Rare recessive mutations pry open new windows on autism
(Boston Children's Hospital) Most genetic variants linked to autism are de novo mutations, which are not inherited and are relatively easy to find. A new study, in one of the largest cohorts to date, instead tracked rare recessive mutations in which a child inherits two 'bad' copies of a gene. The findings provides a likely explanation for up to 5 percent of all autism cases and offer new clues to autism's biological causes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Canadian researchers discover new genetic link to premenopausal breast cancer
(University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine& Dentistry) University of Alberta researchers have added a new genetic marker to the breast cancer map, helping to expand the list of genetic mutations clinicians can watch for in cancer screenings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Signature of an ineffective immune response to cancer revealed
(University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM)) Our immune system is programmed to destroy cancer cells. Sometimes it has trouble slowing disease progression because it doesn't act quickly or strongly enough. In a study published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers from the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) revealed the genetic signature of this failed immune response for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

B chromosome first -- mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes uncovered
(Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research) B chromosomes are supernumerary chromosomes, which often are preferentially inherited and showcase an increased transmission rate. This transmission advantage is known as 'chromosome drive'. Scientists from the IPK in Gatersleben have now deciphered the mechanisms behind the drive of B chromosomes in Aegilops speltoides. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biological adaptations in the Arctic cervid, the reindeer (Rangifer tarandus)
The reindeer is an Arctic species that exhibits distinctive biological characteristics, for which the underlying genetic basis remains largely unknown. We compared the genomes of reindeer against those of other ruminants and nonruminant mammals to reveal the genetic basis of light arrhythmicity, high vitamin D metabolic efficiency, the antler growth trait of females, and docility. We validate that two reindeer vitamin D metabolic genes (CYP27B1 and POR) show signs of positive selection and exhibit higher catalytic activity than those of other ruminants. A mutation upstream of the reindeer CCND1 gene endows an extra functio...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Lin, Z., Chen, L., Chen, X., Zhong, Y., Yang, Y., Xia, W., Liu, C., Zhu, W., Wang, H., Yan, B., Yang, Y., Liu, X., Sternang Kvie, K., Roed, K. H., Wang, K., Xiao, W., Wei, H., Li, G., Heller, R., Gilbert, M. T. P., Qiu, Q., Wang, W., Li, Z. Tags: Evolution, Genetics, Online Only special/r-articles Source Type: news

Genetic basis of ruminant headgear and rapid antler regeneration
Ruminants are the only extant mammalian group possessing bony (osseous) headgear. We obtained 221 transcriptomes from bovids and cervids and sequenced three genomes representing the only two pecoran lineages that convergently lack headgear. Comparative analyses reveal that bovid horns and cervid antlers share similar gene expression profiles and a common cellular basis developed from neural crest stem cells. The rapid regenerative properties of antler tissue involve exploitation of oncogenetic pathways, and at the same time some tumor suppressor genes are under strong selection in deer. These results provide insights into ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wang, Y., Zhang, C., Wang, N., Li, Z., Heller, R., Liu, R., Zhao, Y., Han, J., Pan, X., Zheng, Z., Dai, X., Chen, C., Dou, M., Peng, S., Chen, X., Liu, J., Li, M., Wang, K., Liu, C., Lin, Z., Chen, L., Hao, F., Zhu, W., Song, C., Zhao, C., Zheng, C., Wang Tags: Evolution, Genetics, Online Only special/r-articles Source Type: news

Phylogeny and characteristics of ruminants
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Evolution, Genetics twis Source Type: news

