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Why People Can ’t Agree on Basic Facts
Your brain is programmed to get a kick out of information. This makes our current digital era a celebration for your mind. While the agricultural age gave us easier access to nutrition, and the industrial age dramatically increased our quality of life, no other era has provided so much stimulation for our brains as the information age. It is as if, finally, our brain has succeeded in building its own amusement park that is perfectly customized for itself. Consider the numbers: every day we produce approximately 2.5 billion gigabytes of data and perform 4 billion Google searches. In the short time it took you to read the la...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tali Sharot Tags: Uncategorized Science Source Type: news

Ambitious neuroscience project to probe how the brain makes decisions
Combining expertise from 21 labs in Europe and the US, the International Brain Laboratory will attempt to answer one of the greatest mysteries of all timeWorld-leading neuroscientists have launched an ambitious project to answer one of the greatest mysteries of all time: how the brain decides what to do.The international effort will draw on expertise from 21 labs in the US and Europe to uncover for the first time where, when, and how neurons in the brain take information from the outside world, make sense of it, and work out how to respond.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience World news Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Psychiatric Genomics in the Era of Team Science Symposium
The NIMH Office of Genomics Research Coordination and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research led a symposium on the state of the field of neuropsychiatric genomics. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network Investigators ’ Workshop
The NIMH Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science held the annual Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network (BSMN) investigators ’ workshop. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 19, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Dar Williams: How to Make Your Town Somewhere Everyone Wants to Live
It doesn’t start with love. If you want to live in a great town, but you’re not quite there yet, you don’t just start to build that town with love, peace, civility, or morality. You start with a hill. You say to yourself, That hill, off the side of the high school, would be perfect for sledding. I know someone who could mow it with his riding mower. You call that guy and ask. He says, “Sure.” On an early Saturday morning in late September when the streets are empty, he drives over on the main roads and mows the hill. You hand him a coffee and tell him your idea. He says, pointing, “Afte...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dar Williams Tags: Uncategorized Books Community Source Type: news

Women of childbearing age around world suffering toxic levels of mercury
Study finds excessive levels of the metal, which can seriously harm unborn children, in women from Alaska to Indonesia, due to gold mining, industrial pollution and fish-rich dietsWomen of childbearing age from around the world have been found to have high levels of mercury, a potent neurotoxin which can seriously harm unborn children.Thenew study, the largest to date, covered 25 of the countries with the highest risk and found excessive levels of the toxic metal in women from Alaska to Chile and Indonesia to Kenya. Women in the Pacific islands were the most pervasively contaminated. This results from their reliance on eat...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Pollution Health Fishing Environment Mining Coal World news Society Source Type: news

Sleep most important ingredient of good health, even over diet and exercise, according to scientists
(Natural News) The scientific community has long established that losing sleep has detrimental effects on the body’s overall health and may increase the odds of debilitating conditions, a neuroscientist and human sleep science expert Professor Matthew Walker said in a recent Daily Mail article. The expert stressed that sleep deprivation may put people at an increased risk... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dynamics of Stem Cell Differentiation
Differentiation MarkersNeuromics hasexcellent markers for determining stem cell differentiation.This new publication references use of ourOTX2 marker: Sumin Jang, Sandeep Choubey, Leon Furchtgott, Ling-Nan Zou, Adele Doyle, Vilas Menon, Ethan B Loew, Anne-Rachel Krostag, Refugio A Martinez, Linda Madisen, Boaz P Levi, Sharad Ramanathan.Dynamics of embryonic stem cell differentiation inferred from single-cell transcriptomics show a series of transitions through discrete cell states. eLife 2017;6:e20487. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20487Figures: Single-Cell Gene Expression Profiling of mESCs during early germ layer ...
Source: Neuromics - September 16, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: OTX-2 antibody Otx2 Antibody Stem Cell Differentiation Stem Cell Differentiation Protocol Stem cell markers Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Psychiatric Genomics in the Era of Team Science Symposium
The NIMH Office of Genomics Research Coordination and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research led a symposium on the state of the field of neuropsychiatric genomics. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network Investigators ’ Workshop
The NIMH Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science held the annual Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network (BSMN) investigators ’ workshop. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 15, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

