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Comparison of primate brains hints at what makes us human
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A detailed comparative analysis of human, chimpanzee and macaque brains reveals elements that make the human brain unique, including cortical circuits underlying production of the neurotransmitter dopamine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 23, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Getting under the skin of prion disorders
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Infectious prion proteins -- the causative agents of the fatal neurodegenerative disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- can be detected in the skin of afflicted individuals, researchers now report. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 22, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study reveals new mechanisms of cell death in neurodegenerative disorders
(King's College London) Researchers at King's College London have discovered new mechanisms of cell death, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Francis Crick Institute's £700m building 'too noisy to concentrate'
Some of the 1,250 people working at the year-old laboratory say its open plan layout, designed to produce collaboration, makes it hard to focus on workIt is a£700m cathedral to biomedical science, where scientists work together to make breakthroughs in cancer, neuroscience, pandemics and genetics. But the Francis Crick Institute is not proving to be the easiest place to concentrate.A year after opening, some of the 1,250 people working at the Crick Institute, in its central London laboratory, have complained that the open plan design, intended to assist informal collaboration, means some areas set aside for thinking ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robert Booth Tags: Science Architecture Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Need Cells? Contest
We're live; Be CreativeWe are offering a $25 Amazon Gift Card to scientists who creatively places images their favorite cell cultures anywhere in a picture of their lab AND if the picture has images ofour human cells, you could win a $500 VISA card.Here's a link to learn more about our Need Cells Contest.Please email your picture torose@neuromics.com and we will email you a $25 Amazon Gift Card. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - November 21, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Cell Cultures needcells primary human cells Source Type: news

A neuroimaging project by INRS professor Jinyang Liang
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) Real-time mapping of neuronal activity through neural imaging is an emerging, non-invasive approach and a wonderful scientific and technological challenge. INRS professor Jinyang Liang has designed an ultrafast, highly sensitive imaging microscope to study living animals. For this exceptional project, he was chosen from among 750 applicants as the winner of the Edmund Optics Americas Gold Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers link post-right stroke delirium and spatial neglect to common brain mechanism
(Kessler Foundation) Stroke researchers at Kessler Foundation have proposed a theory for the high incidence of delirium and spatial neglect after right-brain stroke. Their findings are detailed in " Disruption of the ascending arousal system and cortical attention network in post-stroke delirium and spatial neglect " , published Sept. 27, 2017 by Neuroscience& Biobehavioral Reviews. Authors are Olga Boukrina, PhD, research scientist,& A.M. Barrett, MD, director of Stroke Rehabilitation Research at Kessler Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol: It is time for a debate without prejudice in Europe
(Istituto Neurologico Mediterraneo Neuromed I.R.C.C.S.) To outline solid scientific bases on the relationship between health and alcohol consumption in moderation, to increase awareness and to fight against excesses. These are the goals of " Moderate Consumption of Alcohol in a Balanced Lifestyle " meeting, to be held in Brussels on Wednesday November 29, starting at 8 am. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

David T. Richardson Named President and CEO of Neuronetrix
Richardson Completes Management Team that Includes Founder and Chief Technology Officer, KC Fadem, Chief Science Officer, Marco Cecchi and Chief Business Development Officer, Matt Ullum(PRWeb November 21, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/11/prweb14934955.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Could the Next Big Thing in Medtech Stem from Your Idea?
So, you have a great idea for a new medical device that could improve outcomes, save lives, and make your company lots of money. You just need to get your idea in front of the right person to help make it a reality—which, of course, is easier said than done. Selling ideas to upper management was the topic of discussion during a plenary session at the recent MD&M Minneapolis Conference. Experts on the panel shared these tips to give your pitch its best chance of success. Don't miss your chance to network with your medtech colleagues in Silicon Valley at the BIOMEDevice San Jose Conference and Expo, December 6&ndas...
Source: MDDI - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Jamie Hartford Tags: MD & M Minneapolis Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Spit Test May Diagnose, Predict Duration Of Concussion In Kids
By Susan Scutti, CNN (CNN) — A saliva test may someday be able to diagnose a concussion and predict how long symptoms last, according to a study published Monday in the JAMA Pediatrics. A concussion is one type of traumatic brain injury caused by a bump, blow or jolt to either the head or the body. Though not life-threatening, these injuries to the brain can be serious and cause symptoms of headache (or “pressure” in the head), nausea, vomiting, dizziness, balance problems, double or blurry vision, sluggishness, confusion, memory problems and difficulty concentrating. In their study, Penn State College of...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Concussion JAMA Source Type: news

