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How does the brain learn categorization for sounds? The same way it does for images
Categorization, or the recognition that individual objects share similarities and can be grouped together, is fundamental to how we make sense of the world. Previous research has revealed how the brain categorizes images. Now, researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) have discovered that the brain categorizes sounds in much the same way. The results are published today in the journal Neuron. "Categorization involves applying a single label to a ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=245142&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Amgen Presents First-Of-Its-Kind Data At AAN Annual Meeting Reinforcing Robust And Consistent Efficacy Of Aimovig ™ (erenumab) For Migraine Patients With Multiple Treatment Failures
The LIBERTY Trial was Conducted in Patients who Have Tried Two to Four Therapies Without Success -- a Uniquely Difficult-to-Treat Population Often Excluded From Migraine Prevention Trials Patients Taking Aimovig had Nearly Three-Fold Higher Odds of Having Their Migraine Days cut by Half or More Compared to Placebo Safety and Tolerability Were Consistent With Results Seen in the Pivotal Clinical Program; Over 97 Percent of Those Taking Aimovig Completed the Double-Blind Treatment Phase Data Selected by the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee as one of the Most Noteworthy Presentations at 2018 Annual Meetin...
Source: Amgen News Release - April 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Bioelectronic Medicine: Targeting Inflammatory Disease with Electricity
We presented positive initial results in Crohn’s disease at the 2016 United European Gastroenterology meeting: six of the eight patients had seen a substantial reduction in their disease activity index scores, and three were in remission from the disease. As SetPoint looks ahead, several chronic disease areas are emerging as key bioelectronic medicine therapy targets, and our company is exploring a number of these. One of our preclinical programs explores bioelectronic medicine’s potential role as a treatment for MS.   New Target: Multiple Sclerosis In late 2017, SetPoint presented positive data from a s...
Source: Mass Device - April 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Anthony Arnold Tags: Bioelectronic Medicine Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation SetPoint Medical Sponsored Content Source Type: news

Diagnosing, treating neuropathy symptoms in cancer patients not exact science
(University of Michigan) Most of the roughly 15.5 million cancer survivors in the US receive chemotherapy, and roughly 65 percent develop some degree of the chemotherapy-induced nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What depressed robots can teach us about mental health | Zachary Mainen
The idea of a depressed computer may seem absurd – but artificial intelligence and the human brain share a vital featureDepression seems a uniquely human way of suffering, but surprising new ways of thinking about it are coming from the field of artificial intelligence. Worldwide, over 350 million peoplehave depression, and rates are climbing. The success of today ’s generation of AI owes much to studies of the brain. Might AI return the favour and shed light on mental illness?The central idea of computational neuroscience is that similar issues face any intelligent agent – human or artificial – and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zachary Mainen Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) Depression Mental health Computing Consciousness Neuroscience Human biology Psychology Technology Robots Source Type: news

Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse Brains
After implantation, the tissue developed blood vessels and became integrated into neuronal networks in the animals' brains. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 16, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

New disease model to facilitate development of ALS and MS therapies
(Karolinska Institutet) Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new disease model for neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and MS that can be used to develop new immunotherapies. The model is described in a publication in the scientific journal Nature Immunology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reversing brain injury in newborns and adults
(Oregon Health& Science University) Researchers at OHSU in Portland, Ore., have identified a new molecule within the brain's white matter that blocks the organ's ability to repair itself following injury. By preventing the production of this molecule, it is possible to create an effective pathway that allows the brain to continue its regenerative process. This may help to limit long-term physical and mental disability associated with devastating neurological conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long Term Culturing of Cells
Non-Perfusion ModelResearchers, for some studies, are demanding the ability to maintain vibrant cultures for long periods of time.Perfusion models afford this, but are expensive, sensitive and require specialized expertise. Given this, I believed it a good time to represent a protocol that can be used for ourprimary neurons and can be extrapolated to many of our other primary and stem cells.Here's the complete protocol.Rose Ludescher, Manager of Customer Satisfaction, is an expert in helping our customers successfully culturing cells. So if you need help with any of your cell-based assays do not hesitate to contact her. Ju...
Source: Neuromics - April 14, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Cell based assays Cell Cultures cell culturing protocol Neurons Source Type: news

