Doctors in poor areas prescribe up to FOUR times as many high-strength opioid painkillers
Researchers from the universities of Nottingham and Manchester found doctors in Blackpool and St Helens prescribe the most opioid painkillers such as codeine, tramadol and morphine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Metabolism and metabolomics of opiates: a long way of forensic implications to unravel - Dinis-Oliveira RJ.
Opium poppy has important medical, socioeconomic, forensic and political implications. More than 80 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids have been described, many of them with relevant therapeutic properties such as morphine, codeine, papaverine and noscapine. Her... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Comparison between intravenous morphine versus fentanyl in acute pain relief in drug abusers with acute limb traumatic injury - Vahedi HSM, Hajebi H, Vahidi E, Nejati A, Saeedi M.
BACKGROUND: Rapid and effective pain relief in acute traumatic limb injuries (ATLI) is one of the most important roles of emergency physicians. In these situations, opioid addiction is an important concern because of the dependency on opioids. The study ai... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Morphine concentrations in human urine following poppy seed paste consumption - Özbunar E, Aydoğdu M, Döğer R, Bostancı Hİ, Koruyucu M, Akgür SA.
Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants which are widely used for medicinal, nutritive and scientific purposes. Turkey is one of the major legal opium poppy producer countries in the world and the seed paste of the po... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

How tiny implant could help thousands blighted by crippling abdominal pain  
The matchbox box-sized device is being trialled on 30 NHS patients with a common condition of the pancreas and could slash the use of potent painkilling drugs like morphine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Industrially processed fructose is just as addictive as alcohol and even morphine, concludes study
(Natural News) Sweets are well-loved by millions of people across the world, with at least 50 pounds of processed fructose being consumed per year. If you find yourself constantly eating and craving sweets, don’t immediately dismiss this as nothing serious. Studies have shown that industrially processed fructose is just as addictive and damaging as alcohol. Fructose,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Weaponization of Narcan
Narcan, the trade name of the opiate antidote naloxone, has become a part of the modern lexicon. It can even be found in the Urban Dictionary. Although initially a noun, it is now a widely used verb as in, “I Narcanned that patient,” or, “I Narcanned your Honor Student.” Narcan is so effective that we have even dreamed up imaginary clinical situations to administer it. YouTube is full of videos of police officers giving themselves or colleagues Narcan for suspected “fentanyl exposure.” A popular video shows a police officer giving Narcan to another officer after exposure to what was late...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bryan Bledsoe, DO, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Airway & Respiratory Exclusive Articles Columns Source Type: news

MORE DANGEROUS than a nuclear weapon, Fentanyl – the heroin-based prescription painkiller – could be the next WMD
(Natural News) Opioids are the class of pain-relieving drugs made from the illegal and deadly drug heroin. Fentanyl is by far the most dangerous, but you’ve certainly heard of some other popular ones, including oxycodone (a.k.a. Oxycontin), hydrocodone (a.k.a. Vicodin), morphine and codeine. Fentanyl is so strong that just a few too many milligrams can... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaccine could help address the opioid epidemic
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Synthetic psychoactive drugs have become a serious public health threat in recent years. This is particularly true of the fentanyls, a large family of synthetic opioids, which can be up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Synthetic opioids are highly addictive and, because of their potency, often prove fatal: among the roughly 72,000 drug overdose deaths in the US in 2017, some 30,000 were related to synthetic opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fentanyl Surpasses Heroin As Drug Most Often Involved In Deadly Overdoses
When fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50 to 100 times more powerful than morphine, infiltrated the drug supply in the U.S. it had an immediate, dramatic effect on the overdose rate. (Image credit: Towfiqu Photography/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laurel Wamsley Source Type: news

Overdose Deaths Involving Fentanyl Doubled Every Year From 2013 to 2016
Drug overdose deaths involving the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl are on the rise, and the number of fentanyl-related deaths roughly doubled each year from 2013 through 2016, according to new federal data. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) reviewed death certificates filed from 2011 to 2016 to find out which drugs were mentioned most frequently each year. During this time period, drug overdose deaths increased from 41,340 in 2011 to 63,632 in 2016. Just as striking as the overall uptick, however, was the sharp increase in deaths invo...
Source: TIME: Health - December 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

SAPB for Minimal Invasive Heart Surgery SAPB for Minimal Invasive Heart Surgery
Can serratus anterior plane block reduce morphine consumption and improve management of post-operative pain when compared with continuous wound infiltration following minimal invasive heart surgery?BMC Anesthesiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news

