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Budget Accord Offers Opportunity to Increase Federal Science Funding
Congress approved a two-year budget plan on February 9 that would increase authorizations for federal spending. The agreement passed in the Senate (71-28) and House (240-186) and was signed into law by President Trump. The bipartisan agreement raised the caps on defense and nondefense discretionary spending by nearly $300 billion over two years, with nondefense discretionary spending - the biggest source of research funding - getting a $63 billion boost in FY 2018 and an additional $68 billion in FY 2019. Congress has yet to complete work on FY 2018 appropriations, however. Appropriations legislation is the legislative ve...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NIH Budget Remains Flat Under Trump Budget
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) would see roughly flat funding if the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request were enacted as proposed. The White House has requested $34.8 billion for NIH, approximately $2 billion below the 2018 enacted appropriation. Late adjustments to the budget reversed an originally proposed 27 percent cut to NIH. The FY 2019 budget for NIH is slated to increase only slightly by $538 million over 2017 levels because it would absorb three agencies under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that fund research on healthcare quality, occupational health, and disabiliti...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

How spacecraft testing enabled bone marrow research
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) In the 1970s, a NASA employee stepped up to a challenge posed by the National Institutes of Health or NIH: to freeze bone marrow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Physical and mental multitasking may boost memory, study suggests
FINDINGSPerforming memory training exercises at the same time as pedaling a stationary bike led to better gains in memory than doing the training exercises after working up a sweat, according to a 55-person study led by UCLA researchers. The findings suggest that exercise may temporarily make it easier for the brain to create new memories.BACKGROUNDIn the United States, studies have shown that more than 40 percent of people over age 60 have some memory decline or forgetfulness; it ’s often considered a normal part of aging. Researchers have previously uncovered a handful of lifestyle interventions — including e...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Einstein Ranks 7th in NIH Awards Per Principal Investigator Among Top U.S. Medical Schools
February 20, 2018—(BRONX, NY)—Asreported earlier, investigators at Einstein and Montefiore secured $174 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in federal fiscal year 2017. Now, an analysis byBlue Ridge Institute for Medical Research shows that Einstein ranks 7th in award dollars per investigator (28th in total funding) among the nation’s top medical schools. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA scientists use color-coded tags to discover how heart cells develop
UCLA researchers used fluorescent colored proteins to trace how cardiomyocytes — cells in heart muscle that enable it to pump blood — are produced in mouse embryos. The findings could eventually lead to methods for regenerating heart tissue in human adults.The research was published in the journal Nature Communications.“Our ultimate goal is to be able to regenerate cardiomyocytes after an injury like a heart attack,” said Dr. Reza Ardehali, an associate professor of medicine in UCLA’s division of cardiology and a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2016
These tables provide detailed data on graduate students and postdoctoral appointees in science, engineering, and selected health fields. Trend data are provided on graduate student enrollment, postdoctoral appointments, and other doctorate-holding nonfaculty researcher (NFR) appointments, as well as counts of graduate students, postdoctoral appointees, and NFRs by characteristics, such as sex, race and ethnicity, citizenship, field, and primary source and mechanism of support. Data are from the Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering: Fall 2016, sponsored by the National Center for Science...
Source: NSF - Statistics on U.S. Science and Engineering Resources - February 21, 2018 Category: Statistics Source Type: news

Health Tip: Understanding Palliative Care
-- Palliative care is designed to improve the quality of life and help manage the symptoms of a serious iilness, the U.S. National Institutes of Health says. The focus is on keeping a person comfortable and happy, and can be provided alongside... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

PHAT Life: Effective HIV intervention for youth in the criminal justice system
(NIH/National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities) A group risk-reduction intervention that uses role-playing, videos, games, and skill-building exercises to promote knowledge about HIV/AIDS, positive coping, and problem-solving skills for high-risk teens in the juvenile justice system, showed great potential for reducing sexual risk-taking. The findings were published in Health Psychology and funded by the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rooting out Ebola's biomechanical enabler
(Lehigh University) In a new study supported by the National Institutes of Health, researchers at Lehigh University seek to elucidate quantitatively -- for the first time -- the biomechanical mechanism of Ebola-host cell interaction, providing potential new targets for antiviral drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social Media Analysis During Disasters
National Library of Medicine [National Institutes of Health]. 02/07/2018 This course from the National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center helps users to develop and implement a plan that will help effectively monitor and analyze disaster information on social media. It details how to develop a plan for monitoring social media for disaster information, monitor social media for actionable information during disasters, choose reliable social media sources and use a checklist to verify content, and practice techniques to lessen uncertainty and information overload. (Video or Multimedia) (Source...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

NIH program to accelerate therapies for arthritis, lupus releases first datasets
Collaborative effort provides important clues about potential research targets. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

PHAT Life: Effective HIV intervention for youth in the criminal justice system
Program showed great potential for reducing sexual risk-taking. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

