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Rainfall can indicate that mosquito-borne epidemics will occur weeks later
FINDINGSA new study demonstrates that outbreaks of mosquito-borne viruses Zika and Chikungunya generally occur about three weeks after heavy rainfall.Researchers also found that Chikungunya will predominate over Zika when both circulate at the same time, because Chikungunya has a shorter incubation period — just two days, versus 10 days for Zika. The latter finding explains why a late-2015 Zika epidemic in Rio de Janeiro ended while the number of Chikungunya cases increased in February 2016.BACKGROUNDViruses transmitted by insects can lead to serious health repercussions. Zika is linked to birth defects, and up to 1 ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 21, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NIH scientists and collaborators find infectious prion protein in skin of CJD patients
Prion diseases originate when normally harmless prion protein molecules become abnormal and gather in clusters and filaments in the human body and brain. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 21, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

How storing corneas affects transplantation success
A large study found that corneas can be stored safely for up to 11 days. The findings suggest that more people can have access to vision-saving corneal transplantations. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brain circuits linked to alertness
Researchers discovered brain circuits that regulate alertness in fish and mice. The findings could lead to a better understanding of mental health conditions associated with alertness. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - November 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fresenius gets in on $3m Modulated Imaging Series A
Medtech imaging developer Modulated Imaging said today it closed a $2.9 million Series A financing round that was joined by dialysis giant Fresenius Medical Care‘s (NYSE:FMS; ETR:FRE) Ventures arm. The round was led by Grey Sky Venture Partners and joined by Mitsubishi UFJ Capital, Fresenius Medical Care Ventures and Hamamatsu Photonics’ Photonics Management Corporation, the Irvine, Calif.-based company said. “Hamamatsu Photonics has invested in Modulated Imaging once again due to its innovative work with photonics to improve human health. Modulated Imaging’s technology is very much in sync with Ham...
Source: Mass Device - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Imaging Fresenius modulatedimaging Source Type: news

Physical activity key to keeping weight off
A careful metabolic analysis of contestants in “The Biggest Loser” competition supports previous findings that increased physical activity is key to keeping weight off. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Fish Oil Help Reading?
Discussion Fats and fatty acids are essential for good human health. Saturated fats have hydrogen pairs linked to each carbon on the carbon backbone. They are solid or semi-solid at room temperature. Common examples are butter, lard, or hardened vegetable shortening. They are linked to higher cholesterol and triglycerides and only a small amount of them are recommended to be consumed in the diet. Unsaturated fats have one or more hydrogen atoms missing from the carbon backbone. They are liquid at room temperature. Monounsaturated fatty acids have one hydrogen pair that is missing from the carbon backbone. They are liq...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 20, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Hibernating ground squirrels provide clues to new stroke treatments
Multi-step screening process leads to molecule that may protect brain cells. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 17, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Closing Today! The Fall 2017 offering for the Health Sciences Library Association o...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - November 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Researchers aim to create touch-sensitive, nerve-connected robotic prosthetic hand
Researchers at two academic facilities are aiming to create a first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand that can grow and adapt to its environment, equipped with a living pathway to translate the robots touch sensation to the user’s brain. Teams from both Florida Atlantic University and the University of Utah School of Medicine said they have received a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of health for the project, according to a press release. Read the whole story on our sister site, The Robot Report The post Researchers aim...
Source: Mass Device - November 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Prosthetics Research & Development Robotics Source Type: news

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients
FINDINGSA tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery, UCLA researchers concluded.BACKGROUNDIn adults who undergo inpatient surgery, the mortality rate for those patients who experience cardiac arrest after surgery is 65 percent, and is about 15 to 25 percent for those who have a heart attack. Estimating the risk of cardiac complications is an important ste...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Separating side effects could hold key for safer opioids
NIH-funded scientists may have revealed brain functions in pre-clinical research that widen the safety margin for opioid pain relief without overdose. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 16, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