‘ Science Spin ’ Found Prevalent in Biomedical Literature
Nature of spin varies, with highest variability in prevalence of spin seen in trials (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - September 15, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Dermatology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Infections, AIDS, Internal Medicine, Allergy, Critical Care, Emergency Medicine, Nephrology, Neurology, Nursing, Oncology, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, ENT, Source Type: news

New European Guidelines for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis New European Guidelines for Cerebral Venous Thrombosis
The guidelines, which cover both the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis, are based purely on scientific evidence and make several new recommendations, rated as'clear'or'weak. 'Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

It's Like An 'Electric-Fence Sensation,' Says Scientist Who Let An Eel Shock His Arm
A neurobiologist noticed something strange whenever he tried to fish out electric eels in his lab using a net with a metal rim and handle. So he decided to roll up his sleeves and investigate.(Image credit: Kenneth Catania) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nell Greenfieldboyce Source Type: news

Synaptic receptor mobility: Discovery of a new mechanism for controlling memory
(CNRS) Researchers in Bordeaux recently discovered a new mechanism for storing information in synapses and a means of controlling the storage process. The breakthrough moves science closer to unveiling the mystery of the molecular mechanisms of memory and learning processes. The research, carried out primarily by researchers at the Interdisciplinary Institute for Neurosciences (CNRS/Universit é de Bordeaux) and the Bordeaux Imaging Center (CNRS/Universit é de Bordeaux/Inserm), appears in the 13 september 2017 edition of Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study offers scientific explanation for why spurned males abandon courtship attempts
(University of California - Riverside) Unsuccessful courtship attempts by males create aversive memories that can reduce their level of enthusiasm for subsequent courtship attempts. Scientists at UC Riverside and colleagues have attempted to understand this behavior at the molecular level. Using the fruit fly as a model organism, the researchers show that the body's hormonal state is critical to the maintenance of such " courtship memories. " Two hormones and dopamine, a neurotransmitter, are required in the brain to maintain courtship memories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book explores how the human brain can overcome any condition
(Wyss Center for Bio and Neuroengineering) In his new book 'Your brain knows more than you think,' the neuroscientist Professor Niels Birbaumer, a Senior Research Fellow at the Wyss Center, in Geneva, Switzerland, investigates the limitless capacity of the brain to remold itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain science: finding secrets in century-old brains
The father of neurosurgery, Yale's Dr. Harvey Cushing, left a remarkable gift to science. Now his collection of brains is being used for active research. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - September 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why You Should Think Twice About Playing With Puppies in a Pet Store
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan / Health Tags: Uncategorized animals campylobacter campylobacter outbreak Dog Dogs health risks pet diseases pet store outbreak Petland Pets public health puppies puppy puppy outbreak Source Type: news

AI can tell Republicans from Democrats – but can you? Take our quiz
Researchers say artificial intelligence will soon be able todetect a person ’s political allegiance– just by looking at photos of their face.We ’ve put together a quiz to see if you can beat the algorithms and work out, from someone’s face, their political allegiance. We’ve chosen 15 pictures of city councillors from Bristol, Connecticut and San Diego – eight Democrats, seven Republicans. Can you figure out which is which?Republican or Democrat?RepublicanDemocratRepublican or Democrat?RepublicanDemocratRepublican or DemocratRepublicanDemocratRepublican or Democrat?RepublicanDemocratRepub...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Adam Gabbatt and Sam Morris Tags: Artificial intelligence (AI) Republicans Computing Consciousness US news Technology Psychology World news Human biology Neuroscience Source Type: news

