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Budget Accord Offers Opportunity to Increase Federal Science Funding
Congress approved a two-year budget plan on February 9 that would increase authorizations for federal spending. The agreement passed in the Senate (71-28) and House (240-186) and was signed into law by President Trump. The bipartisan agreement raised the caps on defense and nondefense discretionary spending by nearly $300 billion over two years, with nondefense discretionary spending - the biggest source of research funding - getting a $63 billion boost in FY 2018 and an additional $68 billion in FY 2019. Congress has yet to complete work on FY 2018 appropriations, however. Appropriations legislation is the legislative ve...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 24, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

FY 2018 Announcement of Anticipated Availability of Funds for Family Planning Services Grants
This notice solicits applications from public and private nonprofit entities, including comprehensive primary care providers, hospitals, health collaboratives, and womens'health centers to establish and operate voluntary family planning projects to serve the United States and its territories. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SETsquared partnership ranked as the world ’ s top business incubator
A national university business incubator, with offices in Bristol ’ s Engine Shed, has been named as the best in the world for its outstanding contribution to developing the next generation of UK tech entrepreneurs. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 23, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards, Business and Enterprise; Press Release Source Type: news

Chuck Noll Foundation grants $600K for brain injury research
The Chuck Noll Foundation for Brain Injury Research announced its inaugural grants to research teams totaling more than $600,000. Five research teams from the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University and UPMC were awarded grants after review by the foundation's medical advisory board, according to a news release. "The proposals the Foundation has selected are at the forefront of traumatic brain injury research a nd are highly deserving of these grants,” said Dr. Julian Bailes, a member… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Stacey Federoff Source Type: news

$5,000 Grant for Johns Hopkins Nurses
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 23, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

As good as old: The age of martian meteorites gives clues to the makeup of Mars
(University of Houston) A team of researchers in the University of Houston College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is analyzing a few small fragments of the Tissint meteorite with the help of a $349,520, three-year grant from the NASA Solar System Workings program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMass Amherst biologist receives Fulbright Award to study birdsong in the Amazon
(University of Massachusetts at Amherst) Biologist Jeff Podos at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has been awarded a Fulbright Scholar grant that will not only support his teaching next fall at Brazil's National Institute for Amazon Research and the Federal University of Amazonas, but will also take him deep into the Amazon rain forest to study birds that communicate vocally in unusual ways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

EPA Chief Questioned by Democrats at Senate Oversight Hearing
On January 30, 2018, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt testified for the first time since his confirmation hearing last year before the Senate Environmental and Public Works Committee for the first time since his confirmation hearing last year. He faced tough questions and criticisms from the Democrats on the panel. Senator Tom Carper (D-DE) urged Pruitt to come before the committee and meet with lawmakers more often and criticized some of his actions as the EPA chief, such as delaying environmental rules, removing science advisers, and taking down web pages pertaining to climate scienc...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President Calls for Big Cuts for ESA Listings
The President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 Interior Department budget proposal would limit Endangered Species Act (ESA) listing activity to $10.9 million, which is about half the $20.4 million received in FY 2017. Gavin Shire, public affairs head of the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), said in a statement, “Our focus is on prioritizing species recovery, where we have funding for recovery planning, five-year reviews and down- and delisting packages.” The budget proposal for Interior notes that officials want to focus “available resources on the recovery of the more than 1,660 species listed domestically ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Trump Budget Offers More Deep Cuts for EPA
The White House plan for fiscal year (FY) 2019 would reduce spending for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by 25 percent, reducing the budget from $8.1 billion in FY 2017 to $6.1 billion. This would be the smallest budget for the EPA since the 1990s. The proposal would gut funding for climate-change research and reorganize research programs related to clean water, land preservation, and healthy communities. To replace these, the budget would allocate $112 million for “core mission” and $357 million for “Rule of Law and Process.” These new items might provide the agency with some leeway to m...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

President's Budget Slashes NOAA
President Trump’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request would provide $4.6 billion to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a 20 percent reduction compared to enacted 2017 funding of $5.7 billion. The proposal would slash spending for climate change-related activities across the agency by $40 million, ending competitive grants for climate-change research and studies aimed at understanding the impacts of global warming on the Arctic. The administration seeks to eliminate $273 million in grants, including the National Sea Grant College Program, the National Estuarine Research Reserve System, coas...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

