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Parkinson ’ s protein to take a trip into space
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research and the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space yesterday inked a collaboration to send a protein linked to Parkinson’s disease to the International Space Station. The researchers plan to evaluate the protein’s growth under microgravity conditions, which could foster larger, more regular LRRK2 protein crystals to grow and give insight into the protein’s structure. A better understanding of LRRK2’s structure could help design therapies optimized against the protein. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. ...
Source: Mass Device - July 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Neurological Pharmaceuticals Research & Development Wall Street Beat Source Type: news

Mice Show Signs of Mental Disorder After Injections of Cells from Schizophrenia Patient
The work may offer new insights into the disease’s origins  -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research)
Source: Scientific American Topic - Stem Cell Research - July 21, 2017 Category: Stem Cells Authors: Sharon Begley STAT Tags: Health Mind Mental Health Neurological Health Biology Source Type: news

Science News » Guidelines published for treating PANS/PANDAS
An expert panel has published guidelines for treatment of Pediatric Acute Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) and a subset of patients diagnosed with PAN Disorder Associated with Streptococcal Infection (PANDAS). (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - July 21, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jules Asher Source Type: news

SAGE Publishing reports continued strong growth in 2017
SAGE Publishing, one of the world’s leading independent academic and professional publishers, today reported continued strong performance and growth across its journals portfolio in the 2017 Journal Citation Reports (Source: 2016 Web of Science Data). SAGE continues to see consistent growth within the reports. This year 70% of SAGE journals received an increased ranking with 49% of SAGE journals now ranking within the top half of their subject category. 233 titles now place in the top 30% of the JCR and over 100 SAGE journals received a top 10-category rank. 566 titles are now listed totaling a 40% increase in SAGE j...
Source: News from STM - July 21, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: European Featured Source Type: news

Nine lifestyle changes may reduce risk of dementia
"Nine lifestyle changes can reduce dementia risk," BBC News reports. A major review by The Lancet has identified nine potentially modifiable risk factors linked to dementia. The risk factors were: low levels of education midlife hearing loss physical inactivity high blood pressure (hypertension) type 2 diabetes obesity smoking depression social isolation However, it's important to note that even if you add up the percentage risk of all of these factors, they only account for about 35% of the overall risk of getting dementia. This means about 65% of the risk is still due to factors you can't co...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology QA articles Source Type: news

Lifestyle changes could prevent a third of dementia cases, report suggests
Researchers admit prevention estimate is a ‘best-case scenario’, but stress that action can be taken to reduce dementia riskMore than a third of dementia cases might be avoided by tackling aspects of lifestyle including education, exercise, blood pressure and hearing, a new report suggests.Approximately 45 million people worldwide were thought to be living with dementia in 2015, at an estimated cost of $818bn.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dementia Science Mental health Society Neuroscience Alzheimer's Depression Source Type: news

Probiotics: Novel biosynthetic tool to develop metallic nanoparticles
(Bentham Science Publishers) Probiotics, being live microbes, exert numerous beneficial health effects on the host cells. Such probiotics are commercially available as dietary supplements, foods, pharmaceutical formulations. Yakult, Activia yogurt, DanActive fermented milk provide health benefits like boosting up the immune system, treating digestive problems, mental illness, neurological disorders, cancer, etc. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neuroendocrine tumor grants soon available
The Neuroendocrine Tumor Research Foundation will award a new round of scientific...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDA approves new PET agent for rare neuroendocrine tumors Ga-68-based PET/CT good for neuroendocrine tumors SNMMI: PET/CT with Ga-68 DOTATOC targets neuroendocrine tumors (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Hearing voices: the science of auditory verbal hallucinations - Science Weekly podcast
What can advances in neuroscience and psychology reveal about this age-old phenomenon? And how might digital avatars help patients answer back?Subscribe& Review oniTunes,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud&Acast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterOnce thought to originate from the realm of the supernatural, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have a well-documented history, with more recent times often seeing them linked to mental health issues. But with recent surveys suggesting that up to 10% of the population report hearing voices that nobody else can hear, could these hallucinations reveal the way our bra...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Nicola Davis and produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Psychology Neuroscience Mental health Source Type: news