Neurostimulation device offers new hope for those with epilepsy
According to the Epilepsy Foundation about 48 of every 100,000 people will develop epilepsy, a condition that can cause debilitating seizures. But there's new hope thanks to advancements in science and technology. Dr. Jon LaPook reports. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - April 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'I was a monster': Mental health scientist describes her own delusions
National Institutes of Health neurologist Dr Barbara Lipska thought her years of studying mentally ill brains had helped her understand the conditions - until she failed to see she was losing her sanity. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA study produces clearest images to date of HSV-1, the virus that causes cold sores
UCLA researchers have produced the clearest 3-D images to date of the virus that causes cold sores, herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1. The images enabled them to map the virus ’ structure and offered new insights into how HSV-1 works.A report on the research was published online by the journal Science.The scientists used cryo electron microscopy, or cryoEM, to obtain the first atomic model of the virus particle, which is made up of more than 3,000 protein molecules comprising tens of millions of atoms.“We’ve known that HSV-1 can hide inside the nucleus of the nerve cell and establish life-long latent ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 13, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Funding applications are due today! Applications for our upcoming round of health information outreach funding are due by 11pm this evening – don’t forget our last funding tip – follow directions for submission. Please note, late applications will not be accepted. We look forward to funding some great projects! NNLM Edit-a-thon: don’t forget to use #citeNLM2018 next week during NNLM’s first Wikipedia Edit-a-thon – we’re adding citations to existing articles on rare diseases! Not sur...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Cluster of cells in the brain that influence parental behaviour identified
Research, published inNature, has identified a galanin-producing population of cells in the mouse brain that influence the complex neurocircuitry associated with parenting behaviour, including hormone release from the hypothalamus.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 12, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

The neurons the power parenting
(Harvard University) Harvard researchers have described, for the first time, how separate pools of neurons control individual aspects of parenting behavior in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The severity of neurocognitive impairment
(Bentham Science Publishers) Neurocognitive impairment is frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis patients affecting between 40-65 percent of these individuals, irrespective of disease duration, severity of physical disability, and at both the earlier and later disease stages, with a tendency to worsen over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NeuroMetrix touts Quell user-response study data
NeuroMetrix (NSDQ:NURO) yesterday touted results from a clinical study of its Quell wearable device, touting its ability to treat chronic pain. Results from the trial were published in the Journal of Pain Research, the Waltham, Mass.-based company said. In the retrospective study, researchers examined data from 713 subjects using its Quell device to treat chronic pain over 60 days of use. Data was obtained from consenting device users who rated pain at a baseline before therapy and at 60 days of use. Primary outcome measures were changes in pain intensity and pain interference with sleep, activity and mood on an 11-po...
Source: Mass Device - April 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Pain Management Neurometrix Source Type: news

Soterix touts transcranial stim depression trial results
Soterix Medical today released results from trials of its direct current stimulation-limited total energy technology designed to treat depression, touting that the device was found to be safe and effective with improvements in depression-rating metrics lasting for a month after treatment. The tDCS-LTE system is designed to deliver energy to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex region of the brain which is implicated in depression control, the New York-based company said. In the first trial, the company reported that its tDCS-LTE system was effective and safe as an add-on intervention for patients with type I or II bipolar di...
Source: Mass Device - April 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Soterix Medical Source Type: news

A Man Got ‘Thunderclap Headaches’ After Eating the World’s Hottest Pepper
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Macmillan / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Review examines everything we know about Internet gaming disorder
(Wiley) An analysis of all published articles on Internet gaming disorder (IGD) notes that the condition has a complex psychosocial background, and many personal, neurobiological, familial, and environmental factors may put certain individuals at increased risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Large-scale replication study challenges key evidence for the pro-active reading brain
(Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics) When people read or listen to a conversation, their pro-active brains sometimes predict which word comes next. But a scientific team led by the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands now demonstrates that the predictive function of the human language system may operate differently than the field has come to believe in the last decade. Their study is the first large-scale, multi-laboratory replication effort for the field of cognitive neuroscience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale scientist searches for alternatives to opioids
Dr. Stephen Waxman, the Bridget M. Flaherty Professor of Neurology, is looking for painkillers that target sodium channels, not opioid receptors. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - April 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A Neuroscientist Explains: how we read words - podcast
For our final episode of this series,Daniel Glaser (with a little misguided help from his producerMax) attempts to unpick what the brain does – and doesn’t do – when we readSubscribe and review oniTunes andAcast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterA Neuroscientist Explains is back for its second season. In each episode,Daniel Glaser and series ’ producerMax revisit a column from Daniel ’s hugely successfulweekly column in the Observer Magazine and explore the neuroscience within it. One subject, one interview and many, many interesting questions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Daniel Glaser and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

