Doctors develop system which can predict Bipolar Disorder 4 years before onset
(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) An international team of doctors have developed a machine learning system which can predict the development of Bipolar Disorder up to 4 years before onset in young people: at age 18 it was able to predict which individuals would develop the condition at age 22. This work is presented at the ECNP virtual congress, and is in press with a peer-reviewed journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New data further reinforce Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) as a highly effective treatment for people with multiple sclerosis
Basel, 11 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new data that show OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) is a highly effective treatment option for people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who experienced a suboptimal response to their prior disease modifying therapy (DMT). Subgroup analys is from the two-year open-label Phase IIIb CASTING study also demonstrates that patients benefit across a wide range of disease related and demographic subgroups, regardless of prior treatment background. Findings will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New data further reinforce Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) as a highly effective treatment for people with multiple sclerosis
Basel, 11 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new data that show OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) is a highly effective treatment option for people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who experienced a suboptimal response to their prior disease modifying therapy (DMT). Subgroup analys is from the two-year open-label Phase IIIb CASTING study also demonstrates that patients benefit across a wide range of disease related and demographic subgroups, regardless of prior treatment background. Findings will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee...
Source: Roche Media News - September 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Is the " Mozart Effect " real? New analysis indicates that music can help epilepsy
(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) A new comprehensive analysis on the effect of Mozart's music on epilepsy has confirmed that listening to his piano music can reduce the frequency of epilepsy attacks. The results of this comprehensive meta-analysis (a study of studies), which may overturn current scepticism about the effect, are presented at the ECNP congress after recent publication in a peer-reviewed journal (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Depression risk detected by measuring heart rate changes
(European College of Neuropsychopharmacology) For the first time doctors have shown that measuring changes in 24-hour heart rate can reliably indicate whether or not someone is depressed. In practical terms, this may give clinicians an objective " early warning " of potential depression, as well as a rapid indication whether or not treatment is working, so opening the way to more rapid and responsive treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MAX binding with the variant Rs72780850 in RNA helicase DDX1 for susceptibility to neuroblastoma
(Science China Press) The researchers adopted the functional polymorphism research strategy to screen out the functional polymorphisms associated with neuroblastoma in Chinese population and elucidate its mechanism, providing data on children susceptible to neuroblastoma in China. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New data show Roche ’s ENSPRYNG (satralizumab) significantly reduces severity and risk of relapse in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD)
Basel, 10 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) will present new ENSPRYNG ® (satralizumab) data on reducing relapse severity in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), a rare disease of the central nervous system. These data are being presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS meeting, in addition to longer-term efficacy data supporting the continued effect of ENSPRYNG on reducing the risk of NMOSD relapse, as well as its favourable benefit:risk profile.“The data for ENSPRYNG at MSVirtual2020 are promising and suggest it significantly reduces relapse severity ...
Source: Roche Media News - September 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New data show Roche ’s ENSPRYNG (satralizumab) significantly reduces severity and risk of relapse in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD)
Basel, 10 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) will present new ENSPRYNG ® (satralizumab) data on reducing relapse severity in the treatment of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), a rare disease of the central nervous system. These data are being presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th joint ACTRIMS-ECTRIMS meeting, in addition to longer-term efficacy data supporting the continued effect of ENSPRYNG on reducing the risk of NMOSD relapse, as well as its favourable benefit:risk profile.“The data for ENSPRYNG at MSVirtual2020 are promising and suggest it significantly reduces relapse severity ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FABP4: Preschool-aged biomarker discovered for autism spectrum disorder
(RIKEN) Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science in Japan have discovered a biomarker that can detect autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in preschool-aged children. The new study found that levels of the protein FABP4 were much lower in four- to six-year-old children with ASD than they were in other typically developing children. Experiments in mice that lacked FABP4 revealed changes in neurons that resemble those found in the postmortem brains of people with ASD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CERENOVUS Launches New Suite of Technologies to Advance Stroke Treatment
IRVINE, CA – September 9, 2020 – CERENOVUS, part of Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies* today announced that it has launched CERENOVUS Stroke Solutions™, which includes a suite of three devices designed to aid physicians in clot removal procedures. The announcement was made during the virtual European Society of Minimally Invasive Neurological Therapy (ESMINT).Strokes are the second leading cause of death globally, and account for an estimated 140,000 deaths in the United States each year.[i],[ii] Over half of stroke survivors become chronically disabled placing an estimated $34 billion econo...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche expands its multiple sclerosis portfolio with investigational BTK inhibitor fenebrutinib and initiates novel clinical trials for OCREVUS (ocrelizumab)
Basel, 9 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the initiation of an innovative Phase III clinical trial programme for its investigational medicine fenebrutinib in multiple sclerosis (MS), along with a higher-dose Phase III clinical trial programme for OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) and a distinct O CREVUS trial specifically to support African-American and Hispanic- and Latinx-American patients with MS. Overviews of clinical trials and scientific rationale will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTR...
Source: Roche Media News - September 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche expands its multiple sclerosis portfolio with investigational BTK inhibitor fenebrutinib and initiates novel clinical trials for OCREVUS (ocrelizumab)
Basel, 9 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the initiation of an innovative Phase III clinical trial programme for its investigational medicine fenebrutinib in multiple sclerosis (MS), along with a higher-dose Phase III clinical trial programme for OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) and a distinct O CREVUS trial specifically to support African-American and Hispanic- and Latinx-American patients with MS. Overviews of clinical trials and scientific rationale will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTR...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Lumpy proteins stiffen blood vessels of the brain
(DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases) Deposits of a protein called " Medin " , which manifest in virtually all older adults, reduce the elasticity of blood vessels during aging and hence may be a risk factor for vascular dementia. Experts from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research at the University of T ü bingen report on this in the scientific journal PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study suggests unconscious learning underlies belief in God
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Individuals who can unconsciously predict complex patterns, an ability called implicit pattern learning, are likely to hold stronger beliefs that there is a god who creates patterns of events in the universe, according to neuroscientists at Georgetown University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biopharma Leaders Unite To Stand With Science
NEW YORK, September 8, 2020 — The CEOs of AstraZeneca (LSE/STO/NYSE: AZN), BioNTech (NASDAQ: BNTX), GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE/NYSE: GSK), Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ), Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, Moderna, Inc. (Nasdaq: MRNA), Novavax, Inc. (Nasdaq: NVAX), Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE), and Sanofi (NASDAQ: SNY), today announced a historic pledge, outlining a united commitment to uphold the integrity of the scientific process as they work towards potential global regulatory filings and approvals of the first COVID-19 vaccines. All nine CEOs signed the following pledge: We, the un...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. Their findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how groups of neurons can self-organize by synchronizing when they fire fast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study from researchers at Penn Medicine and Mayo Clinic. Results were published in Science Translational Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As information flows through brain's heirarchy, higher regions use higher frequency waves
(Picower Institute at MIT) New study by MIT neuroscientists also finds specific frequency bands associated with encoding, or inhibiting encoding, of sensory information across the cortex. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scans reveal how brain adapts to life in space
Analysis of brain scans finds increase in white and grey matter in regions involved in physical movementBrain scans of cosmonauts have revealed the first clear evidence of how the organ adapts to the weird and often sickness-inducing challenge of moving around in space.Analysis of scans taken from 11 cosmonauts, who spent about six months each in orbit, found increases in white and grey matter in three brain regions that are intimately involved in physical movement.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 4, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Space Neuroscience UK news Source Type: news