We can cure Alzheimer ’s – if we stop ignoring it | Joseph Jebelli
The disease is now the leading cause of death among the oldest people. Given focus and funding, however, Alzheimer ’s will yield to science and reason• Joseph Jebelli is a neuroscientist and authorThe terror of Alzheimer ’s is that it acts by degrees, and can therefore bewilder family members as much as its victims. Those who first notice the onset of Alzheimer’s in a loved one tell of forgotten names and unsettling behaviour, of car keys found in the fridge and clothing in the kitchen cabinet, of aimless wander ings.Naturally, they want to understand the boundaries of normal ageing and whether these...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Joseph Jebelli Tags: Alzheimer's Charities Science Dementia Medical research Ageing Older people Source Type: news

Rosalind Franklin University awarded NIH grant for research on neurological repair
(Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science) A $2.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help researchers at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science study how to replace neurons lost through stroke, traumatic brain and spinal injury and brain diseases including Alzheimer's. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Electrical Preconditioning of Stem Cells
Cool Science The ability to manipulate hNPCs via a conductive scaffold creates a new approach to optimize stem cell-based therapy and determine which factors (such as VEGF-A) are essential for stroke recovery: Paul M. Georgea, Tonya M. Blissb, Thuy Huab, Alex Leed, Byeongtaek Oh, Alexa Levinson, Swapnil Mehta, Guohua Sun, Gary K. Steinberg.Electrical preconditioning of stem cells with a conductive polymer scaffold enhances stroke recovery. doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2017.07.020...anti βIII-tubulin (1:500, Neuromics, Edina, MN)...Image: Neural progenitors were labeled with anti-ratNestinpolyclonal antibody (Cat#:GT...
Source: Neuromics - July 17, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Human Neural Progenitors nestin antibody Stem cell markers Tuj 1 (Neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin) antibody Tuj-1 antibody Source Type: news

Strong performance in Journal Citation Reports reaffirms Wiley as leading society publishing partner
Wiley’s performance in the 2017 release of Clarivate Analytics’ Journal Citation Reports (JCR) remains strong, maintaining its position as #3 in terms of the number of titles indexed, articles published and citations received. Overall, 1,214 Wiley journals were included in the reports (+9 from last year), of which 57% were society publications – strengthening Wiley’s position as the world’s leading society publishing partner. Wiley journals were ranked #1 in 26 subject categories, and achieved 363 top-10 category rankings. Particular success stories include the continued high performance of CA...
Source: News from STM - July 17, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

New study of brain circuits finds key links to symptoms of depression
(University of California - San Diego) Scientists have linked specific wiring in the brain to distinct behavioral symptoms of depression. In a study published in Cell, researchers at UC San Diego found brain circuits tied to feelings of despair and helplessness and were able to alleviate and even reverse such symptoms in mice studies. Two populations of neurons were identified in the brain's ventral pallidum region (part of the basal ganglia) as key to underlying depressive behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Humans hardwired to lean to the right while kissing the world over
(University of Bath) New research that looked into people's kissing bias could have wider implications for cognitive and neuroscience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New discovery in MND and dementia could pave the way to novel treatments
(University of Sheffield) A new discovery by scientists at the University of Sheffield could help slow down the progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as motor neurone disease (MND), dementia and neurological decline associated with ageing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Let's twist again: the secrets of kissing angles revealed
Humans hard-wired to favour leaning to the right while locking lips with romantic partners, an international study has foundHumans are hard-wired to favour leaning to the right while kissing romantic partners, an international study by psychologists and neuroscientists has found.The research, by the universities of Dhaka, Bath and Bath Spa, found that kiss recipients have a tendency to match their partners ’ head-leaning direction.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Research Relationships Life and style UK news Source Type: news

Stressful experiences can age brain 'by years', Alzheimer's experts hear
Child ’s death, divorce or job loss linked to poorer cognition in later life, study finds, with African Americans more susceptibleStressful life experiences can age the brain by several years, new research suggests. Experts led by a team from Wisconsin University ’s school of medicine and public health in the US found that even one major stressful event early in life may have an impact on later brain health.The team examined data for 1,320 people who reported stressful experiences over their lifetime and underwent tests in areas such as thinking and memory. The subjects ’ average age was 58 and included 1...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Alzheimer's Dementia Science Neuroscience Psychology Health Mental health Society Medical research Source Type: news

