Novartis ’ Spinal Drug Gets FDA Approval, $2 Million Price Tag
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration approved a treatment Friday for a genetic disease called spinal muscular atrophy that causes infants’ muscles to waste away, potentially killing them before age 2. And then came the price tag: $2.125 million for a one-time treatment. The gene therapy, called Zolgensma, will be marketed by AveXis, whose parent company is Novartis. “Today’s approval marks another milestone in the transformational power of gene and cell therapies to treat a wide range of diseases,” Dr. Ned Sharpless, the FDA’s acting commissioner, said in a statement Friday. &ldqu...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Novartis Source Type: news

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Gene therapy gets FDA approval -- and a $2 million price tag
The US Food and Drug Administration approved a treatment Friday for a genetic disease called spinal muscular atrophy that causes infants' muscles to waste away, potentially killing them before age 2. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In The end, Rare Drug Pricing Will Hurt Pharma Just As Much As Patients
There ’s been an odd-sounding word circulating in the English headlines recently.The word is Orkambi; a drug created by Vertex that treats approximately 40% of people born with the genetic condition, cystic fibrosis. It is the second drug to market in a promising pipeline that targets the CFTR mutation.   True gene therapy it isn’t, but it represents a near-first for a biotech firm, by successfully altering the shape and function of a protein[1]. And priced at £105,000 per patient per year, it is the latest in a long line of medicines the NHS can’t afford.Orkambi has been licensed by the EMAsin...
Source: EyeForPharma - May 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elly Aylwin-Foster Source Type: news

Mouse Models for Disease Research
Genetically modified/knockout/transgenic mice have revolutionized the biological sciences, helping to uncover countless mechanisms of physiological and pathological function, as well as being... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 24, 2019 Category: Science Tags: TechEdge Source Type: news

An examination of within- and between-family influences on the intergenerational transmission of violence and maltreatment - Valgardson BA, Schwartz JA.
Using a sample of sibling pairs from the National Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), the relationship between child and adolescent maltreatment and intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration was examined within a genetically sensitive fra... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Novartis CEO dances around price tag talks for breakthrough gene therapy
Days before Novartis is expected to win approval for its breakthrough spinal muscular atrophy treatment, the drugmaker's CEO said he could justify charging up to $5 million for the revolutionary treatment — but that the goal is to set the cost at " a fraction of what is the current standard of care. " (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - May 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What's the environmental impact of Impossible Foods GMO burgers, made with genetically modified soy that's sprayed with glyphosate weed killer?
(Natural News) Climate-anxious media outlets are raving about a new artificial beef product known as “Impossible Burger” that, according to the company that manufactures it, has an 89 percent smaller “carbon footprint” than real beef. But are genetically-modified (GMO) soybeans that have been sprayed with toxic glyphosate (Roundup) really environmentally-friendly? The reason we ask is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Gene Variants for Type 2 Diabetes Found
Title: New Gene Variants for Type 2 Diabetes FoundCategory: Health NewsCreated: 5/23/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 5/24/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Diabetes General)
Source: MedicineNet Diabetes General - May 24, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

CNIO participates in a study identifying a novel oncogene for most common types of blood cancer
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) The study shows that tumour suppressor hnRNP K can lead to cancer. Overexpression of the gene may lead to B-cell lymphoma, the most common type of blood cancer. Lymphoma patients might benefit from more personalised treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 24, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gene therapy towards a clinical trial for gamma-sarcoglycanopathy, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy
(AFM-T é l é thon) Isabelle Richard's team, a CNRS researcher in an Inserm unit at Genethon, the AFM-Telethon laboratory, has demonstrated the efficacy of gene therapy and determined the effective dose for treating a rare muscle disease, gamma-sarcoglycanopathy, in mouse models of the disease. Based on these encouraging results, published in Molecular Therapy: Methods and Clinical Development, the researchers are preparing a clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infection biology: Signs of selection in the stomach
(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen) Helicobacter pylori, a globally distributed gastric bacterium, is genetically highly adaptable. Microbiologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now characterized its population structure in individual patients, demonstrating an important role of antibiotics for its within-patient evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Approves Zolgensma, Landmark AAV-Delivered Gene Therapy to Treat...
Zolgensma (Novartis, AveXis), an AAV-delivered gene therapy used to treat spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) also known as AVXS-101, was approved for clinical use in the United States by the Food and Drug...(PRWeb May 24, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/fda_approves_zolgensma_landmark_aav_delivered_gene_therapy_to_treat_spinal_muscular_atrophy/prweb16337373.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - May 24, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Gene Variations for Type 2 Diabetes Found
The genes identified in the study and the proteins they encode are potential targets for new diabetes medicines, and may help improve understanding and treatment of the disease, according to the study authors. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Watch as bacterial cells help each other outsmart antibiotic drugs
Bacteria cells with an antibiotic resistance gene (in green) share DNA with other bacteria cells that lack the gene (in red). After the DNA has been transfered and used to make a drug-resistant protein, the previously red cells turn green. (Video courtesy of  Christian Lesterlin) (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientist behind anti-vaxxers' favorite study says 'it's just not even a valid' 
The scientists who published a study a decade ago that linked a gene variant to 'adverse events' in response to smallpox shots say the study, used by anti-vaxxers, is invalid. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

