With Reduced Reimbursement from Medicare, Anatomic Pathology Groups and Clinical Laboratories Must Learn to Optimize Collections from Managed Care Payers to Stabilize Financials and Survive the Industry Shift
As PAMA brings estimated Medicare reimbursement cuts of up to 30% over the next three years to a range of typically high-volume tests and diagnostics, medical laboratories that wish to stay competitive must understand the needs of managed care payers and learn how to optimize collections, reduce denials, and communicate value effectively or risk their […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 22, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Managed Care Contracts & Payer Reimbursement Management & Operations Webinars aetna anatomic pathology Avalon Healthcare Source Type: news

There ’s Hope for a Vaccine to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes
Could a vaccine for type-1 diabetes be on the horizon? In a new study, a small group of people with type 1 diabetes who were given a vaccine showed improvement in their blood sugar levels to nearly normal levels—and the changes lasted for five to eight years. The study, published Thursday in the journal npj Vaccines by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, looked at nine people with type 1 diabetes who were given a vaccine to prevent tuberculosis, called bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). They had two injections, four weeks apart. Levels of their hemoglobin a1c (HbA1c), which measures a person’s bl...
Source: TIME: Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized diabetes healthytime Source Type: news

Diabetes Breakthrough: Common Vaccine Can Improve Blood Sugar Levels Long-Term
BOSTON (CBS) – Researchers at Mass General Hospital announced a breakthrough in treating Type 1 Diabetes. In a long-term study released Thursday, patients in a clinical trial had their blood sugar levels restored to near normal, with lasting results. Patients in the trial received two doses of the bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine, an inexpensive vaccine that is widely used to prevent tuberculosis. Results were not immediate, but after three years, every patient, “showed an improvement in HbA1c to near normal levels – improvement that persisted for the following five years,” MGH said in a news ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local Diabetes Mass General Hospital Source Type: news

CSELS Partnership: Strengthening Public Health Laboratories
Funding to promote quality and safe Public Health Laboratory (PHL) practice; improve PHL infrastructure; strengthen the PHL system and develop a well-trained PHL workforce. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army study quantifies changes in stress after meditation
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) or a thousand years, people have reported feeling better by meditating but there has never been a systematic study that quantified stress and how much stress changes as a direct result of meditation until now. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers engineer bacteria to exhibit stochastic Turing patterns
(University of Illinois College of Engineering) A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University has brought science one step closer to a molecular-level understanding of how patterns form in living tissue. The researchers engineered bacteria that, when incubated and grown, exhibited stochastic Turing patterns: a 'lawn' of synthesized bacteria in a petri dish fluoresced an irregular pattern of red polka dots on a field of green. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell development
(Duke University) Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in laboratory cell models, a Duke-led study finds. Researchers observed increases in the size and number of fat cells after exposing the models to a mixture of 23 common fracking chemicals or to wastewater or surface-water samples containing them, even at diluted concentrations. Adipogenesis occurred through PPARy-dependent and independent mechanisms. More research is needed to assess potential health impacts outside the laboratory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A precise extragalactic test of General Relativity
Einstein’s theory of gravity, General Relativity, has been precisely tested on Solar System scales, but the long-range nature of gravity is still poorly constrained. The nearby strong gravitational lens ESO 325-G004 provides a laboratory to probe the weak-field regime of gravity and measure the spatial curvature generated per unit mass, . By reconstructing the observed light profile of the lensed arcs and the observed spatially resolved stellar kinematics with a single self-consistent model, we conclude that = 0.97 ± 0.09 at 68% confidence. Our result is consistent with the prediction of 1 from General Relativ...
Source: ScienceNOW - June 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Collett, T. E., Oldham, L. J., Smith, R. J., Auger, M. W., Westfall, K. B., Bacon, D., Nichol, R. C., Masters, K. L., Koyama, K., van den Bosch, R. Tags: Astronomy, Physics reports Source Type: news

Monitoring is Key in Precipio ’s Liquid Biopsy Success
The liquid biopsy market has expanded greatly in the past few years. From billion-dollar financings to highly publicized spinouts – the space has managed to attract quite a bit of attention and change the dynamic of diagnostics. Earlier this week, Roche made a big play in the space by acquiring the remaining shares of Foundation Medicine for $2.4 billion. Precipio is hoping to make its own impact in liquid biopsy and said it is focused on the monitoring segment of the market. The New Haven, CT-based company is about a year removed from merging with Transgenomics. The transaction also helped Precipio become a public c...
Source: MDDI - June 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Testing Source Type: news