LivaNova to deal CRM biz to MicroPort for $190m
LivaNova (NSDQ:LIVN) said today that it inked a deal to sell its cardiac rhythm management business to China’s MicroPort Scientific (HK:00853) for $190 million in cash. The companies, which are already partners in a CRM join venture in the People’s Republic, said the sale for LivaNova’s 900-worker CRM business is slated to close during the second quarter next year. LivaNova, formed by the $2.7 billion merger of Italy’s Sorin and Cyberonics in October 2015, said in September that it was putting the CRM business on the auction block. The business pulled in sales of $249 m...
Source: Mass Device - November 20, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Mergers & Acquisitions Wall Street Beat Cardiac Rhythm Management LivaNova MicroPort Scientific Source Type: news

Three UCLA professors named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Two  doctors and a dentist from UCLA have been selected as 2017 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are among 396 members awarded this honor by the AAAS for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.New fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin, representing science and engineering, on Feb. 17, 2018, at the association ’s annual meeting in Austin, Texas, and formally announced in the “AAAS News and Notes” section of the journal Science on Nov. 24.UCLA ’...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 20, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Realistic rodent model of drug addiction
(Society for Neuroscience) Drug addiction may not require a habitual relationship with a substance, suggests findings from a new model of cocaine administration in rats that better captures the human experience of obtaining and using drugs. The research, published in JNeurosci, represents a step towards a translational animal model of addiction that challenges widely held views about drug users. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain tree: why we replenish only some of our cells | Daniel Glaser
Many of the body ’s cells regenerate - but not the brain’s, explains Daniel GlaserWe are being treated to a spectacular display of autumn colour this year, but it isn ’t only trees that share this pattern for periodic shedding and regrowth. Our own skin cells, for example, are renewed every month or so, but we replenish less than 10% of our bone each year. Certain types of human cells do not seem to regenerate at all and this includes brain cells. With a few ex ceptions (such as the hippocampus), we are born with all the brain we’ll ever have. Over childhood and into adolescence, extensive pruning o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Glaser Tags: Life and style Neuroscience Biology Society Health Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Where future cures come from
A new director brings wisdom and passion to training bilingual physician-scientists. For?Kendall Lee, M.D., Ph.D., being bilingual starts with language and extends to the training of physician-scientists. Born in a South Korean fishing village, he learned English only after moving to the United States at age 10. Dr. Lee is now a neurosurgeon and director [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - November 18, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Code talker: A Q & A with genetic counselor Kira Dies
Your child has just been diagnosed with a rare genetic disorder. Your pediatrician has never heard of the condition and the internet doesn’t offer much information. Where do you turn? Kira Dies, a genetic counselor in the Department of Neurology at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps parents with these hard questions every day. One of about only 4,000 genetic counselors in the country, Dies has been trained in handling both the scientific and emotional sides of genetic disorders. Dies was also the recent winner of the Code Talker Award, presented by Genome Magazine and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - November 17, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Ellen Greenlaw Tags: Ask the Expert genetic counselor Kira Dies Mustafa Sahin Neurogenetics Program SPG47 tuberous sclerosis complex tuberous sclerosis program Source Type: news

No, there hasn ’t been a human 'head transplant', and there may never be
Neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero is in the news again, claiming to haveperformed the first successful human head transplant. But even cursory analysis reveals that he hasn ’t. And scientific logic suggests he never willIn February 2015,Sergio Canavero appeared in this very publication claiming alive human head will be successfully transplanted onto a donor human body within two years. He ’s popped up in the media a lot since then, but two years and nine months later, how are things looking?Well, he ’s only gone and done it! As we can see in this Telegraph story from today,the world ’s first human head t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Neuroscience Health Media Science and scepticism Source Type: news