San Francisco biopharm tech company opens regional HQ in Bethesda
Biopharmaceutical software company Vineti Inc. has opened a regional headquarters in Bethesda to strengthen relationships with its East Coast clients. Co-founded by GE Co, and the Mayo Clinic, Vineti's cloud-based platform expands patient access to cell and gene therapies by tracking how the individualized treatments move from blood collection to manufacturing and back to the patient. With more than 1,000 active cell and gene therapy clinical trails globally, San Francisco-based Vineti seeks… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 23, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Katishi Maake Source Type: news

After IFM buy, Novartis looks to more early stage biotech M & A
After the gene therapy M&A battles of late 2018, Novartis is looking make buy up more preclinical or early stage biotechs like Boston-based IFM Tre. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 23, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Dog ownership could be down to genes
A study of tens of thousands of identical and nonidentical twins in Sweden suggests that genetic makeup could be a strong factor in choosing to own a dog. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics Source Type: news

New Gene Variants for Type 2 Diabetes Found
THURSDAY, May 23, 2019 -- It has long been known that lifestyle affects a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Now, researchers report that they have identified rare variants of four genes that may also play a part. For the study, an... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Variation of FTO gene linked to weight gain and obesity in children
(The Obesity Society) Researchers have discovered that children who do not have obesity, but who are at risk for the chronic disease due to a common genetic variant eat more, according to a new study to be published in the June 2019 issue of Obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Studying the function of liver cancer genes in mini-organs
(Hubrecht Institute) Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute developed a human model in which they use organoids, or mini organs, to study the function of specific genes that are mutated in liver cancer. Using this method, they have found that mutations in BAP1, a gene commonly mutated in liver cancer, changes the behavior of the cells, which may make them more likely to be invasive. Their results were published in Cell Stem Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 23, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Climate change affects the genetic diversity of a species
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) What effects does climate change have on the genetic diversity of living organisms? In a study led by Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin, an international team of researchers studied the genome of the alpine marmot. Results were unexpected: the species was found to be the least genetically diverse of any wild mammal studied to date. The alpine marmot has lost its genetic diversity during ice-age related climate events and been unable to recover its diversity since. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children's Tumor Foundation launches NF2 accelerator to combat rare genetic disorder
(Children's Tumor Foundation) The Children's Tumor Foundation has announced a significant research initiative dedicated to finding effective treatments for NF2, along with a substantial investment of $2.3 million in this effort. Called the 'NF2 Accelerator Initiative,' this undertaking is dedicated to bringing NF2 treatments to clinic by expanding the drug pipeline for NF2, improving drug selection through the development of innovative testing models, and the development of gene therapy options that address the underlying causes of NF2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Better gene knockout in aneuploid cell lines
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) CRISPR/Cas9 technology enables convenient and effective genome editing in diploid cell lines based on the isolation and expansion of edited single-cell clones. However, this approach is ineffective for aneuploid cell lines, and a group has now reported an improved method for genome editing based on multiple rounds of modification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ALS research reveals new treatment approach
(Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) New research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (AML) has revealed that a protein called membralin plays a key role in the disease process. The study, published in Journal of Clinical Investigation, suggests that membralin-boosting gene therapy is a potential therapeutic direction to treat this often deadly disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 23, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

San Francisco biopharm tech company opens regional HQ in Bethesda
Biopharmaceutical software company Vineti Inc. has opened a regional headquarters in Bethesda to strengthen relationships with its East Coast clients. Co-founded by GE Co, and the Mayo Clinic, Vineti's cloud-based platform expands patient access to cell and gene therapies by tracking how the individualized treatments move from blood collection to manufacturing and back to the patient. With more than 1,000 active cell and gene therapy clinical trails globally, San Francisco-based Vineti seeks… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katishi Maake Source Type: news

