The information warriors fighting 'robot zombie army' of coronavirus sceptics
The Anti-Virus website takes on figures like Toby Young and Allison Pearson - and its creators think it has them on the runCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSometimes, Stuart Ritchie feels like he ’s being pursued by an army of smiley faces. The lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King’s College London, is not delusional: instead, and somewhat to his surprise, he is on the frontline of a coronavirus information war.The emojis often decorate the Twitter profiles of the self-proclaimed “lockdown sceptics”, a subset of social media use...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Archie Bland Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Media Society Toby Young Medical research UK news Twitter Source Type: news

What Causes Lethargy?
Discussion Lethargy is a common word used to describe a person who is drowsy, sluggish, listless and apathetic. Concentration may be difficult and they may have problems doing simple tasks. Many people actual mean fatigue or lassitude or being more tired when they use the word. In medical terms, lethargy is usually used to describe patients who have some type of excessive tiredness and usually have mental status changes with decreased alertness or arousal. Patients and health care providers both usually qualify the term and give more description to better communicate what is implied when using the term. This is true of man...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - January 25, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Lost touch: how a year without hugs affects our mental health
Humans are designed to touch and be touched – which is why so many who live on their own have suffered during the pandemic. Will we ever fully recover?There ’s only so much a dog can do, even if that is a lot. I live alone with my staffy, and by week eight of the first lockdown she was rolling her eyes at my ever-tightening clutch. I had been sofa-bound with Covid and its after-effects before lockdown was announced, then spring and summer passed without any meaningful touch from another person. I missed the smell of my friends ’ clothes and my nephew’s hair, but, more than anything, I missed the gro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Eleanor Morgan Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Source Type: news

Boston Scientific Receives FDA Approval For The Vercise Genus(TM) Deep Brain Stimulation System
Fourth-generation DBS portfolio features full-body MR conditional devices MARLBOROUGH, Mass., Jan. 22, 2021 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Boston Scientific Corporation (NYSE: BSX) has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) appr... Devices, Neurology, FDA Boston Scientific, Vercise Genus, Deep Brain Stimulation, Parkinson's disease (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - January 22, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Janssen Announces U.S. FDA Approval of CABENUVA (rilpivirine and cabotegravir), the First Long-Acting Regimen for the Treatment of HIV
TITUSVILLE, N.J., January 21, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved CABENUVA (consisting of Janssen’s rilpivirine and ViiV Healthcare’s cabotegravir), the first and only once-monthly, long-acting regimen for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in adults. The novel regimen was co-developed as part of a collaboration with ViiV Healthcare and builds on Janssen’s 25-year commitment to make HIV history. In the U.S., ViiV Healthcare is the marketing authorization holde...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 22, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

How the brain learns that earmuffs are not valuable at the beach
(University of Tsukuba) A collaboration between the University of Tsukuba and the NEI in the US has discovered that fast-spiking neurons in the basal ganglia allow monkeys to associate different values with the same objects based on the surrounding environment. Blocking input from these cells inhibited learning of new scene-based values, but did not erase already learned associations. This could help understand clinical conditions such as Tourette syndrome, which is characterized by reduced input from these cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19's Effects on the Brain
Autopsy studies have yet to find clear evidence of destructive viral invasion into patients' brains, pushing researchers to consider alternative explanations of how SARS-CoV-2 causes neurological... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 20, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
(American Academy of Neurology) A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 has multiple faces
According to current studies, the COVID-19 disease which is caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus comprises at least five different variants. These differ in how the immune system responds to the infection. Researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and the University of Bonn, together with other experts from Germany, Greece and the Netherlands, present these findings in the scientific journal "Genome Medicine". (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 19, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New study shows correlation between teen obesity and mental health issues
(Lund University) Half of all young people treated for severe obesity have neuropsychiatric problems, according to a new study by researchers from Lund University and Gothenburg, Sweden, among others. Two thirds of the teens suffered from some type of mental health problem, as reported by themselves or their parents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The brain region responsible for self-bias in memory
(Society for Neuroscience) A brain region involved in processing information about ourselves biases our ability to remember, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Turn it down: how to silence your inner voice
Your internal monologue shapes mental wellbeing, says psychologist Ethan Kross. He has the tools to improve your mind ’s backchatAs Ethan Kross, an American experimental psychologist and neuroscientist, will cheerfully testify, the person who doesn ’t sometimes find themselves listening to an unhelpful voice in their head probably doesn’t exist. Ten years ago, Kross found himself sitting up late at night with a baseball bat in his hand, waiting for an imaginary assailant he was convinced was about to break into his house – a figure conju red by his frantic mind after he received a threatening letter...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Cooke Tags: Psychology Science Coronavirus US news Medical research Source Type: news

