The Aging of Chimpanzees versus that of Humans
We humans are unusually long-lived in comparison to our near primate cousins, and also compared to other mammals of similar body mass. We also exhibit menopause, an end to reproductive capability well before the end of life, which occurs in only a small number of other mammalian species. With a few noteworthy exceptions, such as naked mole-rats, some bats, and we humans, mammalian lifespan correlates quite well with some combination of body mass and resting metabolic rate. So why are the outliers long-lived? Evolutionary theorists consider longer human life spans to be a consequence of our intelligence and culture. ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Trying to Make AI Less Squirrelly
By KIM BELLARD You may have missed it, but the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) just announced its first annual Squirrel AI award winner: Regina Barzilay, a professor at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL).   In fact, if you’re like me, you may have missed that there was a Squirrel AI award.  But there is, and it’s kind of a big deal, especially for healthcare – as Professor Barzilay’s work illustrates.  The Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence for the Benefit of Humanity (Squirrel AI is a Chi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech AI Kim Bellard Regina Barzilay Squirrel AI award Source Type: blogs

Where ’s Waldo: Finding what’s important in the medical record
I did a peer review once of an office note about an elderly man with a low-grade fever. The past medical history was all there, several prior laboratory and imaging tests were imported, and there was a long narrative section that blended active medical problems and ongoing specialist relationships. There was also a lengthy review […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 29, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/a-country-doctor" rel="tag" > Hans Duvefelt, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Health IT Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The Future of Emergency Medicine: 6 Technologies That Make Patients The Point-of-Care
Car crashes, home injuries, fires, natural disasters: every minute – if not every second – spent without treatment in such cases of medical emergencies and high-risk patients could reduce the chance of survival or proper recovery. In fact, when deprived of oxygen, permanent brain damage begins after only 4 minutes, while death can occur as soon as 4-6 minutes later. In this race against time, digital health technologies that turn patients into the point-of-care could prove to be game-changers for first responders and emergency units.  From driverless cars through medical drones to artificial intelligence (...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 29, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Portable Medical Diagnostics Robotics Telemedicine & Smartphones digital health Health 2.0 Innovation technology emergency emergency medicin Source Type: blogs

Penicillin: the accident that saved many lives
Alexander Fleming in his laboratory, 1881 – 1955   There have been many happy accidents in science. Several of these were of great benefit to medicine. For example, in 1895, a German physicist working with a cathode ray tube happened to place his hand in front of the rays and found that he could see his bones in the image projected onto the screen. Soon after that, the first X-ray images were produced. There have been other instances where serendipity played a role in unearthing effective treatments against diseases.    THE FIND OF THE 20TH CENTURY The most famous of these happy accidents is the discov...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 28, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Study: Elders today are in significantly better shape –physically and cognitively–than three decades ago
Conclusions: The results of this study provide strong evidence that cognitive performance is better in more recent cohorts of older people compared to their counterparts measured 28 years earlier. (Editor’s Note: The cognitive performance measures used underlie traits such as memory, attention, processing speed and problem solving.) The Study in Context: Brain scans show lower accumulation of tau and amyloid pathology among cognitive “super-agers” Reminder: A brain-friendly lifestyle is the best approach to delay cognitive decline and dementia Cognitive training, diet, exercise, and vascular management ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 23, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness cognitive decline cognitive performance tests cognitive-abilities cognitive-performance Cognitive-tests elders lower cognitive abilities older Source Type: blogs

