The revival of pigs ’ brains inspires hopes – and fears | Kenan Malik
Scientists at Yale may not have found an answer to eternal life but they have advanced the frontiers of neuroscienceA team of neuroscientists at Yale School of Medicine, led by Nenad Sestan, last week reported that they had managed torevive brains from pigs that had been decapitated in an abattoir four hours earlier.Well, “revive” in the sense of getting certain neurons to fire. This was no “brain in a vat” experiment. The brains were neither alive nor possessed consciousness.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kenan Malik Tags: Neuroscience Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » The NIMH Director ’ s Innovation Speaker Series - Seven Years and One-Hundred MRI-Dogs
On May 2, 2019, Dr. Gregory Berns presents “ Seven Years and One-Hundred MRI-Dogs: Awake Unrestrained fMRI in Dogs Reveals Common Neurobiology and Implications for Human Health and Disease ” as part of the NIMH Director ’ s Innovation Speaker Series. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - April 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Finally, a Wearable Neuromodulation Device for Overactive Bladder
As a urogynecology surgeon, Alexandra Haessler, MD, has seen firsthand the limitations of current overactive bladder (OAB) therapies. Aside from medication, the current gold standard for OAB is Medtronic's InterStim, an implantable sacral neuromodulation device that is FDA approved for the treatment of OAB as well as chronic fecal incontinence, and non-obstructive urinary retention. Haessler told MD+DI that the InterStim device works very well but it's an expensive treatment and access is limited because only a few subspecialists in any one metropolitan area are truly qualified to deliver the therapy. The InterStim is not ...
Source: MDDI - April 19, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Cross Section: Barry Smith - Science Weekly podcast
Coffee is a drink adored the world over. But have you ever wondered why a fresh brew smells better than it tastes? Prof Barry Smith has spent his career pondering how the senses work together to produce flavour perception and soGraihagh Jackson invited him into the studio to talk tasteCoffee is a drink adored the world over. But have you ever wondered why a fresh brew smells better than it tastes?This is one of the many questionsProf Barry Smith from the University of London has been trying to answer by studying the senses. It turns out there are a lot to choose from; we could have anywhere between 22 and 33 different sens...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Graihagh Jackson and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Philosophy Neuroscience Source Type: news

4 Medtech Innovations That Are Tearing up the Script
Decision Resources Group (DRG) released a new report today, "4 Crazy Medtech Innovations" that identifies four areas of medtech innovation that are forecasted to shake up the treatment landscape within the next five years. "The reason we decided to look at crazy innovation in medtech was that a few people on our consulting team were doing that and to help them out we decided to do a scan talking to our different data experts, therapy experts, [to learn] what have people seen that's actually crazy innovation," Lexie Code, director of medtech learning at DRG, told MD+DI. After gathering intel from each of...
Source: MDDI - April 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Mind control, levitation and no pain: the race to find a superman in sport
The US and Soviet Union both believed people could develop superpowers. And, reveals The Men on Magic Carpets, their psychic experiments played out in the sporting arenaCandlestick Park, San Francisco, 1964. The wind is whipping off the Bay on a typically cold night at the ballpark. Mike Murphy takes his seat in Section 17. A jazz band pipes up and the vendors shout their wares: Hamm ’s or Falstaff beers, Oscar Mayer hot dogs with Gulden’s mustard. Murphy is close enough to talk to theSan Francisco Giants players – but he’s not interested in hero worship. He wants to put a voodoo curse on the opposi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 18, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ed Hawkins Tags: Books Cold war Psychology Espionage Sport and leisure books Culture US sports Neuroscience Human biology California Communism Russia San Francisco Giants Baseball Anatoly Karpov Chess Religion CIA US news World news Source Type: news