What Your Dreams Actually Mean, According to Science
If dreams were movies, they wouldn’t make a dime. They’re often banal, frequently fleeting and they’re screened for an audience of just one. As for the storyline? You’re in a supermarket, only it’s also Yankee Stadium, shopping with your second-grade teacher until she turns into Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Then you both shoot a bear in the cereal aisle. Somebody call rewrite. But dreams are vastly more complex than that, and if you’ve got a theory that explains them, have at it. The ancient Egyptians thought of dreams as simply a different form of seeing, with trained dreamers serving as seers ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized behavior dreams Freud health Jung mind psychology sleep the brain Source Type: news

Maine Technology Institute funds MDI Biological Laboratory scientist
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) The Maine Technology Institute has awarded a grant to Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory to study peripheral neuropathy. The grant will allow Rieger to collaborate with scientists from the University of New England (UNE) in Biddeford, Maine, to ascertain if compounds she previously identified as preventing or somewhat reversing peripheral neuropathy in zebrafish are also effective in rats. The research is an important step in moving the compounds into human clinical studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Western researchers reverse the negative effects of adolescent marijuana use
(University of Western Ontario) Researchers at Western University have identified a specific mechanism in the prefrontal cortex for some of the negative mental health risks associated with adolescent marijuana use. By demonstrating that adolescent THC exposure modulates the activity of a neurotransmitter called GABA in the prefrontal cortex region of the brain, they were also able to identify a mechanism to reverse those risks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Russian Science Foundation grant winners: Neuronal networks of the hippocampus
(Kazan Federal University) The results can be used to understand the nature of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by dementia.Inhibition in neuronal networks is an important part of brain functioning. The main role in these processes is played by interneurons which use gamma-aminobutyric acid as a neurotransmitter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Generic (Scientific) » Psychiatric Genomics in the Era of Team Science Symposium
The NIMH Office of Genomics Research Coordination and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research led a symposium on the state of the field of neuropsychiatric genomics. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Generic (Scientific) » Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network Investigators ’ Workshop
The NIMH Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science held the annual Brain Somatic Mosaicism Network (BSMN) investigators ’ workshop. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Eye changes may signal frontotemporal lobe degeneration
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is present in tens of thousands of Americans, but is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Now in a study published this week online ahead of print in Neurology, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that a simple eye exam and retinal imaging test may help improve that accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NuVasive Announces Acquisition Of Vertera Spine
NuVasive invests in advanced materials science portfolio with first-of-its-kind porous PEEK technology SAN DIEGO, Sept. 7, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- NuVasive, Inc. (NASDAQ: NUVA), a leading medical device company focused on tran... Devices, Orthopaedic, Neurosurgery, Mergers & Acquisitions NuVasive, Vertera Spine, Interbody Fusion, spine surgery (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - September 7, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Mainstay Medical taps ex-NuVasive COO Hannon for CEO | Personnel Moves, Sept. 7, 2017
Mainstay Medical (EPA:MSTY) said this week that it tapped former NuVasive Inc. (NSDQ:NUVA) president & COO Jason Hannon to succeed Peter Crosby as CEO, effective Oct. 9. Crosby, recruited in 2009 to lead the company and its development of the Reactiv8 neurostimulation device for treating chronic pain, is slated to act as a consultant for Mainstay through 2020. “Mainstay has made tremendous progress since the founding of the company in 2008 under Mr. Crosby’s leadership, and as we move forward to the next phase we are delighted that Jason is joining as our new CEO. Jason’s broad medical devic...
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Wall Street Beat AdvaMed avitamedical Axonics Modulation Technologies lightmed Mainstay Medical Monarch Medical qholding venturemed Source Type: news

Headache Congress Promises Engagement, Networking, and Debate Headache Congress Promises Engagement, Networking, and Debate
The International Headache Congress, taking place September 7 to 10 in Vancouver, Canada, promises a full program of basic and clinical science designed to encourage delegate interaction and engagement.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

