells in islets recovered from humans with type 2 diabetes. The study also showed that beta cell function can be recovered by removing these aged populations either via genetic modification or oral medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa
(Saint Louis University) A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Freshwater find: Genetic advantage allows some marine fish to colonize freshwater habitats
(Research Organization of Information and Systems) Fishes are present in not only marine but also freshwater environments. However, only few fish lineages could colonize freshwater habitats. What enable some lineages to colonize freshwater? Dr. Asano Ishikawa and Dr. Jun Kitano at the National Institute of Genetics, Japan, collaborated with international researchers to answer this question. They found that Fatty acid desaturase 2 (Fads2) is a key gene important for freshwater colonization in fishes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Genetic Analysis Of Cannabis Lights The Way For Better Policy
Researchers from Washington State University have released the first comprehensive analysis of the genetic and chemical characteristics of cannabis. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - May 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Baron, Contributor Source Type: news

Research from Ambry Genetics & Mayo Clinic Reveals Differences in...
Abstract to be presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO) Annual Meeting(PRWeb May 30, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/research_from_ambry_genetics_mayo_clinic_reveals_differences_in_the_prevalence_of_breast_cancer_genes_among_racial_and_ethnic_populations/prweb16340331.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Oligogenic inheritance of a human heart disease involving a genetic modifier
Complex genetic mechanisms are thought to underlie many human diseases, yet experimental proof of this model has been elusive. Here, we show that a human cardiac anomaly can be caused by a combination of rare, inherited heterozygous mutations. Whole-exome sequencing of a nuclear family revealed that three offspring with childhood-onset cardiomyopathy had inherited three missense single-nucleotide variants in the MKL2, MYH7, and NKX2-5 genes. The MYH7 and MKL2 variants were inherited from the affected, asymptomatic father and the rare NKX2-5 variant (minor allele frequency, 0.0012) from the unaffected mother. We used CRISPR...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Gifford, C. A., Ranade, S. S., Samarakoon, R., Salunga, H. T., de Soysa, T. Y., Huang, Y., Zhou, P., Elfenbein, A., Wyman, S. K., Bui, Y. K., Cordes Metzler, K. R., Ursell, P., Ivey, K. N., Srivastava, D. Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases r-articles Source Type: news