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Global Health: Ethicists Call for More Scrutiny of ‘ Human-Challenge ’ Trials
A vaccine study in which subjects are to be deliberately infected with Zika is on pause after ethicists said it had “ insufficient value. ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: Zika Virus Vaccination and Immunization Research National Institutes of Health Science (Journal) University of Washington Source Type: news

RTP biotech banks federal grant to treat age-related disorders
Research Triangle Park-based ZenBio has banked a new federal grant aimed at the treatment of age-related disorders.   The $220,000, one-year grant was awarded to ZenBio on March 15 by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. Through the Phase I Small Business Innovation Research grant, ZenBio will develop technology to use exosomes, or vesicles, secreted from stem cells to tre at such age-related disorders as chronic tendon injuries.  “We know that there are… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - April 20, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

RTP biotech banks federal grant to treat age-related disorders
Research Triangle Park-based ZenBio has banked a new federal grant aimed at the treatment of age-related disorders.   The $220,000, one-year grant was awarded to ZenBio on March 15 by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health. Through the Phase I Small Business Innovation Research grant, ZenBio will develop technology to use exosomes, or vesicles, secreted from stem cells to tre at such age-related disorders as chronic tendon injuries.  “We know that there are… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 20, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

2018 Demystifying Medicine: The Opioid Epidemic: How, Where, and What Can Be Done?
National Institutes of Health. 04/17/2018 This one-hour, 49-minute lecture describes the state of the opioid crisis, the state of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)'s efforts, and how clinicians, medical students, Ph.D. students, and other healthcare and research professionals can be a part of the solution. The focus of NIH's efforts center on ways to reduce the over-prescription of opioids, accelerate development of effective non-opioid therapies for pain, and provide more flexible options for treating opioid addiction. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

IU psychologist awarded $1.7 million to study early child language learning
(Indiana University) Indiana University Bloomington psychology professor Chen Yu has been awarded $1.7 million from the National Institutes of Health to better understand the earliest phases of language learning in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reddit AMA: Dr. Francis Collins and the future of precision medicine
Former NHGRI Director Dr. Francis Collins, now director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), earned a reputation as a gene hunter at the University of Michigan and led the successful completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003. Now, Dr. Collins manages the NIH's efforts in building innovative enterprises like the precision medicine initiativeAll of Us. This AMA will focus on Dr. Collins' experiences during the Human Genome Project and his vision for the future of precision medicine. (Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights)
Source: NHGRI Homepage Highlights - April 19, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Monika Goyal M.D., M.S.C.E., consultant on $5 million NIH grant to reduce pediatric firearm injuries
(Children's National Health System) Monika Goyal M.D., M.S.C.E., director of research in Children's Division of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services, has been named a consultant on a new $5 million National Institutes of Health research grant that represents the agency's largest funding commitment in more than two decades to reduce pediatric firearm injuries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NLM Technical Bulletin, Mar-Apr 2018, Eric Dishman to Deliver the 2018 Joseph Leiter NLM/MLA Lecture, May 9, 2018
Eric Dishman, director of the All of Us Research Program at the National Institutes of Health, will deliver the 2018 Joseph Leiter National Library of Medicine/Medical Library Association Lecture on Wednesday, May 9, 2018, at 1:30 pm (EDT). The lecture is open to the public and will be recorded and broadcast live. (Source: NLM Technical Bulletin)
Source: NLM Technical Bulletin - April 17, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mother (of all Pandemics) and Her Naughty Children: 100 Years of Behaving Badly
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [National Institutes of Health]. 04/10/2018 This one-hour, two-minute lecture discusses the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic and what scientists still can learn from it. The speaker describes how research on 1918 flu virus and the pandemic it caused is informing current efforts to understand how and why new flu viruses with pandemic potential emerge. He also discusses investigations aimed at developing new and better flu vaccines, a major focus of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases research going into the second century of the 1918 pandemic era. (Video or Mu...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Study suggests way to improve flu vaccines
Current flu vaccines mainly target the virus surface protein hemagglutinin. A study suggests that vaccines designed to target neuraminidase might be more effective. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Disrupting normal hormone cycle spurs fat cells
In mice, interfering with the natural cycle of a certain hormone spurs development of fat cells. The finding may help explain how stress and conditions that affect hormone levels can cause obesity. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New AIBS Report on Biological Sciences in the President's FY 2019 Budget Request
A new report by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) Public Policy Office analyzes the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request for biological sciences research and education. The report summarizes proposed budget and program changes relevant to the biological sciences. The document analyzes the budget proposals for several federal agencies and programs, including National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Standards and Technology, United States Geological Survey, Department of Energy Office of Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Researchers link sedentary behavior to thinning in brain region critical for memory
This study does not prove that too much sitting causes thinner brain structures, but instead that more hours spent sitting are associated with thinner regions, researchers said. In addition, the researchers focused on the hours spent sitting, but did not ask participants if they took breaks during this time.The researchers next hope to follow a group of people for a longer duration to determine if sitting causes the thinning and what role gender, race and weight might play in brain health related to sitting.IMPACTMedial temporal lobe thinning can be a precursor to cognitive decline and dementia in middle-aged and older adu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lingering feelings over daily stresses may impact long-term health
Researchers found that people who continued to have negative feelings about a stressful event the day after were more likely to have health issues ten years later. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Epstein-Barr virus protein can “switch on” risk genes for autoimmune diseases
EBV may trigger some cases of lupus, say NIH-supported researchers. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Genetically altered broadly neutralizing antibodies protect monkeys from HIV-like virus
NIH scientists report single dose elicited long-term protection. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH scientists watch the brain ’s lining heal after a head injury
Study provides insights into the immune system ’s role in recovery after concussion in mice. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Cyberbullying, unmet medical needs contribute to depressive symptoms among sexual minority youth
NIH study finds higher rates of dissatisfaction with family relationships. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

