Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Portable Test Helps Identify Refugees at Risk of Outbreaks
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished and remote parts of the world, in time to save lives. Wednesday, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. "We're very excited about the potential for this technology," said epidemiologist Aimee Summers of the...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Portable Test Helps Identify Refugees at Risk of Outbreaks
WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a lab in a box: Researchers created a device about the size of a toaster that can test a drop of blood to tell, in about half an hour, who's immune to certain infections and who's not. The goal is to find groups of people at risk of outbreaks, especially in impoverished and remote parts of the world, in time to save lives. Wednesday, Canadian researchers reported their novel tool worked pretty well at identifying people vulnerable to measles and rubella in a refugee camp in Kenya. "We're very excited about the potential for this technology," said epidemiologist Aimee Summers of the...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - April 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren Neergaard, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Noninvasive spinal stimulation method enables paralyzed people to regain use of hands, study finds
paylessimages/iStockphotoMore than 1.2 million Americans are living with paralysis from spinal cord injuries, which results in loss of the ability to perform such tasks as opening a water bottle.The ability to perform simple daily tasks can make a big difference in people ’s lives, especially for those with spinal cord injuries. A UCLA-led team of scientists reports that six people with severe spinal cord injuries — three of them completely paralyzed — have regained use of their hands and fingers for the first time in years after undergoing a nonsurgical, nonin vasive spinal stimulation procedure the rese...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCLA research may explain some causes of infertility and miscarriage
A new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.Infertility affects around 10 percent of the U.S. population, and roughly 15 to 20 percent of all pregnancies in the U.S. end in miscarriage. In many cases, the causes of infertility and miscarriage are unknown.A team led by Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology and member of the  Eli and Edythe Br...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Lab Culture Podcast
Lab Culture is a podcast by the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) about public health, laboratory science, and everything in between. Join them for discussions about infectious diseases, food safety, emergency preparedness, newborn screening, environmental health, global health, and more. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tests confirm deadly listeria strain at South Africa's Tiger Brands' plant
JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South Africa's Tiger Brands, which faces two class action lawsuits over a listeria outbreak that has killed 180 people, said results from an independent laboratory confirmed the presence of the deadly listeria strain in one of its food factories. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

LabCorp sees 1Q profit drop slightly to $173.2 million
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings posted a profit of $173.2 million for the 2018 first quarter, down 5.3 percent from the same period a year ago. Earnings per share for LabCorp (NYSE: LH) were $1.67 for the period ending March 31, down from $1.75 in 2017. Excluding restructuring charges and other items, adjusted earnings per share were $2.78 for the first quarter. “We delivered another outstanding quarter, with strong results from each of our businesses demonstrating the power of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

LabCorp sees 1Q profit drop slightly to $173.2 million
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings posted a profit of $173.2 million for the 2018 first quarter, down 5.3 percent from the same period a year ago. Earnings per share for LabCorp (NYSE: LH) were $1.67 for the period ending March 31, down from $1.75 in 2017. Excluding restructuring charges and other items, adjusted earnings per share were $2.78 for the first quarter. “We delivered another outstanding quarter, with strong results from each of our businesses demonstrating the power of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Direct-to-Consumer Clinical Laboratory Test Developer, EverlyWell, Receives $1 Million in Funding from Shark Tank Investor
Direct-to-consumer medical laboratory testing company gets a major shot in the arm as developers find ready investors and increasing consumer demand Clinical laboratory tests, usually performed without fanfare, were thrust into the limelight during a recent episode of Shark Tank, an American reality TV show on which aspiring entrepreneurs compete for the attention and partnership […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 25, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Management & Operations 23andMe anatomic pathology any lab test now C Source Type: news

