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New Vaginal Mesh Implant Material Could Reduce Complications, Accelerate Healing
Vaginal mesh implants made of polypropylene have caused severe medical complications in millions of women across the world, and medical manufacturers from Johnson & Johnson to Bard, acquired by BD last year, have been mired in lawsuits as a result. Now, scientists at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom have developed an alternative polyurethane material to treat pelvic organ prolapse and incontinence that is better suited for use in the pelvic floor. Moreover, they have embedded the material with estrogen, which is released into the surrounding pelvic tissue to form new blood vessels and accelerate the he...
Source: MDDI - February 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Tags: Plastics Today Source Type: news

Can Alcohol Help You Live Longer? Here ’s What the Research Really Says
New research, which was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference, has found that moderate drinking is linked to a longer life. Drinking about two glasses of wine or beer a day was linked to an 18% drop in a person’s risk of early death—an even stronger effect than the life-preserving practice of exercise, according to the researchers. The results came from the 90+ Study, a research project out of the University of California Irvine’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders that examines the habits of people who live to at least 90. ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

More awareness, research needed on abuse risk of non-opioid painkiller
(University of Louisville) Gabapentin, a nerve pain medication and anticonvulsant sold under the brand name Neurontin and others, increasingly is being misused, necessitating prescribers to understand its abuse potential and risk profile, said Rachel Vickers Smith, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the University of Louisville School of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists tackle the aberrant epigenetic programming underlying childhood cancers
(Write Science Right) Researchers at UFRGS and the US NIH have targeted proteins that regulate chromatin in Ewing sarcoma cells, hindering malignant tumor growth. They induced chromatic relaxation by treating the cells with histone deacetylase inhibitors, reducing expression of the EWSR1-FLI-1 oncogene and other pluripotency/cell viability genes, while impairing sarcoma cell survival and growth. Decreased survival of stem-like cancer cells and re-expression of a neuronal differentiation marker were also observed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood, Urine Test Could Help Diagnose Autism Earlier In Children
This study does not tell us how effectively this measure can differentiate between autism and other neurodevelopmental or mental health conditions such as ADHD and anxiety.” Autism is a developmental disorder that mainly affects social interaction, causing a wide spectrum of behavioral problems, including hyperactivity, anxiety or speech disturbances. An estimated 30% of cases have been found to have genetic causes. The remaining 70% are thought to be caused by a combination of environmental factors, mutations and genetics, according to the study. Currently, if a child is suspected of having autism, doctors carry out...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Autism Local TV Source Type: news

i-Fect Delivers Again and Again
This study revealed that LDHA, which is a known damage marker, promotes CNS-specific angiogenesis. LDHA-mediated angiogenesis depends on vimentin on the surface of vascular endothelial cells. The work described here proposes a novel mechanism by which neurodegeneration drives angiogenesis in the CNS.A mixture of ouri-FectTM and LDHA siRNA, in this study, were directly injected into mice cortexes: Hsiaoyun Lin, Rieko Muramatsu, Noriko Maedera, Hiroto Tsunematsu, Machika Hamaguchi, Yoshihisa Koyama, Mariko Kuroda, Kenji Ono, Makoto Sawada, Toshihide Yamashita.Extracellular Lactate Dehydrogenase A Release ...
Source: Neuromics - February 19, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: angiogenesis Delivering siRNA to the CNS Lactate Hydrogenase A LDHA Neurodegenerative Disease siRNA delivery in-vivo Source Type: news

i-Fect Delivers siRNA to Study Angiogenesis in Brain Injury
This study revealed that LDHA, which is a known damage marker, promotes CNS-specific angiogenesis. LDHA-mediated angiogenesis depends on vimentin on the surface of vascular endothelial cells. The work described here proposes a novel mechanism by which neurodegeneration drives angiogenesis in the CNS.A mixture of ouri-FectTM and LDHA siRNA, in this study, were directly injected into mice cortexes: Hsiaoyun Lin, Rieko Muramatsu, Noriko Maedera, Hiroto Tsunematsu, Machika Hamaguchi, Yoshihisa Koyama, Mariko Kuroda, Kenji Ono, Makoto Sawada, Toshihide Yamashita.Extracellular Lactate Dehydrogenase A Release ...
Source: siRNA and DsiRNA Transfection Efficiency - February 19, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Angiogenesis Delivering siRNA to the CNS i-Fect Lactate Dehydrogenase A LDHA siRNA delivery to mouse brain Source Type: news

