'Stranger Things' Sheds Light on a Rare Disorder
The disorder, called cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD), affects only about one in a million people, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Caused by a mutated gene, CCD leads to abnormal bone development -- most apparent in the collarbones and teeth. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

$3.2 million NIH award to support technology to fight deadly bacterial lung infections
(Purdue University) A Purdue University team has received a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for its work to treat antibiotic-resistant lower respiratory infections - the fourth-leading cause of death worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Maternal obesity linked to ADHD and behavioral problems in children, NIH study suggests
Women who were obese before pregnancy were approximately twice as likely to report that their child had ADHD or symptoms of hyperactivity. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 19, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Breakthrough in coronavirus research results in new map to support vaccine design
Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and the National Institutes of Health have made a critical breakthrough toward developing a vaccine for the 2019 novel coronavirus by creating the first 3D atomic scale map of the part of the virus that attaches to and infects human cells. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Maternal obesity linked to ADHD and behavioral problems in children, NIH study suggests
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Maternal obesity may increase a child's risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to an analysis by researchers from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

President's Budget Cuts Science
The White House released the President’s Budget Request for fiscal year (FY) 2021 on February 10, 2020. The budget proposes large cuts for science for the fourth consecutive year. The $4.8 trillion budget framework calls for cuts to most federal agencies, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The proposal would provide $1.3 trillion for discretionary programs, including $590 billion for non-defense spending - the source for m...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NIH Slated for 7 percent Budget Cut
The President has proposed a $38.7 billion budget for the National Institutes of Health in fiscal year (FY) 2021. This translates to a $3 billion or 7 percent cut in the agency’s funding compared to FY 2020. The NIH budget request includes a $50 million initiative to use artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a better understanding of the causes of chronic diseases and to identify early treatments. This plan is in line with the Administration’s “Industries of the Future” effort, which supports using and developing AI across sectors. The budget would provide $50 million for the Childhood Cancer ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 18, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover new compound that promotes lung health
A molecule identified by UCLA researchers helps maintain a healthy balance of cells in airway and lung tissue. If the compound, so far only studied in isolated human and mouse cells, has the same effect in people, it may lead to new drugs to treat or prevent lung cancer.“We think this could help us develop a new therapy that promotes airway health,” said Dr. Brigitte Gomperts, a UCLA professor of pediatrics and of pulmonary medicine, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, and lead author of the study. “This could not only inform the treatm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria
Findings suggest drugs targeting immune cells may help treat deadly disease mainly affecting children. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 18, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH-funded study links natural sugars in breastmilk to early childhood height and weight
The study also suggested that maternal obesity may affect sugar composition in breastmilk. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 18, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH study supports new approach for treating cerebral malaria
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Researchers at the National Institutes of Health found evidence that specific immune cells may play a key role in the devastating effects of cerebral malaria, a severe form of malaria that mainly affects young children. The results, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, suggest that drugs targeting T cells may be effective in treating the disease. The study was supported by the NIH Intramural Research Program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Passenger Confirmed to Have Coronavirus After Leaving Cruise Ship That Docked in Cambodia
A passenger on a cruise ship that was denied entry from several countries amid concerns about the spread of a deadly coronavirus was confirmed to be infected with the novel coronavirus after she and her husband disembarked when the ship was allowed to dock in Cambodia. The confirmation of an infection on the ship has raised concerns about the virus’ further spread, and authorities are scrambling to confirm if other passengers might be infected, potentially spreading the virus to countries it has not yet reached. The 83-year-old American woman, who had been on board the Holland America Line ship the Westerdam, was s...
Source: TIME: Health - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia and Hillary Leung Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime overnight Travel Source Type: news

Hundreds of Cruise Ship Passengers Stuck in Cambodia After Coronavirus Case Confirmed
Hundreds of passengers from a cruise ship are stuck in Cambodia while officials test them for a coronavirus after an elderly woman who had disembarked was found to have the virus. U.S. State Department officials said that 200 Americans remain in Cambodia, waiting to be cleared for travel, including 92 who remain on board the Holland America Line ship the Westerdam. Cambodian officials asked those in hotels in the country not to leave their rooms while further testing is done. According to the cruise line, the first batch of 406 tests were negative, and cleared guests were allowed to travel home. On Monday, Holland America...
Source: TIME: Health - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia, Hillary Leung and Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime overnight Travel Source Type: news

A Passenger Tested Positive for Coronavirus After Hundreds Exited a U.S. Cruise Ship, Sparking Fears the Outbreak Could Further Spread Worldwide
The elderly cruise passenger who tested positive for coronavirus after disembarking from a U.S. cruise ship in Cambodia has raised the specter that other passengers now dispersed around the world could be infected too. Currently, hundreds of passengers from Holland America Line’s Westerdam are being held back in Cambodia, where the ship was allowed to dock last week after being denied entry to multiple ports following rumors of a possible coronavirus on board—despite assurances from the cruise line that there were no signs of the virus, officially named COVID-19, in any passengers. After the shipped docked in ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Gunia, Hillary Leung and Madeleine Carlisle Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 onetime overnight Travel Source Type: news

