Upper body accelerations during level walking in transtibial amputees - Paradisi F, Di Stanislao E, Summa A, Brunelli S, Traballesi M, Vannozzi G.
BACKGROUND: The observation of upper body movement is gaining interest in the gait analysis community. Recent studies involved the use of body-worn motion sensors, allowing translation of laboratory measurements to real-life settings in the context of pati... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Africa:Take Charge of Your Food - Your Health Is Your Business
[IPS] New Delhi -The minimum we expect from the government is to differentiate between right and wrong. But when it comes to regulating our food, it's like asking for too much. Our latest investigation vouches for this. The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE)'s pollution monitoring laboratory tested 65 samples of processed food for presence of genetically modified (GM) ingredients. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - August 17, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Comparison of the Fit of Lithium Disilicate Crowns made from Conventional, Digital, or Conventional/Digital Techniques
ConclusionsCeramic crowns, which were made using all ‐digital approach or cast digitization by a laboratory or intraoral scanner had comparable fit to those produced by conventional approach. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 17, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Take Charge of Your Food: Your Health is Your Business
Credit: IPSBy Sunita NarainNEW DELHI, Aug 17 2018 (IPS)The minimum we expect from the government is to differentiate between right and wrong. But when it comes to regulating our food, it’s like asking for too much. Our latest investigation vouches for this. The Centre for Science and Environment (CSE)’s pollution monitoring laboratory tested 65 samples of processed food for presence of genetically modified (GM) ingredients.The results are both bad and somewhat good. Of the food samples tested, some 32 per cent were positive for GM markers. That’s bad. What’s even worse is that we found GM in in...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Sunita Narain Tags: Active Citizens Asia-Pacific Civil Society Development & Aid Food & Agriculture Headlines Health Human Rights Source Type: news

Stanford University Researchers Finds Physician Burnout as Big a Threat to Patient Safety as Unsafe Hospital Conditions; Exhausted Providers Twice as Likely to Make Medical Errors
Pathologists might be able to help overburdened doctors by adding medical laboratory support services that assist providers in selecting the right tests and identifying the best therapeutic options for patients In a new Stanford University School of Medicine study published in the July 9, 2018, issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers indicate that physician burnout […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 17, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Digital Pathology Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology clinical laboratories clinical laboratory Daniel Tawfik MD MS Dark Daily dark intelligence gro Source Type: news

URI scientist: Long-legged lizards better adapted for hurricane survival
(University of Rhode Island) Jason Kolbe has been thinking about hurricanes and lizards for many years. The University of Rhode Island professor of biological sciences has measured the length of lizard legs and the size of their toe pads to assess how those factors influence the animal's ability to cling to vegetation during strong storms. He even used a powerful leaf blower to test his hypotheses in a laboratory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lessons learned: How Jeff Karp stays at the forefront of innovation
Serial entrepreneur Jeff Karp has a philosophy for his laboratory: find important problems and get solutions to people quickly. To learn about the exciting technologies emerging from Karp’s lab, join us at DeviceTalks Boston on Oct. 8-10. After Jeff finished his PhD in chemical and biomedical engineering at the University of Toronto, he knew he wanted to work with Robert Langer. “He’s the intergalactic translational superstar,” Karp said. Langer, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and one of the most cited engineers of all time, receives thousands of applications per year ...
Source: Mass Device - August 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Pharmaceuticals Research & Development DeviceTalks Boston Frequency Therapeutics Source Type: news

Research and Education Evaluation of the success rate of cone beam computed tomography in determining the location and direction of screw access holes in cement-retained implant-supported prostheses: An in vitro study
ConclusionsUsing CBCT could help determine the direction and location of SAHs in clinical situations. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 16, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Chemical shows promise at killing glioblastoma cells in mouse studies
Researchers have identified a synthetic chemical, named KHS101, which causes the death of aggressive brain tumour cells from patients in laboratory tests. The researchers found that the synthetic chemical cut the energy source of glioblastoma tumour cells. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - August 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Life Biosciences funds MDI Biological Laboratory aging course
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) The MDI Biological Laboratory has announced that Life Biosciences, a biotech company co-founded by David Sinclair, Ph.D., a leading researcher on aging and age-related diseases, has contributed $100,000 to fund its biomedical innovation course on aging. The intensive, two-week course attracted graduate and post-doctoral students from around the globe to the coast of Maine to study the latest advances in the biology of aging with the leaders in the field. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eileen Parkes on Why Cancer Researchers Are Excited About STING Agonists
ONCOLOGY recently interviewed Dr. Eileen Parkes, whose laboratory studies the STING pathway, to find out why researchers are excited about targeting this pathway as a potential cancer therapy. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Eileen Parkes, MD, PhD Source Type: news