The grey zone: reaching out to patients with disorders of consciousness – podcast
In this edition of Science Weekly,Ian Sample explores whether it is possible to communicate with those in a ‘vegetative’ state – and what are the ethical and legal ramifications?Subscribe& Review onApple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud&Acast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterIn 2006,neuroscientists in Cambridge ran brain scans on a young woman who had suffered serious brain damage in a traffic accident. The incident left her in a vegetative state: she slept and woke, but showed no signs of consciousness. But remarkablly, by analysing her brain activity, the scientists found a wa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Neuroscience Medicine Source Type: news

Salk computational neurobiologist receives NSF grant to study how brain processes sound
(Salk Institute) Salk Associate Professor Tatyana Sharpee has been awarded a grant of approximately $950,000 over 4 years by the National Science Foundation to study how the brain processes complex sounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technique gives a clearer image of immunotherapy results in advanced brain cancer
FINDINGSResearchers led by Robert Prins, a member of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, have developed a new approach for brain imaging that can better distinguish immune responses from tumor growth in both preclinical studies and in people with glioblastoma.BACKGROUNDDespite clinical advances in immunotherapy for cancer, non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth (especially in people with brain tumors) has been a significant problem. When clinicians use traditional medical imaging processes, the inflammation that sometimes results from immunotherapies can resemble neurological decline and tumor growth.METHODPrins...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How science found a way to help coma patients communicate
After suffering serious brain injuries, Scott Routley spent 12 years in a vegetative state. But his family were convinced that he was still aware – could a pioneering ‘mind-reading’ technique prove them right? By Adrian OwenOn 20 December 1999, a young man pulled away in his car from his grandfather ’s house in Sarnia, Ontario, with his girlfriend in the passenger seat beside him. Scott Routley, who was 26, had studied physics at the University of Waterloo and had a promising career in robotics ahead of him. But at an intersection just a few blocks from his grandfather’s house, a police car tr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Adrian Owen Tags: Neuroscience Canada World news Family Death and dying Coma Technology Source Type: news

Side effects of antidepressants used for chronic pain relief
(Frontiers) The study, recently published in Frontiers in Neurology, collected all reported adverse effects for these drugs in the clinical literature from the past two decades. The researchers found that almost all antidepressants presented significant side effects. Clinical data also showed that some might better tolerate certain side effects than others, and therefore. These results may help physicians improve treatment outcomes by better matching the health status of chronic pain patients to their antidepressant medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Estrogen may stop infection-induced brain inflammation
A study, published inScientific Reports, indicates that estrogen synthesis in the brains of zebra finches may also fight off neuroinflammation caused by infection.Science Daily (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - September 4, 2017 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Superfly flight simulator helps unravel navigation in the brain
(RIKEN) Researchers at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Japan have identified two independent pathways in the fly brain that are integrated to allow successful navigation during flight. Published in Nature Neuroscience, the study combined a flight simulator designed for flies with imaging of active neurons to show that landmark locations are processed separately in the fly brain from self-motion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuronal Markers
New Pub References 3 MarkersWe are recognized for our large catalog ofneuronal markers. Our strength, in this area, includes markers designed for pain researchers.They are widely used and frequently published. This new publication references use of ourGuinea Pig Substance P,Guinea Pig PGP9.5 andChicken NF200 of NF-Heavy. andla, Jagadeesha, Lomada, Santosh Kumara, Jianninga; Kuner, Rohinia, Bali, Kiran Kumar.miR-34c-5p functions as pronociceptive microRNA in cancer pain by targeting Cav2.3 containing calcium channels. Pain: September 2017 - Volume 158 - Issue 9 - p 1765 –1779 doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000971....
Source: Neuromics - September 1, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Neurofilament Antibody Neurofilament-H Antibody Neuronal Markers PGP9.5 Antibody Protein Gene Product 9.5 Substance P Antibody Source Type: news

