Neurosurgery could spread protein linked to Alzheimer's, study finds
Doctors should decontaminate tools more thoroughly as a precaution, say researchersSurgical instruments used in brain operations should be treated to ensure they are not contaminated with proteins linked to Alzheimer ’s disease, according to scientists who found evidence that they may be spread by certain medical procedures.The researchers urged doctors to decontaminate neurosurgical tools more thoroughly as a precautionary measure to reduce the potential risk of spreading abnormal proteins known to build up in the brains of Alzheimer ’s patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Alzheimer's Health Neuroscience Medical research Source Type: news

Vaccine could help address the opioid epidemic
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Synthetic psychoactive drugs have become a serious public health threat in recent years. This is particularly true of the fentanyls, a large family of synthetic opioids, which can be up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Synthetic opioids are highly addictive and, because of their potency, often prove fatal: among the roughly 72,000 drug overdose deaths in the US in 2017, some 30,000 were related to synthetic opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research suggests how parents protect children from the long-term effects of stress
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) When young children experience violence or poverty, the effect can last well into adulthood. But new research from the Emory School of Medicine suggests that a strong parental relationship could override some of these effects, by changing how children perceive the environmental cues that help them distinguish between what's safe or dangerous. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers developing nonopioid drug for chronic pain
(Virginia Tech) Researchers from the Virginia Tech School of Neuroscience are teaming with the University of California San Diego and the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop a drug -- now in its earliest stages -- that can treat certain types of chronic pain without the addictive consequences of opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Always Forgetting Important Things? Here ’s How to Fix That, According to Science
Most people, when tasked with remembering something important, jot down a note. But a study published recently in the journal Experimental Aging Research says there may be a better way to keep memories fresh: draw a picture. Drawing works your brain in ways that writing alone does not, forcing it to process visual information, translate the meaning of a word into an image and carry out a physical act all at once, says study co-author Melissa Meade, a doctoral candidate in cognitive neuroscience at the University of Waterloo in Canada. “It’s bringing online a lot of different brain regions that you wouldn’...
Source: TIME: Health - December 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Meditation adapts the brain to respond better to feedback
(University of Surrey) In a new study in the Journal of Cognitive, Affective& Behavioral Neuroscience researchers from the University of Surrey have discovered a link between meditation and how individuals respond to feedback. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

J & J ’s Cerenovus launches global thrombectomy registry
Johnson & Johnson‘s (NYSE:JNJ) Cerenovus said today that it launched a new registry aiming to collect and analyze stroke-inducing blood clots removed with the company’s Embotrap II revascularization device. The Irvine, Calif.-based company touted the Excellent registry as the single largest global registry of its kind to date, looking to enroll up to 1,000 ischemic stroke patients across 50 locations in the U.S. and Europe. Investigators in the trial will collect and analyze clots removed to explore how different characteristics, including size, composition and density may affect outcomes, the com...
Source: Mass Device - December 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Blood Management Clinical Trials Featured Neurological cerenovus johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Consider high-intensity interval exercise
(Florida Atlantic University) Researchers have discovered what might be an effective strategy to prevent and combat cognitive dysfunction in obese individuals. They are the first to examine the modulatory role of an exercise-induced protein in the brain that promotes neuron survival and used high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in obese and normal-weight subjects. Obesity reduces the expression of this protein and lower levels are associated with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and obesity. HIIE upregulated this protein in the obese subjects compared to normal-weight subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insights into childhood cancer
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Peripheral nervous system tumors, known as neuroblastoma, are one of the most common types of childhood tumors. As part of an international research endeavor, researchers from Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin have studied the genetic factors behind different tumor subtypes and their prognoses. Their findings enable clinicians to predict the precise clinical course of the disease, and to adapt their treatment regimens accordingly. The study has been published in the prestigious journal Science*. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Why feeling empathy could lead former drug users to relapse
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Empathy, the awareness of another's feelings and emotions, is a key feature in normal social interactions. But new research from the University of Minnesota suggests that empathy can have detrimental effects on an individual -- and can push former drug users to relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OHSU scientist seeks a parrot's help in longevity study
The blue-fronted Amazon parrot is not only intelligent but can live up to 66 years, much longer than similar sized birds. Which is why the species was the perfect study subject for Claudio Mello, who published a paper this week entitled “Parrot Genomes and the Evolution of Heightened Longevity and Cognition.” Mello, a behavioral neuroscientist at OHSU, has also published research on the genetic makeup of zebra f inches as a vehicle to study the neural and genetic basis of human speech. Mello’s… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