A laboratory study on effects of cycling helmet fit on biomechanical measures associated with head and neck injury and dynamic helmet retention - Yu HY, Dennison C.
There is a scant biomechanical literature that tests, in a laboratory setting, whether or not determinants of helmet fit affect biomechanical parameters associated with injury. Using conventional cycling helmets and repeatable models of the human head and ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Local Health Department Learning Laboratory
A 12-month program for teams across the country to identify replicable solutions that enable local health departments to successfully transition to population-focused strategies for improving health outcomes in their communities. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Red Tide Is Killing Marine Life and Scaring Away Tourists in Florida. Here ’s What to Know About It
Tourists and residents alike have been chased away from Florida’s famous beaches by an ominous-sounding ecological occurrence: red tide. Florida sees red tide — an algae outbreak that can kill marine life and sicken humans — nearly every year, but the current flare-up has become severe enough to warrant a state of emergency declaration from Florida Gov. Rick Scott. Here’s what to know about red tide in Florida. What is red tide? The naturally and frequently occurring marine phenomenon is caused by an influx of microscopic algae called Karenia brevis, which give water a namesake reddish hue. The orga...
Source: TIME: Science - August 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Researchers Investigate Ways Telomeres Could be Useful in Clinical Laboratory Diagnoses of Diseases Associated with Short Telomere Syndrome
Using precision genomics, Mayo researchers hope to develop improved medical laboratory tools for screening, diagnosing, and treating patients with inherited genetic disorders such as accelerated aging Telomeres increasingly are on the radars of physicians and healthcare consumers alike, as researchers gain more knowledge about these critical nucleotides, and doctors continue to indicate their belief that […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 15, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Digital Pathology Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing anatomic pathology clinical laboratory comprehensive obstructive pulmonary disorder COPD Dark Daily Source Type: news

Scientists discover chemical which can kill glioblastoma cells
(University of Leeds) Aggressive brain tumour cells taken from patients self-destructed after being exposed to a chemical in laboratory tests, researchers have shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Light-emitting nanoparticles could provide a safer way to image living cells
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) A research team has demonstrated how light-emitting nanoparticles, developed at Berkeley Lab, can be used to see deep in living tissue. Researchers hope they can be made to attach to specific components of cells to serve in an advanced imaging system that can pinpoint even single cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dozens of holidaymakers visiting Mexico struck down by a parasite that causes explosive diarrhoea
As of 3 August 2018, there were 63 laboratory-confirmed incidents of the parasitic infection. Nearly all of these patients travelled outside of the UK - and 89 per cent of them visited Mexico. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gene-Editing Startups Ignite the Next'Frankenfood' Fight Gene-Editing Startups Ignite the Next'Frankenfood' Fight
In a suburban Minneapolis laboratory, a tiny company that has never turned a profit is poised to beat the world's biggest agriculture firms to market with the next potential breakthrough in genetic engineering - a crop with"edited" DNA.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - August 13, 2018 Category: Pathology Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine News Source Type: news

FDA Approves First Oral Drug for Fabry Disease FDA Approves First Oral Drug for Fabry Disease
Migalastat (Galafold) is for adults with Fabry disease who have a genetic mutation amenable to treatment based on laboratory data.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nephrology News Alert Source Type: news

Moving Toward an Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma
This study provided proof of concept for the presence of ctDNA in blood of treatment-naive MPM [malignant pleural mesothelioma] patients by the detection of somatic variants that were identified by analysis of a tumor sample,” the authors wrote. “This opens perspective towards its use in MPM.” The post Moving Toward an Earlier Diagnosis of Mesothelioma appeared first on Mesothelioma Center - Vital Services for Cancer Patients & Families. (Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News)
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 13, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