Shimmer launches version 2.0 of its NeuroLynQ ™ neuromarketing platform
(Rana Healthcare Solutions LLC) Shimmer's NeuroLynQ biometrics neuromarketing platform uses scientifically-validated galvanic skin responses (GSR) to monitor an audience's nonconscious emotional response to stimuli, such as a live performance or new advertising material. A Harvard Business Review study also shows how Shimmer's biometric data can help predict viral marketing campaigns. NeuroLynQ v2.0 features an entirely new analytics module, which reduces the time required for neuromarketing data analysis from days and weeks to minutes and hours. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Barrow researcher discovers critical RNA processing aberrations
(St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center) Research by a Barrow Neurological Center scientist on mechanisms of dysfunctional RNA processing in ALS and frontaltemporal dementia (FTD) was published in the April issue of Acta Neuropathologica. The research was conducted by Dr. Rita Sattler and her graduate student Stephen Moore in her laboratory at the Department of Neurobiology at Barrow Neurological Institute, which is dedicated to understanding the mechanisms of disease in ALS, FTD and related neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MALCOLM RITTER / AP Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Scientists Restore Some Brain Activity in Recently Slaughtered Pigs
(NEW YORK) — Scientists restored some activity within the brains of pigs that had been slaughtered hours before, raising hopes for some medical advances and questions about the definition of death. The brains could not think or sense anything, researchers stressed. By medical standards “this is not a living brain,” said Nenad Sestan of the Yale School of Medicine, one of the researchers reporting the results Wednesday in the journal Nature. But the work revealed a surprising degree of resilience among cells within a brain that has lost its supply of blood and oxygen, he said. “Cell death in the brai...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized Brain Activity onetime Source Type: news

Measuring brain activity in milliseconds possible through new research
(King's College London) Researchers from King's College London, Harvard and INSERM-Paris have discovered a new way to measure brain function in milliseconds using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE). This could help with diagnosing and understanding neurological diseases like Alzheimer's, dementia, multiple sclerosis, or epilepsy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gut Brain Axis
Helicobacter pylori Induced Anxiety and AnorexiaOurPGP9.5 was used as a Hypothalamic Neuronal Marker in this study-Hajime Suzuki, Koji Ataka, Akihiro Asakawa, Kai-Chun Cheng, Miharu Ushikai, Haruki Iwai, Takakazu Yagi, Takeshi Arai, Kinnosuke Yahiro, Katsuhiro Yamamoto, Yoshito Yokoyama, Masayasu Kojima, Toshihiko Yada, Toshiya Hirayama, Norifumi Nakamura& Akio Inui (2019).Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Cytotoxin A Causes Anorexia and Anxiety via Hypothalamic Urocortin 1 in Mice. Scientific Reports volume 9, Article number: 6011.Images: Ucn1- and DAPI-positive cells (yellow arrow heads), or Ucn1- and PGP9.5-positive c...
Source: Neuromics - April 17, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Gut-Brain Axis. Hypothalamus Helicobacter pylori Hypothalamic Neurons PGP9.5 Antibody Protein Gene Product 9.5 Source Type: news

10 Biggest Myths About Sleeping, According To Researchers
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news

Cerebral Therapeutics Strengthens Clinical Development Leadership with Strategic Appointments
Lisa Shafer, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, and Eric Distad, Vice President of Clinical Development, add Extensive CNS Drug-Device Development Experience AURORA, Colo., April 16, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Cerebral Therapeutics... Biopharmaceuticals, Neurology, Personnel Cerebral Therapeutics (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 16, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Summit empowers women to take charge of their brain health
UCLA alumna  and singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles blew the roof off a packed ballroom with her powerful performance of her anthem, “Brave,” setting the tone for a day of self-discovery and conversation about mental health at the Wonder of Women Summit on April 11.Johnese Spisso, president of UCLA Health, welcomed 500 attendees to the star-studded occasion, which melded the cream of Hollywood celebrities with UCLA trailblazers in fields ranging from medicine to athletics.Emceed by actress Lisa Kudrow, the event was hosted by UCLA ’s Friends of the Semel Institute and Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