How to Wipe Out Malaria for Good
Malaria has plagued humanity for thousands of years. Caused by a tiny parasite transported from person to person by a certain kind of mosquito, the disease poses a risk to nearly half the world’s population. The WHO attempted to eradicate malaria in the 1960s and while it succeeded in ridding many countries of the disease, it fell short of the goal due to growing drug resistance and by failing to focus enough attention on Africa. Every year on World Malaria Day, April 25, the malaria community celebrates progress made to date and focuses on the challenges ahead. This year is especially exciting as just this past Fri...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Erin M. Stuckey Tags: Uncategorized Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria World Malaria Day Source Type: news

Nuclear radiation detecting device could lead to new homeland security tool
(Northwestern University) A Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory research team has developed an exceptional next-generation material for nuclear radiation detection that could provide a significantly less expensive alternative to detectors now in commercial use. Specifically, the high-performance material is used in a device that can detect gamma rays, weak signals given off by nuclear materials, and can easily identify individual radioactive isotopes. Potential uses include more widespread detectors for nuclear weapons and materials as well as applications in biomedical imaging, astronomy and spectrosco...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

To Truly Manage Malaria in Uganda, Diagnosis Matters
April 24, 2018Treatment without a proper diagnosis can undermine malaria care. Now Uganda is working to eliminate this practice.Susan Adongo, a 26-year-old stay-at-home mum, has not been feeling well for the past few days.As she runs her daily errands, she feels a slight backache, fatigue, and headache. Today she has traveled over three kilometers to Kyere Health III to see a health worker about what is afflicting her.“I know for sure this is malaria,” Susan says. “The village health team has always mentioned to us the symptoms of malaria during the health talk sessions and this is exactly what I am exper...
Source: IntraHealth International - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news

The Laboratory Executive ’s Guide to Maximizing Revenue & Valuation: Effective Revenue Cycle and Compliance Management are Critical Success Factors
There is no doubt that the complexity of laboratory revenue cycle management is unmatched in all of health care. With frequent regulatory and compliance rules changes, ever tightening margins, and a severely weakened economy, it is getting harder and harder for potentially acquirable independent labs to be sure they are not leaving potential profits on the table. The Dark Report is happy to offer our readers a chance to download our recently published White Paper “The Laboratory Executive’s Guide to Maximizing Revenue & Valuation: Effective Revenue Cycle and Compliance Management are Critical Success Factor...
Source: Dark Daily - April 24, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: The Dark Daily Tags: White Papers Source Type: news

Managing chronic pain with light
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Scientists from EMBL Rome have identified the population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch, and which cause severe pain in neuropathic pain patients. The team developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this type of nerve cell. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targeted cells retract from the skin's surface, leading to pain relief. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detector
(Washington State University) Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections.The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are sometimes not readily available. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Precision Therapeutics to acquire Helomics
Precision Therapeutics (NSDQ:AIPT) said today it inked a letter of intent to acquire the remaining equity in Helomics, making it a wholly owned subsidiary. Minneapolis, Minn.-based Precision Therapeutics, which currently owns 25% of Helomics, said that it will acquire the remaining 75% equity stake in the company. Precision Therapeutics said it is hopeful that a new merger agreement will be signed by May 15. Helomics developed and maintains the D-Chip database which contains de-identified data from clinical tests of tumor responses to drugs and uses artificial intelligence powered bioinformatics to generate insights f...
Source: Mass Device - April 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Oncology Helomics Precision Therapeutics Inc. Source Type: news

Faces of glory: the left-cheek posing bias for medallists of Brazilian jiu-jitsu competitions - Okubo M.
Laboratory studies have shown that people tend to show the left side of their face when asked to broadly express emotions, while they tend to show the right side when asked to hide emotions. Because emotions are expressed more intensely in the left side of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Determination the levels of subjective and observer rating of drowsiness and their associations with facial dynamic changes - Poursadeghiyan M, Mazloumi A, Saraji GNASL, Niknezhad A, Akbarzadeh A, Ebrahimi MH.
BACKGROUND: We determined the levels of subjective and observer drowsiness and facial dynamics changes.METHODS: This experimental study was done in the virtual reality laboratory of Khaje-Nasir Toosi University of Technology in 2015. Facial dynamic... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