How the brain responds to injustice
(Society for Neuroscience) Punishing a wrongdoer may be more rewarding to the brain than supporting a victim. That is one suggestion of new research published in JNeurosci, which measured the brain activity of young men while they played a 'justice game.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Geffen School Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How Exercise May Help Protect Your Brain From Cognitive Decline and Dementia
Older adults with poor fitness levels have more deterioration of white matter in their brains, according to a new study, compared with their fitter peers. White matter deterioration was also linked with a decline in decision-making brain function among adults with early signs of memory loss, suggesting that regular exercise may slow cognitive decline and perhaps even dementia, say the study authors. The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, is not the first to suggest that exercise may help keep the brain healthy in old age. But while previous research has asked adults to self-report their fitness l...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Exercise/Fitness healthytime onetime Source Type: news

At AAAS, Brown explains how statistics, neuroscience improve anesthesiology
(Picower Institute at MIT) Dr. Emery Brown, an MIT neuroscientist and MGH anesthesiologist, has combined scientific and statistical methods to put the brain at the center of anesthesiology practice. By deciphering and monitoring EEG readings in real time he can more optimally dose patients under general anesthesia. He's presenting at the 2018 AAAS Annual Meeting, Friday Feb. 16. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New approaches in neuroscience show it's not all in your head
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) Our own unique experiences shape how we view the world and respond to the events in our lives. But experience is highly subjective. These differences can matter, especially as a growing body of research shows that our thoughts about and interpretations of our experiences can have physical consequences in our brains and bodies, says University of Wisconsin-Madison Center for Healthy Minds founder and director Richard Davidson, in a talk titled: How the Mind Informs the Brain: Depression and Well-Being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

American Pain Society Slams McCaskill Report on Opioids American Pain Society Slams McCaskill Report on Opioids
The APS says the report's conclusions are'simplistic, misleading and insulting'and damage their reputation for scientific integrity and advocacy on behalf of pain management doctors and patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

iPSC Derived Human Neural Progenitors
Potent, Pure and Easy to CultureWe are pleased to announce the addition of HumanNeural Progenitors to ourPrimary and Stem Cell offering.Human Neural Progenitors at 95% ConfluencyCell potency, for us, includes the how well our cells can be differentiated into terminal types. For these progenitors, we have protocols for differentiating into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes.Neural Progenitors differentiated into Neurons and Stained with Tuj-1We also have Neural Progenitors from Alcohol and Opioid-Addicted Donors. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - February 15, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: astrocyte cultures Astrocytes Culturing Human Neurons Protocol Human Neural Progenitors Neuroprogenitors Oligodendrocytes Source Type: news

Inside One Couple ’s Experimental Treatment to Battle Alzheimer’s Disease
JoAnn Wooding is staring intently at the clear liquid dripping from a dark brown IV bag into her husband Peter’s arm. “Please be the drug, please be the drug,” she says. Married for more than 50 years, the Woodings are among the more than 5 million Americans who are facing Alzheimer’s disease, one of the most devastating diagnoses today. But instead of accepting the slow descent into memory loss, confusion and dementia, Peter–who has the disease–could be among the first to successfully stop that decline from happening. Peter, 77, is one of the 2,700 people around the world who are expect...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alzheimer's Disease healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