Direct Primary Care a New Option for Patients to Receive High-Quality Medical Care at Affordable Prices
Medical laboratories prepared to receive direct payments for services rendered will have an advantage as more physicians’ practices convert to concierge medicine and stop taking insurance or Medicare A growing number of physicians are looking at new care delivery models as increasing costs and narrow networks drive patients into high-deductible health plans (HDHPs). These can […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 20, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing American Journal of Medicine anatomic pathology clinical laboratory concierge medicine Source Type: news

Towards personalised medicine: One type of data is not enough
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory - European Bioinformatics Institute) To understand the biology of diseased organs researchers can use different types of molecular data.One of the biggest computational challenges at the moment is integrating these multiple data types.A new computational method jointly analyses different types of molecular data and disentangles the sources of disease variability to guide personalised treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New theory deepens understanding of Turing patterns in biology
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) A team of researchers at EMBL have expanded Alan Turing's seminal theory on how patterns are created in biological systems. This work, which was partly done at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), may answer whether nature's patterns are governed by Turing's mathematical model and could have applications in tissue engineering. Their results have been published on June 20 in Physical Review X. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acute cyanide poisoning: are skin findings and odors helpful in making the diagnosis?
2 out of 5 stars Challenges in the diagnosis of acute cyanide poisoning. Parker-Cote JL et al. Clin Toxicol 2018;56(7):609-617 Abstract The stated goal of this somewhat confusing and unfocused article was to “identify isolated acute cyanide poison cases and to identify reported signs, symptoms and laboratory findings.” The authors did a systematic literature review to retrieve cases reports and case series describing patients who were alive on presentation after acute exposure to a cyanide salt. Patients exposed to cyanide in association with smoke inhalation were excluded. They found 65 relevant studies (...
Source: The Poison Review - June 19, 2018 Category: Toxicology Authors: Leon Gussow Tags: Medical bitter almond odor cherry red skin clinical characteristics cyanide poisoning ingestion Source Type: news

Cincinnati doctor group strikes deal with private equity firm
The Institute for Reproductive Health, a fertility center with three locations in Greater Cincinnati, has sold its laboratory-related assets to the New York private equity firm WindRose Health Investors. The institute will merge its laboratory with Ovation Fertility, which is a WindRose portfolio company. Financial terms of the deal weren’t disclosed. Joining Ovation Fertility’s affiliated physicians are Dr. Sherif Awadalla, Dr. Michael Scheiber and Dr. Thomas Burwinkel of the Institute for… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 19, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Barrett J. Brunsman Source Type: news

Army plans to license nanogalvanic aluminum powder discovery
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army Research Laboratory plans to license its discovery of a nanogalvanic aluminum powder for hydrogen generation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Wilmar-NUS joint lab to drive innovation in food-tech and sustainable biochemicals
(National University of Singapore) Asia's leading agribusiness group Wilmar International Limited and the National University of Singapore have established a new joint research laboratory to conduct cutting-edge clinical nutrition and synthetic biology research to create healthier food products as well as to devise green production technologies for industrial enzymes and biochemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding genes controlling ovarian reserve could hold key to better female fertility care
(Jackson Laboratory) Jackson Laboratory Assistant Professor Ewelina Bolcun-Filas, Ph.D., is looking at how multiple genetic factors regulating oocyte development determine the differences in each woman's ovarian reserve. Bolcun-Filas has received a five-year grant totaling $2,165,475 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to investigate these genetic factors, using special, genetically diverse mouse populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UnitedHealth Group Says 50% of Seniors Will Enroll In Medicare Advantage Plans within 10 Years; Clinical Laboratories Soon May Have Less Fee-For-Service Patients
Clinical laboratories will want to develop value-based lab testing services as the nation’s largest health insurers prepare to engage with Medicare Advantage patients in record numbers UnitedHealth Group (UNH), the nation’s largest health insurer, forecasts wildly impressive growth of Medicare Advantage plans and value-based care. If this happens, it would further shrink the proportion of […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 18, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Managed Care Contracts & Payer Reimbursement Management & Operations AARP Affordable Care Act American As Source Type: news