LabCorp expands its partnership with Walgreens, opens more patient service centers
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings is opening 10 patient service centers in Walgreens stores in Florida, expanding a partnership that brings the company's lab testing services directly to consumers by placing them in retail shops. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) will open service centers in April and May to serve the Gainesville, Palm Beach County, Pasco County and Orlando areas. The Florida centers will give the Burlington-based company 16 service centers at the drugstore locations. LabCorp already… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - April 23, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Walgreens to add LabCorp patient centers in 10 Florida stores, including Tampa Bay area
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings is making a push into Florida through consumer lab testing services in retail locations — including two in Pasco County. Burlington, North Carolina-based LabCorp (NYSE: LH) will open patient service centers this month and next month in 10 Sunshine State Walgreens stores, bringing the company's total to 16 service centers at the drugstore locations. Here are the locations that will get LabCorp patient service centers: 2000 Howell Branch Road, Winter… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Walgreens to add LabCorp patient centers in 10 Florida stores, including Orlando
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings is making a push into Florida through consumer lab testing services in retail locations — including two in Central Florida. Burlington, N.C.-based LabCorp (NYSE: LH) will open patient service centers this month and next month in 10 Sunshine State Walgreens stores, bringing the company's total to 16 service centers at the drugstore locations. Here are the locations that will get La bCorp patient service centers: 2000 Howell Branch Road, Winter Park 7815… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

LabCorp expands Walgreens partnership
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings is opening 10 patient service centers in Walgreens stores in Florida, expanding a partnership that brings the company's lab testing services directly to consumers by placing them in retail shops. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) will open service centers in April and May to serve the Gainesville, Palm Beach County, Pasco County and Orlando areas. The Florida centers will give the Burlington-based company 16 service centers at the drugstore locations. LabCorp already… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

LabCorp expands its partnership with Walgreens, opens more patient service centers
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings is opening 10 patient service centers in Walgreens stores in Florida, expanding a partnership that brings the company's lab testing services directly to consumers by placing them in retail shops. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) will open service centers in April and May to serve the Gainesville, Palm Beach County, Pasco County and Orlando areas. The Florida centers will give the Burlington-based company 16 service centers at the drugstore locations. LabCorp already… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Some Hospitals Launch Concierge Care Clinics to Raise Revenue, Generating both Controversy and Opportunity for Medical Laboratories
Critics are quick to note that this creates a disparity in how patients access healthcare services Independent concierge care (AKA concierge medicine) is available to anyone willing to pay the additional costs, which are over and above any health insurance. In a concierge care medical practice, patients pay an annual retainer fee to gain increased […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 23, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Management & Operations AA Source Type: news

Frontiers in Blockchain: first peer-reviewed journal dedicated to blockchain from a scientific publisher
A new collaboration between Frontiers and the Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and Governance (CCEG) Think Tank will make cutting-edge research on blockchain technologies freely available through an open-access online platform. Led by founding chief editors Professor Olinga Ta’eed, director of the CCEG, and Dr. Christopher Clack, financial computing expert and founder of the Thomson Reuters laboratory at University College London, the new Frontiers in Blockchain journal will publish peer-reviewed research on a range of topics — from cryptocurrencies for social justice to smart contracts. Invent...
Source: News from STM - April 23, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Source Type: news

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer's spread
(UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) In the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Causes Hyponatremia?
Discussion Normal kidneys regulate water balance to maintain a plasma osmolality of 275-290 mOsm/kg normally. Thirst and arginine vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are the primary regulators of plasma osmolality. ADH is made in the hypothalamus and released by the posterior pituitary gland. ADH acts on the kidney’s distal collecting duct to increase water reabsorption. ADH is appropriately released in hypovolemic states, such as dehydration caused by gastroenteritis. ADH has an ~10 minute half-life and therefore can respond to rapid changes in volume status. Sodium balance is regulated by aldosterone (as part...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 23, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Biomedical tattoo' might catch cancer early
Medical research is reaching a new frontier with implants that can accurately spot early signs of cancer. Yet the road from laboratory to patient is long. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Neurosurgeon Eric Leuthardt: ‘An interface between mind and machine will happen’
The US researcher – and sci-fi author – on how brain implants will drive the next turning point in human evolutionDr Eric C Leuthardt, 45, is a neurosurgeon at Washington University in St Louis. He is also the co-founder of NeuroLutions, a research laboratory developing directinterfaces between mind and computer. Leuthardt is pioneering the use of electrical brain implants to help restore motor function to the paralysed limbs of stroke victims. He is also helping to develop electrode systems that can directly decode the unspoken “inner voice” of the mind, and use it to direct external action; for ex...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Ethics Health Technology Biology Source Type: news