Risk of distracted driving predicted by age, gender, personality and driving frequency
(Frontiers) The first study of how personal traits affect driver distraction finds that young men, extroverted or neurotic people, and people who drive more often are more likely to report being distracted during driving, while older women and those who feel they could control their distracted behavior are less likely to report distraction. The study also proposes future directions for interventions to reduce distracted driving. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coming Soon-Need Cells? Contest
Creativity RewardedWe are revving up another contest as ourNeuromics Brain Adventure was successful and wow, were people creative.We are expert at finding humanprimary and stem cells so cell cultures are central to the contest. Rules are simple. Affix an image of your favorite cell culture anywhere in your lab and we will email you a $25 Amazon gift card.The contest will run for 3 months and the most creative entry will receive a $500 Visa Gift Card.Simply e-mail your entry to rose@neuromics.com and we will email back the gift card. Multiple entries encouraged. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - November 16, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: astrocyte cultures Astrocyte-Glial-Neuron Co-cultures. endothelial cells needcells Source Type: news

CTE Was Confirmed in a Living Person for the First Time. And It ’s a Veteran NFL Player
A former NFL player is reportedly the first living person ever accurately diagnosed with CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the disease found in the brains of dozens of ex football players. This breakthrough, which was made in 2012, but only published this week in the journal Neurosurgery, could help doctors identify and treat patients while they are still alive. CTE was previously only identifiable through a brain examination after death. The subject of the diagnosis was not named in the study, but was reported by CNN to be Fred McNeill, who died in 2015 at age 63. McNeill played 12 seasons as a linebacker for the ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Billy Perrigo Tags: Uncategorized CTE NFL onetime Source Type: news

Stress can lead to risky decisions
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT neuroscientists have discovered making decisions that require weighing pros and cons of two choices is dramatically affected by chronic stress. In a study of rats and mice, they found stressed animals were far likelier to choose high-risk, high-payoff options. They also found that impairments of a specific brain circuit underlie this abnormal decision making. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Emeran Mayer, World-Renowned Gastroenterologist and...
Leading researcher on mind-body interactions will speak on his work and emerging science on neurobiological aspects of digestive and nervous system interaction regarding health and disease(PRWeb November 16, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/11/prweb14894779.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Dr. Emeran Mayer, World-Renowned Gastroenteroloist and Neuroscientist,...
Leading researcher on mind-body interactions will speak on his work and emerging science on neurobiological aspects of digestive and nervous system interaction regarding health and disease(PRWeb November 16, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/11/prweb14894779.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Emeran Mayer, World-Renowned Gastroenteroloist and Neuroscientist, to...
Leading researcher on mind-body interactions will speak on his work and emerging science on neurobiological aspects of digestive and nervous system interaction regarding health and disease(PRWeb November 16, 2017)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/11/prweb14894779.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists sniff out new treatment for Alzheimer's; new research suggests brain cells can be protected by stimulating the sense of smell
(Natural News) A study published in the journal Science Signaling has revealed that teaching roundworms to sniff out a certain type of bacterium has lead them to develop a defense mechanism to preserve their brain cells. The findings show potential as a drug-free intervention against neurodegenerative diseases such as dementia and Huntington’s disease, the researchers have stated.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NUS researchers identify potential mediator for social memory formation
(National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine) The ability to form long-term social memories is essential for remembering faces and developing social bonds. Scientists at NUS Medicine have now discovered that the tiny CA2 region in the hippocampus is involved in the linking up of memory fragments (consolidation) to form long-term memories, and that a neuropeptide, substance P, is involved in this process. Since CA2 is responsible for social memory, this finding has significant implications for how long-term social memories are formed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Head injury does not worsen drinking behavior in heavy drinkers
(Elsevier) Head injury, which often damages brain regions overlapping with those involved in addictive behaviors, does not worsen drinking behavior in people with heavy alcohol use, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The study also found that combining head injury with heavy alcohol use did not further alter the structure or function of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New player in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis identified
(Sanford-Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute) Scientists have shown that a protein called membralin is critical for keeping Alzheimer's disease pathology in check. The study, published in Nature Communications, shows that membralin regulates the cell's machinery for producing beta-amyloid (or amyloid beta, Aβ), the protein that causes neurons to die in Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognitive training enhanced innovative thinking and brain networks in older adults
(Center for BrainHealth) Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas have demonstrated in a pilot study that cognitive training improves innovative thinking, along with corresponding positive brain changes, in healthy adults over the age of 55.The study, published recently in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, reveals that a specific strategic cognitive training program enhanced innovation in healthy adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex differences a rich field for UCLA multiple sclerosis researcher
As a child, Dr. Rhonda Voskuhl had terrible asthma, was often sick and had to get weekly allergy shots. She wondered why her body was so reactive to pollen, cats, wheat and eggs — her throat would swell, breathing became more difficult and her skin developed a rash. A frequent visitor to the doctor’s office, she had “a wonderful doctor who made me feel so much better.”It ’s no surprise, then, that Voskuhl grew up to become a doctor. Today, Voskuhl directs UCLA’s multiple sclerosis program and is the Jack H. Skirball professor of Multiple Sclerosis Research. She’s wrapping up one cl...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic neurologist receives distinguished national achievement award for stroke research
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. ? Neurologist Thomas Brott, M.D., the Eugene and Marcia Applebaum Professor of Neurosciences on Mayo Clinic?s Florida campus, has been selected as the recipient of the 2017 Research Achievement Award from the American Heart Association. He received the honor on Sunday, November 12, during the American Heart Association?s Scientific Sessions in Anaheim, California. [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - November 13, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