With weeks left in flu season, the FDA is already working on next year ’s vaccine
Photo credit: USACE There are still weeks left in this year’s flu season, according to the FDA, but the agency is already planning on how to better protect the nation’s public health next year. An initial report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded that this year’s flu vaccine sported a 36% efficacy rate. Although that’s better than some public health experts predicted, FDA chief Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statement that “there is still clearly significant room for improvement.” Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The p...
Source: Mass Device - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Wall Street Beat Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

Marshall School of Medicine receives multi-million dollar grant to research obesity
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine) The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has received a $10.78 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to research obesity and related conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Science News » NIH Releases First Dataset from Unprecedented Study of Adolescent Brain Development
The National Institutes of Health released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: NIDA press office Source Type: news

Epilepsy study links mossy brain cells to seizures and memory loss
NIH-funded study in mice suggests loss of mossy cells plays a critical role in both. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 15, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NEH and NLM Renew Partnership to Collaborate on Research, Education, and Career Initiatives
The National Library of Medicine (NLM), the world ’s largest medical library and a component of the National Institutes of Health, and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) have reaffirmed a partnership, originally established in 2012, to develop initiatives that explore the intersection of biomedical and humanities research. (Source: NLM General Announcements)
Source: NLM General Announcements - February 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Inside One Couple ’s Experimental Treatment to Battle Alzheimer’s Disease
JoAnn Wooding is staring intently at the clear liquid dripping from a dark brown IV bag into her husband Peter’s arm. “Please be the drug, please be the drug,” she says. Married for more than 50 years, the Woodings are among the more than 5 million Americans who are facing Alzheimer’s disease, one of the most devastating diagnoses today. But instead of accepting the slow descent into memory loss, confusion and dementia, Peter–who has the disease–could be among the first to successfully stop that decline from happening. Peter, 77, is one of the 2,700 people around the world who are expect...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Your Tax Dollars Fund Research on Hundreds of New Meds
THURSDAY, Feb. 15, 2018 -- The U.S. National Institutes of Health spent more than $100 billion on research that led to 210 new medicines gaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval over six years, a new study shows. Nearly $64 billion of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Szent-Gy ö rgyi Prize to honor NCI's Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller
(NIH/National Cancer Institute) The 2018 Szent-Gy ö rgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research will be awarded to Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., and John T. Schiller, Ph.D., of the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). They are being recognized for their contributions toward the development of vaccines for the human papillomavirus (HPV). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Epilepsy study links mossy brain cells to seizures and memory loss
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) A small group of cells in the brain can have a big effect on seizures and memory in a mouse model of epilepsy. According to a new study in Science, loss of mossy cells may contribute to convulsive seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) as well as memory problems often experienced by people with the disease. The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

NIH solicits next-generation retina organoids in prize competition
$1 million in prizes will be awarded for functional prototypes of human retinas for disease modeling, drug testing, and treatments. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 14, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

‘It’s a National Problem.’ How Hospitals Are Treating Opioid Addiction’s Youngest Sufferers
(CHICAGO) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments.Sarah Sherbert’s first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert’s second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal sy...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Tanner / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

UTA researcher studies influence of fat storage in the heart on cardiovascular disease
(University of Texas at Arlington) Michael Nelson, assistant professor of kinesiology at The University of Texas at Arlington, has received a new five-year, $3.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the link between fat storage in the heart and cardiovascular disease, as well as the influence of gender on the development of cardiac dysfunction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-funded researchers identify risk factors for sleep apnea during pregnancy
Snoring, older age and obesity may increase a pregnant woman ’s risk. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH study will assess biomarker as potential indicator of whether lower respiratory tract infections improve with antibacterial treatment
LRTIs can cause a variety of symptoms, including persistent coughing, wheezing, chest pain, fever, and rapid or difficult breathing. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development
More than 7,500 children recruited for study to date; data available for first 4,500 (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development
(NIH/National Institute on Drug Abuse) The National Institutes of Health today released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH study will assess biomarker as indicator of viral lower respiratory tract infection
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A new clinical trial sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, aims to determine whether low blood levels of the protein procalcitonin can reliably indicate whether a person's lower respiratory tract infection will improve with antibiotic treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH-funded researchers identify risk factors for sleep apnea during pregnancy
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Snoring, older age and obesity may increase a pregnant woman's risk for sleep apnea -- or interrupted breathing during sleep -- according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Injection prompts mouse immune system to destroy tumors
Scientists found agents that, when injected into a tumor, direct the mouse immune system to destroy tumors of the same type throughout their bodies. The approach might be applied to many forms of cancer. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Compound repairs features of Alzheimer ’s disease in mice
Researchers found that a compound called an NAD+ precursor helped mice with features of Alzheimer ’s disease perform better on learning and memory tests. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development
The National Institutes of Health today released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. To date, more than 7,500 youth and their families have been recruited for the study, well over half the participant goal.  ... (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - February 13, 2018 Category: Addiction Tags: ABCD, Brain, Brain and Addiction, Children, Health and Medical Professionals, Researchers Source Type: news