China Has Promised to Crack Down on Fentanyl. Here ’s What That Could Mean for Overdose Deaths in the U.S.
As part of a wide-ranging deal between President Donald Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping, China has reportedly pledged to designate the potent synthetic opioid fentanyl and similar drugs as controlled substances, subjecting those who sell them to harsher punishments and potentially slowing their flow into the U.S. Last month, a Congressional commission said China — which it previously called the “largest source of illicit fentanyl and fentanyl-like substances in the United States” — was not doing enough to stop the drug and its related analogs from reaching U.S. borders. The Trump Administration ...
Source: TIME: Health - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized China healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Fentanyl in cocaine: The deadly truth of new drugs cocktail
A surge in cocaine deaths is being blamed on fentanyl, a synthetic opioid far stronger than morphine. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study Shows Cancer Patients Can Benefit from Opioid Switching
Switching from one prescription opioid to another often solves the problem of debilitating side effects or inadequate pain relief, according to a recent study involving a wide range of cancer patients. Opioids are not all the same. And neither are those they are helping. Despite the increasing government restrictions and the frenzy over potential abuse, opioids can be a lifesaver for a mesothelioma patient finding the right fit. “I’ve been through both sides of that switching issue,” said Tim Crisler, a 16-year pleural mesothelioma survivor told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “It worked gr...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 26, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Zapping the brain can treat chronic pain (and the results kick-in after just one 40 minute session)
Doctors at the University of North Carolina say the therapy could be a cheap alternative to reduce the use of opioids, such as morphine, which can have severe side effects. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Amid Deepening Addiction Crisis, FDA Approves Powerful New Opioid
(CNN) — Despite the ongoing opioid crisis plaguing the nation, the US Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a new opioid medication five to 10 times more powerful than fentanyl. Dsuvia, made by AcelRx Pharmaceuticals Inc., is a tablet in a single-dose, prefilled applicator to be administered under the tongue by health care providers to patients in settings such as hospitals, surgical centers and emergency rooms, according to the company. FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb was quick to defended the approval in a statement Friday: “The agency is taking new steps to more actively confront this crisis, ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV opioids Source Type: news

WATCH: FDA approved new opioid drug called Dsuvia
The drug is 10 times stronger than fentanyl, which is already up to 1,000 times stronger than morphine. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - November 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

FDA approves opioid pill 1,000 times stronger than morphine despite warnings 'it will kill people'
Despite criticism, on Friday, the FDA approved a pill form of sufentanil, a cousin of fentanyl estimated to be as much as 10 times as powerful as the drug that has fueled the opioid epidemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WATCH: FDA approves powerful, controversial new painkiller
Dsuvia is an opioid taken in pill form that is 10 times stronger than Fentanyl and up to 1,000 times stronger than morphine. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: WNT Source Type: news

Rx Switching at the Pharmacy: What would you say?
Should you substitute  Vigamox with Moxeza? How about Oxycontin with MS Contin? Take our quick, 4-question quiz to find out.  (Source: ConsultantLive)
Source: ConsultantLive - November 1, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Alex Evans, PharmD, BCGP Source Type: news

Comparison of Oxycodone and Morphine for Cancer Pain Comparison of Oxycodone and Morphine for Cancer Pain
Do oxycodone and morphine differ significantly in their analgesic efficacy or tolerability when used as first-line therapy for patients with moderate to severe cancer pain?BMC Anesthesiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anesthesiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Fake drugs: The global industry putting your life at risk
In late 2012, 60 people died in two cities in Pakistan after drinking cough syrup to get high. Tests in Pakistan revealed that the medicines seemed to contain the correct amount of active ingredient, but further tests revealed something that was not supposed to be there. Levomethorphan, a chemical five times stronger than morphine, was the contaminant that had caused the deaths. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - October 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA committee votes to approve Opioid tablet 1,000 times stronger than morphine
A Food and Drug Adminstration's advisory committee voted in favor of the approval of a sufentanil tablet, an opioid 10 times stronger than fentanyl. The committee's chair warns doing so will fuel the crisis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA mulls approval for opioid 500 times stronger than morphine
An FDA committee has recommended approval of a new synthetic opioid much stronger than other pain killers on the market. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - October 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Heroin vaccine technology advances as researchers are awarded grant for further testing
(The U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP)) Researchers at the U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) and SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, N.Y., have been awarded a grant to advance an experimental heroin vaccine through Phase I/IIa clinical trials to assess both its safety and its efficacy against a morphine challenge. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ketamine is a safe, effective alternative to opioids in treating acute pain in the ED
(Society for Academic Emergency Medicine) Intravenous, low-dose ketamine (LDK) is as effective as intravenous morphine in the control of acute pain in adults in the emergency department (ED). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

