Genetic variant linked to increased stroke risk in childhood cancer survivors treated with CRT
(American Association for Cancer Research) A common single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was associated with increased risk for developing stroke in childhood survivors who received cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for their primary cancer, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fast-changing genetics key to hospital superbug survival
(University College London) A highly drug-resistant bacteria common in hospitals, Klebsiella pneumoniae, represents a significant antimicrobial resistance threat and should be monitored globally, say UCL researchers. The warning follows new genetic analyses revealing how K. pneumoniae are able to quickly evolve to change their genetic makeup. This has implications for understanding how several species of bacteria -- called Enterobacteriaceae -- can rapidly adapt to essentially any antibiotic currently used in treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 2, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study reveals genes associated with heavy drinking and alcoholism
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A large genomic study of nearly 275,000 people led by Penn Medicine researchers revealed new insights into genetic drivers of heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD), the uncontrollable pattern of alcohol use commonly referred to as alcoholism. In the largest-ever genome-wide association study (GWAS) of both traits in the same population, a team of researchers found 18 genetic variants of significance associated with either heavy alcohol consumption, AUD, or both. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Three easy measures to predict metabolic syndrome in elderly
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study found a surprisingly high rate of metabolic syndrome among individuals aged 60-100 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can delayed/extended-release methylphenidate allow for once daily evening dosing in ADHD?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new three-part study showed that a delayed-release, extended-release form of methylphenidate could be given to adults in the evening with or without food and would not exert any clinically meaningful effect for at least 10 hours after administration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosses -- Dynamic and built to last
(University of Connecticut) New UConn research dives deep into the genetic history of mosses. The researchers use DNA from multiple moss organelles and reveal how dynamic these heretofore evolutionary 'dead ends' are. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Plant pathologist leads research to stop spread of citrus-destroying disease
(University of California - Riverside) A molecular geneticist at the University of California, Riverside, has secured a four-year grant aimed at halting the spread of a deadly bacterial disease that continues to spread among California's citrus trees. The award of nearly $4 million, which comes from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will help cure citrus trees affected by huanglongbing disease, or HLB, and protect healthy trees from infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nature versus nurture: Environment exerts greater influence on corn health than genetics
(American Phytopathological Society) In one of the largest and most diverse leaf microbe studies to date, the team monitored the active bacteria on the leaves of 300 diverse lines of corn growing in a common environment. They were especially interested to see how corn genes affected bacteria and found there was little relationship between the two--in fact, the bacteria were much more affected by the environment, although genetics still had a small role. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Trump Proposes $1B Cut to NSF
The President has proposed a $7.1 billion budget fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget for the National Science Foundation (NSF), which represents a 12.5 percent cut from its current funding level. The President’s budget asserts that NSF would accelerate its progress on its “10 Big Ideas for Future Investments,” allocating support to high-priority areas that integrate science and engineering fields and create partnership opportunities with industry, private foundations, other federal agencies, and the education sector. The agency would provide $30 million to each of the six research-focused Big Ideas, that inclu...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Researchers uncover gene regions that affect cholesterol levels in smokers
Smoking has long been associated with an increase in heart-clogging cholesterol but the role that a smoker's genes play in their cholesterol levels has been a mystery - until now. National Institutes of Health researchers and their collaborators identified 13 new gene regions that influence cholesterol levels, some of which affected people differently if they are smokers or former smokers. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 2, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Ambry Genetics Research Demonstrates RNA Genetic Testing in Hereditary...
Data presented at the 2019 American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting(PRWeb April 02, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/ambry_genetics_research_demonstrates_rna_genetic_testing_in_hereditary_cancer_improves_variant_classification_and_patient_management/prweb16208774.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - April 2, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers create the largest global catalog of variations in the dog genome
Dogs and humans share an intimate bond that has surpassed centuries. Researchers at NHGRI are understanding how and what genes underscore the vast variation observed in dog breeds. Using next-generation sequencing tools, they have created the largest variant canine catalog and identified variants associated with dog body structure, behavior and life span which could also be implicated in human health and disease. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 2, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

New treatment uses genetically modified cells to fight tumors
The treatment can turn a patient's own blood cells into weapons that kill cancerous cells (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genetic Validation for New LDL Cholesterol-Lowering Target Genetic Validation for New LDL Cholesterol-Lowering Target
ATP citrate lyase inhibitors such as bempedoic acid lower LDL cholesterol by the same mechanism of action as statins and may provide similar or perhaps additive cardiovascular protection.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 1, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