Forensic drowning site inference employing mixed pyrosequencing profile of DNA barcode gene (rbcL) - Fang T, Liao S, Chen X, Zhao Y, Zhu Q, Cao Y, Wang Q, Zhang S, Gao Z, Yang Y, Wang Y, Zhang J.
The development of DNA barcoding method has given rise to a promising way of studying genetic taxonomy. Our previous study showed that pyrosequencing profile of 18S rDNA V7 hypervariable region can be used for identifying water sources without resolving th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Genetic influences on behavioral outcomes after childhood tTBI a novel systems biology-informed approach - Kurowski BG, Treble-Barna A, Pilipenko V, Wade SL, Yeates KO, Taylor HG, Martin LJ, Jegga AG.
Objectives: To test whether genetic associations with behavioral outcomes after early childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) are enriched for biologic pathways underpinning neurocognitive and behavioral networks. Design: Cross-sectional evalu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Study of multiethnic genomes identifies 27 genetic variants associated with disease
NIH-funded research highlights need for diversity in study populations, creates a comprehensive genomic toolkit for scientists. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - June 19, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Scientists demonstrate the advantages of diverse populations when compiling genetic data
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Relying strictly on genetic data from those of European descent, rather than more diverse populations, can exacerbate existing disease and increase health care disparities, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Phage display for engineering blood-contacting surfaces
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Surfaces that enable endothelial cell attachment without causing blood clotting are needed for various tissue engineering efforts. A new approach involving phage display has been used to identify unique peptides with these typically divergent characteristics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study highlights need for ethnic and ancestral diversity in genomic research
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) A new multicenter analysis led by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other institutions found the inclusion of diverse, multiethnic populations in large-scale genomic studies is critical for reducing health disparities and accurately representing genetics-related disease risks in all populations. The results appear in the June 19 issue of the journal Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Genetics Research Gets Help From Social Media Genetics Research Gets Help From Social Media
Researchers have harnessed the power of social media to build a genetic database, according to a new report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - June 19, 2019 Category: Pathology Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

LabCorp and Mount Sinai to Create AI-Fueled Digital Pathology Center
Some of the biggest names in healthcare are coming together to form a digital and artificial intelligence-enabled pathology center of excellence. LabCorp and Mount Sinai Health System are the primary architects for the center, with a huge assist from Philips. The Mount Sinai Digital and Artificial Intelligence (AI)-Enabled Pathology Center of Excellence will be housed within the New York-based health system’s department of Pathology, Molecular and Cell-Based Medicine and will use the Philips IntelliSite Pathology Solution to expand digital pathology capabilities for primary diagnosis and consultations. Th...
Source: MDDI - June 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

NHS prepares to fast-track cancer drugs that target genetic mutations
The NHS is preparing to fast-track the introduction of new cancer drugs that target tumours according to their genetic make-up rather than where they originate in the body. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - June 19, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Genetic risk at fault for 30 percent of heart disease cases
While diet and lifestyle play a large role in heart disease, researchers in Sweden report that more than 30 percent of cases are caused by genetics -- much higher than previously thought. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Do Young Women Get Addicted to Indoor Tanning?
TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 -- A combination of depression and genetic risk may fuel an addiction to indoor tanning. That's the conclusion of a new study out of Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center in Washington, D.C. For the study,... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 18, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Roche wins Japan approval for personalized cancer drug Rozlytrek
Swiss drugmaker Roche's push into personalized cancer medicines hit a milestone on Tuesday with Japanese approval of a new drug, Rozlytrek, that targets patients who must be identified via genetic profiling. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study, which will be published June 18, 2019 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body's immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway could prevent the deaths of patients suffering rapid liver failure in response to viral infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Does greater immersion in virtual reality lead to a better experience?
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) Contrary to current industry trends to develop more immersive virtual reality systems, a new study found that a more immersive environment or the presence of real-world distractions could have surprising effects on a participant's recall, description of the virtual encounter, and how positive they feel about the experience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dark centers of chromosomes reveal ancient DNA
(University of California - Davis) Geneticists exploring the dark heart of the human genome have discovered big chunks of Neanderthal and other ancient DNA. The results open new ways to study both how chromosomes behave during cell division and how they have changed during human evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Bluebird Prices Gene Therapy at 1.575 Mln Euros Over Five Years Bluebird Prices Gene Therapy at 1.575 Mln Euros Over Five Years
Bluebird bio Inc on Friday set a price for its gene therapy, Zynteglo, at 1.575 million euros ($1.78 million) over five years, after winning conditional approval in Europe this month to treat a rare genetic blood disorder.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines)
Source: Medscape Transplantation Headlines - June 18, 2019 Category: Transplant Surgery Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