Henry Marsh: ‘The mind-matter problem is not a problem for me – mind is matter’
The celebrated neurosurgeon and writer talks about 40 years inside our skulls, what ’s wrong with the NHS – and the Zen of woodworkHenry Marsh made the decision to become a neurosurgeon after he had witnessed his three-month-old son survive the complex removal of a brain tumour. For two decades he was the senior consultant in the Atkinson Morley wing at St George ’s hospital in London, one of the country’s largest specialist brain surgery units. He pioneered techniques in operating on the brain under local anaesthetic and was the subject of the BBC documentary Your Life in Their ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Neuroscience Autobiography and memoir Science and nature NHS Hospitals Society Books Culture Health Source Type: news

Agent clears toxic proteins and improves cognition in neurodegeneration models
(Georgetown University Medical Center) Researchers have found cell receptors abnormally overexpressed in post-mortem brains of those with Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, and that they can be inhibited in animal models to clear toxic protein buildup, reduce brain inflammation, and improve cognitive performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study identifies new target to preserve nerve function
(Oregon Health& Science University) Scientists have identified an enzyme that plays a crucial role in the degeneration of axons, the threadlike portions of a nerve cell that transmit signals within the nervous system. Axon loss occurs in all neurodegenerative diseases, so this discovery could open new pathways to treating or preventing a wide array of brain diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists discover brain's neural switch for becoming an alpha male
Timid mice turn bold after their ‘alpha’ circuit is stimulated as results show ‘winner effect’ lingers on and mechanism may be similar in humansBrash, brawny and keen to impose their will on anyone who enters their sphere of existence: the alpha male in action is unmistakable.Now scientists claim to have pinpointed the biological root of domineering behaviour. New research has located a brain circuit that, when activated in mice, transformed timid individuals into bold alpha mice that almost always prevailed in aggressive social encounters.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Neuroscience Biology Medical research Genetics Animal behaviour Source Type: news

Behavior Circuits Mapped in Whole Fruit Fly Brain
Using machine learning, researchers have created extensive maps of the neuronal circuits associated with social and locomotion behaviors in the fruit fly. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 13, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News Source Type: news

The neuroscience of inequality: does poverty show up in children's brains?
There is increasing evidence that growing up poor diminishes the physical development of a child ’s brain. A landmark US study is attempting to establish a causal link – and find new ways to help our poorest childrenWith its bright colours, anthropomorphic animal motif and nautical-themed puzzle play mat,Dr Kimberly Noble’s laboratory at Columbia University in New York looks like your typical day-care centre – save for the team of cognitive neuroscientists observing kids from behind a large two-way mirror.TheNeurocognition, Early Experience and Development Lab is home to cutting-edge research on how...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mike Mariani Tags: Inequality Income inequality US income inequality Neuroscience Children Society Education Technology Source Type: news

How neurons sense our everyday life
(King's College London) Researchers from King's College London have discovered a molecular mechanism that enables neuronal connections to change through experience, thus fueling learning and memory formation. The findings are published in the journal Neuron and have the potential to reveal new therapeutic strategies for neurological and psychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mapping behavior in the fruit fly brain
(Cell Press) One of the primary missions of neuroscience is to make connections between particular neurons in the brain and specific behaviors. Now a team of researchers has used computer-vision and machine-learning techniques in fruit flies to create behavior anatomy maps that will help us understand how specific brain circuits generate Drosophila aggression, wing extension, or grooming. The data are being published July 13 in the journal Cell as a resource for other investigators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zimmer Biomet prez, CEO Dvorak unexpectedly resigns | Personnel Moves, July 12, 2017
Zimmer Biomet (NYSE:ZBH) said late yesterday its prez and CEO David Dvorak has resigned from his position at the head of the company, effective immediately, to be replaced on an interim basis by senior VP and CFO Daniel Florin until a permanent successor is named. The Warsaw, Ind.-based company said it is retaining “a leading executive search firm” as it pursues a new candidate to permanently fill the CEO role. “Serving alongside Zimmer Biomet’s dedicated employees over the past 16 years and leading the company as CEO for ten of those years has been a privilege and a highlight of my profes...
Source: Mass Device - July 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Abiomed Accuray Inc. Amendia Boston Scientific Cochlear Ltd. conformis crbard GE Healthcare InVivo Corp. IsoRay johnsonandjohnson Lidco Lumicell Neurometrix portal instruments RenalGuard Solutions Source Type: news