The Surprising Secrets to Living Longer — And Better
Old age demands to be taken very seriously–and it usually gets its way. It’s hard to be cavalier about a time of life defined by loss of vigor, increasing frailty, rising disease risk and falling cognitive faculties. Then there’s the unavoidable matter of the end of consciousness and the self–death, in other words–that’s drawing closer and closer. It’s the rare person who can confront the final decline with flippancy or ease. That, as it turns out, might be our first mistake. Humans are not alone in facing the ultimate reckoning, but we’re the only species–as far as we ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Epilepsy study links mossy brain cells to seizures and memory loss
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) A small group of cells in the brain can have a big effect on seizures and memory in a mouse model of epilepsy. According to a new study in Science, loss of mossy cells may contribute to convulsive seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) as well as memory problems often experienced by people with the disease. The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘It’s a National Problem.’ How Hospitals Are Treating Opioid Addiction’s Youngest Sufferers
(CHICAGO) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments.Sarah Sherbert’s first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert’s second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal sy...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Tanner / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news

The One Thing Happy Couples Do Every Day to Keep Their Relationship Strong
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Danielle Friedman / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Sex/Relationships Source Type: news

5 Ways Love Is Good for Your Health
If you’re in a relationship, Valentine’s Day may be one of the healthiest days of the year — despite the champagne and chocolate. That’s because love come with some solid health benefits, according to a growing body of scientific research. Dr. Helen Riess, director of the Empathy and Relational Science Program at Massachusetts General Hospital and author of the forthcoming book The Empathy Effect, told TIME how falling head over heels can help your health, both mentally and physically. Love makes you happy. When you first fall in love, dopamine, the feel-good brain chemical associated with reward, i...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Research Fellow – Full-time (Fixed Term) at the Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research (IMSR), University of Birmingham
Location:Department of Physiology, Development and NeuroscienceSalary: £29,799 -£38,832Closing Date: 8 March 2018Post Duration: 36 monthsUniversity of Birmingham are seeking a talented and motivated postdoctoral fellow to join Prof. David Hodson’s research group atthe Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research (IMSR), University of Birmingham. The project, funded for 36 months by a Diabetes UK Research Grant, seeks to understand how stress hormones (termed glucocorticoids) influence beta cell function and insulin release, and how this may interact with obesity To do this, w...
Source: Society for Endocrinology - February 13, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Your Besotted Brain: A Neuroscience Love Song
(Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Adam Cole Source Type: news

Pimavanserin: Relief from psychosis in dementia, without devastating side-effects
(University of Exeter) New research led by the University of Exeter Medical School, and published today in Lancet Neurology found that pimavanserin significantly improves psychosis symptoms in people with the condition, without the devastating side-effects of currently used antipsychotics. The research found an even greater benefit in those with the most severe psychotic symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rob Kass and Byron Yu to discuss advanced techniques for understanding brain function
(Carnegie Mellon University) The session will feature examples of the ways cutting-edge statistical methods are contributing important new insights; explore how statistical data analysis is helpful in understanding the mechanisms of anesthesia and loss of consciousness; and demonstrate the use of a brain-computer interface for illuminating how neurons work in the brain and providing better treatment options for paralyzed patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Congenica and FutureNeuro unite to deliver more accurate diagnoses for genetic epilepsy
(RCSI) New software to deliver faster and more accurate diagnoses in genetic epilepsies is the ambition of a ground-breaking partnership between Congenica, a global provider of clinical genomics interpretation software, and FutureNeuro, the SFI Research Centre for Chronic and Rare Neurological Diseases, supported by Science Foundation Ireland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Gap Between The Science On Kids And Reading, And How It Is Taught
Two thirds of the nation's school children struggle with reading. Neuroscientist Mark Seidenberg says teachers need a better understanding of what science knows about how kids learn to read.(Image credit: LA Johnson/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claudio Sanchez Source Type: news