NIH Budget Remains Flat Under Trump Budget
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) would see roughly flat funding if the President’s fiscal year (FY) 2019 budget request were enacted as proposed. The White House has requested $34.8 billion for NIH, approximately $2 billion below the 2018 enacted appropriation. Late adjustments to the budget reversed an originally proposed 27 percent cut to NIH. The FY 2019 budget for NIH is slated to increase only slightly by $538 million over 2017 levels because it would absorb three agencies under the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) that fund research on healthcare quality, occupational health, and disabiliti...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Budget Accord Offers Opportunity to Increase Federal Science Funding
Congress approved a two-year budget plan on February 9 that would increase authorizations for federal spending. The agreement passed in the Senate (71-28) and House (240-186) and was signed into law by President Trump. The bipartisan agreement raised the caps on defense and nondefense discretionary spending by nearly $300 billion over two years, with nondefense discretionary spending - the biggest source of research funding - getting a $63 billion boost in FY 2018 and an additional $68 billion in FY 2019. Congress has yet to complete work on FY 2018 appropriations, however. Appropriations legislation is the legislative ve...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Center for Infectious Disease Research receives $17 million grant to study tuberculosis
10 million new cases of active TB are diagnosed each year. The grant allows CIDR to continue addressing the unanswered questions surrounding the disease. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Coral Garnick Source Type: news

3M, Minnesota Settle Water Pollution Claims for $850 Million 3M, Minnesota Settle Water Pollution Claims for $850 Million
Industrial group 3M Co and Minnesota's attorney general have agreed to settle a lawsuit over polluted groundwater, with the company agreeing to grant $850 million to the state for groundwater projects, the attorney's office said on Tuesday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news

NIOSH Occupational Safety and Health Research (R01)
The purpose of the R01 grant program is (1) to develop an understanding of the risks and conditions associated with occupational diseases and injuries, (2) to explore methods for reducing risks and preventing or minimizing exposure to hazardous conditions in the workplace, and (3) to translate significant scientific findings into prevention practices and products that will effectively reduce work-related illnesses and injuries. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Funding Tip 2 – Register for a webinar
Do you have a great idea for health information outreach? Ready to turn your ideas into a funded project? At the National Network of Libraries of Medicine, Middle Atlantic Region, we want you to be successful. It can be daunting to write a grant application, especially if you have never written one before. That’s why we offer training especially geared to potential applicants in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware. This week’s funding tip – register for one of our webinars. Middle Atlantic Region funding: Grants and Proposal Writing – March 16, 2017, 2:00-3:30 PM ET – this class pr...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 22, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kate Flewelling Tags: Funding Source Type: news

Research to uncover factors behind bladder cancer progression receives ACS grant
(Penn State) To find new therapies for aggressive bladder cancer, researchers must first uncover what drives each subtype at the molecular level. That's why the American Cancer Society has awarded a grant to study bladder cancer development to David DeGraff, assistant professor of pathology, surgery and biochemistry and molecular biology, and a member of Penn State Cancer Institute. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kessler Foundation receives grant to study cortical changes in youth with brain injury
(Kessler Foundation) Drs. Kiran Karunakaran and Karen Nolan have won a $35,000 grant from New Jersey Health Foundation to study the cortical changes in children and young adults with lower extremity motor deficits caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI). 'Our research shows that robotic exoskeleton training has the potential for tremendous impact on gait function, balance, and neuromuscular responses, as well as community participation and quality of life for individuals with TBI,' explained Dr. Nolan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. Kucukboyaci receives grant to study cognitive therapies for traumatic brain injury
(Kessler Foundation) 'Memory and learning problems are very common in people with moderate to severe TBI,' explained Dr. Kucukboyaci. 'Through this NJ Health Foundation grant, we will be able to advance our preliminary research and directly address the need for Class I research in software-assisted cognitive rehabilitation. 'Our goal is to improve patient care for this population,' he continued, 'by devising and teaching TBI-tailored memory strategies that can boost work or school functioning, and monitoring cognitive changes over time.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Physical and mental multitasking may boost memory, study suggests
FINDINGSPerforming memory training exercises at the same time as pedaling a stationary bike led to better gains in memory than doing the training exercises after working up a sweat, according to a 55-person study led by UCLA researchers. The findings suggest that exercise may temporarily make it easier for the brain to create new memories.BACKGROUNDIn the United States, studies have shown that more than 40 percent of people over age 60 have some memory decline or forgetfulness; it ’s often considered a normal part of aging. Researchers have previously uncovered a handful of lifestyle interventions — including e...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA scientists use color-coded tags to discover how heart cells develop
UCLA researchers used fluorescent colored proteins to trace how cardiomyocytes — cells in heart muscle that enable it to pump blood — are produced in mouse embryos. The findings could eventually lead to methods for regenerating heart tissue in human adults.The research was published in the journal Nature Communications.“Our ultimate goal is to be able to regenerate cardiomyocytes after an injury like a heart attack,” said Dr. Reza Ardehali, an associate professor of medicine in UCLA’s division of cardiology and a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Atypon ’ s Artificial Intelligence R & D Fuels Four More BioASQ Awards in Semantic Technologies
For the fifth year in a row, Atypon has placed in the widely respected International BioASQ Awards competition. Atypon’s ongoing research and development (R&D) into artificial intelligence technologies led to four awards for four different semantic technology categories in the 2017 BioASQ Challenge. BioASQ organizes international contests in biomedical semantic indexing and question answering (QA) to help advance technologies that make it faster and easier for researchers to find the most relevant and actionable information from within the vast corpus of published biomedical research. Atypon’s R&D in ma...
Source: News from STM - February 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