Scientists isolate protein data from the tiniest of caches -- single human cells
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Scientists have captured the most information yet about proteins within a single human cell, giving scientists one of their clearest looks yet at the molecular happenings inside a human cell. The team detected on average more than 650 proteins in each cell -- many times more than conventional techniques capture from single cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Russian scientists created 'flying' gas chromatograph
(Samara University) A lightweight and compact device will make it possible to turn a conventional drone into an air chemical laboratory. Scientists of Samara University have tested 'flying laboratory' in field conditions. A gas microchromatograph reached the required altitude, collected samples and analyzed them online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Carbon nanotube optics provide optical-based quantum cryptography and quantum computing
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week's edition of the journal Nature Materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Constructing new tissue shapes with light
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) Constructing biological tissues, such as skin, muscle, or bone, in customized shapes is now one step closer. Researchers at EMBL have succeeded in guiding the folding and thus shape of tissues with optogenetics: a technique to control protein activity with light. Nature Communications publishes their results, with implications for regenerative medicine, on June 18. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of 2018 Switzer Prize
Dr. David Sabatini, an MIT biologist and associate director of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, will be the 2018 recipient of the Switzer Prize awarded by the  David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Sabatini ’s pioneering discoveries of mechanisms that regulate cell growth are propelling research into potential treatments for cancer and other diseases.As a graduate student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Sabatini identified the central protein, mTOR,  that turns cell growth on and off. At the Whitehead Institute and MIT, his laboratory ’s research&...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

£720m Large Hadron Collider upgrade 'could upend particle physics'
Collider will be far more sensitive to anomalies that could lead to entirely new theories of the universeA massive project to supercharge the world ’s largest particle collider launched on Friday in the hope that the beefed-up machine will reveal fresh insights into the nature of the universe.The 950m Swiss franc ( £720m) mission will see heavy equipment, new buildings, access shafts and service tunnels installed, constructed and excavated at theLarge Hadron Collider (LHC) at Cern, the particle physics laboratory on the edge of Geneva.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Large Hadron Collider Science Particle physics Cern Higgs boson Source Type: news

Tanzania:State Targets to Collect More Safe Blood
[Daily News] AUTOMATED Analyser, which is a medical laboratory instrument designed to measure different chemicals quickly with minimal human assistance, will be installed in all public hospitals with blood banks to facilitate donated blood testing. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 15, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

No horsing around: Penn Vet researchers get $300K to study new way to combat gene doping
The Pennsylvania Horse Breeders Association has donated $300,000 to the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine to fund research to detect gene doping in race horses. The research will be conducted at Penn Vet's New Bolton Center’s Equine Pharmacology Laboratory in Kennett Square, Pa. Gene doping has been a lingering problem in the horse racing industry. The practice involves transferring or modifying genes, or genetically modified cells, of healthy human at hletes — as well… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

First Time Ever: Less than Half of All Healthcare Practices in America are Physician Owned —Are Doctors Giving Up Their Independence and Will Independent Clinical Laboratories Lose Test Orders to Hospital Labs?
Often when a hospital health system buys an independent physicians’ practice, the new owner would like its clinical laboratory to serve that medical group After a hospital or health system buys a physicians’ practice, it is common that the new owner has its in-house medical laboratory provide lab testing to the newly-acquired medical group. Such […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 15, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing american medical association anatomic pathology Avalere Health clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence group Dark Source Type: news

Critical plant gene takes unexpected detour that could boost biofuel yields
(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) For decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function -- produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets.But for Wellington Muchero, Meng Xie and their colleagues, this enzyme does more than advertised. They had run a series of experiments on poplar plants that consistently revealed mutations in a structure of the life-sustaining enzyme that was not previously known to exist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Integrated lead discovery: An evolving toolbox
(SLAS (Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening)) A new SLAS Discovery review article by GlaxoSmithKline researchers in the US and UK offers an informative guide to the established and emerging tools available for early drug discovery and screening, and provides illustrative scenarios demonstrating considerations that drive decisions on choice of lead discovery tactics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two UCLA chemists selected as 2018 Pew scholars
UCLA chemistry professors Hosea Nelson and Jose Rodriguez have been selected among 22  Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences for 2018. The honor provides funding to outstanding young researchers whose work is relevant to the advancement of human health. The scholars, who were selected from 184 nominations, will receive four-year, $300,000 grants to advance their explorations of biological mechanisms underpinning human h ealth and disease.UCLA and UC San Diego each has two 2018 Pew scholars in the biomedical sciences; no other university has more than one.“These scientists have shown the boldness and creat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