Brain thickness provides insight into teenage decision-making
(Society for Neuroscience) Young adults with thinner cortex in particular brain regions are more impulsive during a decision-making task than teens with thicker cortex, according to a large correlational study of adolescents from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. The results, published in JNeurosci, suggest that individual differences in brain structure could be used to identify youth at higher risk of making dangerous choices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘Suddenly my world would flip’: the woman who is permanently lost
Sharon ’s world is regularly reversed by a rare brain malfunction. Now neurologists, and Wonder Woman, have come to the rescueIn 1952, when she was a child, Sharon was playing in the front garden. She was blindfolded while her friends ran around her, laughing, trying not to be caught in a game of blind man ’s buff. Sharon grabbed hold of someone’s sleeve and whipped off the scarf that covered her eyes. “You’re it!” she shouted.Then she blinked and looked around her. She panicked. The house and the street looked different. She had no idea where she was. Sharon ran into the back garden and...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Helen Thomson Tags: Health Neuroscience Medical research Disability Wonder Woman Society Oliver Sacks Books Source Type: news

The Genius Within by David Adam review – to what extent is intelligence determined by genes?
Zapping his brain and taking ‘smart pills’, Adam’s fascinating history of how we define intelligence raises intriguing questions about our futureThe old myth that you only use 10% of your brain is obviously rubbish. If an iron spike went through the 90% you never use, why would you care? But what might be true is that we only typically use a small part of our brain ’s potential function. What if you could zap your head or take a pill, like Bradley Cooper in the filmLimitless, and become insanely clever? Over the last decade, this sci-fi possibility has started to approach reality, and David Adam &rs...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Steven Poole Tags: Science and nature Books Culture Neuroscience Society Psychology Source Type: news

‘I could hear things, and I could feel terrible pain’: when anaesthesia fails
Anaesthesia remains a mysterious and inexact science – and thousands of patients still wake up on the operating table every year. By Kate Cole-AdamsWhen Rachel Benmayor was admitted to hospital, eight and a half months pregnant, in 1990, her blood pressure had been alarmingly high and her doctor had told her to stay in bed and get as much rest as possible before the baby came. But her blood pressure kept rising – this condition, known as pre-eclampsia, is not uncommon but can lead to sometimes-fatal complications – and the doctors decided to induce the birth. When her cervix failed to dilate properly afte...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kate Cole-Adams Tags: Consciousness Medical research Neuroscience Health Society Hospitals Human biology Psychology Books Source Type: news

Major Neurological Conditions Have More In Common Than We Thought, Study Finds
Understanding the molecular basis of major disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder could help in developing better treatments. (Image credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Merrit Kennedy Source Type: news

Autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder share molecular traits, study finds
Most medical disorders have well-defined physical characteristics seen in tissues, organs and bodily fluids. Psychiatric disorders, in contrast, are not defined by such pathology, but rather by behavior.A UCLA-led study,publishedin Science, has found that autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder share some physical characteristics — and important differences — at the molecular level, specifically, patterns of gene expression in the brain. Gene expression is the process by which instructions in DNA are converted into a product, such as a protein.“These findings provide a molecular, pathological signature...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Girl, interrupted: the science behind my stutter – and what not to say to me
People tend to be misinformed about stammering. Here ’s why finishing my sentences or telling me to ‘slow down’ doesn’t helpI ’ve heard the misconceptions for most of my life.“Just slow down,” a stranger told me as a child. “You’re talking too fast –that ’swhy you stutter! ” Later on, as my stutter carried on into adolescence and adulthood, strangers and loved ones alike offered up their own judgments of my speech –usually incorrect. Some have good intentions when it comes to sharing their opinions about my stutter. Others ... not so much. But ev...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Hoge Tags: Language Science Neuroscience Source Type: news

DBS with Nanoparticle-Based Optogenetics Modifies Behavior in Mice
Researchers develop a new technique to selectively activate neurons deep in the rodent brain, taking a step toward noninvasive brain stimulation for neurological disorders. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