CBD for chronic pain: The science doesn ’t match the marketing
If you ask health care providers about the most challenging condition to treat, chronic pain is mentioned frequently. By its nature, chronic pain is a complex and multidimensional experience. Pain perception is affected by our unique biology, our mood, our social environment, and past experiences. If you or a loved one is suffering from chronic pain, you already know the heavy burden. People are looking for novel, nonaddictive ways to treat pain Given the ongoing challenges of chronic pain management coupled with the consequences of the opioid epidemic, pain management practitioners and their patients are searching for eff...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shafik Boyaji, MD Tags: Back Pain Marijuana Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Terminology standards bridging gaps between health systems during COVID-19
The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 are varied, and patients are known to have rapidly changing signs and symptoms that must be tracked with laboratory testing. A patient may start his treatment journey with his primary care physician and will include lab centers, diagnostic centers, inpatient, and home quarantine centers.   (Source: Healthcare IT News Blog)
Source: Healthcare IT News Blog - September 22, 2020 Category: Information Technology Tags: Clinical Electronic Health Records (EHR, EMR) Health Information Exchange (HIE) Interoperability Population Health Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 607
 This week's case was donated by my colleague, Dr. Tom Grys. Tom and I did our Clinical Microbiology fellowship together and had a lot of fun! The following specimen was brought in by a patient after finding it near his eye upon wakening. He is concerned that it might be an ectoparasite or vector of human pathogens, and is hoping that the laboratory can provide this information. What is your identification, and how would you counsel the patient or patient's clinician? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 21, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Is There a COVID-Related Wound?
A variety of skin lesions have been described with Coronavirus infection, also called COVID-19 or SARS-CoV-2, and this post explores whether there is a link between COVID and wounds. Understanding of this disease is still in the early stages, and it is unclear whether these skin lesions are the result of comorbidities or coinfection with other agents, or whether COVID-19 is actually responsible. A search of the world literature reveals the following skin issues with COVID: Acral erythema (redness and swelling of the hands and feet) with vesicles and pustules.  This is similar to chilblains – a condition associa...
Source: Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - September 21, 2020 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Jeffrey M Levine Tags: Featured Medical Articles Geriatric Medicine Long-Term Care Pressure Injuries & Wound Care bedsore bedsores coronavirus COVID COVID-19 decubiti decubitus ulcer end-of-life care eschar geriatrics gerontology Improving Medical Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 21st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Brucellosis – how dangerous is it?
Brucellosis is most frequently transmitted via unpasteurized dairy products   Zoonotic diseases to be keeping the world on its toes. What is the disease responsible for the latest outbreak in China and what is its pathogenic potential? Not the next COVID-19 Brucellosis is a category B bioterror disease, as classed by CDC. While it is one of the most important zoonotic diseases worldwide, brucellosis has limited pandemic potential, since human-to-human transmission is sporadic and occurs via blood, sexual exposure, or breastfeeding.  63% of cross-border events since 1965 were directly linked to the consumption of ...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 19, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Higher Temperature Slows Osteoporosis, an Effect Mediated by Polyamine Produced by Gut Microbes
Osteoporosis is the name given to the characteristic age-related loss of bone mass and strength. The extracellular matrix of bone tissue is constantly remodeled, created by osteoblasts and broken down by osteoclasts. The proximate cause of osteoporosis is a tilt in the balance of these processes, favoring osteoclast activity and thus slow loss of bone structure. Today's research materials discuss a most intriguing result: in mice, maintaining a higher environmental temperature slows the progression of osteoporosis. Interesting, but is it a path to therapy? As is always the case when looking at metabolic responses to...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A welcome to new residents
Twenty-five years have passed since I finished my residency, and a lot has changed. Back then, we hand wrote all our notes, and the only time we looked at a computer screen was to obtain laboratory results. Now, residents spend more time in front of a computer screen than at the bedside. I contend that […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 18, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/thomas-j-clark" rel="tag" > Thomas J. Clark, DO < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Neurology Residency Source Type: blogs

Doctors Urge Caution in Interpretation of Research in Times of COVID-19
September 9, 2020 To:       American College of Cardiology American College of Chest Physicians American College of Physicians American College of Radiology American Heart Association American Society of Echocardiography American Thoracic Society European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging European Society of Cardiology European Society of Radiology Heart Rhythm Society Infectious Disease Society of America North American Society of Cardiovascular Imaging Radiologic Society of North America Society of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Soci...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Medical Practice Patients Physicians myocarditis Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