A 2-year-old couldn't walk on his own. So a high school robotics team built him a toy car
Due to a genetic condition, Cillian Jackson, 2, can't walk. But the Minnesota boy now motors around in style, thanks to some enterprising students at his local high school. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dana-Farber Opens First Center Devoted to Lynch Syndrome Dana-Farber Opens First Center Devoted to Lynch Syndrome
The new center will provide genetic testing, coordinated care, and research for individuals with Lynch syndrome.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - April 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Colorectal cancer vaccine could prevent tumors in people at genetic risk
People with Lynch Syndrome have genes that give them an 80 percent higher risk of the cancer. A vaccine developed by Weill Cornell Medicine researchers prevented the cancer in some mice. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AHA News: Genetic Testing Helps Family Uncover Inherited Heart Condition
Title: AHA News: Genetic Testing Helps Family Uncover Inherited Heart ConditionCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/29/2019 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/1/2019 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Heart General)
Source: MedicineNet Heart General - April 1, 2019 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Atopic Dermatitis: The Skin Barrier and Beyond Atopic Dermatitis: The Skin Barrier and Beyond
This review sheds light on the complex pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis, encompassing genetic risk factors, environmental triggers, skin barrier disruption, and immunological dysfunction.The British Journal of Dermatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Journal Article Source Type: news

The Rise of Genetic Testing Companies and DNA Data Race
With the rise of direct to consumer (DTC) genetic testing companies, and an explosion of genomic data emerging from individual DNA, genome companies are racing to build a search engine for our DNA. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jayshree Pandya, Contributor Source Type: news

GGC launches EpiSign, a novel clinical test for epigenetic changes
(Greenwood Genetic Center) Greenwood Diagnostic Laboratories at the Greenwood Genetic Center, in collaboration with London Health Sciences Centre, announce the launch of a new diagnostic test focused on disease-specific epigenetic signatures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Panvigilance -- a strategy to integrate biomarkers in clinical trials to enhance drug safety
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Modern medicines have positively contributed to public health and changed the ways human diseases are prevented and treated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Germ Warfare: A Very Graphic History
Source: Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense. Published: 4/2019. Written and illustrated as a highly stylized and engaging graphic novel, this 44-page document depicts previous biological warfare events, the possibilities for the future, and the continued need for public health security. It traces the long, brutal story of microscopic weapons from the infected arrows of Bronze Age archers, to the plague factories of World War II, up through the biological arms race of the Cold War, into the modern age of genetically manipulated terrorism. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cancer-Specific Antigens Encoded in "Junk" DNA
Researchers found that allegedly noncoding genetic material carries the instructions for many peptides that may help harness the immune system to fight cancer. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: The Literature Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Can genetic testing help doctors better prescribe antidepressants? There’s quite a debate.
Some doctors and patients support the practice. But the FDA and other physicians warn about the lack of scientific proof (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - March 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ilana Marcus Source Type: news

How Pain Tolerance and Anxiety Seem to Be Connected
An article about the case of a woman who feels little pain or anxiety raised many questions, such as: Do low-anxiety people seem to feel less pain? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: HEATHER MURPHY Tags: Cameron, Jo Pain Anxiety and Stress Emotions Genetics and Heredity Source Type: news

Repair protein uses filaments to bridge broken DNA
NIEHS scientists and colleagues discovered how the protein Ctp1 helps repair DNA double-strand breaks, which may shed light on certain genetic diseases. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - March 30, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Recommendations Presented on Genetic Testing in Psychiatry
Guidelines emphasize that common genetic variants are not sufficient to cause psychiatric disorders (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - March 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Pathology, Psychiatry, Journal, Source Type: news

Woman feels no pain due to rare gene mutation, researchers say
New research is shedding light on the genetic reasons why a woman in Scotland feels virtually no pain. Jo Cameron, 71, also experiences very little anxiety or fear, and her body appears to heal quickly. Now scientists say they know why: a mutation in a previously unidentified gene. Elizabeth Palmer reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - March 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AHA News: Genetic Testing Helps Family Uncover Inherited Heart Condition
FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- Kristen Criss'father died of complications from a stroke, her mother died from a heart condition at age 40 and her sister passed away at 33. Still, it would be many years -- and health... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 29, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Recommendations Presented on Genetic Testing in Psychiatry
FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 -- Recommendations have been developed for the use of genetic testing in psychiatric care, according to a statement published by the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG). Francis J. McMahon, M.D., from the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 29, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New pancreatic repair mechanism found
A study, published inPLoS Genetics, demonstrates that a novel mechanism involving the Wt1 gene is essential for normal pancreas function and repair.Medical Xpress (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - March 29, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

EMA panel recommends approval of Bluebird Bio's first gene therapy
A European Medicines Agency panel on Friday recommended a conditional marketing approval for a gene therapy from Bluebird Bio Inc as a genetic blood disorder treatment, setting the stage for the U.S. biotech to win its first regulatory nod. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - March 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Genomic analysis offers roadmap for diagnosis and treatment of a high-risk leukemia
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) is a high-risk cancer with a dismal prognosis, uncertain genetic basis and controversy surrounding the diagnosis. That is changing, thanks to research led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital that appears today in the journal Nature Genetics.The researchers completed the largest, most comprehensive genomic analysis yet of AEL and identified six age-related subgroups with distinct mutations and patterns of gene expression as well as treatment outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Origin of Scandinavian wolves clarified
(Uppsala University) There are no signs that hybrids of dog and wolf have contributed to the Scandinavian wolf population -- a matter that has been discussed, especially in Norway. These wolves appear to have originated from the Nordic region or adjacent parts of Northern Europe, new genetic research from Uppsala University shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