Heart Health Information Resources webinar
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 at 1pm MT/2pm CT Discover NLM Resources and More series Registration and login information Dive into heart health resources from the National Institutes of Health with Annette Parde-Maass, NNLM MCR Education and Outreach Coordinator. She will focus on resources from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and how they can help you and the people you serve. She’ll provide an overview of each site, demonstrate some sample searches, and show you where to find educational and outreach materials, including multilingual or multicultural pi...
Source: MCR News - February 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Health Sciences Public Libraries Webinars and Training Source Type: news

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalent in U.S. communities
A study of the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in U.S. communities highlights the need for strategies to address this problem. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Abraham Lincoln Was Our Tallest President Ever. This May Be Why
Abraham Lincoln, who would have celebrated his 209th birthday on Feb. 12, left behind an impressive legacy during his time in office — but many Americans still associate the 16th president, first and foremost, with his towering height. Standing 6’4″, Lincoln is, to this day, the tallest president ever, edging out Lyndon Johnson by a full inch. Height wasn’t Lincoln’s only distinguishing physical characteristic. While he was in office, a journalist described the president’s “long pendulous arms” and “hands of extraordinary dimensions…far exceeded in proportion by ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Abraham Lincoln healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Inovio lands $4.6M in funding for malaria, tuberculosis vaccines
Inovio Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Monday it has received $4.6 million in grant funding from the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation and the National Institutes of Health to advance work on vaccine programs targeting tuberculosis and malaria. The Plymouth Meeting biopharmaceutical company is conducting its research as part of its partnership with the Wistar Institute of Philadelphia. Both programs involve the use of Inovio's SynCon synthetic vaccine technology that helps a person's own immune system… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 12, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

New test speeds up diagnosis of Parkinson's, Lewy body dementia
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health said they've developed a new test to detect Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Congress doles out $300m to fund diabetes research
Congress today approved a two-year extension of the Special Diabetes Program, giving the National Institutes of Health $300 million to fund research into new therapies and technologies for people with Type I diabetes. The program, which has historically garnered bipartisan support, was last reauthorized in 2015 when lawmakers budgeted $150 million over two years for the program. That funding ran out at the end of September. At the time, Congress approved a short-term patch that would fund the program through the end of March but advocacy groups pushed back, arguing that temporary support was not enough. Get the f...
Source: Mass Device - February 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Diabetes Funding Roundup Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Source Type: news

NIH scientists adapt new brain disease test for Parkinson ’s, dementia with Lewy bodies
Early and accurate diagnoses of these brain disorders is essential for developing treatments and identifying patients eligible for clinical trials. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 9, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertension and muscular dystrophy
Engineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.The new device could make it easier and faster to test and evaluate new drugs for diseases associated with abnormal levels of cell strength, including hypertension, asthma and muscular dystrophy. It could also open new avenues for biological research into cell force. It is the first high-throughput tool that can measure the strength of thousands of individual cells at a time.“Our tool tracks how much force individual cells exert over ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study finds gadolinium leaks into eyes of stroke patients
Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health found that gadolinium...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Gadolinium in fetuses almost entirely cleared via placenta X-ray fluorescence detects retained gadolinium in bone FDA issues directive on GBCA labeling, safety research GBCA-related allergic reactions rare in cardiac MRI MGH researchers working on GBCA alternativeComments: 2/9/2018 4:23:20 AMPazhayanur Ramakrishnan https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/eye-could-provide-window-brain-after-stroke Eye could provide “window to the brain” after stroke - Preliminary res...
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study finds gadolinium leaks into eyes of stroke patients
Researchers from the U.S. National Institutes of Health found that gadolinium...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Gadolinium in fetuses almost entirely cleared via placenta X-ray fluorescence detects retained gadolinium in bone FDA issues directive on GBCA labeling, safety research GBCA-related allergic reactions rare in cardiac MRI MGH researchers working on GBCA alternative (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 8, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Ebola virus infects reproductive organs in monkeys
Additional research is needed to determine if drugs and vaccines can cure or prevent such infections, and to understand the mechanisms of sexual transmission. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 8, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Cell phone radiation exposure found to give rats CANCER
(Natural News) A new study released by the National Institutes of Health shows that exposure to cell phone radiation known as RFR causes male rats to develop a rare type of cancer. According to two technical reports on mice and rats, the RFR exposure caused male rats to develop tumors in the tissues that surround... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

With new grant, MIT neuroscientists will give 'invisible' cells a new look
(Picower Institute at MIT) With a new $1.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, MIT neuroscientists will determine how astrocytes work with neurons in the formation and performance of neural circuits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texas flood: Researchers compare pollution levels before and after Hurricane Harvey
(Texas A&M University) Recent years have seen rising interest in improving post-disaster research, with calls for more and better studies coming from the academic community and agencies such as the National Institutes of Health. Although understanding the wide-ranging effects of disasters is vital for an effective public health response, a lack of baseline data has made it difficult to attribute post-disaster changes in environmental conditions to the impacts of disasters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news