An advance for precision medicine
(Oregon Health& Science University) Scientists have developed a method to quickly and efficiently recognize the subtypes of cells within the body for the first time. The discovery will improve understanding of disease at the molecular level and could ultimately could enable the development of precise treatments of conditions such as cancer, disorders that destroy neurons in the brain, and diseases that affect the heart and blood vessels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Neuroscientist Gregory Berns: ‘Studying dogs is way more enjoyable than studying humans’
The US researcher on exploring the bond between dogs and humans and why animal testing needs to be questionedGregory Berns is a distinguished professor of neuroeconomics at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. His current work involves taking brain scans of dogs to probe what goes on between canine ears, as well as using scanning techniques to probe the connections within brains of dead animals, including the extinct Tasmanian tiger, the thylacine.In your new book, you say a dog ’s brain is about the size of a lemon …That ’s probably for a medium-size dog, like a labrador. Bigger dogs generally hav...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Neuroscience Dogs Pets Life and style Animal experimentation Source Type: news

National Eye Institute's 3-D ROC Challenge
Are you Ready?Neuromics is a proudSponsor of this challenge. It enables us to further leverage our potent, proven and published3-D Cell-Based Assay Solutions into drug discovery for eye-related diseases.Our solution set includes 21-CFR Complianthuman primary and stem cells and research ready custom and off the shelf 3-D Models. We also provide defined media and supplements.Neuromics 3-D Blood-Brain Barrier ModelIn addition to models, we offer: ECMS•Engineered hydrogels optimized for cell types•Coming soon: Bio-Inks for 3-D Printing-Engineered for Cells•NanofibersNeuromics ’ HUVECS in an engin...
Source: Neuromics - April 7, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: 3-D Assays. 3-D imaging 3-D Cell based Assays 3-D ROC Challenge Collagen Hydrogels National Eye Insititute Source Type: news

Printed thermo-plasmonic heat patterns for neurological disorder treatment
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) A KAIST team presented a highly customized neural stimulation method. The research team developed a technology that can print the heat pattern on a micron scale to enable the control of biological activities remotely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA research could be first step toward healing the hearts of children with Duchenne
After a progressive weakening of the muscles takes away their motor skills, and then their abilities to stand and walk, most males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy die of heart and respiratory failure in their 20s.Now, researchers at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA are pursuing a cutting-edge way to stop heart disease in patients with Duchenne, which affects one in 5,000 male babies born in the United States. Their work, which is supported by a David Geffen School of Medicine Seed Grant, is just one of a number of projects underway at the medical school in which interdisciplinary groups of UCLA researchers are p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 6, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Humans produce new brain cells throughout their lives, say researchers
Findings could help hunt for treatment for degenerative conditions such as Alzheimers, and psychiatric problemsHumans continue to produce new neurons in a part of their brain involved in learning, memory and emotion throughout adulthood, scientists have revealed, countering previous theories that production stopped after adolescence. The findings could help in developing treatments for neurological conditions such as dementia.Many new neurons are produced in the hippocampus in babies, but it has been a matter of hot debate whether this continues into adulthood – and if so, whether this rate drops with age as seen in ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Stem cells Biology Medical research Source Type: news

Surprise! Scientists find signs of new brain cells in adults as old as 79
Do we continue to add new neurons to our brain circuitry throughout our lives? Or does our neuron count remain fixed once we reach adulthood?The scientific debate rages on.In areport published Thursday in Cell Stem Cell, scientists from Columbia University present new evidence that our brains... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Netburn Source Type: news

This Study Could Explain Why Our Brains Perform Worse As We Age
For a long time researchers thought the brain did not make new cells. That meant that as the existing cells died with age, nerve connections were lost and everything from memory to reasoning and language skills started to decline. Then scientists learned that the brain actually did make new nerve cells, specifically in areas associated with memory. But why do cognitive functions still decline over time? That’s what researchers led by Maura Boldrini, a research scientist in the department of psychiatry at Columbia University, and her colleagues wanted to find out. In a study published in Cell Stem Cell, Boldrini and h...
Source: TIME: Health - April 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Brain onetime Source Type: news