'I was a monster': Mental health scientist describes her own delusions
National Institutes of Health neurologist Dr Barbara Lipska thought her years of studying mentally ill brains had helped her understand the conditions - until she failed to see she was losing her sanity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Omega-3s from fish oil supplements no better than placebo for dry eye
NIH-funded study finds omega-3 fails to yield beneficial results in the clinic. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Lack of sleep may be linked to risk factor for Alzheimer ’s disease
Preliminary NIH study shows increased levels of beta-amyloid  Losing just one night of sleep led to an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer ’s disease, according to a small, new study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. In Alzheimer’s disease, beta-amyloid proteins clump together to form amyloid plaques, a hallmark of the disease.  (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - April 13, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Tina Source Type: news

Drop in new opioid prescriptions to benzodiazepine patients could reduce overdoses, study suggests
The mixing of opioid medications and benzodiazepines has been found by the National Institutes of Health to be a significant factor in opioid overdose deaths. But a new study suggests that co-prescriptions of benzodiazepines and opioids in the US are on the decline. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA study produces clearest images to date of HSV-1, the virus that causes cold sores
UCLA researchers have produced the clearest 3-D images to date of the virus that causes cold sores, herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1. The images enabled them to map the virus ’ structure and offered new insights into how HSV-1 works.A report on the research was published online by the journal Science.The scientists used cryo electron microscopy, or cryoEM, to obtain the first atomic model of the virus particle, which is made up of more than 3,000 protein molecules comprising tens of millions of atoms.“We’ve known that HSV-1 can hide inside the nucleus of the nerve cell and establish life-long latent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding applications are due today! Applications for our upcoming round of health information outreach funding are due by 11pm this evening – don’t forget our last funding tip – follow directions for submission. Please note, late applications will not be accepted. We look forward to funding some great projects! NNLM Edit-a-thon: don’t forget to use #citeNLM2018 next week during NNLM’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – we’re adding citations to existing articles on rare diseases! Not sur...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Lack of sleep may be linked to risk factor for Alzheimer ’s disease
Preliminary NIH study shows increased levels of beta-amyloid. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Inhibiting metabolism found to be effective in treating aggressive form of lung cancer
FINDINGSResearchers from UCLA and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center have found that two targeted therapies could be more effective if used in combination to treat squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The two drugs, MLN128 and CB-839, individually target the metabolism of key nutrients glucose and glutamine, respectively, prohibiting the cancer from switching metabolic gears between glucose (a simple sugar) and glutamine (an amino acid) to tap vital sources of energy. This switch enables the cancer cells to adapt their metabolism and evade treatments.BACKGROUNDNon-small cell lung cancer makes up about 85 percent of all lu...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lack of sleep may be linked to risk factor for Alzheimer's disease
(NIH/National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism) Losing just one night of sleep led to an immediate increase in beta-amyloid, a protein in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, according to a small, new study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Omega-3s from fish oil supplements no better than placebo for dry eye
(NIH/National Eye Institute) Omega-3 fatty acid supplements taken orally proved no better than placebo at relieving symptoms or signs of dry eye, according to the findings of a well-controlled trial funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mystery behind ‘dripping candle wax’ disease is cracked
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health, Maryland, found the genetic mutations behind the rare disorder only occur in affected bones and do not spread elsewhere in the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH funding is on the rise. Here's who's winning in Pittsburgh
The University of Pittsburgh is in the top five largest recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with the agency having survived concerns about possible cuts in the latest federal budget standoff. The university was granted the vast majority of Pittsburgh's 1,223 awards totaling $485 million-plus from the research center, which serves as an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The budget for 2018-19 for the NIH ended up at about $34.8 million — roughly… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 12, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeff Jeffrey Source Type: news

NIH funding is on the rise. Here's who's winning in Pittsburgh
The University of Pittsburgh is in the top five largest recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with the agency having survived concerns about possible cuts in the latest federal budget standoff. The university was granted the vast majority of Pittsburgh's 1,223 awards totaling $485 million-plus from the research center, which serves as an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The budget for 2018-19 for the NIH ended up at about $34.8 million — roughly… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 12, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jeff Jeffrey Source Type: news