National organizations support outreach efforts for NIH ’s All of Us Research Program
Groups will help raise awareness about the initiative to engage 1 million or more volunteers in health research. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 16, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Air pollution exposure in early pregnancy linked to miscarriage, NIH study suggests
Ozone is a highly reactive form of oxygen that is a primary constituent of urban smog. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 16, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Separating side effects could hold key for safer opioids
(NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse) Opioid pain relievers can be extremely effective in relieving pain, but can carry a high risk of addiction and ultimately overdose when breathing is suppressed and stops. Scientists have discovered a way to separate these two effects -- pain relief and breathing -- opening a window of opportunity to make effective pain medications without the risk of respiratory failure. The research, published today in Cell, was funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kenneth J. Sher to present the Keller Lecture November 30
Dr. Kenneth J. Sher will present the 2017 Mark Keller Honorary Lecture.  Date: Thursday, November 30  Time: 1:30 pm  Location: Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health,  Bethesda, MD  (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - November 15, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

Kenneth J. Sher to present the Mark Keller Honorary Lecture November 30
On November 30, Kenneth J. Sher, Ph.D., will deliver a lecture on “Development and Resolution of Alcohol Use Disorders” at this fall’s Mark Keller Honorary Lecture.  Time: 1:30 pm Location: Masur Auditorium, NIH Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health,  Bethesda, MD  (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - November 15, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

Society for Neuroscience satellite meeting explores notable studies in addiction research
What:  The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health, will host a one-day mini convention, a satellite event of the 2017 Society of Neuroscience annual meeting. NIDA and NIAAA grantees will present on treatment approaches for substance use disorders while exploring the functions of the immune and nervous systems, as well as the impact of social stressors on brain development and addiction. (Source: NIAAA News)
Source: NIAAA News - November 15, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: groa Source Type: news

BioCorRx inks deal with Nat ’ l Institute on Drug Abuse
BioCorRx (OTC:BICX) said today that it inked a confidentiality agreement with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which will allow the group to share information and potentially work together on R&D and commercialization of BioCorRx’s therapies for opioid use disorder. The National Institutes of Health division has also agreed to participate as an observer at the FDA’s pre-IND meeting for BioCorRx’s naltrexone implant slated to take place on Jan. 24. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post BioCorRx inks deal with Nat’l Institute on Drug Abuse appeared ...
Source: Mass Device - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Implants Pharmaceuticals Regulatory/Compliance Research & Development Wall Street Beat BioCorRx National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

Study: Head-to-head comparison of opioid use disorder therapies finds similarities
A study published today in The Lancet found that two different therapies used to treat opioid use disorder – an extended-release naltrexone injection and a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone – have similar outcomes once patients get past the hurdle of starting treatment. This is the first study to compare the combination therapy and naltrexone head-to-head in the U.S. The study enrolled 570 opioid-dependent adults, 82% of which were using heroin and 16% of which were abusing pain medications. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Study: Head-to-head c...
Source: Mass Device - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

Scientists Have Made Their First Attempt at Gene Editing Inside a Human Patient
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