UTA researcher to develop nanomaterials to treat antibiotic-resistant infections
(University of Texas at Arlington) A researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington has been awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development, or CAREER, grant to develop new synthetic antimicrobial nanomaterials to treat antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals and military facilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GW researcher awarded more than $1.5 million to study PTSD and cardiovascular disease
(George Washington University) Paul Marvar, PhD, at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, received a large grant from the NIH to study a possible link between post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kuni Foundation gives $5M grant to Legacy Health for cancer research
The Wayne D. Kuni& Joan E. Kuni Foundation has awarded $5 million to Legacy Health Foundation to found a cancer research project. The grant will fund research into how cancer can be targeted by manipulating adenosine kinase, an enzyme that controls cell growth. The research is led by Detlev Boison, Dow Chair of Neurology and director of neurobiology research and basic and translational research at Legacy Research Institute; and Dr. Serene Perkins, director of surgical and clinical research at… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Legacy Health Foundation collects its largest grant for cancer research
The Wayne D. Kuni& Joan E. Kuni Foundation has awarded $5 million to Legacy Health Foundation to found a cancer research project. The grant, the largest the Foundation has collected, will fund research into how cancer can be targeted by manipulating adenosine kinase, an enzyme that controls cell growth. The research is led by Detlev Boison, Dow Chair of Neurology and director of neurobiology research and basic and translati onal research at Legacy Research Institute; and Dr. Serene Perkins, director… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Legacy Health Foundation collects its largest grant for cancer research
The Wayne D. Kuni& Joan E. Kuni Foundation has awarded $5 million to Legacy Health Foundation to found a cancer research project. The grant, the largest the Foundation has collected, will fund research into how cancer can be targeted by manipulating adenosine kinase, an enzyme that controls cell growth. The research is led by Detlev Boison, Dow Chair of Neurology and director of neurobiology research and basic and translati onal research at Legacy Research Institute; and Dr. Serene Perkins, director… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Colorado pot company to open 3 Florida dispensaries in settlement
A Colorado company will open three medical marijuana dispensaries in a central Florida county despite a local moratorium on dispensaries. Osceola County Commissioners on Monday approved a settlement with one of Colorado's largest marijuana-dispensary chains, The Green Solution, that grants it three certificates to open the dispensaries. In return, the company agreed to take no legal action against the county. Osceola County is lo cated south of Orlando and southwest of Cape Canaveral. The Green… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

Colorado pot company to open 3 Florida dispensaries in settlement
A Colorado company will open three medical marijuana dispensaries in a central Florida county despite a local moratorium on dispensaries. Osceola County Commissioners on Monday approved a settlement with one of Colorado's largest marijuana-dispensary chains, The Green Solution, that grants it three certificates to open the dispensaries. In return, the company agreed to take no legal action against the county. Osceola County is lo cated south of Orlando and southwest of Cape Canaveral. The Green… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