San Francisco biopharm tech company opens regional HQ in Bethesda
Biopharmaceutical software company Vineti Inc. has opened a regional headquarters in Bethesda to strengthen relationships with its East Coast clients. Co-founded by GE Co, and the Mayo Clinic, Vineti's cloud-based platform expands patient access to cell and gene therapies by tracking how the individualized treatments move from blood collection to manufacturing and back to the patient. With more than 1,000 active cell and gene therapy clinical trails globally, San Francisco-based Vineti seeks… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 23, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katishi Maake Source Type: news

Role of AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump in drug-resistance acquisition by plasmid transfer
Drug-resistance dissemination by horizontal gene transfer remains poorly understood at the cellular scale. Using live-cell microscopy, we reveal the dynamics of resistance acquisition by transfer of the Escherichia coli fertility factor–conjugation plasmid encoding the tetracycline-efflux pump TetA. The entry of the single-stranded DNA plasmid into the recipient cell is rapidly followed by complementary-strand synthesis, plasmid-gene expression, and production of TetA. In the presence of translation-inhibiting antibiotics, resistance acquisition depends on the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux pump, because it reduces tetr...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nolivos, S., Cayron, J., Dedieu, A., Page, A., Delolme, F., Lesterlin, C. Tags: Cell Biology, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Novartis CEO plans gene therapy price 'far lower' than $4 million to $5 million range
Novartis AG's top executive said on Wednesday it expects to price its gene therapy for spinal muscular atrophy “far lower” than the $4 million to $5 million figure the Swiss drugmaker has said it could be worth. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Exposure to common virus may increase risk for type 1 diabetes
Researchers say there may be triggers to the genetically linked type 1 diabetes, finding in a recent study that coxsackievirus may be one of those triggers. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetically Personalized Fruit Flies Screen for Cancer Drugs
Fly avatars bearing multiple genetic changes akin to those of a cancer patient lead to a tailor-made treatment that has shrunk the patient's tumors. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - May 22, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

New Cambridge VC firm ElevateBio's first investment is a Houston biotech
A Texas cell therapy company is restarting its clinical testing and setting up shop in Massachusetts after becoming the first company to work with new venture capital firm ElevateBio. Cambridge-based ElevateBio was launched last week by three former Alexion Pharmaceuticals and bluebird bio executives, who raised $150 million to found and invest in cell and gene therapy companies.   ElevateBio has now disclosed its first venture: AlloVir, formerly called ViraCyte, which is dev eloping single-dose… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

News Brief: Impeaching Trump, Iran Threat, CRISPR Modified Viruses
House Democrats meet to decide whether to move forward with impeaching the president. Lawmakers on Capitol Hill are briefed on the threat Iran poses. And, the latest on genetically modified viruses. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Noel King Source Type: news

Experimental noninvasive tool monitors effectiveness of stem cell transplantation
(University of Maryland Medical Center) Other than clinical observations, the stem cell field lacks a repeatable, time-sensitive, noninvasive tool to assess the effectiveness of transplanted cells in the targeted organ. Researchers analyzed biomarkers secreted from transplanted human stem cells in the recipient blood of a rodent model of heart attack. Analysis of the blood test showed responding cells had changed their gene expression, behavior and secretions, suggesting this liquid biopsy could provide a window into stem cell activity and effectiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover novel genes responsible for regulating muscle cells
(York University) York University scientists have uncovered a unique set of genes that play a role in muscle cellular gene expression and differentiation which could lead to new therapeutic targets to prevent the spread of muscle cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Using fruit flies to identify new treatment for a colorectal cancer patient
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Erdem Bangi and colleagues demonstrate a new approach to developing personalized therapy for a patient with treatment-resistant colorectal cancer: using a fruit fly genetically modified with a patient's own cancer mutations to test candidate treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dog Person? It May Be in Your Genes
Scientists calculated that genetics is responsible for 57 percent of dog ownership in women and 51 percent in men. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Genetics and Heredity Twins Dogs Source Type: news