University of California Davis Researchers Discover Infant Microbiomes Lack B. Infantis in Developed Nations
Without the beneficial bacteria, infants can develop gut dysbiosis, which can lead to severe chronic diseases Another key insight into how the human microbiome performs essential functions has been discovered by a research team at the University of California, Davis (UCD). They have learned that nearly all babies born in developed nations no longer have […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing anatomic pathology B. infantis Bifidobacterium Infantis breast milk Bruce German PhD clinical laboratory Dark Daily dark intelligence group Source Type: news

Getting more out of microbes
This study advances research for fundamental science and biotechnology applications by testing the performance of an unusual bacterial microorganism known as Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (Shewanella) in microgravity conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Algorithm provides early warning system for tracking groundwater contamination
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Savannah River National Laboratory have developed a low-cost method for real-time monitoring of pollutants using commonly available sensors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

MDI Biological Laboratory announces Morris Scientific Discovery Fund
(Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory) The MDI Biological Laboratory has announced the formation of the Morris Scientific Discovery Fund, which will provide up to $250,000 per year for eligible research programs. The goal of the fund is to ensure the continued development of the faculty by providing short-term, pilot project support for research programs that demonstrate a likelihood of successfully competing for federal funding. The fund is supported by Martha and Wistar Morris of Villanova, Pa., and Northeast Harbor, Maine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

At Least 72 People Got Sick After Swimming at a Minnesota Campground, Officials Say
A Minnesota campground seems to be behind an apparent outbreak of water-borne parasitic illness, public health officials said. Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) officials confirmed last week that three people tested positive for cryptosporidiosis after visiting Shades of Sherwood Campground in Zumbrota. (One person also tested positive for E. coli.) In an update posted Friday, MDH officials said they have identified 72 people with symptoms consistent with cryptosporidiosis or E. coli, though most of these illnesses have not been laboratory-confirmed. Cryptosporidiosis is typically contracted after ingesting water that h...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Minnesota onetime Source Type: news

Routine Lab Testing of Little Value in Surveillance of Aggressive Lymphoma Routine Lab Testing of Little Value in Surveillance of Aggressive Lymphoma
Routine laboratory testing has limited value in the surveillance of aggressive lymphoma in asymptomatic patients in complete remission, researchers from Australia report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - August 11, 2018 Category: Pathology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Albany pharmacy college invests in South End laboratory
The Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is making another investment in the South End neighborhood of Albany. Next month, the college will open its new "Collaboratory," a 3,000-square-foot space on Morton Avenue in Albany to serve the community with pharmacists and social workers. The South End is an underserved area when it comes to medicine, and the college saw an opportunity for outreach working with community organizations, said President Greg Dewey. "It's very high-density and… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 10, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Liz Young Source Type: news

Bloodless Malaria Test Could Signal Major Breakthrough for Early Detection of Diseases Using Light Instead of Traditional Clinical Laboratory Tests
This low-cost, reusable noninvasive light test could serve as a prototype for detecting other biomarkers and diseases in rural and outlying medical laboratories A 24-year-old Ugandan computer scientist whose own malaria was missed by traditional clinical laboratory blood tests has developed a device that detects signs of the disease using a beam of light directed […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 10, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Africa Prize anatomic pathology BBC World News Focus Source Type: news

DNA ancestry tests may look cheap. But your data is the price | Adam Rutherford
Do customers realise that genetic genealogy companies like 23andMe profit by amassing huge biological datasets?In 1884, at theInternational Health Exhibition in South Kensington, four million punters came to view the latest scientific marvels: drainage systems, flushing toilets and electrically illuminated fountains. There, the scientist Francis Galton set up the Anthropometric Laboratory, where common folk would pay 3d (around 80p today) to enter, and anonymously fill out a data card. Galton ’s technicians recorded 11 metrics, including height, hair colour, keenness of sight, punch strength and colour perception, an...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Adam Rutherford Tags: Genetics Biology Science GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals industry Business World news Source Type: news