Roche to present new data in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder at MSVirtual2020
Basel, 3 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that new multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) data will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) - European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) Meeting from 11-13 September 2020.“While conditions of the nervous system are some of the most complex to understand and treat, we are committed to following the science to reduce relapses in NMOSD and slow and eventually stop disease progression in ...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche to present new data in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder at MSVirtual2020
Basel, 3 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that new multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) data will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTRIMS) - European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) Meeting from 11-13 September 2020.“While conditions of the nervous system are some of the most complex to understand and treat, we are committed to following the science to reduce relapses in NMOSD and slow and eventually stop disease progression in ...
Source: Roche Media News - September 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Octapharma launches phase 3 study for pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome
(Yankee Public Relations) Octapharma has launched a phase 3, multicenter superiority study to compare the ef-fectiveness of PANZYGA ® (immune globulin intravenous, human - ifas) 10% Liquid Preparation versus placebo in patients with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inside the Dangerous Mission to Understand What Makes Extremists Tick —and How to Change Their Minds
On a cool winter’s day in early 2014, the American academic Nafees Hamid was invited for tea at the second-story at the Barcelona apartment of a young Moroccan man. It started well enough; they sat down at the kitchen table, chatting amiably in French while two acquaintances of the host sat nearby in the living room. Halfway through the conversation, though, things took a turn. “He started saying things like, ‘Why should we trust any Westerner?’” Hamid recalls. “‘Why would we not kill every one of them? Why should I even trust you—you are an American—sitting here? Why s...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emily Feldman and Malia Politzer Tags: Uncategorized extremism feature Londontime Source Type: news