DARZALEX FASPRO ® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj) Becomes the First FDA-Approved Treatment for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Light Chain (AL) Amyloidosis
January 15, 2021 (HORSHAM, Pa.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of DARZALEX FASPRO® (daratumumab and hyaluronidase-fihj), a subcutaneous formulation of daratumumab, in combination with bortezomib, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone (D-VCd) for the treatment of adult patients with newly diagnosed light chain (AL) amyloidosis.[1] DARZALEX FASPRO® is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for patients with this blood cell disorder that is associated with the production of an abnormal protein, which leads to th...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Archive review – anyone for a posthuman wife? She comes with an off switch
A lonely computer scientist in the year 2038 secretly works on an android version of his wife who died in a car crash – is it romantic, or something more sinister?British illustrator and visual-effects director Gavin Rothery makes his feature debut with this artificial intelligence thriller: a tale of love, death and robotics that has some nicely creepy moments. Set in 2038, it centres on lonely computer scientist George Almore (Divergent ’s Theo James), who is holed up in a remote research facility in Japan secretly working on an android version of his wife Jules (Stacy Martin); she has died in a car crash. Hi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Cath Clarke Tags: Film Science fiction and fantasy films Artificial intelligence (AI) Technology Culture Consciousness Computing Human biology Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap
(Ruhr-University Bochum) Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using electroencephalography (EEG), they recorded the brain activity of romantic couples at home while they cuddled, kissed or talked about happy memories together. The results confirmed the theory that positive emotions are mainly processed in the left half of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor College of Medicine neuroscientist and geneticist recognized for re
(The Academy of Medicine, Engineering& Science of Texas) HOUSTON - Baylor College of Medicine Neuroscientist and Geneticist Benjamin Arenkiel, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 2021 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Medicine from TAMEST (The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas). He was chosen for his breakthrough identification of the brain's neural pathways that are connected to eating disorders, addiction and other neuropsychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Janssen to Highlight Commitment to Lung Cancer Science and Innovation with Eight Data Presentations at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer ’s 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer
January 12, 2021 (RARITAN, N.J.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today that eight company-sponsored presentations, including two oral presentations, will be featured at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s (IASLC) 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) Singapore taking place virtually January 28-31, 2021. The presentations include updated data from the Phase 1 CHRYSALIS study (NCT02609776) evaluating amivantamab in patients with NSCLC and EGFR exon 20 insertion mutations and two studies that characterize the high unmet need and lack of stand...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that encodes timing of events
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT neuroscientists shed new light on how the timing of a memory is encoded in the hippocampus, and suggest that time and space are encoded separately. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Talking to yourself behind a face mask may do you good. Just ask Boswell | Rachel Cooke
Literature and now science suggest muttering in the second or third person can help with anxiety in difficult momentsNo one actively likes wearing a mask, but for some of us putting one on does more than merely help to stop the spread. Last week, I interviewed a neuroscientist and experimental psychologist who told me that a few people have told him that if they wear theirs outside, at least no one will see them talking to themselves as they doggedly march yet again around their local park. Is talking to yourself a sign of incipient madness? On this, he had good news: no, it isn ’t. The latest science, in fact, sugge...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Cooke Tags: Psychology Science UK news Coronavirus Source Type: news

