Wary of Chinese Espionage, Houston Cancer Center Chose to Fire 3 Scientists
The director of the National Institutes of Health said that 55 similar investigations into possible foreign exploitation of American research are happening nationwide. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIHIR ZAVERI Tags: Research Hospitals Espionage and Intelligence Services National Institutes of Health University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center Houston (Tex) Source Type: news

The NIH Hopes a New Study in 4 States Can Cut Opioid Deaths by 40%. Here ’s How
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) on Thursday announced an ambitious new study that’s meant to reduce opioid-related deaths by 40% in communities that have been hardest-hit by the ongoing epidemic. The NIH awarded grants to four research sites — the University of Kentucky, Boston Medical Center, Columbia University and Ohio State University — through the three-year, $350 million project, called the HEALing Communities Study. Each site will test the effectiveness of various strategies for combating and preventing opioid addiction in at least 15 communities in those states that are struggling with wid...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Research Source Type: news

National experts chart roadmap for AI in medical imaging
A foundational research roadmap for artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging was published this week in the journal Radiology. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

A Gene Therapy Breakthrough Could Offer a Treatment for the Rare and Deadly ‘Bubble Boy’ Disease
Researchers used an experimental gene therapy to develop a possible treatment for a rare and deadly immune disorder known as “bubble boy” disease, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced Wednesday. Because of a gene mutation, babies who are born with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) do not develop immune cells properly, leaving them highly susceptible to infections. The condition, which strikes up to one in 50,000 newborns, primarily affects boys and requires extreme measures to prevent infection. In one famous case, a boy with SCID, David Vetter, lived in a sterile plastic “bu...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Decline in measles vaccination is causing a preventable global resurgence of the disease
(Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH funds study in four states to reduce opioid related deaths by 40 percent over three years
Findings to serve as a blueprint for communities nationwide (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

In rare cases, immune system fails despite HIV suppression
NIH scientists identify paradoxical response to HIV medication in five individuals (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

‘ Partly Alive ’ : Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs
In research that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something like it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Brain Ethics and Official Misconduct Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare Research National Institutes of Health Nature (Journal) Yale University Nita Farahany your-feed-science Source Type: news

Novel antibody may suppress HIV for up to four months
NIH researchers, international collaborators report results of small, open-label study (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 17, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MALCOLM RITTER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Gene therapy restores immunity in infants with rare immunodeficiency disease
NIH scientists and funding contributed to development of experimental treatment (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 17, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH BRAIN Initiative tool may transform how scientists study brain structure and function
Tissue support system preserves limited function in an isolated postmortem animal brain (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 17, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Ohio State ’s College of Medicine uses grant to improve health in local communities
With a $25 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), The Ohio State University College of Medicine has the resources to continue fulfilling its mission of translating scientific discoveries into clinical therapies that improve human health. The NIH’s Clinical and Translational Science Award was given in 2018 to Dr. Rebecca Jackson, associate dean for Clinical Research at the Ohio State College of Medicine and director of the university’s Center for Clinical and Translational… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 17, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: The Ohio State University College of Medicine Source Type: news

Ohio State ’s College of Medicine uses grant to improve health in local communities
With a $25 million award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), The Ohio State University College of Medicine has the resources to continue fulfilling its mission of translating scientific discoveries into clinical therapies that improve human health. The NIH’s Clinical and Translational Science Award was given in 2018 to Dr. Rebecca Jackson, associate dean for Clinical Research at the Ohio State College of Medicine and director of the university’s Center for Clinical and Translational… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: The Ohio State University College of Medicine Source Type: news