In D.C., Brain Science Meets Behavioral Science To Shed Light On Mental Disorders
The Society for Neuroscience meeting is taking place in Washington, D.C., this weekend. Researchers there are focusing on how to find the biological underpinnings of mental disorders. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jon Hamilton Source Type: news

Innovative genetic and cellular techniques help identify multiple disease targets
(Society for Neuroscience) Research released today highlights advances in the use of CRISPR-Cas9 and human induced pluripotent stem cell technologies to identify novel therapeutic targets for neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and addiction. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Studying sleep's profound and extensive effects on brain function
(Society for Neuroscience) Although the general benefits of a good night's sleep are well established, one-third of American adults do not get a sufficient amount of sleep. Recent research sheds new light on the extensive effects of sleep on the brain, as well as the harms caused by sleep loss. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The age of the driverless bus is coming – and we can't let developers take sole control
With the commercial sector providing most of the stimulus for advances in AI, we need to ensure societal goals and values are kept in sightIt ’s a bit like buses. You wait for one new technology to come along and then three arrive, presenting a range of exciting journeys and destinations, full of promises and possibilities. With rapid developments in genomics; in data and computer science; in neuroscience; and in the combinations that t heir convergence make possible, it is easy to feel simultaneously confused, excited and anxious. And at the centre of it all and supposedly orchestrating our future –driving the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hugh Whittall Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) Technology Computing Science Source Type: news

Neurologist Deena Kuruvilla on why most headaches are actually migraines
Dr. Deena Kuruvilla discusses the different variety of headaches and how they can be treated. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The neuroscience of no regrets: why people still support Brexit and Trump
Many people still strongly supportBrexit andTrump, despite mounting evidence that both are problematic. Much of this is not politics, but the workings of the human brainIt ’s now over a year since the Brexit referendum and the election of Donald Trump, plenty of time to witness the consequences of both. And, from an entirely objective perspective, going solely by the ever-increasing evidence, they were terrible decisions. Brexit has gifted Britaina veritable avalanche of governmental chaos, economic damage, international humiliation, internal strife, and much more. The Donald Trump administration hasprovided essentia...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Science Donald Trump Brexit Psychology Source Type: news

Researchers uncover genetic basis of natural variation in aging rate
(Chinese Academy of Sciences Headquarters) Lifespan extension induced by genetic mutations has been shown in recent studies not to necessarily delay age-related behavioral decline. Now, a new study carried out by researchers from Dr. CAI Shiqing's lab at the Institute of Neuroscience, CAS Center for Excellence in Brain Science and Intelligence Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has uncovered a genetic basis for natural variation in aging rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 9, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UCLA helps many to live long and prosper
In Westwood, more than 100 faculty experts from 25 departments have embarked on anall-encompassing push to cut the health and economic impacts of depression in half by the year 2050. The mammoth undertaking will rely on platforms developed by the new Institute for Precision Health, which will harness the power of big data and genomics to move toward individually tailored treatments and health-promotion strategies.On the same 419 acres of land, researchers across the spectrum, from the laboratory bench to the patient bedside, are ushering in a potentially game-changing approach to turning the body ’s immune defenses a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Sleep and Neurodevelopment Workshop: Electrophysiologic Sleep Phenotyping (ESP)
The NIMH Division of Intramural Research Programs (IRP) convened a workshop to develop and promote Electrophysiologic Sleep Phenotyping (ESP) as a mainstay of the clinical assessment of children at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