Your DNA Might Determine Whether You're a Dog Lover
TUESDAY, May 21, 2019 -- Could a love for canines be contained in your genes? New research from Europe suggests that's so after comparing the genetic makeup of more than 35,000 twin pairs with dog ownership. The researchers concluded that genetic... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Why lack of sleep is bad for your heart
(University of Colorado at Boulder) People who sleep fewer than 7 hours per night have lower levels of gene-regulating molecules, or microRNAs, which help dampen down inflammation in cells and support vascular health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Summit charts a course to uncover the origins of genetic diseases
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) A team led by Ivaylo Ivanov of Georgia State University used the 200-petaflop IBM AC922 Summit system, the world's smartest and most powerful supercomputer, to develop an integrative model of the transcription preinitiation complex (PIC), a complex of proteins vital to gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 21, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Developing biosecurity tool to detect genetically engineered organisms in the wild
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) If a genetically or synthetically engineered organism gets into the environment, how will we tell it apart from the millions of naturally occurring microorganisms? Recently, the US government and research scientists have identified a need for new tools that can detect engineered organisms that have been accidentally or intentionally released beyond the lab. With scientists from Raytheon and other universities, WPI chemical engineer Eric Young is helping develop a detection tool based on DNA signatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

After GWAS studies, how to narrow the search for genes?
(Boston Children's Hospital) Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often turn up a long list of genes that MIGHT help cause the trait of interest. Many algorithms can help scientists prioritize which genes to pursue further, but which one to choose? Borrowing from machine learning, and singling out one chromosome at a time, a new tool called Benchmarker helps scientists evaluate existing algorithms to guide their search for relevant genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in Florida could spell trouble for papaya
(American Phytopathological Society) In the fall of 2017, leaves of phasey bean plants in Homestead, Florida, displayed powdery fungal growth, which appeared in the form of white spots on both sides of the leaves. Scientists conducted analysis by sequencing genes of genomic DNA and identified the fungus as Erysiphe fallax, which causes a disease known as powdery mildew. To their knowledge, this is the first report of powdery mildew on phasey bean in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 21, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

mTORC1 amplifies the ATF4-dependent de novo serine-glycine pathway to supply glycine during TGF-{beta}1-induced collagen biosynthesis
The differentiation of fibroblasts into a transient population of highly activated, extracellular matrix (ECM)–producing myofibroblasts at sites of tissue injury is critical for normal tissue repair. Excessive myofibroblast accumulation and persistence, often as a result of a failure to undergo apoptosis when tissue repair is complete, lead to pathological fibrosis and are also features of the stromal response in cancer. Myofibroblast differentiation is accompanied by changes in cellular metabolism, including increased glycolysis, to meet the biosynthetic demands of enhanced ECM production. Here, we showed that trans...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Selvarajah, B., Azuelos, I., Plate, M., Guillotin, D., Forty, E. J., Contento, G., Woodcock, H. V., Redding, M., Taylor, A., Brunori, G., Durrenberger, P. F., Ronzoni, R., Blanchard, A. D., Mercer, P. F., Anastasiou, D., Chambers, R. C. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

IRF2 transcriptionally induces GSDMD expression for pyroptosis
Gasdermin-D (GSDMD) is cleaved by caspase-1, caspase-4, and caspase-11 in response to canonical and noncanonical inflammasome activation. Upon cleavage, GSDMD oligomerizes and forms plasma membrane pores, resulting in interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, pyroptotic cell death, and inflammatory pathologies, including periodic fever syndromes and septic shock—a plague on modern medicine. Here, we showed that IRF2, a member of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family of transcription factors, was essential for the transcriptional activation of GSDMD. A forward genetic screen with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)&...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - May 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kayagaki, N., Lee, B. L., Stowe, I. B., Kornfeld, O. S., O'Rourke, K., Mirrashidi, K. M., Haley, B., Watanabe, C., Roose-Girma, M., Modrusan, Z., Kummerfeld, S., Reja, R., Zhang, Y., Cho, V., Andrews, T. D., Morris, L. X., Goodnow, C. C., Bertram, E. M., Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Seattle's Sana Biotechnology expands with Cambridge lab acquisition
A preclinical gene and cell therapy hoping to be the biotech world ’s new unicorn is expanding in Cambridge after acquiring a Flagship Pioneering company. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 20, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Seattle's Sana Biotechnology expands with Cambridge lab acquisition
A preclinical gene and cell therapy hoping to be the biotech world ’s new unicorn is expanding in Cambridge after acquiring a Flagship Pioneering company. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 20, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Allison DeAngelis Source Type: news

Bolstering Biopsies: Testing Patients' Individual Cells to Guide Treatment
May 20, 2019—(BRONX, NY)— In research that could make biopsies more useful for many diseases, scientists have used a powerful new tool to zero in on individual cells in a patient’s diseased organ and reveal the cells’ underlying glitches in gene expression—information that may allow for more precise and effective treatment. The findings, by scientists atAlbert Einstein College of Medicine,Montefiore Health System, and other medical institutions, are published online today inNature Immunology. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - May 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news