Government names preferred NICE chair
The government has named its preferred candidate to chair the board of the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - February 14, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Wayne State University team developing new treatments for Barth syndrome
(Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research) A Wayne State University research team received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for a grant that aims identify specific metabolites as candidates or new treatments for Barth syndrome and other cardiomyopathies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys
Results support testing antiviral against 2019 novel coronavirus. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Breastfeeding may reduce type 2 diabetes risk among women with gestational diabetes, NIH study suggests
The researchers analyzed data from a long-term study of risk factors for chronic diseases in women. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Study shows how a tiny and strange marine animal produces unlimited eggs and sperm over its lifetime
NIH-supported research of Hydractinia could provide clues to human reproductive conditions. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Genetic profile may predict chance of type 2 diabetes among women with gestational diabetes
Researchers followed women before, during and after pregnancy and captured data on their health later in life. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 13, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys
The experimental antiviral remdesivir successfully prevented disease in rhesus macaques infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to a new study from National Institutes of Health scientists. Remdesivir prevented disease when administered before infection and improved the condition of macaques when given after the animals already were infected. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 13, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Remdesivir prevents MERS coronavirus disease in monkeys
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) The experimental antiviral remdesivir successfully prevented disease in rhesus macaques infected with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), according to a new study from National Institutes of Health scientists. Remdesivir prevented disease when administered before infection and improved the condition of macaques when given after the animals already were infected. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Philly nursing school leads the nation in NIH research grants, but Pitt not far behind
Penn Nursing is celebrating a three-peat. In fiscal 2019, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing led the country in National Institutes of Health research funding with $11.3 million in awards. Penn Nursing has now held the top spot in the rankings for three consecutive years, but the University of Pittsburgh was also on the lis t. “Although rankings are not the only measure of our research success, they are a national reflection of our commitment to our mission and progress in advancing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Gene associated with autism also controls growth of the embryonic brain
A UCLA-led study reveals a new role for a gene that ’s associated with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability and language impairment.The gene, Foxp1, has previously been studied for its function in the neurons of the developing brain. But the new study reveals that it ’s also important in a group of brain stem cells — the precursors to mature neurons.“This discovery really broadens the scope of where we think Foxp1 is important,” said Bennett Novitch, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA and the senior author ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Trump Proposes Significant Cuts to NIH for 2021 Budget
The president's request for next year ’s federal budget includes a 7 percent drop in funding for the National Institutes of Health and reductions for other science agencies. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 11, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

NLM Technical Bulletin, Jan-Feb 2020, NLM Announces Curation at Scale Workshop
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce a two-day Curation at Scale Workshop, to be held on April 27-28, 2020 on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. (Source: NLM Technical Bulletin)
Source: NLM Technical Bulletin - February 11, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Recent advances in addressing tuberculosis give hope for future
NIH officials describe “banner year”. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 11, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Less than a quarter of at-risk adolescent boys ever get tested for HIV
Study stresses promoting patient-clinician communication about sexual behavior to encourage HIV testing in teenagers. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 11, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Disparities in National Institute of Health trauma research funding: the search for sufficient funding opportunities - Dowd B, McKenney M, Boneva D, Elkbuli A.
To evaluate disparities in the National Institute of Health (NIH) trauma research funding.Traumatic injury has increased in both prevalence and cost over the last decade. In the event of a traumatic injury, patients in the United States (US) rely on the tr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news