The Canary in the Coal Mine: Clinical and Public Health Laboratories Respond to Biosafety Risks
This article presents an overview of responses to recent events and provides resources for laboratories that can be utilized to prepare and improve their biosafety programs. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 21, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Michael A. Pentella Source Type: news

Hungarian laboratory worker isolated after exposure to Ebola virus
BUDAPEST (Reuters) - A Hungarian laboratory worker has been isolated at a Budapest hospital after accidental exposure to the deadly Ebola virus but has shown no symptoms so far, health officials said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Hungarian scientist exposed to Ebola, WHO says
The World Health Organization says it has co-ordinated shipment of an experimental Ebola vaccine and drugs to treat a laboratory scientist in Hungary who was exposed to the potentially deadly disease earlier this month. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

UN health agency: Hungarian scientist exposed to Ebola
The World Health Organization says it has helped ship an experimental Ebola vaccine and drugs to treat a laboratory scientist in Hungary who was exposed to the potentially deadly disease in an accident earlier this month (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

UN health agency: Hungarian scientist sickened by Ebola
The World Health Organization says it has helped ship an experimental Ebola vaccine and drugs to treat a laboratory scientist in Hungary who caught the potentially deadly disease in an accident earlier this month (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

KFF Study Finds HDHPs and Increased Cost-Sharing Requirements for Medical Services are Making Healthcare Increasingly Inaccessible to Consumers
Though ACA reforms may have slowed healthcare spending, rapidly increasing deductibles and cost sharing requirements have many experts questioning if patients can afford care at all, despite the increased availability of insurance coverage Much of the debate surrounding efforts to replace and repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has centered on premiums as a central […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 20, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Coding, Billing, and Collections Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing ACA Affordable Care Act anatomic pathology CDC cen Source Type: news

Primary pancreatic organoid tumor models for high-throughput phenotypic drug screening
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) A multidisciplinary team of scientists share recent advancements in innovative in-vitro cancer biology methods for screening drug-like molecules in cancer tissue relevant models in a new report published online ahead-of-print at SLAS Discovery. Entitled Advanced Development of Primary Pancreatic Organoid Tumor Models for High-Throughput Phenotypic Drug Screening, the report can be accessed for free. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lassa Fever – Nigeria
From 1 January through 15 April 2018, 1849 suspected cases have been reported from 21 states (Abia, Adamawa, Anambra, Bauchi, Benue, Delta, Ebonyi, Edo, Ekiti, Federal Capital Territory, Gombe, Imo, Kaduna, Kogi, Lagos, Nasarawa, Ondo, Osun, Plateau, Rivers, and Taraba). Of these, 413 patients were confirmed with Lassa fever, nine were classified as probable 1422 tested negative and were classified as non-cases and for the five remaining suspect cases laboratory results are pending. Among the 413 confirmed and the nine probable Lassa fever cases, 114 deaths were reported (case fatality rate for confirmed cases is 25.4% and...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - April 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Flat-pack heaven? Robots master task of assembling Ikea chair
Machines programmed by engineers in Singapore complete job in just over 20 minutesThose who fear the rise of the machines, look away now. In a laboratory in Singapore two robots have mastered a task that roundly defeats humans every weekend: they have successfully assembled an Ikea chair.Engineers at Nanyang Technological University used a 3D camera and two industrial robot arms fitted with grippers and force sensors to take on the challenge of building an £18 “Stefan” chair from the furniture company.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Technology Robots Ikea Source Type: news