I ’m a scientist studying laughter – and it’s funnier than you might think | Sophie Scott
Parrots do it, rats do it, and we do it partly for social reasons. But to learn more, I need the help of comedy fansThe American writer EB White famously said, “Analysing humour is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” But is the same true of analysing laughter?I am a brain scientist who studies laughter, and I find it quite interesting, not least because scientific analyses tell us that pretty much everything we humans think we know about laughter is wrong. We think laughter is primarily something we do when we find something funny, but in fact most laughter is produced fo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sophie Scott Tags: Comedy Neuroscience Culture Psychology UK news Source Type: news

Neurobiologist Paul Greengard Dies
The Nobel laureate revolutionized our understanding of how brain cells communicate. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 15, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories
(Kanazawa University) A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. Their research sheds light on how drug addiction develops and reveals pathways that can be exploited for the development of strategies to treat cocaine addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RNA transport in neurons -- Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) A team of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and the University of Ulm has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought. RNA is transported within highly complex protein-RNA particles whose structure and specificity are still poorly understood. The team's findings, recently published in the journal Nature Communications, opens up new approaches to improve our understanding of the process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Paul Greengard, Nobel Prize-Winning Neuroscientist, Dies at 93
His 15-year quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided the underlying science for many antipsychotic drugs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GELLENE Tags: Nobel Prizes Deaths (Obituaries) Mental Health and Disorders Carlsson, Arvid Kandel, Eric R Greengard, Paul Source Type: news

Paul Greengard, 93, Nobel Prize-Winning Neuroscientist, Is Dead
His 15-year quest to understand how brain cells communicate provided the underlying science for many antipsychotic drugs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GELLENE Tags: Greengard, Paul Brain Mental Health and Disorders Nobel Prizes Deaths (Obituaries) Source Type: news

‘When we dream, we have the perfect chemical canvas for intense visions’
US journalist Alice Robb, author of a new book about the science and life-changing potential of dreams, talks about her researchAlice Robb is an American science journalist who has written for theWashington Post and theNew Republic. Her new book,Why We Dream, encourages us to rethink the importance of dreams and to become dream interpreters ourselves.Writing a book about dreams turned you into a “magnet for confessions”. Why are people compelled to talk about dreams?It is a natural impulse because dreams are emotional, affect moods, feel profound. What is unusual is that we live in a culture where we ’re ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kate Kellaway Tags: Neuroscience Books Health, mind and body books Science and nature books Psychology Source Type: news

UCLA researcher aims to study societal impacts of cannabis
In the 15 months since the recreational sale of marijuana became legal for adults in California, an explosion of new cannabis-based products, unchecked health claims and slick advertisements has bombarded the state.Anticipating the accompanying social impacts, UCLA established the  UCLA Cannabis Research Initiative, known as the CRI,  in 2017 as one of the first academic programs in the world dedicated to the study of marijuana. Supported by the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and the UCLA Brain Research Institute, the CRI is led by director Dr. Jeff Chen and brings to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

PET Scans Reveal Elevated Tau in NFL Players' Brains
A study hints that it might be possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease associated with frequent head injuries, while patients are still living. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

Does Red Wine Help You Live Longer? Here ’s What the Science Says
In the 1990s, some researchers observed that French people—despite eating lots of saturated fat—tended to have low rates of heart disease. Dubbing this phenomenon the “French paradox,” the researchers speculated that regular wine consumption may be protecting their hearts from disease. A little later, in the early-2000s, evidence began to pile up tying Mediterranean-style eating and drinking patterns with longer lifespans. One component of these diets that got a lot of attention was the consumption of wine—red wine, in particular. Even among people who ate healthy Mediterranean diets, those w...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Longevity Source Type: news

BU Study Of NFL Players ’ Brains Might Help Diagnose CTE In The Living
CNN) — After examining the brains of former professional football players, researchers might be a step closer to diagnosing the devastating brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the living, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. The researchers utilized PET imaging to find tau, an abnormal protein that’s a signature indicator of CTE, using a radioactive drug or tracer called flortaucipir. The researchers imaged the brains of 26 living former football players and compared them with the brains of 31 people with no history of traumatic brain injury. (WBZ-TV) Th...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN CTE Source Type: news