CDC warns about salmonella infections traced to kratom
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration and several states are investigating an outbreak of salmonella illness linked to kratom, an unregulated herbal supplement that is sometimes used for pain, anxiety and opioid-withdrawal symptoms, the CDC said Tuesday. The agency, which urged consumers to not use kratom in any form because […]Related:Here’s what you should know about the flu season this yearThis season’s flu vaccine is only 36 percent effective, but experts say you should still get itNine organizations sue Trump administration for ending grants to teen pr...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3 medical marijuana dispensaries to open in Osceola County
Three medical marijuana dispensaries are headed to Osceola County even as the county had placed a moratorium on dispensaries. On Feb. 19, Osceola County Commissioners approved a settlement with one of Colorado's largest marijuana dispensary chains, The Green Solution, that grants them three certificates to open the dispensaries. In return, the company agreed to take no legal action against the county. The Green Solution asserted it had a “vested right in the issue” because it was poised to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Veronica Brezina Source Type: news

U.S. Groups Sue Trump Administration Over Teen Pregnancy Grant Cuts U.S. Groups Sue Trump Administration Over Teen Pregnancy Grant Cuts
Planned Parenthood, other organizations and a Washington state county filed lawsuits on Thursday challenging a decision by U.S. President Donald Trump's administration to defund more than $200 million in teen pregnancy prevention programs.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

DOD-Backed MeMed Feels the Need for Speed
An Israeli startup that has developed a platform to differentiate between viral and bacterial infections in 15 minutes just got a big boost toward bringing the product to market. The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) has given Haifa-based MeMed a $4 million grant to fund its manufacturing efforts. MeMed’s technology measures three blood-borne immune markers to detect whether a patient has a bacterial or viral infection. Its first generation product, ImmunoXpert, has been cleared for use in laboratories in the EU, Switzerland, and Israel. The platform under development, ImmunoPoC, is designed for point-of-care use to h...
Source: MDDI - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: IVD Source Type: news

United Therapeutics reaches patent settlement with Actavis
Silver Spring biotech United Therapeutics Corp.'s share price was largely unchanged Friday after announcing it settled litigation with Actavis Laboratories FL Inc. in a deal that will allow that company to market a generic version of one of United Therapeutics' hypertension drugs. Under the settlement, United Therapeutics (NASDAQ: UTHR) grants the Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) subsidiary a license to manufacture and commercialize a generic version of Orenitram — an extended-release,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

United Therapeutics reaches patent settlement with Actavis
Silver Spring biotech United Therapeutics Corp.'s share price was largely unchanged Friday after announcing it settled litigation with Actavis Laboratories FL Inc. in a deal that will allow that company to market a generic version of one of United Therapeutics' hypertension drugs. Under the settlement, United Therapeutics (NASDAQ: UTHR) grants the Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) subsidiary a license to manufacture and commercialize a generic version of Orenitram — an extended-release,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 16, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Children ’ s deaths from flu rise sharply amid signs that season may be hitting plateau
This file has been updated. Flu has killed 22 more children, the most reported since the respiratory virus began slamming the country in the fall, according to a government report released Friday. The total number of flu-related pediatric deaths is now at least 84 nationwide. But other indicators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest […]Related:Here’s what you should know about the flu season this yearThis season’s flu vaccine is only 36 percent effective, but experts say you should still get itNine organizations sue Trump administration for ending grants to teen pregnancy...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Children ’s deaths from flu climb sharply, CDC reports
Flu has killed 22 more children, the most reported since the respiratory virus began slamming the country in the fall, according to a government report released Friday. The total number of flu-related child deaths is now at least 84. But other indicators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that this vicious influenza season […]Related:Here’s what you should know about the flu season this yearThis season’s flu vaccine is only 36 percent effective, but experts say you should still get itNine organizations sue Trump administration for ending grants to teen pregnancy programs (So...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gambia:Sharab Medical Center Receives Grant
[Foroyaa] Mr. Daisuke Enomoto, Second Secretary of the Japanese Embassy in The Gambia, on Tuesday 13th February 2018, presided over a signing ceremony dedicated for a grant for the execution of a project to supplying medical equipment to Sharab Medical Center . (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 16, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