TWiV 664: TWiV is for the dogs
On this mid-week edition, does it matter that SARS-CoV-2 is mutating, seasonal coronavirus immunity is short-lived, another bogus claim that the virus was produced in a laboratory (it came from Nature), and answers to listener questions. Click arrow to playDownload TWiV 664 (73 MB .mp3, 122 min)Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Show notes at microbe.tv/twiv (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology common cold coronavirus COVID-19 D614G immunity mutation pandemic reinfection SARS-CoV-2 viral viruses Source Type: blogs

The Malpani Baby Making Kit is designed by IVF specialists to help you to have a baby !
 The reason the Malpani Baby Self Insemination Kit is very thoughtfully designed is because it consists of exactly the same medical grade equipment we use in our IVF laboratory when we do IVF .This is what makes the Malpani Baby Kit so special – and this is why it’s such great value for money.Some users get intimidated when using it for the first time, because everything seems so strange and new , but the reality is that it ’s surprisingly easy to use.The instructions we provide are comprehensive, and our kit is packed with thoughtful products to make your life easier, such as individually packed spe...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - September 17, 2020 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Most Reliable COVID-19 Online Resources: Your Ultimate Guide
In the era of fake news, mask naysayers and, dare we say, covidiots, relevant news often gets lost under the rubble of conspiracy theories and what not. 2020 already feels like a lucid fever dream as it is and we would be better off being well-informed by trustworthy sources of information. However, even leading authorities are lagging behind in this respect. The WHO only recently stopped releasing its daily PDF COVID reports in favour of an online dashboard. On the other hand, Johns Hopkins put one together in 3 days in January. It took the WHO 8 months since the first outbreak to have its own. The health authority als...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy Security & Privacy testing online resources digital technology applications covid covid19 Good Judgement Project WHO sewage data vaccine who dashboard worldometer Johns Hopkins JHU Source Type: blogs

Getting the best treatment for your fibromyalgia
Imagine being in pain and having your doctor tell you it’s all in your head. Unfortunately, this is not an uncommon experience for many of the six million Americans living with fibromyalgia, a chronic, painful condition. People with fibromyalgia experience widespread pain, aches, and stiffness in muscles and joints throughout the body, as well as unusual tiredness. No one knows what causes this condition, and no apparent physical cause has been identified thus far. The most likely culprit is a brain malfunction that amplifies normal nerve responses, causing people with fibromyalgia to experience pain or other symptom...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kelly Bilodeau Tags: Bones and joints Fatigue Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Sewage Data As A Surprising Predictor For COVID-19 Cases
You might not think much of them, but bodily fluids offer a treasure trove of information for medical diagnoses. Indeed, scientists are now looking past the drain and directly into sewage to gather data about COVID-19.  You might not have heard about it, but it turns out it is possible to detect and measure the amount of virus DNA in sewage samples which can predict case number by about 7-10 days in advance. Several countries are already employing this method to predict infection cases; and it is yet another example of an unusual association between a data source and outcomes. Combining the information gathered fro...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Healthcare Design Security & Privacy prediction rna epidemiology gastrointestinal covid sewage data covid-19 cdc wastewater Yale Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 605
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 605: Earthworm, an oligochaete. As a segmented annelid, these worms usually have a few setae (i.e., bristles) on their outer body surface, as seen in this case, which aid in their identification, and differentiation from large parasitic worms such asAscaris lumbricoides.As so nicely stated by Florida Fan, " Did we say “after the bowel movement”? Good thing the patient did not pass it out. Yes, we have seen this annelid a few times. (SeeCase 545,Case 344, andCase 234). It always shows the locomotive spicules on each ring of the body. A diligent, hardworking creature,...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 7, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 7th 2020
In conclusion, using a large cohort with rich health and DNA methylation data, we provide the first comparison of six major epigenetic measures of biological ageing with respect to their associations with leading causes of mortality and disease burden. DNAm GrimAge outperformed the other measures in its associations with disease data and associated clinical traits. This may suggest that predicting mortality, rather than age or homeostatic characteristics, may be more informative for common disease prediction. Thus, proteomic-based methods (as utilised by DNAm GrimAge) using large, physiologically diverse protein sets for p...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Federal Aid Creates Central ‐​Planning Power
This study argues that Congress should repeal all federal aid-to-state programs for many reasons, including that aid comes with costly strings attached that destroy local democracy.Richard Epstein and Mario Loyolanoted about aid programs: “When Americans vote in state and local elections, they think they are voting on state and local policies. But often they are just deciding which local officials get to implement the dictates of distant and insulated federal bureaucrats, whom even Congress can’t control.”I came across a table (p. 82) in New Jersey ’s budget that lists the $15 billion the state rece...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 4, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Stress Granules as a Therapeutic Target
Stress granules are a comparatively poorly understood portion of the processes that a cell uses to maintain its protein machinery and component structures. When cells are subject to mild stress or damage, whether it is due to radiation, heat, lack of nutrients, or other challenges, they upregulate the activity of both autophagy and the ubuiquitin-proteasome system. Autophagy involves flagging proteins and structures for disassembly, followed by transport to a lysosome packed with enzymes to break down molecules into component parts that can be reused. The ubuiquitin-proteasome system tags proteins with ubiquitin, allowing ...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Inside the IVF laboratory | What the IVF Patients need to know about the IVF lab !
(Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog)
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - August 31, 2020 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