Genes linked to schizophrenia identified in ancestral African population
Researchers found damaging genetic variants linked to schizophrenia in the Xhosa population of South Africa. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Engineered bacteria protect honey bee health
Bacteria naturally found in honey bees were engineered to help bees fight infections that that have been destroying colonies. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 11, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Low-dose aspirin reduces preterm birth among first-time mothers
In a large trial, daily low-dose aspirin reduced the risk of preterm birth (before 37 weeks) by 11% and early preterm birth (before 34 weeks) by 25% among first-time mothers. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neural signature identifies people likely to respond to antidepressant medication
NIH-funded research used machine learning algorithm to predict individual treatment response. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 10, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH-Funded Clinical Trial to Test PrEP, Dapivirine Ring for Safety in Pregnant Women
Study Also to Examine Whether Pregnant Women Accept, Use These HIV Prevention Tools. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 10, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Youth with HIV less likely than adults to achieve viral suppression
Findings suggest a low proportion of youth adhere to care regimens. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 10, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH scientists link higher maternal blood pressure to placental gene changes
Gene modifications correspond to blood pressure increases at distinct pregnancy intervals. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 10, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH scientists link higher maternal blood pressure to placental gene changes
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Higher maternal blood pressure in pregnancy is associated with chemical modifications to placental genes, according to a study by researchers from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH-funded clinical trial to test PrEP, dapivirine ring for safety in pregnant women
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) The first clinical trial specifically designed to test the safety of the monthly dapivirine vaginal ring in pregnant women has begun in southern and eastern Africa. The National Institutes of Health-funded study also will test the safety of a daily oral antiviral tablet for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in pregnant women and will assess how much they accept and use these two HIV prevention tools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Youth with HIV less likely than adults to achieve viral suppression
(NIH/Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) Despite similar rates of enrollment into medical care, youth with HIV have much lower rates of viral suppression --reducing HIV to undetectable levels -- compared to adults, according to an analysis funded by the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Parking dispute delays NIH's proposed campus expansion — again
The National Institutes of Health won ’t be moving forward just yet on proposed additions to its Bethesda campus, for the same reason it was stopped from advancing a different plan five years ago: parking. The National Capital Planning Commission Thursday deferred action on the NIH’s draft proposal, which would bring a medical buil ding expansion and new parking garage to the campus. The campus master plan was last updated in 2013. At the core of the debate was a proposed six-level, 780-space… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 6, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Parking dispute delays NIH's proposed campus expansion — again
The National Institutes of Health won ’t be moving forward just yet on proposed additions to its Bethesda campus, for the same reason it was stopped from advancing a different plan five years ago: parking. The National Capital Planning Commission Thursday deferred action on the NIH’s draft proposal, which would bring a medical buil ding expansion and new parking garage to the campus. The campus master plan was last updated in 2013. At the core of the debate was a proposed six-level, 780-space… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 6, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

UCLA research could be step toward lab-grown eggs and sperm to treat infertility
A new study on how and when the precursors to eggs and sperm are formed during development could help pave the way for generating egg and sperm cells in the lab to treat infertility.The study, published in the journal Cell Reports, describes the way in which human stem cells evolve into germ cells, the precursors for egg and sperm cells.“Right now, if your body doesn’t make germ cells then there’s no option for having a child that’s biologically related to you,” said Amander Clark, the study’s lead author, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cold plasma patch could make immunotherapy more effective for treating melanoma, study finds
This study represents an important milestone for the field of plasma medicine,” said co-senior author Richard Wirz, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UCLA Samueli. “It demonstrates that the microneedle patch can realize the plasma delivery while also working with the drug t o improve the effectiveness of cancer therapy.”“Plasma can generate reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which are a group of chemical species that can destroy cancer cells,” said Guojun Chen, who is the co-first author of the study and a postdoctoral fellow in Gu’s laboratory.&ldq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Final FY20 Appropriations: National Institutes of Health
The National Institutes of Health is receiving a multibillion dollar budget increase for the fifth time in a row, with its total budget increasing by 7% to $42 billion. Congress also directs the agency to adopt stronger policies regarding sexual harassment and research security. (Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News)
Source: FYI: The AIP Bulletin of Science Policy News - February 4, 2020 Category: Physics Authors: apeterson Source Type: news

Past Outbreaks Provide a Roadmap for U.S. Government Response to Coronavirus Threat
While the threat of the new coronavirus in the United States remains limited, a network of U.S. government agencies are already furiously ramping up efforts to contain the disease, should an outbreak occur. “We are working to keep the risk low,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, who is leading the federal government’s response, at a press conference Friday. So far, the overwhelming number of new cases of the virus, which originated in Wuhan, China, remain in China. There are only 11 confirmed cases in the U.S. The good news, some officials and infectious disease experts tell TIME, is t...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

First childhood flu helps explain why virus hits some people harder than others
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Research Security: Scientists Arrested as Government Increases Efforts to Protect US Security Interests
Concerns about and oversight of foreign influence on research and espionage have been rising since 2018. In an August 2018 letter to more than 10,000 research institutions, NIH urged grant applicants and awardees to properly disclose all forms of support and financial interests and launched investigations into NIH-funded investigators who failed to properly disclose foreign financial support. Following this, an April 2019 editorial in BioScience alerted readers that investigations into foreign ties of researchers will likely spread to other agencies and need to be taken seriously. Lawmakers have also made enquiries about t...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Drug activates brown fat, improves glucose metabolism in healthy women
In a small study, a drug approved to treat overactive bladder boosted brown fat activity and improved glucose metabolism in healthy women. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New strategies drive HIV from cellular hiding places
Experimental treatments in animal models of HIV led to the viruses emerging from their hiding places, a first step needed to make HIV vulnerable to the immune system. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sue Fenton named outstanding mentor
NIEHS toxicologist is one of three mentors honored by National Institutes of Health graduate student trainees. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - February 3, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news