Distinctive brain pattern helps habits form
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT neuroscientists have found that certain neurons in the brain are responsible for grouping behaviors together into a single habitual routine, in a process known as 'chunking.' These neurons, located in a brain region highly involved in habit formation, fire at the beginning and the end of a habitual behavior, but not in the middle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals molecular mechanisms of memory formation
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT neuroscientists have uncovered a cellular pathway that allows specific synapses to become stronger during memory formation. The findings provide the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism by which long term memories are encoded in a region of the hippocampus called CA3. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug shown to reverse brain deficits caused by alcohol
(Queensland University of Technology) Queensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers have identified a drug that could potentially help our brains reboot and reverse the damaging impacts of heavy alcohol consumption on regeneration of brain cells.Their studies in adult mice show that two weeks of daily treatment with the drug tandospirone reversed the effects of 15 weeks of binge-like alcohol consumption on neurogenesis - the ability of the brain to grow and replace neurons (brain cells). The findings have been published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Near-infrared deep brain stimulation via upconversion nanoparticle-mediated optogenetics
Optogenetics has revolutionized the experimental interrogation of neural circuits and holds promise for the treatment of neurological disorders. It is limited, however, because visible light cannot penetrate deep inside brain tissue. Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) absorb tissue-penetrating near-infrared (NIR) light and emit wavelength-specific visible light. Here, we demonstrate that molecularly tailored UCNPs can serve as optogenetic actuators of transcranial NIR light to stimulate deep brain neurons. Transcranial NIR UCNP-mediated optogenetics evoked dopamine release from genetically tagged neurons in the ventral teg...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chen, S., Weitemier, A. Z., Zeng, X., He, L., Wang, X., Tao, Y., Huang, A. J. Y., Hashimotodani, Y., Kano, M., Iwasaki, H., Parajuli, L. K., Okabe, S., Teh, D. B. L., All, A. H., Tsutsui-Kimura, I., Tanaka, K. F., Liu, X., McHugh, T. J. Tags: Materials Science, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Stimulating deep inside the brain
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stern, P. Tags: Materials Science, Neuroscience twis Source Type: news

Back to the Future: Institute for Scientific Information Re-established Within Clarivate Analytics
Clarivate Analytics, the global leader in providing trusted insights and analytics to accelerate the pace of innovation, today announced it will re-establish the prestigious Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) to its Scientific and Academic Research Group. This new incarnation of the institute will be focused on the development of existing and new bibliometric and analytical approaches, fostering collaborations with partners and customers across the academic community. Annette Thomas, CEO of the Scientific and Academic Research group at Clarivate Analytics explains: “For 50 years the Institute for Sc...
Source: News from STM - February 7, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Culture and the mind: a new theory of human intelligence – Science Weekly podcast
What role might culture play in intelligence? And how does human culture differ from culture found in other animals?Nicola Davis explores our evolutionary historySubscribe and review onApple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom,MixcloudandAcast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterIn 1921, residents of the small town of Swaythling in southern England were shocked to find the milk bottles on their doorsteps had been vandalised, with the foil caps pierced and the valuable cream gone. Fingers were pointed at possible culprits, but as the cream theft swept across the country – and eventually Europe – it was disco...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Evolution Biology Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

Culturing Cells in Defined 3-D Structures
In this study, the authors present in-air microfluidics (IAMF), a new chip-free platform technology that enables in-flight (that is, on-the-fly) formation of droplets, fibers, and particles and their one-step deposition into 3D constructs with a modular internal architecture.Figure: Concept of IAMF and guide to the article. (A) Chip-based microfluidics enables in-line control over droplets and particles, making it a versatile platform technology. A chip design where droplets (blue) are transported by a coflow (pink) is shown. (B) IAMF maintains the in-line control of chip-based microfluidics but relies on jet ejection and ...
Source: Neuromics - February 7, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: 3-D Bioprinting 3-D Cell based Assays Bio-inks Fibroblast Growth Factor Basic Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells ISOKine FGF Source Type: news