We hear what we expect to hear
(Technische Universit ä t Dresden) Dresden neuroscientists show that the entire auditory pathway represents sounds according to prior expectations. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What are the performance limits of our brain?
(Otto-von-Guericke-Universit ä t Magdeburg) Which neurobiological principles prevent us from fully utilizing our own cognitive abilities andhow can limitations that occur in old age or with Alzheimer's disease be diminished? The German Research Foundation (DFG) has awarded University of Magdeburg 14 million euros for its Collaborative Research Center CRC 1436 'Neural Resources of Cognition'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Video » Social Disconnection and Late-Life Suicide: Mechanisms, Treatment Targets, and Interventions - Day One, Part Two
On September 17 and 18, 2020, the NIMH Division of Translational Research conducted a two-day virtual workshop, “ Social Disconnection and Late Life Suicide, ” which brought together clinician scientists, behavioral scientists, neuroscientists, geriatric psychiatrists, epidemiologists, and implementation scientists to discuss the current state of the science on social disconnection and suicide. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - January 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Video » Social Disconnection and Late-Life Suicide: Mechanisms, Treatment Targets, and Interventions - Day One, Part One
On September 17 and 18, 2020, the NIMH Division of Translational Research conducted a two-day virtual workshop, “ Social Disconnection and Late Life Suicide, ” which brought together clinician scientists, behavioral scientists, neuroscientists, geriatric psychiatrists, epidemiologists, and implementation scientists to discuss the current state of the science on social disconnection and suicide. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - January 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Video » Social Disconnection and Late-Life Suicide: Mechanisms, Treatment Targets, and Interventions - Day Two
On September 17 and 18, 2020, the NIMH Division of Translational Research conducted a two-day virtual workshop, “ Social Disconnection and Late Life Suicide, ” which brought together clinician scientists, behavioral scientists, neuroscientists, geriatric psychiatrists, epidemiologists, and implementation scientists to discuss the current state of the science on social disconnection and suicide. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - January 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Workshop: Gene-based Therapeutics for Rare Genetic Neurodevelopmental Psychiatric Disorders
Join NIMH for a virtual workshop focused on the potential challenges and opportunities for gene-based therapeutic strategies for individuals with rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorders. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - January 6, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Identifying strategies to advance research on traumatic brain injury's effect on women
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Analysis from a workshop convened by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in 2017 reveals gaps in and opportunities for research to improve understanding of the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in women. A new paper in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation summarizes and updates the findings presented during the 'Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury in Women' workshop and provides strategies for advancing research efforts in this area. NINDS is part of the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Toxin chimeras slip therapeutics into neurons to treat botulism in animals
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Taking advantage of the chemical properties of botulism toxins, two teams of researchers have fashioned non-toxic versions of these compounds that can deliver therapeutic antibodies to treat botulism, a potentially fatal disease with few approved treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Triangle Society for Neuroscience promotes scientific exchange
From studies of the brain to professional development, the Triangle Chapter of the Society for Neuroscience spring conference hit the mark. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Journal article reviews century of data showing COVID-19 likely to impact the brain
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) Decades of data paint a compelling case for why COVID-19 survivors, even those with few symptoms, could experience long-term effects on the brain and central nervous system. A global research program supported by the Alzheimer's Association includes researchers from the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's and Neurodegenerative Diseases at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