Gut microbiome composition is associated with age and memory performance in pet dogs
(E ö tv ö s Lor á nd University (ELTE), Faculty of Science) Our gut microbiota can crucially influence our behaviour and neurodevelopment. New research of the Ethology Department at the Faculty of Science at E ö tv ö s Lor á nd University indicates that dogs' aging mechanism and memory performance are also linked to their gut microbiome composition. According to the study, dogs and humans may have similar mechanisms in cognitive aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Don ’t be brainwashed – Elon Musk’s ‘bionic pig’ is just a publicity stunt | Arwa Mahdawi
The billionaire entrepreneur loves to make headline-grabbing claims, but behind the hype his innovations are often underwhelmingHere is a philosophical conundrum: if no one is talking aboutElon Musk, does he really exist? The entrepreneur needs attention the way mortals need oxygen. If the 49-year-old is not in the news for a couple of days, he finds a way to shoehorn himself back into the headlines – even if it means piggybacking oninternational efforts to rescue children trapped in a cave, or calling his childX Æ A-12.Behold the billionaire ’s latest stunt:a bionic pig. On Friday, Musk livestreamed a &l...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 1, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Arwa Mahdawi Tags: Elon Musk Technology Neuroscience Source Type: news

NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities NIH/HHS News Funding Notices Science Advances Subscribe to NICDR News Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR Announces Availability of COVID-19 Research Funding On May 5, NIDCR issued two Notices of Special Interest highlighting the urgent need for research on coronavirus disease 2019. This research may be conducted either via the National Dental PBRN infrastructu...
Source: NIDCR Science News - September 1, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Brain estrogen is key to brain protection when oxygen is low
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) When the brain isn't getting enough oxygen, estrogen produced by neurons in both males and females hyperactivates another brain cell type called astrocytes to step up their usual support and protect brain function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood Replacement Rescues Mice from Stroke Damage
When mice that had suffered a stroke were given blood from a healthy donor, they experienced less tissue and neurological damage. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 31, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