New Global Compliance Requirements Will Impact Medical Device Industry
The medical devices and diagnostics (MD&D) industry is on the verge of disruption, as new global compliance requirements are set to take effect. In March 2019, the 2016 revision to ISO 13485 will require the incorporation of risk management into every aspect of the quality management system. Also, the European Commission ratified new medical device regulations (MDR) for all European member states, while FDA released more than a dozen new medical device guidance documents in 2016 and 2017 that set new expectations for risk assessment. As a result of these changing regulations, MD&D companies are urgently working to ...
Source: MDDI - November 8, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Melonie Warfel Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Dr. Jaime Grutzendler named the Zimmerman/Spinelli Professor
Dr. Jaime Grutzendler focuses his research on elucidating mechanisms of neuronal-glial interactions in the normal and diseased brain. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - November 8, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Is it ... Baa-rack Obama? Sheep able to recognise celebrities, say neuroscientists
Sheep able to distinguish pictures of celebrities from unfamiliar faces with near-human accuracy, with implications for research into Huntington ’s diseaseIt has all the makings of a pub quiz teaser: what do Barack Obama, Emma Watson, Jake Gyllenhaal and the British TV presenter Fiona Bruce have in common? The answer, courtesy of neuroscientists in Cambridge, is that all have been recognised by sheep.The unlikely connection emerges from work on the face recognition skills of a Welsh Mountain breed that belongs to a university flock. Having trained the animals on mugshots of the four, scientists found the sheep could ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Genetics Neuroscience Biology Source Type: news

Thyroid transporter critical for brain development
According to a study, published in theJournal of Neuroscience, the thyroid hormone transporter MCT8 is essential for the early brain development in chickens. Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - November 7, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Special issue: Fragile X syndrome
In this issue of Science Signaling, three papers uncover molecular mechanisms of neurological dysfunction in animal models of fragile X syndrome. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Papers of note in Science 358 (6363)
This week’s articles describe the identification of a mammalian protein that is required for endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria tethering and regulates intracellular calcium dynamics in neurons. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: VanHook, A. M. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Science News » NIH Announces Awards for BRAIN Initiative Neuroethics Research
The NIH BRAIN Initiative has awarded grants to five teams of experts who will study the neuroethical issues surrounding the use of deep brain stimulation in neuropsychiatric and movement disorders and appropriate consent for brain research. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - November 6, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Barbara McMakin Source Type: news

More FBS Data!
Cells+Media Supplemented with our FBS!We continue to be pleased with the cell culture images our customers are sharing with us-https://www.neuromics.com/fbs-dataNeurons are notoriously hard to culture. Here're images of Mouse Neurons cultured in media supplemented with our FBS.Images: Mouse cortical neurons in culture, using Neuromics heat-inactivated FBS (in plating media for two days). Data courtesy of Dr. Saif at Barrow Neurological Institute.We continue to offer $50 Amazon Gift Card in return for data you share using any of our solutions. Just email the data to Rose Ludescher, Manager of Customer Satisfaction,rose@neur...
Source: Neuromics - November 6, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Cell based assays FBS Fetal Bovine Serum Neurons Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence: Friend Or Foe?
It is safe to say that popular fiction has not been too kind to artificial intelligence. Its origins can be seen in Mary Shelley ’s time-honoured parable about the creator who is destroyed by his creation.Countless sci-fi depictions suggest AI has become the modern-day iteration, the ultimate metaphor for mankind ’s self-destructive power (think Skynet’s killing machines). These depictions may capture our imagination, but do they match reality? Is AI technology maligned and misunderstood?  The Oxford Dictionary defines artificial intelligence as: “The theory and development of computer sys...
Source: EyeForPharma - November 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Adam Chapman Source Type: news