The New Old Age: Older Americans Are Flocking to Medical Marijuana
Oils, tinctures and salves — and sometimes old-fashioned buds — are increasingly common in seniors ’ homes. Doctors warn that popularity has outstripped scientific evidence. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: PAULA SPAN Tags: Marijuana Medical Marijuana Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Elderly Sleep Chemotherapy Nausea Pain-Relieving Drugs Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JAMA Neurology (Journal) Duke University Medical Center Casarett, David J Orange Source Type: news

New generation of therapeutics based on understanding of aging biology show promise for Alzheimer's disease
(Alzheimer's Drug Discovery Foundation) A scientific strategy that explores therapeutic targets based on the biology of aging is gaining ground as an effective approach to prevent and treat Alzheimer's disease, according to research published in the December 7, 2018 online issue of Neurology ® . (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expeditions in Computing: 10 years transforming science and society
The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Expeditions in Computing (Expeditions) program is recognizing a decade of investments in ambitious computing research. That research has included big data, computational neuroscience, quantum computing, computer vision and robotics. During the two-day principal investigator meeting, media are invited to join a morning session (only) on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018, from 7:30 a.m. to 11:45 ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=297412&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Computers can 'spot the difference' between healthy brains and the brains of people with DID
(King's College London) Machine-learning and neuroimaging techniques have been used to accurately distinguish between individuals with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and healthy individuals, on the basis of their brain structure, in new research part funded by the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre and published in The British Journal of Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A mechanistic approach to neuroblastoma prognosis and risk
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A new study reveals key molecular indicators that could help doctors select the best form of treatment for patients with neuroblastoma -- the most common type of cancer in infants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers investigate why older people read more slowly
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) One of the most obvious changes that comes with ageing is that people start doing things more slowly. Numerous studies have shown that ageing also affects language processing. Even neurologically healthy people speak, retrieve words and read more slowly as they get older. But is this slowdown inevitable? Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have been working to answer this question in their article 'No evidence for strategic nature of age-related slowing in sentence processing'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PEMM Student Arielle Baker Receives Prestigious National Fellowship
Arielle Baker, Guarini ‘19, a PhD candidate in the neuroscience track of the Program in Experimental and Molecular Medicine (PEMM), has received a Christine Mirzayan Science & Technology Policy Graduate Fellowship. She will be working with the Committee on Women at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) to advocate for the participation and retention of women in these disciplines. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - December 5, 2018 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Susan Green Tags: Education Insider News Research award fellowship grad student Guarini School public policy Source Type: news

Beware of the Dark Triad
Think of the Dark Triad of narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism as the Bermuda Triangle — it’s perilous to come near it! The traits of all three often overlap and create personality profiles that are damaging and toxic, especially when it comes to intimate relationships, where we let our guard down. One woman was the subject of identity fraud at a time when she was very in love with her boyfriend who lived with her in her apartment. Her bank accounts and credit cards had been compromised. She was speaking regularly with the FBI and suffered extreme anxiety and emotionally stress. The authorities were u...
Source: Psych Central - December 5, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT Tags: Abuse Narcissism Personality Dark Triad Machiavellianism Manipulation Source Type: news