Over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements and their effect on lab test results
(De Gruyter) The study reports on the results of a survey of patients in 18 European countries which shows that those taking OTC products and dietary supplements are not aware of the potential effects on laboratory test results they may have. In addition, patients do not believe that they need to disclose this use to medical and/or laboratory staff. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop a blood drawing robot that provides rapid test results
(Natural News) The simple but important job of drawing and testing the blood of patients can now be taken over by a robot, an article on News Wise reported. That is because New Jersey-based engineers came up with a fully-automated blood drawing and testing machine that can work much faster than humans in a laboratory.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why do some microbes live in your gut while others don't?
(Gladstone Institutes) A new study published in the scientific journal PLOS Computational Biology led by Patrick Bradley, a postdoctoral scholar in Katherine Pollard's laboratory at the Gladstone Institutes, found a new approach to identify the genes that may be important to help microbes live successfully in the human gut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SERSitive: New substrates make it possible to routinely detect one molecule in a million
(Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences) SERS, an extremely sensitive laboratory method of analysing chemical composition, is set to become widespread decades after its invention. The main obstacle that has been slowing down the development of this promising research technique, the poor quality of the substrate on which samples are applied, is now disappearing. New substrates, guaranteeing repeatability of measurements and the appropriate signal enhancement, are now available thanks to scientists from the Institute of Physical Chemistry PAS in Warsaw. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dietary carbohydrates could lead to osteoarthritis, new study finds
(Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation) In a study led by Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist Tim Griffin, Ph.D., researchers found that the carbohydrate composition of diets increased the risk of osteoarthritis in laboratory mice -- even when the animals didn't differ in weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tbx6 revealed as crucial to heart and skeleton formation from stem cells
(University of Tsukuba) In a study of over 50 transcription factors, Tbx6 alone was able to stimulate mesoderm formation in laboratory-grown stem cells, and could cause those stem cells to become cardiovascular or musculoskeletal cells; the University of Tsukuba-led research team found that this essential role of Tbx6 in mesoderm and cardiovascular speci?cation is conserved from lower organisms to mammals. This research report validated a new direct reprogramming-based approach that may enhance future regenerative medicine research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dissipative Kerr solitons in optical microresonators
The development of compact, chip-scale optical frequency comb sources (microcombs) based on parametric frequency conversion in microresonators has seen applications in terabit optical coherent communications, atomic clocks, ultrafast distance measurements, dual-comb spectroscopy, and the calibration of astophysical spectrometers and have enabled the creation of photonic-chip integrated frequency synthesizers. Underlying these recent advances has been the observation of temporal dissipative Kerr solitons in microresonators, which represent self-enforcing, stationary, and localized solutions of a damped, driven, and detuned ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kippenberg, T. J., Gaeta, A. L., Lipson, M., Gorodetsky, M. L. Tags: Physics, Applied, Physics review Source Type: news

Mom still matters, UCLA psychologists report
If you ’re a parent who feels your college-age children would choose their friends over you, a new UCLA psychology study has a reassuring message: You’re probably underestimating their loyalty to you.The psychologists demonstrated for the first time that when forced to make a decision that benefits either a parent or a close friend, young adults are more likely to choose the parent.“Our study suggests mom still matters,” said Jennifer Silvers, a UCLA assistant professor of psychology and senior author of the study,which is published online today in the journal Psychological Science. “Parents c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Latest Push by CMS for Increased Price Transparency Highlights Opportunities and Risks for Clinical Laboratories, Pathology Groups
As federal regulatory agencies continue to push transparency, hospitals, medical labs, anatomic pathology groups, and other healthcare providers must develop strategies for remaining competitive and maintaining patient volume More price transparency continues to be a goal of Medicare officials. Some clinical laboratory managers and pathologists may be unaware of a proposed rule issued by the […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - August 8, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Compliance, Legal, and Malpractice Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations anatomic pathology centers for medicare and medicaid services c Source Type: news

Changing Practice Patterns for Cytotechnologists Changing Practice Patterns for Cytotechnologists
How have specific job tasks changed for practicing cytotechnologists in recent years?Laboratory Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