GP practices prescribe controlled drugs electronically in NHS Digital pilot
A small number of GP practices have been selected to electronically prescribe controlled drugs (CDs) as part of a pilot scheme, NHS Digital has announced.  A total of 10 practices based in Yorkshire, the North West and London and using the Emis Health and Vision systems, started with the pilot on 2 October.  They are now able to prescribe drugs such as morphine and tramadol that it was previously not possible to send through the electronic prescription service (EPS). Hide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Management in Practice)
Source: Management in Practice - October 8, 2018 Category: Practice Management Authors: vfiore Tags: *** Editor ' s Pick Patients Latest News Source Type: news

'I'll keep taking your blue pills'
Jim had been relying on morphine to cope with his back pain - but it turned out a dummy pill worked just as well. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Back pain and the placebo effect: ‘I’ll keep taking the pills’
Jim had been relying on morphine to cope with his back pain - but it turned out a dummy pill worked just as well. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Methadone or Morphine for NAS? Methadone or Morphine for NAS?
A study sets out to find which treatment is best for neonates exposed to opioids before birth.Medscape Pediatrics (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics Viewpoint Source Type: news

Why I Never Did Hard Drugs
“Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with your self-esteem.” – Kurt Cobain I grew up in a close-knit, fairly religious family where children were seen and not heard, where mealtime meant everyone sat down together and exchanged pleasantries while enjoying the prepared-at-home repasts, complete with dessert. There was no distraction, either from television or radio, and the telephone ringing was a rare occurrence, quickly dispatched once the caller learned we were eating. In fact, nothing was so urgent back then. It was, indeed, a peacefu...
Source: Psych Central - September 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Alcoholism Drug Abuse Opioid Addiction Source Type: news

Slow-Release Morphine May Be Safe for Some OSA Patients Slow-Release Morphine May Be Safe for Some OSA Patients
A 40-mg dose of slow-release morphine may be safe for non-severely obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), researchers in Australia report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Being "hooked up" during a sharp increase in the availability of illicitly manufactured fentanyl: adaptations of drug using practices among people who use drugs (PWUD) in New York City - McKnight C, Des Jarlais DC.
Illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF), a category of synthetic opioids 50-100 times more potent than morphine, is increasingly being added to heroin and other drugs in the United States (US). Persons who use drugs (PWUD) are frequently unaware of the prese... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Postmortem tissue distribution of morphine and its metabolites in a series of heroin related deaths - Maskell PD, Wilson NE, Seetohul LN, Crichton ML, Beer LJ, Drummond G, De Paoli G.
The abuse of heroin (diamorphine) and heroin deaths are growing around the world. The interpretation of the toxicological results from suspected heroin deaths is notoriously difficult especially in cases where there may be limited samples. In order to help... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

The domino effect of the opioid epidemic: Thousands of American kids are being forced into foster care due to parents’ addiction
(Natural News) According to a new study, the opioid crisis is now affecting children who are being dragged from their homes and into foster care because of parental neglect caused by addiction. The study authors note that an addiction to prescription painkillers (e.g. oxycodone and morphine) is partly responsible for the sudden increase in deaths caused... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Monkey Trials Raise Hope for Opioid Alternative
AT-121 provided the same level of pain relief as a typical opioid, but at a 100-times lower dose than morphine, according to the research team from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, in Winston-Salem, N.C. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Opioid crisis breakthrough: Non-addictive painkiller found effective
Researchers have developed a compound that simultaneously stops the addictive action of opioids and relieves chronic pain as effectively as morphine. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alcohol / Addiction / Illegal Drugs Source Type: news

Opioid crisis: breakthrough in hunt for non-addictive painkiller
A newly developed pain relief compound appears to be more powerful than morphine, without the addictive highScientists have made a major step towards developing a non-addictive alternative to prescription painkillers.The newly developed compound, called AT121, appears to deliver more powerful pain relief than morphine, but without being accompanied by the feelings of euphoria that drive addiction. So far, the drug has been tested successfully in rats and monkeys, and the team are carrying out final safety tests before human trials can begin.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Science Opioids Society Source Type: news