TNT could be headed for retirement after 116 years on the job
(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the US Army Research Laboratory in Aberdeen, Md., have developed a novel 'melt-cast' explosive material that could be a suitable replacement for Trinitrotoluene, more commonly known as TNT. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NASA ’s Opportunity Rover Has Been Knocked Out as a Giant Dust Storm Envelops Mars
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — NASA’s seemingly unstoppable Mars rover Opportunity has been knocked out by a gigantic dust storm that is enveloping the red planet and blotting out the sun. Officials said Wednesday they’re hopeful the rover will survive the storm, which already covers one-quarter of Mars and is expected to encircle the planet in another few days. It could be weeks or even months, though, until the sky clears enough for sunlight to reach the Martian surface and recharge Opportunity’s batteries through its solar panels. For now, Mars’ oldest working rover is stuck in the middle of the ...
Source: TIME: Science - June 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Marcia Dunn / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight space Source Type: news

Engineering Implantable, Laboratory-Grown Organs To Cure Disease
Physicians and scientists are developing organs and tissues for virtually every part of the human body as they attempt to engineer more than 30 different replacement tissues and organs and to develop healing cell therapies —all with the same goal—to cure, rather than just treat, disease. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Robin Seaton Jefferson, Contributor Source Type: news

Polygenic Scores Show Potential to Predict Humans ’ Susceptibility to a Range of Chronic Diseases; New Clinical Laboratory Genetic Tests Could Result from Latest Research
Access to vast banks of genomic data is powering a new wave of assessments and predictions that could offer a glimpse at how genetic variation might impact everything from Alzheimer’s Disease risk to IQ scores Anatomic pathology groups and clinical laboratories have become accustomed to performing genetic tests for diagnosing specific chronic diseases in humans. […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Alzheimer’s disease Amit Khera MD anatomic patholo Source Type: news

CTCs as a Predictive Biomarker in Suspected Ovarian Cancer CTCs as a Predictive Biomarker in Suspected Ovarian Cancer
Might circulating tumor cells be useful as a diagnostic biomarker in women with complex pelvic masses?Laboratory Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

"I know it because it happened to me!" Confrontations of children within forensic investigations - Katz C, Barnetz Z.
Confrontations and cross-examination are considered to be a vital stage in forensic investigations; however, laboratory and field studies have systematically shown their adverse effects on children's testimonies. The current field study aimed to assess the... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Hydropeaking Extirpates River Insects
Hydropower produces 19% of the world's electricity--far more than all other renewable sources combined. In the face of mounting climate-change effects, the rush to this profuse energy source is expected to continue. However, hydroelectric dams can also produce a number of environmental consequences, many of which are unrecognized or understudied. Writing in an article for BioScience, an interdisciplinary team led by Theodore A. Kennedy of the US Geological Survey identifies one such threat: these dams' ability to devastate aquatic insect populations and the food webs that those insects underpin. One of hydropower's be...
Source: BioScience Press Releases - June 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Queen's Birthday Honours 2018
Dr Richard Henderson, Molecular Biologist and Biophysicist at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology was made a Companion of Honour in the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours for services to electron microscopy of biological molecules. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - June 11, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

LifeBrite Community Hospital of Stokes asks court to dismiss countersuit
LifeBrite Community Hospital of Stokes has asked a court to dismiss a countersuit filed by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina that accuses the Danbury facility of "fraudulent" laboratory practices. LifeBrite claims the insurance company did not want to pay for laboratory services performed by the facility. The issue between LifeBrite and Blue Cross NC is a "contract dispute between a rural hospital, which billed for services it provided, and an insurance company that does not want to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

LifeBrite Community Hospital of Stokes asks court to dismiss countersuit
LifeBrite Community Hospital of Stokes has asked a court to dismiss a countersuit filed by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina that accuses the Danbury facility of "fraudulent" laboratory practices. LifeBrite claims the insurance company did not want to pay for laboratory services performed by the facility. The issue between LifeBrite and Blue Cross NC is a "contract dispute between a rural hospital, which billed for services it provided, and an insurance company that does not want to… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