CZI awards over $51 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced $64.25 million in funding and its selection of 17 early career investigators and nine collaborative science teams to launch the CZI Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from diverse research fields -- neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and genomics -- along with computational biologists and physicians, to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CZI awards over $64 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced $64.25 million in funding and its selection of 17 early career investigators and nine collaborative science teams to launch the CZI Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from diverse research fields -- neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and genomics -- along with computational biologists and physicians, to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA scientist looks to space for possible treatment of some neurological diseases
Do astronauts ’ brains get bigger in space?The answer may be found in 10 small containers of human brain cells on board a SpaceX spacecraft  that is scheduled for blast off Dec. 5 for a 16-month voyage to the International Space Station as part of joint project between UCLA and the NASA Ames Research Center.Astronauts on long-duration space missions frequently develop “intracranial hypertension,” or high pressure within the skull, said Araceli Espinosa-Jeffrey, a neurochemist at UCLA’s Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center in the Jane and Terry Sem...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pushing 3D Printing Forward
Researchers and students have demonstrated that inks can be used instead of thermoplastic filaments to 3D print functional biomedical devices. Michael McAlpine, Benjamin Mayhugh Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota, described such advances in the ESC Minneapolis keynote, “3D Printing Functional Materials & Devices.” A lot of the inks McAlpine’s group uses are nanometer-scale particle inks printed at a line-width scale of 10 microns and above for printing devices at the macro level. They have developed software as well as a hig...
Source: MDDI - December 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis 3-D Printing Source Type: news

Yumanity Therapeutics announces publication of paper in Cell Reports
(W2O Group) Yumanity Therapeutics, a company focused on discovering transformative therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases, today announced the publication of study results describing a potential new target for therapeutic intervention in Parkinson's disease and other related disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To detect new odors, fruit fly brains improve on a well-known computer algorithm
(Salk Institute) It might seem like fruit flies would have nothing in common with computers, but new research from the Salk Institute reveals that the two identify novel information in similar ways. The work, which appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on December 3, 2018, not only sheds light on an important neurobiological problem--how organisms detect new odors--but could also improve algorithms for novelty detection in computer science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peter Jonas receives Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Peter Jonas, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), receives the Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize 2018 goes in equal parts to Peter Jonas and Elly Tanaka, biochemist at the IMP. Jonas is honored for his outstanding research achievements in the field of neuroscience, in particular for his significant contribution to the understanding of synaptic signal processing at the molecular and cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How common is Autism spectrum disorder and do kids receive treatment?
(JAMA Network) National survey data for 43,000 U.S. children suggests an estimated 2.8 percent have ever been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 2.5 percent currently have ASD. Among 1,115 children with current ASD, almost 30 percent aren't treated with behavioral therapies or medication.   ASD is a neurodevelopmental disorder marked by social impairments, communication difficulties, repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. Symptoms of ASD are often treated with behavioral therapies and medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientists pinpoint genes tied to dementia
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A UCLA-led research team has identified genetic processes involved in the neurodegeneration that occurs in dementia -- an important step on the path toward developing therapies that could slow or halt the course of the disease. The findings appear Dec. 3 in the journal Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unconscious bias: what is it and can it be eliminated?
Brought to prominence twenty years ago by a controversial test, the concept is now essential to our understanding of racismIn the ranking of taboos, racism and sexism come close to the top of the list. So it is perhaps unsurprising that the concept of unconscious or implicit bias has gripped the popular imagination to a greater degree than any other idea in psychology in recent decades.Spearheaded by a team of social psychologists at the University of Washington and Yale, the Implicit Association Test (IAT) promised to lift the veil on people ’s subconscious attitudes towards others. Upon publishing their landmark pa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Psychology Neuroscience Race UK news Source Type: news