WormBase is up to date with curation of protein-protein interactions
We have now curated all C. elegans protein-protein interactions (physical) from the published literature. In the current release, WS269, we have over 30,000 binary gene pair interactions. Please let us know if we have missed anything! (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - March 29, 2019 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication news curation protein interaction Source Type: news

Genetic mutation could lead to new pain treatments
Doctors have identified a new mutation in a previously unknown gene which scientists believe must play a major role in pain signaling, mood and memory — boosting hopes of new treatments for chronic pain. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - March 29, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Using genetics to try to figure out how to get mosquitoes to stop biting us
Among all the beasts in the animal kingdom, perhaps none is more dangerous to humans than the mosquito.The whiny insects aren't just irritating — they can be deadly.In fact, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reckons that mosquitoes are responsible for at least 700,000 deaths... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

What Childbirth Was Like for a Woman Who Has Never Felt Pain
Jo Cameron, 71, has a rare genetic mutation that keeps her from feeling pain or anxiety, according to a new scientific report. Researchers hope the finding can help develop more effective treatments for pain. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Genetics and Heredity Women and Girls British Broadcasting Corp Source Type: news

The biggest revolution in gene editing: Crispr-Cas9 explained – video
Prof Jennifer Doudna, one the pioneers of Crispr-Cas9 gene editing, explains how this revolutionary discovery enables precise changes to our DNA, which can be used to correct mutations that cause genetic diseases and eradicate them from a germ line.  Doudna raises the key issues of debate around gene editing and suggests what will have the most immediate impact. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jess Gormley, Dan Susman, Joseph Pierce, Noah Payne-Frank and Simon Roberts Tags: Gene editing Genetics Science Source Type: news

Woman who feels no pain has genetic mutation, scientists discover
A 71-year-old Scottish woman has a rare genetic mutation that means she feels less pain, heals faster and experiences less anxiety than most people. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

At 71, She ’ s Never Felt Pain or Anxiety. Now Scientists Know Why.
Scientists discovered a previously unidentified genetic mutation in a Scottish woman. They hope it could lead to the development of new pain treatment. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: HEATHER MURPHY Tags: Genetics and Heredity Opioids and Opiates Pain-Relieving Drugs Anxiety and Stress University College London Scotland Jo Cameron The British Journal of Anaesthesia Source Type: news

The woman who feels no pain
Thanks to a rare genetic mutation Jo Cameron is one of two people in the world who feel no pain. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

At Age 71, She Has Never Felt Pain or Anxiety
Scientists discovered a previously unidentified genetic mutation in a Scottish woman. They hope it could lead to the development of new pain treatment. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: HEATHER MURPHY Tags: Genetics and Heredity Opioids and Opiates Pain-Relieving Drugs Anxiety and Stress University College London Scotland Jo Cameron The British Journal of Anaesthesia Source Type: news

How a Scottish Woman Endured Burns, Broken Bones, Childbirth and Surgeries Without Ever Feeling Pain
A newly discovered genetic mutation caused a Scottish woman to endure cuts, burns, broken bones, childbirth and surgery without feeling any pain, according to a case study published in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. About five years ago, Joanne Cameron, now 71, had what should have been a painful hand surgery at Scotland’s Raigmore Hospital, says Dr. Devjit Srivastava, a consultant in anesthesia and pain medicine at the hospital. “She mentioned that she does not feel pain and she did not need any anesthesia, which was not a usual day in the office for me,” Srivastava tells TIME. “I disregarded ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized medicine onetime Source Type: news

Sarepta plans second Duchenne drug application this year
With one drug already under FDA consideration, Sarepta Therapeutics Inc. is now planning to submit another Duchenne muscular dystrophy drug for the federal agency's approval this year. Sarepta (Nasdaq: SRPT) is the market leader in treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a rare genetic disease that causes young boys muscles to deteriorate. It developed the first treatment specifically for the disorder, Exondys 51, which brought in $301 million in sales last year. The Cambri dge biotech could… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 28, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Seattle Genetics and Astellas Announce Positive Topline Results from Pivotal Trial of Enfortumab Vedotin in Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer
Companies Plan to Submit Biologics License Application Later This Year BOTHELL, Wash. and TOKYO, March 28, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Seattle Genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq: SGEN) and Astellas Pharma Inc. (TSE: 4503, President and CEO: K... Biopharmaceuticals, Urology, Oncology Astellas Pharma, Seattle Genetics, enfortumab vedotin, bladder cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 28, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New tool uses RNA sequencing to chart rich maps of cellular and tissue function
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) A new technique developed by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard gives an unprecedented view of the cellular organization of tissues. Known as Slide-seq, the method uses genetic sequencing to draw detailed, three-dimensional maps of tissues, revealing not only what cell types are present, but where they are located and what they are doing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study confirms EpCAM as promising target for cancer immunotherapy
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Researchers have shown that cancer immunotherapy targeting the tumor biomarker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is safe and nontoxic in mice and can significantly delay tumor formation and growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Surgical implications of rising heroin abuse
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) With heroin abuse on the rise in the United States, related surgical complications are also increasing, including severe infections and complications related to heroin injection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news