Creating music by thought alone
(Frontiers) Neurologists have created a hands-free, thought-controlled musical instrument, which they've recently described in a report in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Researchers hope that this new instrument will help empower and rehabilitate patients with motor disabilities such as those from stroke, spinal cord injury, amputation, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tango could stave off the effects of Parkinson's disease
Emory University professors Lena Ting, a neuroscientist, and Madeleine Eve Hackney, a rehab scientist and dancer, explain how dance is the next step for Parkinson's care. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Human RPES and BMSCS
NeedHuman Cells? Just Ask!This is our cornerstone and we keep building on it. You asked for them. We are pleased to announce we now haveHuman Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells (BMSCs) andRetinal Pigment Epithelial Cells (RPES).RPES in Culture.BMSCS in Culture.We will continue to post new cell offerings here. (Source: Neuromics)
Source: Neuromics - July 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: BMSCs Bone marrow derived stem cells Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells RPES Source Type: news

Generous people live happier lives
(University of Zurich) Generosity makes people happier, even if they are only a little generous. People who act solely out of self-interest are less happy. Merely promising to be more generous is enough to trigger a change in our brains that makes us happier. This is what UZH neuroeconomists found in a recent study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In rats that can't control glutamate, cocaine is less rewarding, staving off relapse
(Cell Press) Rats missing a neuroreceptor that controls the release of the neurotransmitter glutamate are less amenable to the rewarding effects of cocaine, increasing their chance of kicking the habit once addicted, researchers from the US National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) find. Their work, appearing July 11 in Cell Reports, suggests that the receptor, which protects nerve cells from fatal inundation by excess glutamate, is involved in modulating the reward-seeking behavior associated with drug addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poor quality sleep could increase Alzheimer's risk, research suggests
Findings raise possibility repeated disruption of slow wave sleep could lead to a buildup of proteins linked to diseaseProlonged periods of poor sleep increase levels of proteins involved in Alzheimer ’s disease, research suggests, although quality, not quantity, of sleep is at the root of the issue.While previous research has revealed that bad sleep can increase levels of these proteins, known as beta-amyloid and tau, it was unclear which aspect of shut-eye was behind the uptick.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Alzheimer's Health Society Sleep & wellbeing Life and style Sleep apnoea UK news Neuroscience Source Type: news

How do antidepressants actually work? | Dean Burnett
A recent article by Deborah Orrregarding her experiences with antidepressants sparked a lot of debate as to their merits and drawbacks. The truth is, they ’re not as simple or as understood as many might thinkAntidepressants; the go-totreatment for depression, or generalised anxiety. It ’s incredible when you think about it, the fact that you can have adebilitating mood disorder, take a few pills, and feel better. It ’s practically unbelievable that medical science has progressed so far that we now fully understand how the human brain produces moods and other emotions, so can manipulate them with designer...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dean Burnett Tags: Neuroscience Mental health Depression NHS Source Type: news

Calm under pressure? Run your business the mindful way
Mindfulness could help make you more resilient, regulate stress and increase emotional intelligence. Here are some practical tips for introducing it in the workplaceIf recent events in politics have confirmed anything, it is that we live in unpredictable times where old assumptions no longer hold true.Creative thinking is crucial for business success through a period of uncertainty. Upheaval presents a chance to embrace uncertainty and remain level-headed, focused and compassionate under pressure. That ’s where mindfulness comes in.Research in contemplative neuroscience suggests that mindfulness - the practice of foc...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Palma Michel Tags: Guardian Small Business Network Entrepreneurs Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