L-Serine dietary supplementation is associated with clinical improvement of loss-of-function GRIN2B-related pediatric encephalopathy
Autosomal dominant mutations in GRIN2B are associated with severe encephalopathy, but little is known about the pathophysiological outcomes and any potential therapeutic interventions. Genetic studies have described the association between de novo mutations of genes encoding the subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and severe neurological conditions. Here, we evaluated a missense mutation in GRIN2B, causing a proline-to-threonine switch (P553T) in the GluN2B subunit of NMDAR, which was found in a 5-year-old patient with Rett-like syndrome with severe encephalopathy. Structural molecular modeling predicted ...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - June 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Soto, D., Olivella, M., Grau, C., Armstrong, J., Alcon, C., Gasull, X., Santos-Gomez, A., Locubiche, S., de Salazar, M. G., Garcia-Diaz, R., Gratacos-Batlle, E., Ramos-Vicente, D., Chu-Van, E., Colsch, B., Fernandez-Duenas, V., Ciruela, F., Bayes, A., Sin Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Genetics research gets help from social media
(Reuters Health) - Researchers have harnessed the power of social media to build a genetic database, according to a new report. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Invitae Takes a Deeper Dive into NIPS with New M & amp;A Target
Invitae’s latest acquisition is set to firmly entrench the genetics company in the non-invasive prenatal screening (NIPS). The San Francisco-based company said it signed a definitive agreement to acquire Singular Bio for $55 million. Singular Bio specializes in developing single molecule detection technology that enables lower costs and expanded use of high-quality, cell-free, nucleic acid analysis, initially for application in NIPS. The acquisition is expected to close in the coming weeks, subject to customary closing conditions. Invitae noted the transaction will be cash neutral at close and has already...
Source: MDDI - June 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

China Clamps Down on Foreign Use of Chinese Genetic Material and Data
New rules, which require international scientists to have a Chinese collaborator, go into effect July 1. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 17, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Opinion: Agriculture Must Replace Small Science with Big Science
Agronomic sciences should follow the lead of genetics and other disciplines in sharing data. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - June 17, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Can Wearing a Hat Contribute to Baldness?
Take off that hat. It will make you bald. It’s the sort of thing an opinionated grandparent might tell a grandchild wearing a hat indoors, but there are some who believe there’s wisdom in the admonishment. “I’ve had people ask me about this, and I can understand why they think it’s true,” says Dr. Hayley Goldbach, a dermatologist at UCLA Health. Some people start wearing a hat to hide hair loss, she says, which may lead observers to conclude it was the hat-wearing that triggered the baldness. That’s probably not the case. “I think the short answer is that [hat wearing] is pr...
Source: TIME: Health - June 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Aging beauty Lifestyle relationships Source Type: news

Sights are set on better understanding vision-damaging keratoconus
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) It's an eye condition where genetics and environmental factors like ultraviolet light and vigorous eye rubbing conspire to make the usual curvature of the cornea more pointy, leaving us with double vision and nearsighted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stem cells reprogrammed into neurons could reveal drugs harmful to pregnancy
(Colorado State University) Soham Chanda, an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has designed a new experimental system that can rapidly assess the pathogenic effects of a drug on a baby's developing brain. His system uses embryonic stem cells reprogrammed into neurons, offering a powerful tool for probing genetic and molecular underpinnings of drug-induced neurodevelopmental disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender bias continues in recognition of physicians and nurses
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown that patients are significantly more likely to correctly identify male physicians and female nurses, demonstrating continuing gender bias in the health care environment. These lingering perceptions may slowly be changing, though, as younger patients were more likely to correctly identify female physicians and male nurses, according to the study published in Journal of Women's Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Promising esophageal reconstruction based on engineered constructs
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The loss of complete segments of the esophagus often results from treatments for esophageal cancer or congenital abnormalities, and current methods to re-establish continuity are inadequate. Now, working with a rat model, researchers have developed a promising reconstruction method based on the use of 3D-printed esophageal grafts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers report longest duration of therapeutic gene expression
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A therapeutic gene delivered into the spinal canal of infant rhesus monkeys was still being expressed after nearly 4 years, with no evidence of acute or chronic neuronal tox-icity, according to a new study published in Human Gene Therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pros and Cons of Genetic Testing for Prostate Cancer
You are leaving AARP.org and going to the website of our trusted provider. ... The provider ’s terms, conditions and policies apply. ... Please return to AARP.org to learn more about other benefits. (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - June 17, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Genetic study of the causes of excess liver iron may lead to better treatment
(European Society of Human Genetics) Researchers have shown that genes regulating iron metabolism in the body are responsible for excess liver iron. High levels of iron in the liver are linked to a number of serious health conditions including cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular as well as liver disease. But measuring liver iron is difficult and until recently could only be done through an invasive biopsy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Balancing data protection and research needs in the age of the GDPR
(European Society of Human Genetics) Scientific journals and funding bodies often require researchers to deposit individual genetic data from studies in research repositories in order to increase data sharing with the aim of enabling the reproducibility of new findings, as well as facilitating new discoveries. However, the introduction of new regulations such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) can complicate this. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Association of childhood trauma and genetic variability of CRH-BP and FKBP5 genes with suicidal behavior in bipolar patients - Segura AG, Mitjans M, Jim énez E, Fatjó-Vilas M, Ruíz V, Saiz PA, García-Portilla MP, González-Blanco L, Bobes J, Vieta E, Benabarre A, Arias B.
BACKGROUND: Around 8% of bipolar disorder (BD) patients die by suicide every year, accounting for the highest rate among the psychiatric population. Suicidal behavior (SB) is mediated by an intertwining system of extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Childhood ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Identifying the risk of recurrence of developmental disorder in future pregnancies
(European Society of Human Genetics) A new study aims to provide healthy couples who have a child affected by a developmental disorder with a personalised pre-conception risk evaluation, in order to determine the likelihood of a future child being affected by the same condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol intoxication moderates the association between a polygenic risk score and unprovoked intimate partner aggression - Christ CC, Watkins LE, DiLillo D, Stoltenberg SF.
Despite evidence that genetic variation contributes to aggression, few studies have examined how genetic variation contributes to IPA specifically. In the current study, 69 couples from a Midwestern university completed self-report measures of IPA, childho... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