ASRT: Radiography program enrollment rises
The number of students enrolled in radiography educational programs increased...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: ASRT selects international speaker award recipients ASRT Foundation supports imaging education study ASRT awards grants to 51 members ASRT highlights upcoming RT week ASRT donates to Hurricane Maria relief efforts (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 16, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Marshall School of Medicine receives multi-million dollar grant to research obesity
(Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine) The Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has received a $10.78 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to research obesity and related conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA scientists receive $7.7 million grant to study HIV recurrence
The virus that causes AIDS is known to hide in certain rare cells. When people with HIV stop taking their medications, the virus can re-emerge and multiply, or “rebound,” from those hiding places. To better combat HIV, scientists have been working to understand how and why the virus re-emerges.“It’s the resurrection of virus that you couldn’t see in the body before,” said Jerome Zack, professor of medicine and chair of the UCLA department of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Zack, who is director of the  UCLA Center ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

DataFlash: Data Horror Stories
In the spirit of Love Data Week’s 2018 theme, Data Stories, it’s important to consider cautionary tales as well as good outcomes. We should, after all, learn from our mistakes. Perhaps the best known collection of data horror stories is Dorothea Salo’s Research Data Management Horror Stories pinboard. Dorothea, a University of Wisconsin academic librarian and library-school instructor, has been pinning data tales of woe since 2010. We probably all have our own personal examples of data hell, but here are a few of my favorite themes… Submitting a grant proposal and neglecting to include a well thou...
Source: Dragonfly - February 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Science Data_Science Source Type: news

This season ’ s flu vaccine is only 36 percent effective, but experts say you should still get it
This season’s flu vaccine offers limited protection against the viruses sweeping the country, with its overall effectiveness of 36 percent falling to 25 percent against the most virulent and predominant strain, according to a government report released Thursday. The report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the vaccine’s midseason effectiveness confirms what […]Related:Nine organizations sue Trump administration for ending grants to teen pregnancy programsAn American says she fell asleep with a headache — and woke up with a British accentShe thought the weird sensation was a str...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infant death rates are higher in rural America — but not for all causes
U.S. public health officials have long puzzled over a troubling statistic about infant deaths: Why is the rate so much higher in rural counties than urban areas? But their understanding of the complex factors behind the disparity has been very limited. A report released by the National Center for Health Statistics on Thursday provides some important new information by delving into […]Related:Nine organizations sue Trump administration for ending grants to teen pregnancy programsThis season’s flu vaccine is only 36 percent effective, but experts say you should still get itHow a tra...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nine organizations sue Trump administration for ending grants to teen pregnancy programs
Planned Parenthood has joined forces with eight other local government, health care, and advocacy organizations to take the Trump administration to court over the defunding of a national teen pregnancy program. On Thursday, the groups filed four separate lawsuits in U.S. District Court in the Eastern District of Washington, in Maryland and the District of Columbia, arguing that approximately $220 million in grants […]Related:An American says she fell asleep with a headache — and woke up with a British accentShe thought the weird sensation was a stray eyelash. It was eye ...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

EvidenceNOW: Advancing Heart Health in Primary Care
A grant initiative dedicated to helping small- and medium-sized primary care practices across the country use the latest evidence to improve heart health. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Surprising Secrets to Living Longer — And Better
Old age demands to be taken very seriously–and it usually gets its way. It’s hard to be cavalier about a time of life defined by loss of vigor, increasing frailty, rising disease risk and falling cognitive faculties. Then there’s the unavoidable matter of the end of consciousness and the self–death, in other words–that’s drawing closer and closer. It’s the rare person who can confront the final decline with flippancy or ease. That, as it turns out, might be our first mistake. Humans are not alone in facing the ultimate reckoning, but we’re the only species–as far as we ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Longevity Source Type: news

Sexual assault survivor calls for funding as N.S. counselling grants expire
A woman who had to wait three days for a rape kit in rural Nova Scotia is imploring the province to commit to permanently funding counselling programs for sexual assault survivors. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Nova Scotia Source Type: news

MSU team to empower Latino farmers
(Michigan State University) Armed with a $600,000 grant, Michigan State University researchers will work alongside Latino migrant farmers to reshape how Michigan harvests fruit -- and cultivate a new workforce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news