Sense of purpose aids sleep, US scientists find
People who felt they had a strong purpose in life suffer from less insomnia and sleep disturbance, says neurologistThe secret to a good night ’s sleep later in life is having a good reason to get up in the morning, according to US researchers who surveyed people on their sleeping habits and sense of purpose.People who felt they had a strong purpose in life suffered from less insomnia and sleep disturbances than others and claimed to rest better at night as a result, the study found.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Sleep Sleep apnoea US news Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

Fight or flight? How our brain decides our response to danger | Daniel Glaser
The neuroscience behind whether we run or stand our ground when faced with threatLondoners will always use humour as the ultimate response to terror attacks. Nowhere was this more apparent than with theMillwall supporter, knifed eight times after tackling the London Bridge terrorists, pictured recovering in hospital with a copy ofLearn to Run. A gift from friends, the joke being he would have been safer sprinting away.Neuroscientists would say the choice to run or stay put isn ’t that simple. A ‘fight or flight’ response kicks in when our threat-detection systems prepare the body for action with neuronal ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Daniel Glaser Tags: Life and style Neuroscience London Bridge attack Society Health Source Type: news

Scientists deploy GM sheep in fight to treat Huntington ’s disease
Transgenic flock brought to UK for research into incurable brain condition, which affects more than 6,700 people in the countryScientists at Cambridge University have co-opted an unusual ally in their battle to find treatments for an incurable degenerative ailment that affects thousands of people in the UK. They have taken charge of a flock of merino sheep that have been genetically modified to carry the gene for Huntington ’s disease.The research, led by neuroscientist Professor Jenny Morton, aims to understand how to pinpoint early symptoms of the brain condition, which affects more than 6,700 people in the UK.Cont...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Medical research Neuroscience Genetics UK news Source Type: news

Science News » The NIH NeuroBioBank: Addressing the Urgent Need for Brain Donation
The directors of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke discuss the importance of post-mortem brain donation in a joint message. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - July 7, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: NIMH Press Office Source Type: news

Changes in brain regions may explain why some prefer order and certainty, UCLA behavioral neuroscientists report
Why do some people prefer stable, predictable lives while others prefer frequent changes? Why do some people make rational decisions and others, impulsive and reckless ones? UCLA behavioral neuroscientists have identified changes in two brain regions that may hold answers to these questions.The research — reported by Alicia Izquierdo, UCLA associate professor of psychology and a member of UCLA’s Brain Research Institute, and her psychology graduate student, Alexandra Stolyarova —is published today in the open-access online science journal eLife.The new experiments, which involved studying t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers try to unknot Alzheimer's protein tangles
Conclusion There's a tendency when scientists announce a breakthrough in our understanding of a disease to immediately start thinking about whether this could lead to a cure. While the ultimate aim of research into Alzheimer's disease is of course to be able to prevent or treat it, early research like this is more about understanding the disease mechanisms. This piece of research demonstrates how a new technique can be used to identify the molecular structure of abnormal protein deposits in the brain. That's a big step forward for use of this technology, which may be useful for other diseases, too. The causes of Alzheimer...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

A history of human creativity: the good, the bad, and the ugly – Science Weekly podcast
Ian Sample delves into our evolutionary past to explore the role creativity and collaboration may have played in early human societiesSubscribe& Review oniTunes,Soundcloud,Audioboom,Mixcloud&Acast, and join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterIt is held up as a trait that sets us apart from the rest of the animals: the ability to think creatively and to use our powerful imaginations to shape the world around us. But how our creative imagination became so crucial to our existence remains a mystery with plenty of competing theories put forward. What ideas have scientists come up with? And with something as complex as...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and Produced by Max Sanderson Tags: Science Psychology Biology Neuroscience Source Type: news