NTU and Harvard scientists discover fat-blocking effect of nanofibers
(Nanyang Technological University) Tiny balls of nano-sized cellulose fibers added to food reduced fat absorption by up to half in laboratory and animal experiments, report scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Harvard University, United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is your lung cancer really ROS1-negative?
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) CU Cancer Center study shows that three common laboratory tests used to determine ROS1 status may return false-negative results, meaning that some patients who could benefit from ROS1-directed therapy may be slipping through the cracks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Adding TKIs Could Increase Responses in Metastatic HER2+ Breast Cancer
A laboratory study found that combining anti-HER2 TKIs with trastuzumab and pertuzumab can result in enhanced anticancer activity in HER2+ breast cancer cell lines. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - August 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Dave Levitan Source Type: news

Crayons Sold by Dollar Tree, Amazon Test Positive for Asbestos
A recent test from a consumer advocacy group found toxic levels of asbestos — a mineral that can lead to lung cancer and mesothelioma if inhaled or ingested — in a popular brand of crayons sold by Dollar Tree, Amazon.com and other retailers. The U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG) Education Fund tested 36 packs of Playskool crayons purchased from a Dollar Tree store in Chicago. All contained dangerous amounts of tremolite asbestos fibers, according to Kara Cook-Schultz, toxics director for U.S. PIRG. The results were part of U.S. PIRG’s “Safer School Supplies: Shopping Guide,” rele...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 7, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

UCLA bioengineers show magnetic gel ’s use to ease pain
UCLA bioengineers have demonstrated that a gel-like material containing tiny magnetic particles could be used to manage chronic pain from disease or injury. Broadly, the study demonstrates the promising use of biomechanical forces  that push and pull on cells to treat disease.“Much of mainstream modern medicine centers on using pharmaceuticals to make chemical or molecular changes inside the body to treat disease,” said Dino Di Carlo, UCLA professor of bioengineering and the principal investigator of the study. “However, recent breakthroughs in the control of force s at small scales have opened up a ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

INL wins two FLC Far West Regional Awards
(DOE/Idaho National Laboratory) Idaho National Laboratory has been honored with two Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Awards in 2018 in the Far West Region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Frontiers in Blockchain: Facilitating discoveries which could 'revolutionize the world'
(Frontiers) The new open-access journal Frontiers in Blockchain disseminates and communicates the latest blockchain research and impactful discoveries -- both theoretical and applied -- to researchers, academics, practitioners and the public worldwide. This multidisciplinary journal is launched in collaboration with the Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and Governance (CCEG) Think Tank and led by Olinga Ta'eed, Director, CCEG, and Christopher Clack, financial computing expert and founder of the Thomson Reuters laboratory, University College London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New emerging research suggests Montmorency tart cherries may help enhance gut health
(Weber Shandwick Chicago) Montmorency tart cherries may play a role in improving gut health, suggests a first-of-its kind human trial of nine adults combined with a parallel laboratory study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. An international team of scientists found that Montmorency tart cherries helped to positively impact the gut microbiome -- a collection of trillions of bacteria and other microbes that live in the intestinal tract. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nipah virus – India
As of 17 July 2018, a total of 19 Nipah virus (NiV) cases, including 17 deaths, were reported from Kerala State: 18 of the cases were laboratory-confirmed and the deceased index case was suspected to have NiV but could not be tested. The outbreak was localized to two districts in Kerala State: Kozhikode and Malappuram. No new cases or deaths have been reported since 1 June 2018 and, as of 30 July, human-to-human transmission of NiV has been contained in Kerala State. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - August 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Nanomedical Diagnostics Agile R100 Graphene Biosensor Characterizes...
Using data gathered by Agile R100, a kinetic binding assay system, scientists from Dr. Kim Janda’s laboratory at the Scripps Research Institute developed a new series of compounds with the potential...(PRWeb August 07, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/nanomedical_diagnostics_agile_r100_graphene_biosensor_characterizes_difficult_to_study_myc_oncoprotein_for_cancer_research/prweb15675304.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - August 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news