Search for novel biomarkers indicating early cardiovascular disease risk wins funding
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists have been granted funding from the National Institutes of Health to pursue a promising study on the ultimate causes of heart disease and metabolic disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 15, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Developing new molecular methods for synthetizing treatments for drug-resistant cancers
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) With a $1.7 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Anita Mattson, a biochemist at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI), will develop a new class of catalysts that could make it possible to reliably synthesize organic compounds that hold the promise of treating cancers that have become resistant to commonly used chemotherapy medications. The catalysts may also open the door to a new approach to discovering new drugs for cancer and many other diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Opioid treatment drugs have similar outcomes once patients initiate treatment
NIDA study compares buprenorphine/naloxone combination to extended release naltrexone. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 14, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Three decades of responding to infectious disease outbreaks
NIAID director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., highlights lessons from AIDS to Zika. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 14, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » NIH Multimodal Brain Stimulation Speaker Series: John Rothwell
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is hosting the Multimodal TMS Speaker Series to bring together the leaders in the field conducting research using non-invasive brain stimulation and functional imaging including EEG and fMRI. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » NIH Multimodal Brain Stimulation Speaker Series: Vince Clark
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is hosting the Multimodal TMS Speaker Series to bring together the leaders in the field conducting research using non-invasive brain stimulation and functional imaging including EEG and fMRI. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Einstein researchers receive $6 million grant to untangle the genetic protections against alzheimer's disease
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) The number of older adults with Alzheimer's disease continues to rise, but the number of treatments for the condition has not kept pace. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore, have received a $6.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify networks of genes in healthy centenarians that protect them against dementia. The results could help identify new targets for drugs to treat Alzheimer's. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shining a light on the nervous system to thwart disease
(Case Western Reserve University) Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, and University of Pittsburgh have received a four-year, $9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop enhanced infrared light technology (infrared neuromodulation) for potentially treating a variety of diseases, including cardiac arrhythmias, high and low blood pressure, asthma, sleep apnea and diarrhea, one of the leading killers of children worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SUNY downstate receives $2 million for research into vision-threatening diseases
(SUNY Downstate Medical Center) Brahim Chaqour, PhD, professor of cell biology and ophthalmology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has received two awards to support research into treatment of currently incurable vision-threatening diseases. The new awards, totaling $2,008,973, are from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Einstein Receives $6 Million Grant to Untangle the Genetic Protections Against Alzheimer's Disease
November 13, 2017—BRONX, NY—The number of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease continues to rise, but the number of treatments for the condition has not kept pace. Now, researchers atAlbert Einstein College of Medicine, part ofMontefiore, have received a $6.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify networks of genes in healthy centenarians that protect them against dementia. The results could help identify new targets for drugs to treat Alzheimer’s. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - November 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sex differences a rich field for UCLA multiple sclerosis researcher
As a child, Dr. Rhonda Voskuhl had terrible asthma, was often sick and had to get weekly allergy shots. She wondered why her body was so reactive to pollen, cats, wheat and eggs — her throat would swell, breathing became more difficult and her skin developed a rash. A frequent visitor to the doctor’s office, she had “a wonderful doctor who made me feel so much better.”It ’s no surprise, then, that Voskuhl grew up to become a doctor. Today, Voskuhl directs UCLA’s multiple sclerosis program and is the Jack H. Skirball professor of Multiple Sclerosis Research. She’s wrapping up one cl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Obesity during pregnancy may directly lead to large babies
Obesity during pregnancy may directly lead to overgrown infants, which poses a greater risk for complications with the mother and baby, research from the National Institutes of Health found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Data from landmark NIH blood pressure study supports important part of new AHA/ACC hypertension guidelines
The new high blood pressure guidelines illustrate the utility and impact of NHLBI scientific studies. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 13, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Obesity during pregnancy may lead directly to fetal overgrowth, NIH study suggests
Results underscore the importance of attaining a healthy body weight before pregnancy. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 13, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Mirror image: Researchers create higher-quality pictures of biospecimens
NIH scientists improve efficiency, speed, and resolution of optical microscopy. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 13, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Gestational diabetes increases risk of cardiovascular disease; however, scientists also determined a healthy lifestyle helps mitigate that risk
(Natural News) A new study finds that gestational diabetes increases risk of cardiovascular disease in women, as reported by The Science Daily. In addition, researchers discover that having a healthy lifestyle helps lower cardiovascular risk. Researchers from the National Institute of Health (NIH) analyzed the association between cardiovascular disease and gestational diabetes. They evaluated the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mirror image: Researchers create higher-quality pictures of biospecimens
(NIH/National Institute of Biomedical Imaging& Bioengineering) Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the University of Chicago improved the speed, resolution, and light efficiency of an optical microscope by switching from a conventional glass coverslip to a reflective, mirrored coverslip and applying new computer algorithms to process the resulting data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH awards $2.34m to GBSI for reverse experimental design training to improve research reproducibilitY
(Global Biological Standards Institute) The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has awarded the Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI) $2.34 million over five years for a groundbreaking experimental design training project to improve reproducibility in preclinical research. The project, entitled " Producing Reproducible Experiments by Promoting Reverse Experimental Design " (PREPaRED),* is a collaborative educational partnership between GBSI and faculty at Harvard Medical School, Vanderbilt University, Purdue University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Federal policy to reduce re-hospitalizations is linked to increased mortality rates
Federal policymakers five years ago introduced the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program to spur hospitals to reduce Medicare readmission rates by penalizing them if they didn ’t. A new analysis led by researchers at UCLA and Harvard University, however, finds that the program may be so focused on keeping some patients out of the hospital that related death rates are increasing.In a study of 115,245 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries at 416 hospitals, implementation of the reduction program was indeed linked to a decrease in readmissions at 30 days after discharge and at one year after discharge among people hos...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 12, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding available! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, is accepting applications for health information outreach, health literacy initiatives, emergency preparedness partnerships and health sciences library projects. Applications will be due by COB on December 1. See a recent blog post from Executive Director, Kate Flewelling for details, or review our funding opportunities and start your application today! Rural Health Week begins on Monday, November 13! Wondering how you can participate?...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - November 10, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Robotic suit helps kids with cerebral palsy walk upright
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health created a robotic exoskeleton that attaches to children's legs who have cerebral palsy. It improved posture just as well as surgery would. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH study finds donor corneas can be safely preserved for longer period
Corneal transplantation success unaffected for donor corneas preserved for 11 days, expanding pool of available tissue. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 9, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