3D Printing the Way to Artificial Muscles
Muscles Contract Under the Control Motor Neurons The methods used to develop the artificial muscles included use of ourGDNF Protein to maintain motor neurons in the 3-D Culture-Caroline Cvetkovic, Max H. Rich, Ritu Raman, Hyunjoon Kong , Rashid Bashir.A 3D-printed platform for modular neuromuscular motor units. Microsystems; Nanoengineering 3, Article number: 17015 (2017) doi:10.1038/micronano.2017.15Skeletal muscle cells and motor neurons were combined into a fabricated 3D co-culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into multinucleated myotubes (a) and combined with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins to c...
Source: Neuromics - July 6, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: 3-D Cell based Assays 3-D Cell Culturing 3-D Printing GDNF Protein motor neurons Source Type: news

1.2 million people in England and Wales will have dementia by 2040 – study
Predicted rise of disease down to people living longer, but research unravelling biomarkers of Alzheimer ’s give hope of finding a cureMore than 1.2 million people are expected to be living with dementia in England and Wales by 2040, up from almost 800,000 today, research suggests.Researchers say the predicted rise in the prevalence of dementia is largely down to people living longer, but add that the figures also show that the risk of developing dementia for each age group is falling – a finding they say suggests that preventive strategies are having an impact.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Dementia Mental health Society Science UK news Neuroscience Source Type: news

Renal Nerves and Blood Pressure
Role of Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) CGRP is a potent vasodilator so it is not surprising ourCGRP Antibody was used in this study. Cust ódio AH, de Lima MC, Vaccari B, Boer PA, Gontijo JAR (2017)Renal sodium handling and blood pressure changes in gestational protein-restricted offspring: Role of renal nerves and ganglia neurokinin expression. PLoS ONE 12(6): e0179499. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179499Figure. Comparative expression of SP and CGRP in the renal pelvis of 16-week-old rats. The pictures show a normal distribution of these neurokinins in NP (A and D). In LP offspring, no difference wa...
Source: Neuromics - July 5, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Blood Pressure CGRP antibody sodium channels Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for July 5, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Halyard Health taps former Acelity head Woody for CEO | Personnel Moves July 5, 2017 Halyard Health said late last month it tapped former Acelity prez & CEO Joseph Woody as its new chief executive officer, replacing a retir...
Source: Mass Device - July 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

So forgetting is good for you. But why does it have to be my friends ’ names? | Michele Hanson
Scientists say memory lapses keep your brain healthy. But if it ’s so clever, surely it should erase mundane or unpleasant minutiae• Michele Hanson is an author and Guardian columnistSome marvellous news from the University of Toronto:memory lapses are good for your brain, they are part of its efficiency and an important part of being intelligent. Nothing to do with old age. What a relief for me. Because for decades I ’ve worried that my increasing forgetfulness was a sign of my elderly brain going down the pan. Wrong. According to the Toronto scientists, the brain knows what it’s doing, and it seems...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Michele Hanson Tags: Memory Science UK news Neuroscience Source Type: news

'Substance P' in tears -- a noninvasive test for diabetes-related nerve damage?
(Wolters Kluwer Health) Levels of a nerve cell signaling molecule called substance P -- measured in tear samples -- might be a useful marker of diabetes-related nerve damage (neuropathy), suggests a study in the July issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Man with ALS who inspired ice bucket challenge is still alive, despite reports
Peter Frates posted a video of himself in a hospital bed while Pearl Jam ’s Alive played in the background after multiple newspapers announced he had diedThe man who helped raise over $100m to combat the neurodegenerative disease ALS by encouraging millions of people topour icy buckets of water over their heads is still alive, despite reports to the contrary, and has posted a video to Twitter to prove it.Peter Frates, 32, posted a 45-second video of himself in a hospital bed while Pearl Jam ’s Alive played in the background on social media on Monday, writing: “In the words of my friend ed,” presumab...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Amanda Holpuch in New York Tags: Motor neurone disease Pearl Jam Health Medical research Charities Genetics Source Type: news

Brain training app used to treat memory condition
Conclusion This small trial suggests that an iPad game aimed at training episodic memory – memory of locations and events – can lead to improvements in this aspect of memory in older adults with aMCI. The fact the study used a control group and an RCT design increases confidence in these findings. But there are some important things to bear in mind at this very early stage: The study was very small – the authors acknowledge that it needs to be repeated in a larger sample of people to confirm the findings. The game hasn't been tried in people with dementia, so we don't know if it would help them. T...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news