OSU researcher to help lead $10.7 million push toward gonorrhea vaccine
(Oregon State University) The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $10.7 grant to researchers from seven universities to work toward developing a vaccine for gonorrhea. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nasal spray of the 'love hormone' oxytocin could combat alcoholism, study suggests
A new study from the National Institutes of Health found that alcohol-dependent rats who were given a dose of oxytocin, known as the 'love hormone', drank less than normal rats. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Healthy hearts need two proteins working together
NIH research could be a step toward a treatment to prevent heart attacks (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 16, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
FINDINGSUCLA researchers found that eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients.Forgoing routine chest x-rays, electrocardiograms and other preoperative procedures — which studies have found to have no clinical benefit prior to cataract surgery — was associated with a savings of $67,241 over three years at one of the medical centers analyzed in the study. The change was also associated with other benefits – for instance, one licensed vocational nurse had approximately 70 perc...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 16, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UW-Madison School of Pharmacy designs promising new compounds to fight deadly mosquito-transmitted viruses
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison pharmacy Professor Jennifer Golden is one of three principal investigators on a multidisciplinary research team whose work is funded by a new, five-year, $21 million award from the National Institutes of Health establishing a new Center of Excellence for Encephalitic Alphavirus Therapeutics, which will support the preclinical development of small molecules to treat EEVs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 16, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Healthy hearts need two proteins working together
(NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences) Two proteins that bind to stress hormones work together to maintain a healthy heart in mice, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. These proteins, stress hormone receptors known as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), act in concert to help support heart health. When the signaling between the two receptors is out of balance, the mice have heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Radiology publishes roadmap for AI in medical imaging
(Radiological Society of North America) In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The workshop was co-sponsored by NIH, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and The Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research (The Academy). The organizers aimed to foster collaboration in applications for diagnostic medical imaging, identify knowledge gaps and develop a roadmap to prioritize research needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New AIBS Report on Biological Sciences in the President's FY 2020 Budget
A new report from the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) provides an analysis of the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2020 budget request for biological sciences research and education. The report provides an overview and analysis of the budget request for several federal agencies and programs, including the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Standards and Technology, United States Geological Survey, Department of Energy Office of Science, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and Environmental Protection Agency, among others. The report is availab...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

843 Organizations Urge Congress to Raise Spending Caps
The American Institute of Biological Sciences was among 843 national, state, and local organizations that called upon federal lawmakers to negotiate a new budget agreement that provides relief from budget sequestration for nondefense discretionary programs. An excerpt from the letter reads, “Congress and the President must work together to reach a new agreement that averts the cuts that would be required under the Budget Control Act and allows us to make smart investments in our nation’s future. In reaching an agreement, new investment must be balanced between nondefense and defense programs, as strong investm...
Source: Public Policy Reports - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Know options for uterine fibroids
Uterine fibroids are common. Doctors perform more than 200,000 hysterectomies to treat uterine fibroids every year, according to the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Erica Knavel Koepsel, a Mayo Clinic diagnostic radiologist, says less-invasive procedures, such as focused ultrasound or uterine artery embolization, may be good options for many women. Watch: The Mayo Clinic Minute [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 16, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Researcher awarded $1.17 million for cancer research
(University of Texas at Arlington) Clay Clark, professor and chair of the UTA Department of Biology, has received a four-year, $1.17 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the regulation of proteins responsible for programmed cell death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Want to learn a new skill? Take some short breaks
NIH study suggests our brains may use short rest periods to strengthen memories. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 12, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Want to learn a new skill? Take some short breaks
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) In a study of healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may solidify the memories of new skills we just practiced a few seconds earlier by taking a short rest. The results highlight the critically important role rest may play in learning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FY20 Budget Request: National Institutes of Health
The National Institutes of Health ’s budget would drop 12 percent to $34 billion under the Trump administration’s proposal for fiscal year 2020, rolling back most of the $5 billion increase Congress has provided to the agency over the past two years. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - April 11, 2019 Category: Physics Authors: aschwarber Source Type: news

Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
NIH-supported study sheds light on the neural mechanisms underlying remission of depression. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 11, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

BU Study Of NFL Players ’ Brains Might Help Diagnose CTE In The Living
CNN) — After examining the brains of former professional football players, researchers might be a step closer to diagnosing the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the living, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers utilized PET imaging to find tau, an abnormal protein that’s a signature indicator of CTE, using a radioactive drug or tracer called flortaucipir. The researchers imaged the brains of 26 living former football players and compared them with the brains of 31 people with no history of traumatic brain injury. (WBZ-TV) Th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN CTE Source Type: news