UofL receives $6.7 million to become Superfund Research Center
(University of Louisville) The University of Louisville has received a $6.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to become one of fewer than two dozen Superfund Research Centers across the United States. The five-year grant comes after a 20-year effort by the university to secure Superfund money for environmental study and will establish a new, multidisciplinary center at UofL that will support the federal Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cellphone-based microscope leads to possible strategy for treating river blindness
More than 16,000 volunteers provided finger-prick blood samples for the study. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 8, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Robotic suit helps kids with cerebral palsy walk tall
Scientists from the National Institutes of Health create a robotic armor that can help children with cerebral palsy walk easier and upright. The technology is the first specifically designed to treat crouch gait in kids with cerebral palsy, they say. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » NIH Multimodal Brain Stimulation Speaker Series: Joel Voss and Risto Ilmoniemi
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is hosting the Multimodal TMS Speaker Series to bring together the leaders in the field conducting research using non-invasive brain stimulation and functional imaging including EEG and fMRI (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

LumiThera touts interim data from pilot study of LT-300 AMD treatment
LumiThera today announced topline interim results from the Lightsite 1 trial of its LT-300 photobiomodulation device designed to treat dry age-related macular degeneration, touting statistically significant vision benefits maintained to 3 months. Data came from the 30-patient pilot study of the device, funded by a Small Business Innovation Research grant from the National Institute of Health and National Eye Institute. The trial is slated to follow patients undergoing photobiomodulation therapies for up to 1 year. “We have examined the interim data from the Lightsite I study for up to the first 3 months followin...
Source: Mass Device - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Optical/Ophthalmic LumiThera Source Type: news

Fitbit wearables will help power NIH's All of Us Research Program
Fitbit devices will be the first wearables used in the National Institutes of Health ’s All of Us Research Program, an ambitious longitudinal study ultimately aiming to collect the baseline characteristics of 1 million or more Americans. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - November 7, 2017 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Health Tip: Defining Health Literacy
-- Health literacy refers to how well people get access to the health information and services they need, and their ability to make informed decisions based on this access. According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health, more than 90 million... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 7, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news