To 'Keep Sharp' This Year, Keep Learning, Advises Neurosurgeon Sanjay Gupta
CNN's chief medical correspondent says it's never too late to develop new brain pathways. Even small changes, like switching up the hand you use to hold your fork, can help optimize brain health.(Image credit: Simon & Schuster) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Terry Gross Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Virtual Workshop: Social Disconnection and Late-Life Suicide: Mechanisms, Treatment Targets, and Interventions
Suicide rates in older adults have risen more than 40% in the past 10 years and social disconnection is one of the primary risk factors. This virtual workshop will bring together clinician scientists, behavioral scientists, neuroscientists, geriatric psychiatrists, epidemiologists, and implementation scientists to discuss the current state of the science on social disconnection and suicide. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - January 1, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

How Infectious Diseases Affect the Brain
Infectious agents such as HIV and SARS-CoV-2 often behave differently in the brain than in the circulation or other organs, complicating matters for scientists working to stop neurotropic infectious... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored eBooks Source Type: news

Neurologists Call for End to Neck Holds by Law Enforcement Neurologists Call for End to Neck Holds by Law Enforcement
In a new commentary, neurologists say that science shows there is no safe use of carotid restraints such as chokeholds and strangleholds.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Cardiology Headlines - December 30, 2020 Category: Cardiology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Why Do We Dream? A New Theory on How It Protects Our Brains
When he was two years old, Ben stopped seeing out of his left eye. His mother took him to the doctor and soon discovered he had retinal cancer in both eyes. After chemotherapy and radiation failed, surgeons removed both his eyes. For Ben, vision was gone forever. But by the time he was seven years old, he had devised a technique for decoding the world around him: he clicked with his mouth and listened for the returning echoes. This method enabled Ben to determine the locations of open doorways, people, parked cars, garbage cans, and so on. He was echolocating: bouncing his sound waves off objects in the environment and cat...
Source: TIME: Science - December 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Eagleman and Don Vaughn Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Learning how to walk again during the pandemic forced me to live in the moment | Hollie-Anne Brooks
To recover from my functional neurological disorder, I had to learn to ‘reset’ my mindRestrictions have come to define many people ’s lives this year – understandably frustration has been vented over cancelled plans or the inability to travel. But for me, this was business as usual. For the past two and a half years, I had been unable to walk due to a condition calledfunctional neurological disorder, which blocks messages from the brain to certain body parts. My left leg wasn ’t listening, leaving me stuck and immobile.That was, until it all changed. From September this year I was to be enroll...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hollie-Anne Brooks Tags: Health Disability Society Neuroscience Anxiety Source Type: news

Olive-stuffing and in-theatre piano: the brain surgeon breaking new ground
Italian Roberto Trignani is known for ‘awake surgery’ and other unorthodox methodsPlaying the violin, watching cartoons and doing crosswords: these are just some of the activities patients have performed while having brain surgery under Roberto Trignani.Trignani, the head of neurosurgery at Riuniti hospital in Ancona, Italy, was already known for his “awake surgery” techniques, which he has used roughly 70 times in the last few years. But he broke new ground in June this year when a 60-year-old woman prepared stuffed olives as he removed a tumour from her left temporal lobe.Continue reading... (Sour...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Angela Giuffrida in Rome Tags: Italy Neuroscience Health World news Europe Source Type: news

Astrocytes eat connections to maintain plasticity in adult brains
(The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)) Developing brains constantly sprout new neuronal connections called synapses as they learn and remember. Important connections -- the ones that are repeatedly introduced, such as how to avoid danger -- are nurtured and reinforced, while connections deemed unnecessary are pruned away. Adult brains undergo similar pruning, but it was unclear how or why synapses in the adult brain get eliminated. Now, a team of researchers based in Korea has found the mechanism underlying plasticity and, potentially, neurological disorders in adult brains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists discover how our brains track where we and others go
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) For the first time, scientists have recorded how our brains navigate physical space and keep track of others' location. Researchers used a special backpack to wirelessly monitor the brain waves of epilepsy patients as each one walked around an empty room hunting for a hidden, two-foot spot or watched others do the same. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Brain on COVID-19
Connecting the dots between COVID-19 and neurological disorders (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 21, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored Infographics Source Type: news