How you can control lab-grown heart cells with a remote control light
Mouse heart cells grown on graphene beat at a rate controlled by light stimulation. [Image courtesy of UC San Diego]University of California San Diego researchers have created a technique that speeds up and slows down human heart cells that are being grown in a dish on command by shining light on them and varying the intensity. The heart cells are being grown in graphene which turns light into electricity, a more realistic environment that traditional plastic or glass laboratory dishes. The researchers suggest that the method could be used in a number of research and clinical applications including testing therapeutic drug...
Source: Mass Device - June 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Cardiovascular Research & Development drug screening graphene MedTech University of California at San Diego Source Type: news

LabCorp makes another acquisition to expand its drug development services
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings (NYSE: LH) said Monday it has acquired Sciformix Corp. for an undisclosed amount. The acquisition will expand Burlington-based LabCorp's drug development services, with Sciformix becoming part of Covance when the deal closes. "This acquisition strengthens our position in the later phases of drug and device development, particularly for post-marketing pharmacovigilance and mar ket access solutions,” said LabCorp CEO David King in a statement. “The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 11, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Laboratory and self-report methods to assess reappraisal and distraction in youth - Bettis AH, Henry L, Prussien KV, Vreeland A, Smith M, Adery LH, Compas BE.
Coping and emotion regulation are central features of risk and resilience in childhood and adolescence, but research on these constructs has relied on different methods of assessment. The current study aimed to bridge the gap between questionnaire and expe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Six New Jersey Hospitals and Several Major Corporations to Self-Insure Their Million+ Employees; Trend Could Impact How Local Clinical Laboratories Get Paid
Plans by large-scale employers to self-insure brings into question how clinical laboratories would submit claims and get reimbursed from inside and outside of a corporate provider/payer network Clinical laboratories and anatomic pathology groups serving the nation’s hospitals and health systems may get increased network access to patients due to new developments in the health insurance […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 11, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Amazon anatomic pathology Atlantic Health System Berkshire Hathaway CentraState Healthcare System clinic Source Type: news

PNNL technology clears way for ethanol-derived jet fuel
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) ASTM International recently revised ASTM D7566 Annex A5 -- the Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuel Containing Synthesized Hydrocarbons -- to add ethanol as an approved feedstock for producing alcohol-to-jet synthetic paraffinic kerosene (ATJ-SPK). The revision clears the way for increased adoption of sustainable aviation fuels because ethanol feedstocks can be made from so many different low-cost sources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Large-scale study indicates novel, abundant nitrogen-fixing microbes in surface ocean
(Marine Biological Laboratory) A large-scale study of the Earth's surface ocean indicates the microbes responsible for fixing nitrogen there -- previously thought to be almost exclusively photosynthetic cyanobacteria-include an abundant and widely distributed suite of non-photosynthetic bacterial populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study points to possible treatment target for aggressive liver cancer in kids
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) A protein in the cell nucleus already targeted therapeutically for several types of cancer has now been linked to an aggressive form of pediatric liver cancer called hepatoblastoma (HBL), according to a study published in the Nature journal Communications Biology. Scientists at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report that laboratory testing indicates the protein, PARP1, may be an effective treatment target for the cancer, but emphasize additional research is needed to verify this. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

LabCorp asks court to dismiss Delaware lawsuit
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings has asked a court to dismiss a lawsuit filed two months ago that claims a Medicaid services company worked to make the life sciences giant the only laboratory provider for Medicaid patients in Delaware. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) said in a June 5 court filing that the lawsuit filed by Prescient Medicine Holdings in April should be dismissed for several reasons, including lack of antitrust standing and failure to allege a relevant antitrust market. The initial… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

LabCorp asks court to dismiss Delaware lawsuit
Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings has asked a court to dismiss a lawsuit filed two months ago that claims a Medicaid services company worked to make the life sciences giant the only laboratory provider for Medicaid patients in Delaware. LabCorp (NYSE: LH) said in a June 5 court filing that the lawsuit filed by Prescient Medicine Holdings in April should be dismissed for several reasons, including lack of antitrust standing and failure to allege a relevant antitrust market. The initial… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - June 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jessica Seaman Source Type: news

Ebola outbreak in DRC is 'ongoing' but WHO is 'cautiously optimistic'
A total 62 people have suffered Ebola hemorrhagic fever in the Democratic Republic of the Congo since the first case was reported on May 8, the World Health Organization reported Friday. Thirty-eight of the cases are laboratory confirmed, 14 are probable and 10 are suspected. Over the past month, 27 of these individuals have died. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news