A qualitative systematic review of experiences and perceptions of youth suicide - Grimmond J, Kornhaber R, Visentin D, Cleary M.
BACKGROUND: Suicide remains a global issue with over 800,000 people dying from suicide every year. Youth suicide is especially serious due to the years of life lost when a young person takes their own life. Social interactions, perceived support, genetic p... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Bluebird prices gene therapy at 1.58 million euros over 5 years
Bluebird bio Inc on Friday set a price for its gene therapy, Zynteglo, at 1.58 million euros ($1.78 million) over five years, after winning conditional approval in Europe this month to treat a rare genetic blood disorder. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

A Simple Way to Make Genetic Counseling More Efficient A Simple Way to Make Genetic Counseling More Efficient
Does information up-front improve patient knowledge after genetic counseling?Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - June 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Making it personal: How genetic technologies are changing the face of medicine
The age of one-size-fits-all medicine is fading. Taking its place is an era of personalized medicine - the practice of tailoring disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment to patients as individuals. Many cancers, for example, are resistant to conventional therapies but respond to medications that target specific cancer-causing genetic mutations. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - June 14, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Blood-Brain Barrier Chip Created Using Stem Cells
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles said that for the first time they have duplicated a patient's blood-brain barrier (BBB) with stem cells. In turn, the research team said this can be used to develop personalized medicine and new techniques to research brain disorders. The new research, published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, is a collaboration between Dr. Gad Vatine of BGU's Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research Center and Department of Physiology and Cell Biology and Dr. Clive N. Svendsen, of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The BBB bl...
Source: MDDI - June 14, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Reversing type 2 diabetes
(Natural News) Conventional doctors would have you believe that diabetes can neither be prevented nor reversed. They ask you if your mother or father had diabetes and then tell you solemnly that you’re genetically predisposed to it and that you are the human equivalent of a ticking time bomb. They’re wrong though. Type 2 diabetes... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sickle cell disease moves a step closer
(European Society of Human Genetics) Sickle cell disease is a form of anemia that is inherited when both parents are carriers of a mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Currently, it can only be diagnosed in pregnancy by carrying out an invasive test that has a small risk of miscarriage and is therefore sometimes declined by parents. Now, researchers have developed a non-invasive prenatal test for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Iowa State's Geetu Tuteja selected for Pew Scholars Biomedical Research Program
(Iowa State University) Geetu Tuteja, assistant professor in Iowa State's department of genetics, development and cell biology, has been selected to join the   Pew Scholars Program in the Biomedical Sciences. She is the first Iowa State researcher to receive this honor. Tuteja is one of 22 promising scientists nationwide selected by the Philadelphia-based Pew Charitable Trusts to receive a four-year, $300,000 grant to conduct biomedical research aimed at advancing human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Henry Lynch, 91, Dies; Found Hereditary Link in Cancer
To a doubting medical world, he found compelling evidence that some cancers are passed along genetically. His work was ultimately widely embraced. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Kolata Tags: Lynch, Dr. Henry T. Deaths (Obituaries) Genetics and Heredity Colon and Colorectal Cancer Creighton University Source Type: news

How Almonds Went From Deadly To Delicious
In a new study, researchers pinpoint the genetic mutation that transformed almonds from toxic and bitter to tasty and sweet.(Image credit: Ekapat Suwanmanee/Getty Images/EyeEm) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susie Neilson Source Type: news