Janssen Initiates Rolling Submission of a Biologics License Application to U.S. FDA for BCMA CAR-T Therapy Ciltacabtagene Autoleucel (cilta-cel) for the Treatment of Relapsed and/or Refractory Multiple Myeloma
December 21, 2020 (RARITAN, N.J.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today the initiation of a rolling submission of its Biologics License Application (BLA) to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ciltacabtagene autoleucel (cilta-cel), an investigational B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) therapy, for the treatment of adults with relapsed and/or refractory multiple myeloma.“We are committed to innovation in cell therapy and advancing the science of multiple myeloma to improve patients’ lives,” said Pete...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - December 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Researchers illuminate neurotransmitter transport using X-ray crystallography and molecular simulations
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Scientists from the MIPT Research Center for Molecular Mechanisms of Aging and Age-Related Diseases have joined forces with their colleagues from J ü lich Research Center, Germany, and uncovered how sodium ions drive glutamate transport in the central nervous system. Glutamate is the most important excitatory neurotransmitter and is actively removed from the synaptic cleft between neurons by specialized transport proteins called excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The research was published in a recent issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When the Earth Tilts Toward Hope
SUBSCRIBE HERE to have It’s Not Just You, a new newsletter by Susanna Schrobsdorff, TIME Editor at Large, delivered to your inbox weekly. (A version of this article appeared in this week’s It’s Not Just You.) 🌞 Well hello! I’m so glad you’re here. This week, we have some thoughts on the winter solstice, plus wise words from mindfulness expert, Sharon Salzberg, and some audio wellness. THE LONGEST NIGHT OF THE YEAR My dad always knew what time the sun was going to set. Like a lot of photographers, he loved to take portraits in that singular hour before sunset when the light is soft and kind...
Source: TIME: Health - December 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Evergreen It's Not Just You Source Type: news

CAPTUREing Whole-Body 3D movements
(Harvard University, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology) Neuroscientists have made major advances in their quest to study the brain; however, there are no tools to precisely measure the brain's principal output -- behavior -- in freely moving animals. Researchers at Harvard University present CAPTURE, a new method for long-term continuous three-dimension motion tracking in freely behaving animals. Attaching markers to rats' head, trunk, and limbs, researchers can use CAPTURE to record the animal's natural behavior continuously for weeks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How can you declutter your mind? New study offers clues
(University of Colorado at Boulder) A new neuroimaging study shows for the first time what happens in the brain when we intentionally try to stop thinking about something. Some strategies work better than others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Neurotic people feel worse emotionally during the corona crisis
(University of M ü nster) During the corona crisis, neurotic people experience more negative emotions in their everyday lives, are more unstable emotionally and worry more about their health. These are the results of a study carried out by psychologists from the Universities of M ü nster and Bielefeld. The study has been published in the " Journal of Research in Personality " . (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Editor's Picks of The Scientist's Best Infographics of 2020
This year's most captivating illustrations tell stories from the micro scale--such as newborn neurons in the adult brain and bacteria in the infant gut--to the scale of entire ecosystems, including... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 15, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Unraveling neuroHIV in the Presence of Substance Use Disorders
These reviews address how each of these addictive substances and HIV individually or collectively affect the immune system and subsequent clinical and behavioral outcomes (Source: NIDA News)
Source: NIDA News - December 15, 2020 Category: Addiction Tags: Science Highlight, HIV or AIDS Source Type: news

FDA approves Roche ’s OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) shorter 2-hour infusion for relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 14 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a shorter two-hour infusion time for OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab), dosed twice-yearly for those living with relapsing or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) who have not experienced any prior serious infusion reactions (IRs). The approval was based on data from the randomised, double-blind ENSEMBLE PLUS study.“More than 170,000 people with MS have been treated with OCREVUS - the only approved B-cell therapy with a twice-yearly dosing schedule - and it is the most prescribed...
Source: Roche Media News - December 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news