Final FY18 Appropriations: National Institutes of Health
Funding for the National Institutes of Health is expanding by $3 billion or 9 percent in fiscal year 2018, with all institutes receiving increases over last year ’s levels. Congress has also firmly rejected the administration’s proposal to cap indirect costs paid to research institutions to reimburse them for facilities and administrative overhead. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - April 12, 2018 Category: Physics Authors: awolfe Source Type: news

Mystery behind ‘dripping candle wax’ disease that affects just 400 people worldwide is cracked
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health, Maryland, found the genetic mutations behind the rare disorder only occur in affected bones and do not spread elsewhere in the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eric Dishman to Deliver 2018 NLM/MLA Leiter Lecture, May 9
Eric Dishman, director of the All of Us Research Program at the National Institutes of Health, will deliver the 2018 Joseph Leiter National Library of Medicine (NLM)/Medical Library Association (MLA) Lecture, Wednesday, May 9. It will take place at 1:30 PM in Lister Hill Auditorium, on the first floor of NIH Building 38A, the Lister Hill Center. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - April 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Scientists teach computers how to analyze brain cells
NIH-funded researchers and Google show machine learning can be applied to biomedical research. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 12, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH study revises molecular classification for most common type of lymphoma
Discovery could help explain why some patients with the disease respond to treatment and others don ’t. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 11, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH researchers crack mystery behind rare bone disorder
Study finds gene mutations that cause “dripping candle wax” bone disease. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 11, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH researchers crack mystery behind rare bone disorder
(NIH/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases) Researchers at the National Institutes of Health worked with 15 patients from around the world to uncover a genetic basis of 'dripping candle wax' bone disease. The rare disorder, known as melorheostosis, causes excess bone formation that resembles dripping candle wax on x-rays. The results, appearing in Nature Communications, offer potential treatment targets for this rare disease, provide important clues about bone development, and may lead to insights about fracture healing and osteoporosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NCI study revises molecular classification for most common type of lymphoma
(NIH/National Cancer Institute) In a new study, researchers identified genetic subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) that could help explain why some patients with the disease respond to treatment and others don't. The study, led by researchers in the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, with additional authors from several institutions around the world, was published online April 11, 2018, in The New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New biological research framework for Alzheimer ’s to spur discovery
NIA, Alzheimer ’s Association convene effort to update disease definition, speed testing. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 10, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Procedure makes heart valve replacement safer for high-risk patients
Scientists developed a novel technique that prevents a rare but often fatal complication that can arise during a heart valve procedure called transcatheter aortic valve replacement. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence enhances MRI scans
Researchers used machine learning to improve images from MRI scanners. The technique may enable better quality medical images for people who need MRI, PET, CT, and other scans. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Just ONE sleepless night raises the risk of Alzheimer's disease
A study of 20 people, led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health in Maryland, found a night without sleep increased the beta-amyloid protein in part of the brain by five per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Genomic analysis of 33 cancer types completed
Using molecular and clinical information from more than 10,000 tumors, researchers finished a detailed genomic analysis of 33 types of cancer. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
CCHF is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 9, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Emails reveal pressures on NIH gun research: agency staff wanted program on firearms violence to continue - Wadman M.
Internal agency emails released to Science under the Freedom of Information Act show the political tightrope that officials at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) negotiated as they discussed whether to renew a program soliciting research on preventing... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Research offers clues for improved influenza vaccine design
These efforts contribute to NIAID ’s larger plan to develop a universal influenza vaccine. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 6, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Embolx wins $2m NIH grant for pressure-directed embolization therapy
Embolx said today that it landed a $2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to fund development of its next-generation Sniper balloon occlusion microcatheter. The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based medical device company has developed a drug-delivery system that administers therapies into targeted areas of the body by controlling pressure. Embolx’s Sniper balloon is designed to treat cancerous tumors, benign prostatic hyperplasia and uterine fibroids, according to the company. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Embolx wins $2m NIH grant for pressure-directed emboliz...
Source: Mass Device - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Funding Roundup Pharmaceuticals Research & Development embolx National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

Study: PET imaging agent could help predict depression drug ’ s efficacy
Image courtesy of Mala Ananth Researchers have identified a positron emission tomography imaging agent that could identify the patients that are more likely to benefit from a drug designed to treat major depressive disorder, according to a study published this month in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The C-DASB tracer targets a protein, 5-HTT, found in the part of a person’s brain that is responsible for emotional processing, called the amygdala. Escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is indicated for people with depression, but it doesn’t work for all patients. Scanning a person’s ...
Source: Mass Device - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Imaging Neurological Pharmaceuticals Research & Development National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

UCLA scientists discover that cells contain mitochondria specialized to build fats
Mitochondria, known to most people as the “powerhouses of the cell,” have been recognized for decades as the cellular organelle where sugars and fats are oxidized to generate energy. Now, new research by UCLA scientists has found that not all mitochondria fit this definition. Within each cell a group of specialized mitochondria can be f ound attached to fat droplets. Rather than burn fat to create energy, these specialized mitochondria are responsible for providing the energy to build and store fat molecules.“This is really a whole new view of mitochondria and what they can do,” said lead author Dr....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news