Abundant Neurogenesis Found in Adult Humans Hippocampi
Researchers identified thousands of immature neurons in the brain region, countering a recent result showing little, if any, signs of neurogenesis. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 5, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Nicotine-imbibing teenage rats show an increased risk for drinking alcohol as adults
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Rats who were dosed with nicotine during their adolescence grew up to drink alcohol more often than those who weren't exposed to nicotine or were only exposed to it during adulthood. Exposure to nicotine at a young age changed the neuronal circuitry in the rat brain's reward pathways (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH Helping to End Addiction Long-Term (HEAL) Initiative
An aggressive, trans-agency effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis. This Initiative will build on extensive, well-established NIH research, including basic science of the complex neurological pathways involved in pain and addiction, implementation science to develop and test treatment models, and research to integrate behavioral interventions with Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are people with Parkinson's disease depressed or demoralized?
(American Academy of Neurology) People with Parkinson's disease who show signs of depression may actually have a condition called demoralization, according to a study published in the April 4, 2018, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. That study found demoralization may be common in Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Congressional briefing on neurological diseases and the environment
Congressional staffers were briefed March 8 on scientific findings about connections between neurological diseases and the environment. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - April 3, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Mifepristone may halt growth of intracranial tumor that causes hearing loss
(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers have shown that mifepristone, a drug currently FDA-approved for chemical abortion, prevents the growth of vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma) cells. This sometimes-lethal intracranial tumor typically causes hearing loss and tinnitus. The findings, published online today in Scientific Reports, suggest that mifepristone is a promising drug candidate to be repositioned for the treatment of these tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A Neuroscientist Explains: where perception ends and hallucination begins - podcast
When it comes to perceiving the world around us, how much of it is due to ‘bottom-up’ sensory data and how much comes from the ‘top-down’ predictions we make? Most importantly; how can the delicate dance between the two lead to hallucinations?Subscribe and review oniTunes andAcast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterA Neuroscientist Explains is back for its second season. In each episode,Dr Daniel Glaser and producerMax Sanderson revisit a column from Daniel ’s hugely successfulweekly column in the Observer Magazine and explore the neuroscience within it. One subject, one interview a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Daniel Glaser and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Neuroscience Mental health Psychology Consciousness Human biology Source Type: news

We'll pay more for unhealthy foods we crave, neuroscience research finds
(New York University) We'll pay more for unhealthy foods when we crave them, new neuroscience research finds. The study also shows that we're willing to pay disproportionately more for higher portion sizes of craved food items. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A revolution in our sense of self | Nick Chater
In a radical reassessment of how the mind works, a leading behavioural scientist argues the idea of a deep inner life is an illusion. This is cause for celebration, he says, not despairAt the climax ofAnna Karenina, the heroine throws herself under a train as it moves out of a station on the edge of Moscow. But did she really want to die? Had the ennui of Russian aristocratic life and the fear of losing her lover, Vronsky, become so intolerable that death seemed the only escape? Or was her final act mere capriciousness, a theatrical gesture of despair, not seriously imagined even moments before the opportunity arose?We ask...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nick Chater Tags: Psychology Psychiatry Consciousness Neuroscience Artificial intelligence (AI) Source Type: news

Why two brains are better than one
A radical technique that makes mature cells act like stem cells is growing a mini brain from tissue I donated. One day it could produce whole organs for transplantLast week, I was told my other brain is fully grown. It doesn ’t look like much. A blob of pale flesh about the size of a small pea, it floats in a bath of blood-red nutrient. It would fit into the cranium of a foetus barely a month old.Still, it ’s a “brain” after a fashion and it’s made from me. From a piece of my arm, to be precise.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 31, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Stem cells Science Biology Embryos Medical research Neuroscience Organ donation Health Society Source Type: news

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness
Neuroscientist Barbara Lipska describes in a new memoir surviving 20 brain tumors, and what the eight-week nightmare of psychological symptoms taught her about mental illnesses she's long studied.(Image credit: Courtesy of the author) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Scott Simon Source Type: news