PCOS is linked to increased risk of neuropsychiatric disorders in offspring
(European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology) Children born to mothers with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at greater risk of a wide range of psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, according to new research published in Human Reproduction. The study is the first to show links between PCOS and such a wide range of disorders, which include emotional and behavioural problems, delayed development, learning, speech and language problems, autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain protein linked to seizures, abnormal social behaviors
(University of California - Riverside) A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside has found a new mechanism responsible for the abnormal development of neuronal connections in the mouse brain that leads to seizures and abnormal social behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women with higher neuroticism are less physically active
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) A new study from the University of Jyv ä skyl ä , Finland, shows that the role of personality may vary depending on how physical activity is measured. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unravelling the potential of the unconscious mind
(ATR Brain Information Communication Research Laboratory Group) By using a combination of artificial intelligence and brain imaging technology, researchers have discovered that humans can be trained to rationally use the unconscious contents of their mental processes. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, could open the way to important new approaches in neuroscience and artificial intelligence, but also lead to novel applications in clinical, educational or social settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Peter: The Human Cyborg: Scientist diagnosed with motor neurone disease opens up about journey
Peter Scott-Morgan, 62, from Devon, who has motor neurone disease, appears in Channel 4's documentary Peter: The Human Cyborg tonight, as he uses technology to transform his life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New form of brain analysis engages whole brain for the first time
(Duke Department of Neurology) A new method of brain imaging analysis offers the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of noninvasive brain stimulation treatment for Alzheimer's, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and other conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neurobiologist Dave Schubert Dies
The Salk professor developed the institute's first neurobiology lab and used it to develop cell lines, describe amyloid beta toxicity, and screen for compounds that protect against neurodegeneration. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 24, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Yumanity Therapeutics and Proteostasis Therapeutics Announce Merger Agreement
Combined companies to leverage their common scientific expertise in protein misfolding Focus on Yumanity's lead clinical program in Parkinson's disease and transformative pipeline of disease-modifying treatments for neurogenerative disorders Companie... Biopharmaceuticals, Mergers & Acquisitions Proteostasis Therapeutics, Yumanity Therapeutics (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - August 24, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Coronavirus pandemic halts life-saving UK cancer and heart disease research
Thousands of clinical trials have closed permanently or been suspended – and may never have the cash to restartCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMore than 1,500 clinical trials of new drugs and treatments for cancers, heart disease and other serious illnesses have been permanently closed down in Britain in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic. In addition, a further 9,000 have been suspended andmost will need major cash injections if they are to be reactivated.The figures highlight the catastrophic effect that Covid-19 has had on UK medical research, which has suffered a devastating blow ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Medical research Cancer research Heart disease Motor neurone disease Coronavirus outbreak Infectious diseases Science UK news Health Society Source Type: news

Why obeying orders can make us do terrible things
(Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW) War atrocities are sometimes committed by 'normal' people obeying orders. Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience measured brain activity while participants inflicted pain and found that obeying orders reduced empathy and guilt related brain activity for the inflicted pain. This may explain why people are able to commit immoral acts under coercion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identifying Neuroinflammatory Biomarkers of COVID-19
Functional proteomics detects elevated neuroinflammatory markers in patient plasma and cerebrospinal fluid! (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 20, 2020 Category: Science Tags: The Marketplace Source Type: news

Method of treating central nervous system disease
 Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) Permeability AssayYes, These are troubled times. With our current focus on eradicating COVID-19, we forget that many of the world's most insidious and costly diseases have limited treatments and no cures.That is why Neuromics continues to develop its human based 3-D Cell-Based Assays. At the center if our offerings is ourBBB Model.Here's a recent patent application that includes a permeability assay using our model-Sookhee Bang, Jeong Kuen Song, Seung-wook Shin, Kwan Hee Lee, and Ho June Lee. (2020).Method of Treating Central Nervous System Disease. United States Patent Application 202002302...
Source: Neuromics - August 20, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Tags: 3-D Assays. 3-D imaging 3-D Blood-Brain Barrier Model 3-D Cell Culturing Blood Brain Barrier Blood Brain Barrier Models –brain barrier penetration Source Type: news

Three Yale researchers receive funding from Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
Marc Hammarlund, Pietro De Camilli, and Hongying Shen are among 30 pairs of scientists awarded grants to study the molecular of neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - August 20, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