This new non-addictive painkiller that could help turn the tide of the opioid epidemic
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have developed a chemical compound called AT-121 that can relieve as much pain as an opioid, but at a dose 100 times lower than a dose of morphine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People Are Now Taking Placebo Pills to Deal With Their Health Problems —And It’s Working
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news

People Are Now Taking Placebo Pills to Deal With Their Health Problems —And It’s Working
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news

People Are Now Taking Placebo Pills to Deal With Their Health Problems —And It’s Working
For over 20 years, Linda Buonanno lived in fear that her irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) would suddenly interrupt her daily routine with frequent trips to the bathroom and unbearable cramping. Buonanno, now a 71-year-old medical assistant and hairdresser from Methuen, Mass., tried everything from drugs to dairy-free diets. Nothing worked. She remembers a particularly tough period over 10 years ago, when she was working on the factory floor of a medical-device company for up to 10 hours a day, six days a week. When an IBS episode would strike, her co-workers would cover for her as she huddled in a corner, keeled over in pain...
Source: TIME: Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized medicine Research Source Type: news

Opioid prescribing decreases after learning of a patients fatal overdose
Most opioid prescription deaths occur among people with common conditions for which prescribing risks outweigh benefits. General psychological insights offer an explanation: People may judge risk to be low without available personal experiences, may be less careful than expected when not observed, and may falter without an injunction from authority. To test these hypotheses, we conducted a randomized trial of 861 clinicians prescribing to 170 persons who subsequently suffered fatal overdoses. Clinicians in the intervention group received notification of their patients’ deaths and a safe prescribing injunction from th...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Doctor, J. N., Nguyen, A., Lev, R., Lucas, J., Knight, T., Zhao, H., Menchine, M. Tags: Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Today's medical doctors get virtually ZERO nutrition instruction in medical school – a steep price to pay for most of their patients
(Natural News) One hundred years ago, in 1918, American doctors attended substandard medical schools and earned less than $2,500 on average per year. Morphine and heroin were all available over the counter at local corner drugstores. The best “medical” help you could find came from skilled mid-wives, herbalists, and American Indians. Most doctors made house... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Paramedics in Indianapolis Suburb Turn to Nitrous Oxide as Fentanyl Alternative
The Times of Northwest Indiana Paramedics in the Indianapolis suburb of Fishers are now providing nitrous oxide instead of fentanyl to patients in pain, the first department in the state to make the switch. Read more at The Times of Northwest Indiana   Switch Designed to Combat Epidemic of AddictionThe move is expected to reduce the amount of fentanyl administered to injured patients by about two-thirds, reducing the risk of addiction and eliminating harmful side effects, said Fishers Fire Capt. The nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," will only be used in certain instances, such as for broke...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Paramedics in Indianapolis Suburb Turn to Nitrous Oxide as Fentanyl Alternative
The Times of Northwest Indiana Paramedics in the Indianapolis suburb of Fishers are now providing nitrous oxide instead of fentanyl to patients in pain, the first department in the state to make the switch. Read more at The Times of Northwest Indiana   Switch Designed to Combat Epidemic of AddictionThe move is expected to reduce the amount of fentanyl administered to injured patients by about two-thirds, reducing the risk of addiction and eliminating harmful side effects, said Fishers Fire Capt. The nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," will only be used in certain instances, such as for broke...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Allergan sues Pfizer over opioid litigation costs
Allergan alleges that that the deluge of lawsuits it is facing stem from Pfizer's improper handling of Kadian, which Allergan acquired from Pfizer in 2008 (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - August 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

July 23, 2018: Springfield EMT/Paramedic Pleads Guilty to Stealing Fentanyl, Morphine
(Source: Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) Press Releases)
Source: Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) Press Releases - July 24, 2018 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Painkiller used for dementia 'could make symptoms worse'
Buprenorphine linked to an increase in side-effects including sedation and confusion, scientists findA painkiller commonly used by people living with dementia could make symptoms worse, according to researchers who found it was linked to an increase in problematic side-effects including sedation and confusion.The painkiller buprenorphine is an opioid that is available in several forms, including as a patch that delivers the drug through the skin. It is thought toresult in fewer side-effects than morphine, with the added benefit that it can be given to people who have difficulty swallowing.Continue reading... (Source: Guard...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Drugs Dementia Health Society Science Alzheimer's Source Type: news