Researchers at Several Top Universities Unveil CRISPR-Based Diagnostics That Show Great Promise for Clinical Laboratories
Three innovative technologies utilizing CRISPR-Cas13, Cas12a, and Cas9 demonstrate how CRISPR might be used for more than gene editing, while highlighting potential to develop new diagnostics for both the medical laboratory and point-of-care (POC) testing markets CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is in the news again! The remarkable genetic-editing technology is at the […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 18, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology biosensor Source Type: news

Scientists explain how plastic-eating enzyme can help fight pollution – video
Scientists in Britain and the US say they have engineered an enzyme that eats plastic, a breakthrough that could help in the fight against pollution. The enzyme is able to digest polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. The team from the University of Portsmouth and the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory hope to one day produce the enzyme on an industrial scaleContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 18, 2018 Category: Science Tags: Plastics Environment Pollution Science Source Type: news

Lawrence Brown obituary
As an x-ray crystallographer from the late 1940s onwards, my father, Lawrence Brown, who has died aged 95, was one of a select band of British scientists who helped to determine the atomic and molecular structure of crystals.He put the knowledge he gained to good use in the then growing field of synthetic fibres, particularly with the textile company Courtaulds, where he rose to become head of its acetate and synthetic fibres laboratory. There he oversaw work on the development of several new synthetic fibres, including carbon fibre.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Brown Tags: Science Mathematics Manufacturing sector Business Source Type: news

Study reports possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancers
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Researchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cells donated by patients. Researchers also tested the treatment in humanized mouse models of pediatric brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Army research rejuvenates older zinc batteries
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army scientists, with a team of researchers from the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, have created a water-based zinc battery that is simultaneously powerful, rechargeable and intrinsically safe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biothreat Preparedness Training for Sentinel Laboratories: Bacillus Anthracis
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 10/27/2017 This course provides clinical laboratory scientists with information about the laboratory identification of anthrax. It discusses how to describe laboratory tests for presumptive identification of B. anthracis, how to use the sentinel laboratory protocols to rule out or refer specimens, and the role of the Laboratory Response Network sentinel laboratory in detection of B. anthracis. (Video or Multimedia) Site requires free registration. (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Laboratories, Emergencies, and the Law: How Our Legal System Impacts Laboratories During Emergency Response
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 10/27/2017 This basic-level webinar provides an overview of important concepts of legal preparedness that can impact the operation of laboratories during an emergency response. Issues discussed include liability, the impact of emergency declarations on the legal landscape, and mutual aid agreements. It provides information about how to discuss concepts of legal preparedness during an emergency response, identify legal challenges that may impact laboratory operations in an emergency, and describe legal tools to improve laboratory operations during an emergency response. (Video or ...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

2018 APHL Annual Meeting and Twelfth Government Environmental Laboratory Conference
June 2-5, 2018; Pasadena, CA. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists warn that many pharma drugs DESTROY our gut microbiome, causing us to be more vulnerable to disease
(Natural News) You’ve probably heard by now that antibiotics can seriously impact your gut microbiome, but it turns out that this action is not just limited to antibiotics. Now, scientists from Germany’s European Molecular Biology Laboratory have found that many drugs that target human cells rather than bacteria can cause changes in microbiome composition as... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Makes US Healthcare So Expensive? It ’s Price, Not Overutilization, Say Researchers at IHME and UCLA
Recent studies exploring the economics behind the high price of US healthcare independently point to the price of labor, goods, services, administrative costs, and pharmaceuticals as primary reason why the US spends almost twice as much as peer countries on healthcare It is regularly reported that the cost of healthcare in the United States is […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - April 16, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Managed Care Contracts & Payer Reimbursement Management & Operations Aaron Carroll MD MS AMA american medical association anatomic pathology Austin Frakt PhD Source Type: news