Make a playlist for someone with dementia: the results will astonish you | Sarah Metcalfe
Music is neurologically special: we ’re only just scratching the surface of what it can do for dementia sufferers – and for their carers and familiesIn OctoberBBC Radio 3 will broadcast a six-hour programme blending music with the voices of people living with dementia, in a collaboration with the Wellcome Collection. It promises to be a moving demonstration of something we all need to know: that music can be a powerful tool for people withdementia.Related:Could music projects cut the cost of dementia care?Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 1, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Metcalfe Tags: Dementia Mental health Society Music Culture UK news Ageing Science Carers Social care Source Type: news

Reimagining Neurosciences Finest Works of Art
By recreating the work of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, art professor Dawn Hunter reveals how the master translated life to the page. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 1, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,The Scientist Source Type: news

FBS Works Great for Cell Lines
More Customer DataWe are pleased with the continuing stream of positive feedback on our potentFBS. This includes its supplementing media for cell lines.Here is an image courtesy of Kavita Shah of Purdue University.Image: HEK Cells cultured in Media Supplemented with Neuromics'FBSWe offer the best price anywhere. We will beat all competitive pricing. If you are interested, contact Rose Ludescher, Manager of Customer Satisfaction. email: rose@neuromics.com. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - August 31, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: FBS Fetal Bovine Serum HEK Cells Source Type: news

Yawning -- why is it so contagious and why should it matter?
(University of Nottingham) Feeling tired? Even if we aren't tired, why do we yawn if someone else does? Experts at the University of Nottingham have published research that suggests the human propensity for contagious yawning is triggered automatically by primitive reflexes in the primary motor cortex -- an area of the brain responsible for motor function. Their study is another stage in their research into the underlying biology of neuropsychiatric disorders and their search for new methods of treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroscientist harnesses the power of virtual reality to unlock the mysteries of memory
We ’re all familiar with the image of someone donning virtual reality goggles to enter a new environment while seated at their computer.At UCLA,  Nanthia Suthana is one of the first neuroscientists in the world to harness the power of VR to unravel how someone’s brain encodes and retrieves memories while the person explores a new virtual setting on foot.Her work recently captured the attention of the popular digital network, Mashable, which profiled her in its “How She Works” video series.“Without our memories, each of us would be lost in time and c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 30, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Parkinsons Disease Cell Therapy Relieves Symptoms in Monkeys
Neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells fill in for lost dopamine neurons in a primate model of the disease. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 30, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Robotic Patch Clamping Gains Eyes
Two groups of scientists combined automation with two-photon microscopy to target and record specific neurons in living animals. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 30, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Virus that causes mono may increase risk of MS for multiple races
(American Academy of Neurology) Like whites, Hispanic and black people who have had mononucleosis, commonly known as mono, which is caused by Epstein-Barr virus, may have an increased risk of multiple sclerosis, according to a new study published in the Aug. 30, 2017, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Monkeys with Parkinson's disease benefit from human stem cells
(Center for iPS Cell Research and Application - Kyoto University) A team of Japanese neurosurgeons at the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Japan, report two new strategies to improve outcomes of iPS cell-based therapies for Parkinson's disease in monkey brains. The findings are a key step for patient recruitment of the first iPS cell-based therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is changing languages effortful for bilingual speakers? Depends on the situation
(New York University) Research on the neurobiology of bilingualism has suggested that switching languages is inherently effortful, requiring executive control to manage cognitive functions, but a new study shows this is only the case when speakers are prompted, or forced, to do so. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Onward to open science
(McGill University) A new partnership between The Neuro and F1000 will create a publishing platform for researchers that will speed the progress of neuroscience discovery. The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University (The Neuro) is partnering with F1000, a provider of support services for researchers, institutes and funders, to create a new open research publishing platform called MNI Open Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

30th ECNP Congress for Applied and Translational Neuroscience -- Paris
(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Europe's largest meeting in applied and translational neuroscience, the 30th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) will take place at the Paris Conference Centre, Paris from Sept. 2-5, 2017. Between 4,000 and 6,000 psychiatrists, neuroscientists, neurologists and psychologists are expected to attend the Paris congress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news