Brain Rhythms Guide How Humans Pay Attention
A perception of sustained focus may actually be the result of cycles of fluctuating rather than continuous neural activity, according to new behavioral and neurological data from studies in humans... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Notebook Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Discovery's Crest: A Profile of Marianne Bronner
Studying how neural crest cells journey through the embryo, this Caltech developmental biologist has revealed how they form major cell types, including peripheral neurons, bone, and smooth muscle. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 1, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Profile Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Blog Post » It Begins with Basic Science
Those of you who follow Dr. Gordon on Twitter (@NIMHDirector) may have seen snippets of his experiences at the 2018 annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN), the largest gathering of neuroscientists in the world. In this Director ’ s message, Dr. Gordon highlights some of the excellent basic research on display at this year ’ s conference. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joshua Gordon Source Type: news

ABCD study completes enrollment, announces opportunities for scientific engagement
The study will use advanced neuroimaging to observe brain development in children throughout adolescence. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 30, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Youngest Kindergarten Students More Likely To Be Diagnosed With ADHD, Study Finds
This study confirms on a larger scale what other studies have shown on a smaller one. It confirms that there may be developmental confounders in the diagnosis of the condition and that the relative immaturity of young children’s brains can make those that are merely younger at school entry demonstrate behaviors consistent with ADHD.” Christakis was not involved in the research. Joel Nigg, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at Oregon Health and Science University, said that tracking the diagnoses through an insurance database allowed researchers to see what clinicians are doing, which can be m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health ADHD CNN Harvard Medical School New England Journal Of Medicine Source Type: news

Youngest Students More Likely To Be Diagnosed With ADHD, Study Finds
This study confirms on a larger scale what other studies have shown on a smaller one. It confirms that there may be developmental confounders in the diagnosis of the condition and that the relative immaturity of young children’s brains can make those that are merely younger at school entry demonstrate behaviors consistent with ADHD.” Christakis was not involved in the research. Joel Nigg, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at Oregon Health and Science University, said that tracking the diagnoses through an insurance database allowed researchers to see what clinicians are doing, which can be m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health ADHD CNN Harvard Medical School New England Journal Of Medicine Source Type: news

UCLA research suggests widely used breast cancer therapy doesn ’t cause cognitive decline
UCLA researchers have found that commonly used hormone therapies for women diagnosed with breast cancer do not appear to cause significant cognitive dysfunction following the treatment.Endocrine therapy has become an essential part of treatment for the many women diagnosed with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer, in which hormones, such as estrogen, promote cancer growth. The endocrine treatment helps lower the recurrence and reduce the risk of death from breast cancer by interfering with how a woman ’s own hormones can continue to support the growth of dormant cancer cells. Yet, there has been limited evidence ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Reading rats' minds
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Place cells in the hippocampus fire when we are in a certain position -- this discovery by John O'Keefe, May-Britt Moser and Edvard Moser brought them the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2014. Based on which place cell fires, scientists can determine were a rat is. Neuroscientists are now able to tell where a rat will go next, just from observing which neuron fires in a task that tests rats' reference memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dancing naked with robots: dreams of Jarman prize winner Daria Martin
Video art has never been more celebrated – and after taking the £10,000 prize for the best artist using moving images, the intriguing filmmaker is in the vanguardForDaria Martin, making art is a dream come true – literally. Her films involve restaging the dreams, nightmares or altered states of consciousness of friends and relatives. For one forthcoming project, Tonight the World, she’s recreated several of her grandmother’s nocturnal visions. She fled the Nazis in 1938 and spent the rest of her life dreaming about the family home she was forced to abandon.Even when Martin is not turning dream...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Jonze Tags: Video art Awards and prizes Psychology Art and design Culture Film Consciousness Neuroscience Human biology UK news Source Type: news

How K2 and Other Synthetic Cannabinoids Got Their Start in the Lab
Originally intended for basic neuroscience research, the drugs were ultimately hijacked for illicit recreational use. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 27, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Pain Receptors and Diabetic Neuropathy
We Got the MarkersOurMarkers for Pain Research are widely used and frequently published. They are often referenced in publications on Diabetic nerve pain.Here are some of my past blog postings:Cytokines and Neuropathic PainEpidermal Nerve Fibers in Neuropathic Pain ModelPain Research and Gene Expression AnalysisHere's a model of the actual nerve receptors behind both intractable pain and loss of sensation.A: Simplified model of nociception under normal conditions. Free nerve endings transduce a painful stimulus into a neural signal, which propagates to DRG centrally and eventually synapses on a nociceptive neuron within th...
Source: Neuromics - November 27, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Diabetes Research Diabetic Neuropathy Diabetic retinopathy GABA NMDAR P2X3 TRPV1 Source Type: news