'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners
(University of Cambridge) Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. Dysfunction in these 'simulation neurons' may help explain difficulties with social interactions in conditions such as autism and social anxiety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The trespasser
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Servick, K. Tags: Neuroscience, Physics, Scientific Community Feature Source Type: news

Dartmouth Researchers Offer New Insights into How Maternal Immunity Impacts Neonatal HSV
Findings from a Dartmouth-led study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, are offering new insights into neonatal herpes, its impact on developing nervous systems, and how newborns can be protected from the disease. In this innovative study, investigators were able to measure not only mortality but also neurological consequences of infection in mice who acquired the virus. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - April 10, 2019 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Press Release Research David Leib herpes HSV immunology neonatal HSV Source Type: news

Dartmouth researchers offer new insights into how maternal immunity impacts neonatal HSV
(The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth) Findings from a Dartmouth-led study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, are offering new insights into neonatal herpes, its impact on developing nervous systems, and how newborns can be protected from the disease. In this innovative study, investigators were able to measure not only mortality but also neurological consequences of infection in mice who acquired the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protein pileup affects social behaviors through altered brain signaling
(RIKEN) Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) have discovered that when a normal cellular cleanup process is disrupted, mice start behaving in ways that resemble human symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. They found that loss of normal autophagy influences how brain cells react to inhibitory signals from each other and contributes to the behavioral changes. This intricate signaling pathway could be a new therapeutic target for neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers reveal novel therapeutic strategy for ALS
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and their collaborators revealed a new cellular mechanism for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggested a novel therapeutic strategy targeting the RNA degradation pathway, and identified an asthma drug as a potential medication for ALS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neurostimulation for chronic pain, bladder conditions, and movement disorders
(International Neuromodulation Society) Australian media personality and general practitioner Dr. Sally Cockburn will emcee presentations by physicians and patients prior to the International Neuromodulation Society 14th World Congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists reverse memory decline using electrical pulses
Working memory of older group temporarily improves to match younger group in studyA decline in memory as a result of ageing can be temporarily reversed using a harmless form of electrical brain stimulation, scientists have found.The findings help explain why certain cognitive skills decline significantlywith age and raise the prospect of new treatments.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Memory Ageing Science Neuroscience Medical research Health Society Source Type: news

The rise of the killer robots – and the two women fighting back
Jody Williams and Mary Wareham were leading lights in the campaign to ban landmines. Now they have autonomous weapons in their sights It sounds like something from the outer reaches of science fiction: battlefield robots waging constant war, algorithms that determine who to kill, face-recognition fighting machines that can ID a target and take it out before you have time to say “Geneva conventions”.This is no film script, however, but an ominous picture of future warfare that is moving ever closer. “Killer robots” is shorthand for a range of tech that has generals salivating and peace campaigners te...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Chan in Berlin Tags: Robots Artificial intelligence (AI) Drones (military) US military World news Computing Neuroscience Technology UK news Germany Europe Source Type: news

BethAnn McLaughlin: ‘Too many women in science have to run the gauntlet of abuse and leave’
The scientist behind a website to expose sexual ‘harassholes’ on her campaign and its impact – and who she plans to shame nextNeuroscientistBethAnn McLaughlin is a leading campaigner in the US fight against sexual assault and harassment of women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (Stem). Assistant professor of neurology and pharmacology at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, she launched the#MeTooSTEM website in 2018 so women had a place to tell their stories. Her work was recently recognised with anMIT Media Lab Disobedience award, which she shared with two other prominent #MeToo activis...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 7, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Science Sexual harassment Neuroscience #MeToo movement Source Type: news