InVivo Therapeutics lifts Toselli to permanent prez, CEO | Personnel Moves February 6, 2018
InVivo Therapeutics (NSDQ:NVIV) said yesterday it made Dr. Richard Toselli’s spot in the corner office permanent, lifting him from acting CEO to prez and CEO. Dr. Toselli will maintain his position on the company’s board and as its chief medical officer, the position he was given when he joined the company last July. Prior to joining InVivo, Toselli has held positions with Sanofi (NYSE:SNY), DePuy and Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ). “I am delighted to announce Rich’s full-time role as CEO. Rich has demonstrated clear vision, a strategic mind, and committed leadership in his time at ...
Source: Mass Device - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Alcon Baxter Boston Scientific Faxitron GE Healthcare InVivo Therapeutics johnsonandjohnson Lima Corporate Luxottica Medizone Medtronic performancehealth Respicardia Robocath Sanofi-Aventis T2 Biosys Source Type: news

Dim light may make us dumber
(Michigan State University) Spending too much time in dimly lit rooms and offices may actually change the brain's structure and hurt one's ability to remember and learn, indicates groundbreaking research by Michigan State University neuroscientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Human Hepatocytes
From Healthy and Diseased DonorsWe continue to addhuman primary and derived cells important to your research.We now haveHuman Hepatocytes. They come from healthy and drug-addicted donors.Like all our cells, these are potent, pure and easy to culture.iPSC Derived HeptocytesHuman HepatocytesHC4230  Cell Assays1,000,000 Cells$795.00Human HepatocytesHC4230  Cell Assays500,000 Cells$595.00Human Hepatocytes - Alcohol AddictedHC4230AA  Cell Assays1,000,000 Cells$895.00Human Hepatocytes - Alcohol AddictedHC4230AA  Cell Assays500,000 Cells$695.00Human Hepatocytes - Opioid AddictedHC4230OP&nbs...
Source: Neuromics - February 4, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Human Heptaocytes iPSCs Source Type: news

So men are dying because they don ’t have women’s brains? Show me the evidence
Mortality rates for prostate cancer are rising, but not because of any neurological determinismIt is the crossover moment. For the first time, more men are dying of prostate cancer than women are from breast cancer. Any GP surgery will offer a blood test to check a man ’s prostate-specific antigen (PSA) indicating cancer. All men have to do is ask.The trouble is that, as we all know, men are from Mars. They don ’t go to GPs, don’t talk about illness and believe in their own invincibility. Men with their compartmentalised brains are inherently greater risk-takers and believe they will beat the odds. In any...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Will Hutton Tags: Neuroscience Gender World news Women UK news Cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Life and style Feminism Source Type: news

Respicardia launches Remed ē system, taps Sommerness as CEO
Respicardia said today it launched its Remedē transvenous implantable neurostimulation system designed to treat patients with central sleep apnea, and that it named Peter Sommerness as CEO. The Remedē system consists of a surgically placed battery pack and thin wires inserted into the blood vessels in the chest near the phrenic nerve, which it stimulates to engage the diaphragm to restore natural breathing during sleep and improve patient quality of life and satisfaction. “Central sleep apnea is very common in cardiac patients, especially patients with heart failure, and is associated with a significantly grea...
Source: Mass Device - February 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Respiratory Respicardia Source Type: news

Foot-Strike Technique and the Neuromechanics of the Foot Foot-Strike Technique and the Neuromechanics of the Foot
In what ways do rearfoot and forefoot techniques affect the mechanical function of the longitudinal arch during running?Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Journal Article Source Type: news

Is the Novel Lateral Trauma Position More Effective than the Log-Roll Maneuver for Spinal Trauma?
Is it the new position for trauma? The Research Hyldmo PK, Horodyski M, Conrad BP, et al. Does the novel lateral trauma position cause more motion in an unstable cervical spine injury than the logroll maneuver? Am J Emerg Med. 2017;35:1630–1635. The Science The authors sought to examine the degree of cervical spine motion that occurs during the traditional log-roll maneuver compared to a technique called the "lateral trauma position." A neurosurgeon created an unstable cervical spine injury in five fresh cadavers by cutting all the ligaments between the fifth and sixth cervical vertebra. An electromagnetic ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith Wesley, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Trauma Columns Source Type: news