Image of the Day: All Lit Up
A super-bright cell-labeling method reveals the intricate wiring that connects neurons in the brain. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 27, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Image of the Day Source Type: news

Is your office messy? If so, you may be seen as uncaring, neurotic
(University of Michigan) An extremely messy personal space seems to lead people to believe the owner of that space is more neurotic and less agreeable, say University of Michigan researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thinking through acidic Ca2+ stores
Glutamate signaling regulates neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity, which underlies learning and memory. In this issue of Science Signaling, Foster et al. found that metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate long-term potentiation in hippocampal neurons by mobilizing acidic endolysosomal Ca2+ stores through the intracellular messenger NAADP. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patel, S., Brailoiu, E. Tags: STKE Focus Source Type: news

Quadriplegic Mayo scientist helps advance spine injury tech
A team of researchers at Minnesota’s Mayo clinic, led by an individual who was left with quadriplegia from a teenage injury, are pushing the boundaries of spinal regeneration, according to a new Star Tribune report. The group, led by spinal cord injury researcher Peter Grahn, has published findings from a study that suggests that electrical stimulation, over time, can help restore movement to paralyzed limbs. Results from the study was published in the journal Natural Medicine, according to the report. The researchers initially set out to replicate a similar study that showed that electrical stimulation could help in...
Source: Mass Device - November 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Featured Spinal Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

FDA Eyes Changes to 510(k) Program
FDA wants to modernize the 510(k) clearance pathway, which was adopted in 1976 and now accounts for the majority of medical devices the agency reviews. The agency said it is pursuing changes to the program in an effort to help keep pace with the increasing complexities of evolving medical technology. It's important to note that the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) cleared 3,173 medical devices through the 510(k) pathway in 2017, representing 82% of the total devices cleared or approved by FDA. "The new technology that we’re seeing holds tremendous public health promise fo...
Source: MDDI - November 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Business Source Type: news

Scientists find genetic variants that increase risk of ADHD
Team says study of 55,000 individuals could potentially lead to new drugs and reduce stigmaScientists have uncovered genetic variants that increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in research that experts hope could lead to a better understanding of the condition.ADHD is thought to affect about 2.5% of adults and about 5% of children worldwide. Concerns have been raised that the neurodevelopmental disorder isunder-diagnosed and under-treated in the UK.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Genetics Science Society Source Type: news

Musical training improves visual timing
(Society for Neuroscience) Drummers and brass players are better able to judge the timing of visual stimuli than members of the color guard, according to a naturalistic study of the world-class drum corps Bluecoats published in eNeuro. This counterintuitive finding extends previous research demonstrating superior sensory learning and memory from cross-training the brain's audio and visual systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orange juice, leafy greens and berries may be tied to decreased memory loss in men
(American Academy of Neurology) Eating leafy greens, dark orange and red vegetables and berry fruits, and drinking orange juice may be associated with a lower risk of memory loss over time in men, according to a study published in the Nov. 21, 2018, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First professorship in clinical neurotechnology
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) Prof. Dr. Surjo Soekadar's research explores how neurotechnologies can be used in the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Having been appointed Germany's first Professor of Clinical Neurotechnology, he now took up his new position at Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin. At the same time, Prof. Soekadar is also embarking on his ERC Starting Grant-funded project into the development of innovative brain-computer interfaces. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC), his project will receive approximately € 1.5 million. (Source: EurekAl...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Personality and mood affect brain response to personal choice
(Elsevier) Personality traits and mental health affect how people value personal control in decision making, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news