When learning on your own is not enough
(University of Vienna) We make decisions based on not only our own learning experience, but also learning from others. Is social learning processed differently from direct learning? In a new study, published in " Science Advances " , neuroscientist Lei Zhang of the University of Vienna provides empirical evidence that there are parallel computations for direct and social learning and they are carried out in distinct but interacting regions in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson to Acquire Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Expanding Janssen ’s Leadership in Novel Treatments for Autoimmune Diseases
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., August 19, 2020 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Momenta), a company that discovers and develops novel therapies for immune-mediated diseases, in an all cash transaction for approximately $6.5 billion. This acquisition provides an opportunity for the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson to broaden its leadership in immune-mediated diseases and drive further growth through expansion into autoantibody-driven disease. The transaction will include full global rights to nipocalim...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - August 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Virtual Workshop: Social Disconnection and Late-Life Suicide: Mechanisms, Treatment Targets, and Interventions
Suicide rates in older adults have risen more than 40% in the past 10 years and social disconnection is one of the primary risk factors. This virtual workshop will bring together clinician scientists, behavioral scientists, neuroscientists, geriatric psychiatrists, epidemiologists, and implementation scientists to discuss the current state of the science on social disconnection and suicide. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - August 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Some Coronavirus Patients Are Reporting Symptoms That Last Months. Nobody Knows Exactly How to Treat Them
Kayla Brim laughed when she learned it could take 10 days to get her COVID-19 test results back. “I thought, ‘Okay, well, within 10 days I should be fine,’” she remembers. That was on July 2. More than a month later, Brim is still far from fine. Prior to the pandemic, the 28-year-old from Caldwell, Idaho, juggled homeschooling her two kids with her work as a makeup artist—she was supposed to open her own salon in July. Now, she suffers daily from shortness of breath, exhaustion, excruciating headaches, brain fog, neuropathy, high blood pressure and loss of taste and smell. She feels like &ldqu...
Source: TIME: Health - August 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Call for Urgent Action by 275 World Leaders on Global Education Emergency In Face of Covid19
Credit: UNICEF Mali / DickoBy External SourceNEW YORK, Aug 18 2020 (IPS) We write to call for urgent action to address the global education emergency triggered by COVID-19. With over 1 billion children still out of school because of the lockdown, there is now a real and present danger that the public health crisis will create a COVID generation who lose out on schooling and whose opportunities are permanently damaged. While the more fortunate have had access to alternatives, the world’s poorest children have been locked out of learning, denied internet access, and with the loss of free school meals – once a lif...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Economy & Trade Education Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Source Type: news

Toward a global and reproducible science for brain imaging in neurotrauma: the ENIGMA adult moderate/severe traumatic brain injury working group - Olsen A, Babikian T, Bigler ED, Caeyenberghs K, Conde V, Dams-O'connor K, Dobryakova E, Genova H, Grafman J, H åberg AK, Heggland I, Hellstrøm T, Hodges CB, Irimia A, Jha RM, Johnson PK, Koliatsos VE, Levin H, Li LM, Lindsey HM, Livny A, Løvstad M, Medaglia J, Menon DK, Mondello S, Monti MM, Newcombe VFJ, Petroni A, Ponsford J, Sharp D, Spitz G, Westlye LT, Thompson PM, Dennis EL, Tate DF, Wilde EA, Hilla ry FG.
The global burden of mortality and morbidity caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) is significant, and the heterogeneity of TBI patients and the relatively small sample sizes of most current neuroimaging studies is a major challenge for scientific advance... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Switching off 'master regulator' may shield the brain from Parkinson's-related damage
(Van Andel Research Institute) Switching off a molecular 'master regulator' may protect the brain from inflammatory damage and neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease, reports a study published today in Nature Neuroscience. The study is the first of its kind and points to an entirely new avenue for developing therapies that preserve vulnerable brain cells in Parkinson's disease. Currently, there are no effective ways to prevent Parkinson's or to slow or stop its progression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the brain's internal states affect decision-making
(College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University) By recording the activity of separate populations of neurons simultaneously, researchers have gained an unprecedented insight into how the 'waxing and waning' of our mental state influences the decisions we make. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new treatment concept for age-related decline in motor function
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) A research group led by Professor Yuji Yamanashi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, conducted experiments using aged mice to demonstrate that muscle denervation at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, *1) could be appreciably offset by an NMJ formation-enhancing treatment that strengthened the motor function and muscle of aged mice.The results of this study suggest that NMJ formation-enhancing treatment may be effective to overcome motor impairment and muscle weakness associated with human aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news