Stephen Hawking funeral: How did he die? Symptoms of scientist's fatal condition
STEPHEN HAWKING died at the age of 76 earlier this month and his funeral is due to take place tomorrow. The physicist lived for more than 50 years with motor neurone disease, a rare condition that affects the brain and nerves. What are the symptoms? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Unmasking Root Causes of Stress/Anxiety
i-Fect Knocks Down Suspected Stress/Anxiety ReceptorThe molecular pathogenesis underlying anxiety disorders is still unclear. Here, the authors demonstrate that myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate like 1 (MARCKSL1) overexpression in mice increases spine formation in the amygdala and induces stress hormone upregulation and anxiety-like behaviors. Suppression of MARCKSL1 in the amygdala ameliorates both the increase in stress hormones and the elevated anxiety-like behaviors. Our results indicate that MARCKSL1 expression in the amygdala plays an important role in anxiety-like behaviors.This was proved, in part, by t...
Source: Neuromics - March 29, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Anxiety gene expression analysis i-Fect MARCKSL1 Source Type: news

Monkeys' brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor task
(Duke University Medical Center) Scientists have previously shown that when one animal watches another performing a motor task, such as reaching for food, mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the observer's brain start firing as though the observer were also reaching for food. New Duke research appearing March 29 in the journal Scientific Reports suggests mirroring in monkeys is also influenced by social factors, such as proximity to other animals, social hierarchy and competition for food. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molecular basis of neural memory -- reviewing 'neuro-mimetic' technologies
(Bentham Science Publishers) From the perspective of neuroscientists, the authors review the IBM Brain Chip and the Blue Brain Project, and find them flawed by key oversights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cot death could partly be down to genetic mutation, say researchers
Rare mutation associated with breathing muscles is key to sudden infant death syndrome, says study in LancetScientists have uncovered a new and potentially important genetic mutation implicated in cot deaths, which they say could take research for ways to prevent such tragedies in a new direction.The rare genetic mutation is associated with the breathing muscles. “Previously the whole focus of trying to understand it was either the heart or the brain cells controlling breathing,” said Professor Michael Hanna of the MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases at University College London, one of the authors of a newpa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Sudden infant death syndrome Science Health Society UCL (University College London) Parents and parenting Family Source Type: news

i-Fect Delivers Again!
Knocks Down Suspected Stress/Anxiety ReceptorThe molecular pathogenesis underlying anxiety disorders is still unclear. Here, the authors demonstrate that myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate like 1 (MARCKSL1) overexpression in mice increases spine formation in the amygdala and induces stress hormone upregulation and anxiety-like behaviors. Suppression of MARCKSL1 in the amygdala ameliorates both the increase in stress hormones and the elevated anxiety-like behaviors. Our results indicate that MARCKSL1 expression in the amygdala plays an important role in anxiety-like behaviors.This was proved, in part, by the knoc...
Source: siRNA and DsiRNA Transfection Efficiency - March 28, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Amygdala Anxiety i-Fect MARCKSL1 Stress Source Type: news

Book Review: The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory
I came across the polyvagal theory some time ago in my ongoing study of finding ways to help people recover from trauma. I have come to realize that there is so much to this theory that pervades all of our behavior and feelings. Stephen Porges’ polyvagal theory is truly phenomenal. Porges’ book, The Pocket Guide to the Polyvagal Theory: The Transformative Power of Feeling Safe is another in the Norton series on interpersonal neurobiology and was written to give a nontechnical overview of the theory. It is organized in the form of edited interviews and conversations, mostly with Ruth Buczynski of the Nation...
Source: Psych Central - March 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Stan Rockwell, PsyD Tags: Book Reviews Neuroscience Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology PTSD Trauma eastern philosophy Polyvagal Theory Psychophysiology Source Type: news

UCLA receives $20 million to create state-of-the-art health sciences learning center
A $20 million commitment from Eugene and Maxine Rosenfeld will enable UCLA Health Sciences to enhance its ability to provide simulation training to future health care professionals.The expansion and revitalization of the learning resource center, which includes the UCLA Simulation Center, will also create a new home for the Center for Advanced Surgical and Interventional Technology and provide a new state-of-the-art space for training medical students in the most advanced patient care practices. The project is a priority of UCLA ’s health enterprise because of its importance in attracting and preparing future leaders...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news