What do people who practice anal sex desire for preventing HIV?
(Microbicide Trials Network) Recognizing the major role personal preferences play in HIV prevention, the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Microbicide Trials Network (MTN) has launched a rectal microbicide study that asks participants to 'try on' potential approaches before actual products are developed. The study, MTN-035, or DESIRE (Developing and Evaluating Short-acting Innovations for Rectal Use), is the first to systematically examine placebo, or inactive, methods for delivering drugs to help prevent HIV from receptive anal sex. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
(NIH/National Institute of Mental Health) Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice. Ketamine treatment restored lost dendritic spines and rescued coordinated neural activity in the Prefrontal Cortex of the mice -- findings that may help researchers develop interventions that promote lasting remission of depression in humans. The study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dimitroff Awarded $2.5M NIH/NCI Grant for Cancer Glycobiology Study
Charles Dimitroff, PhD, of the Department of Dermatology, along with collaborators at Imperial College London, received a five-year, $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Cancer Institute (NCI) to support their (Source: BWH News)
Source: BWH News - April 11, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Releasing an immune system brake could help patients with rare but fatal brain infection
Small-scale, NIH-led clinical study offers early hope for developing a treatment. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 10, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Releasing an immune system brake could help patients with rare but fatal brain infection
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) The anti-cancer drug pembrolizumab has shown promise in slowing or stopping the progression of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a typically fatal infection of the brain caused by the JC virus (JCV). This finding comes from a small-scale study by scientists at National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study appears in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 10, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NIH researchers make progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine
EBV is herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 9, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Children who grow up near busy streets are twice as likely to struggle to communicate 
A new study from the National Institutes of Health has found that children who live less than one-third of a mile away from major roads are more likely to experience developmental delays (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lyndra to develop ultra-long-acting opioid use disorder therapy
Lyndra Therapeutics (Watertown, Mass.) announced that it is developing an ultra-long-acting oral treatment for opioid use disorder. On average, about 130 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Lyndra Therapeutics received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to help find new treatment strategies and formulations of existing medications to address the opioid epidemic. The grant covers the development of a once-a-week oral dosage of buprenorphine, which is a medication-assisted treatment that has shown to have improved outcomes for pat...
Source: Mass Device - April 9, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Pain Management lyndra Source Type: news

Kids living near major roads at higher risk of developmental delays, NIH study suggests
Previous studies have linked exposure to common air pollutants in pregnancy to low birthweight, preterm birth and stillbirth. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 9, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

What is regenerative medicine and how can it promote wound healing?
  When traditional treatments fail to heal wounds, many doctors look to modern alternatives to help patients recover. Regenerative medicine is one of the most recent developments to become a worthy treatment alternative. Here’s an overview of regenerative medicine and its role in wound care: What is regenerative medicine? The National Institutes of Health defines regenerative medicine as the process of creating living, functional tissues to repair or replace lost tissue or organ function. Through regeneration, replacement and rejuvenation, regenerative-medicine techniques work with the body’s nat...
Source: Advanced Tissue - April 9, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: AdvancedTissue Tags: Wound Care Wound healing Source Type: news

Virus helps bacteria evade immune system
Researchers discovered how a type of virus that infects bacteria can help the bacteria escape the immune system and cause chronic wound infections. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Small molecule targets cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy
Researchers designed a small molecule that, in mice, blocks the mutated RNA responsible for adult onset muscular dystrophy. The findings suggest a new avenue to develop therapeutics. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bioengineered vessels transform into living blood vessels
Bioengineered vessels that were implanted in people to aid with kidney dialysis matured into living blood vessels, showing that they can be integrated into human tissues. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Physicians may overprescribe antibiotics to children during telemedicine visits
An NIH-funded review examined billing data from over 500,000 healthcare visits. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 8, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Scientists review influenza vaccine research progress and opportunities
Experts in immunology, virology, epidemiology, and vaccine development detail efforts to improve seasonal influenza vaccines. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 8, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Scientists review influenza vaccine research progress and opportunities
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) In a new series of articles, experts in immunology, virology, epidemiology, and vaccine development detail efforts to improve seasonal influenza vaccines and ultimately develop a universal influenza vaccine. The 15 articles are part of a supplement in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and scientists supported by NIAID, are among the contributing authors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu cases still high as first human universal vaccine trial begins
Most states are seeing an unusually high number of flu patients as the season comes to a close. Meanwhile, the very first human experiments with a new universal flu shot have begun at the National Institutes of Health. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First Human Trial of Universal Flu Vaccine Underway First Human Trial of Universal Flu Vaccine Underway
The first-in-human trial of a universal influenza vaccine candidate is currently underway at the National Institutes of Health, researchers have announced.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - April 5, 2019 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

National Institutes Of Health Begin Human Trial Of ‘ Universal ’ Flu Vaccine
BOSTON (CBS) – Four children have died from the flu in Massachusetts so far this season, a stark reminder of why it’s so important to get vaccinated every year. Now, the National Institutes of Health has begun the first human trial of a “universal” flu vaccine. This novel flu vaccine was designed to provide long-lasting protection for all age groups against multiple influenza subtypes, including seasonal flu viruses and those that can cause deadly pandemics. This first study is a Phase 1 trial which will look at the vaccine’s safety and side effects, as well as how robustly it stimulates the i...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Flu Vaccine Source Type: news