The sixth sense: can humans detect the Earth ’s magnetic field?
Scientists in California believe that internal compasses might have enabled our ancestors to navigate as some animals do todayFruit flies do it. Tiny northern wheatears do it. Even salmon in the seas do it. All navigate using Earth ’s magnetic field.In fact, hundreds of animals migrate this way, some over long distances. But one species has always been excluded from this electromagnetic orienteering club:Homo sapiens. Men and women show no evidence of possessing internal compasses, researchers have insisted.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Science Neuroscience Animal behaviour Human biology Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Fruit flies rise to the occasion
Fishing them out of a drink, you may not see the benefit of fruit flies. But they are a vital scientific model, and at Mayo Clinic, they are helping researchers investigate a debilitating chemotherapy side effect: nerve damage called "peripheral neuropathy." "The platinum drugs -- cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin -- are the [most common] drugs used [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 6, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Science News » Fifth Annual BRAIN Initiative Investigators Meeting
On April 11-13, 2019, approximately 1,500 scientists from many disciplines will attend the fifth annual Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) ® Initiative Investigators Meeting in Washington, DC. This open meeting provides a forum for discussing scientific developments and potential new directions, and to identify areas for collaboration and research coordination. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - April 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lindsey O'Keefe Source Type: news

DelMar Pharmaceuticals Welcomes Dr. John de Groot, Chairman, ad interim of the Department of Neuro-Oncology at MD Anderson Cancer Center, as founding member of the Company's Scientific Advisory Board
Dr. Napoleone Ferrara, a Member of DelMar Pharmaceuticals Board Will Serve as the Chairman of the SAB VANCOUVER, British Columbia and MENLO PARK, Calif., April 4, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- DelMar Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: D... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology, Personnel DelMar Pharmaceuticals, VAL-083 (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 4, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

AI Used to Assess Treatment Response for Brain Tumors
Researchers from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre have developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. In their recent publication, the authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard MRI are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors. Thus, they make a valuable contribution to the individualized treatment of tumors. In addition, the validated method is an important first step towards the automated high-throughput analysis of medical image data of brain tumors. One of the essential cri...
Source: MDDI - April 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MDDI Staff Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Woman Who Feels No Pain May Mean a Major Scientific Gain Woman Who Feels No Pain May Mean a Major Scientific Gain
Jo Cameron, 71, has never experienced physical pain. Now scientists have discovered the genetic mutation behind her rare"condition" and hope to harness it in future treatments.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - April 4, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Your Data Wanted
Reward is $50 Amazon Gift CardWe are always honored when customers share theirdata and images. More is better! This month we would like to reward you for any data or images featuring any of our products you share with us.Just e-mail Rose Ludescher, Manager of Customer Satisfaction, atrose@neuromics.com, and she will e-mail you a $50 Amazon Gift Card.Example DataHUMAN PANCREATIC CAF-STELLATE CELLS-Stained with alpha-SMA + DAP1 20x. Courtesy of Emily Rodela, TGEN-Courtesy of Emila Rodela, T-Gen. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - April 3, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: news

Researchers demonstrate latest neurotechnologies at international conference
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Scientists and engineers met to collaborate on their latest research and demonstrate new technologies at the 9th International IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society conference on neural engineering, in San Francisco, Calif., March 19-23. For more information about the recent study visit the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experimental Biology highlights -- Cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and medical news
(Experimental Biology) Embargoed press materials are now available for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held in Orlando April 6-9. EB is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together more than 12,000 scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 3, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Collaboration Leads to Blood-Based Concussion and TBI Test
Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) or concussions contributed to about 30% of all injury deaths according to estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As a result, companies are working diligently to develop tests for the detection of TBI and concussions. Chembio Diagnostics is the latest firm to step into the arena, through a collaboration with Perseus Science Group. The two companies are working to develop a point-of-care diagnostic test for TBI. “We’re going to put their patented biomarker onto the [DPP] to develop a rapid test for concussion,” John ...
Source: MDDI - April 2, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Transplanted bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells delay ALS disease progression
(University of South Florida (USF Innovation)) Transplanting human bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells into mice mimicking symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) helped more motor neurons survive and slowed disease progression by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, University of South Florida researchers report. The new research, published recently in Scientific Reports, contributes to a growing body of work exploring cell therapy approaches to barrier repair in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A Review of Everything in Its Place: First Loves and Last Tales
This posthumously published collection of essays by Oliver Sacks further cements the neurologist ’s place in the pantheon of science writers. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Reading Frames Magazine Issue Source Type: news