The hardly hidden costs
Chronic/persistent pain management is not sexy. No-one gets a magic cure. Lives are not saved – at least not in a way that mortality statistics show. Chronic pain management is under-funded. And now: buried in a list of other proposed service cuts in the local health board’s plan to save millions of dollars, is a proposal to “save” $650,000 from the pain clinic. You’ll note also reductions in community services, GP support for vulnerable, and healthy lifestyles programmes. https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/122558278/hundreds-of-staff-nurses-and-services-may-be-axed-at-canterbury-d...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 30, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Interdisciplinary teams News Pain conditions Research Science in practice Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 31st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Age-Related Downregulation of Rubicon Causes Excessive Autophagy in Adipocytes, Contributing to Metabolic Dysfunction
Autophagy is a vital collection of cellular maintenance processes in which proteins and structures are broken down and recycled for their component parts. In short-lived laboratory species, dysfunctional autophagy shortens life span, while increased operation and efficiency of autophagy - as occurs in response to forms of stress such as heat, exercise, and calorie restriction - slows aging and extends life span. The usual high level view of aging and autophagy is that autophagic activity declines with age, and that this loss of function contributes to cell and tissue dysfunction, and thus also to age-related disease...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

5 Mindful Recovery Steps for Self-Observation
In early recovery, there is value in filling your space and time with meetings and various distractions to fill in the space that was once consumed with substances and addictive behaviors. There is also value, at some point, to create unfilled space for your presence and attention. Creating space to be present for your presence is a key to sustainable long-term recovery.  Creating Space vs Filling Space The practice of mindfulness; being there, being present, paying attention, and learning to be there for yourself starts with the process of letting go. Letting go of substances and addictive behaviors is a gr...
Source: World of Psychology - August 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Laura C Meyer Tags: Addiction Mindfulness Recovery Alcoholism Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 24th 2020
We report that electrical stimulation (ES) stimulation of post-stroke aged rats led to an improved functional recovery of spatial long-term memory (T-maze), but not on the rotating pole or the inclined plane, both tests requiring complex sensorimotor skills. Surprisingly, ES had a detrimental effect on the asymmetric sensorimotor deficit. Histologically, there was a robust increase in the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and SVZ of the infarcted hemisphere and the presence of a considerable number of neurons expressing tubulin beta III in the infarcted area. Among the genes that were unique...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Scientists Grow First Functioning Mini Human Heart Model in the Lab
Researchers from Michigan State University have grown the first functioning mini human heart model in the laboratory.Read more on sciencespacerobots.com (Source: HealthNewsBlog.com)
Source: HealthNewsBlog.com - August 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: heart Source Type: blogs

Is the FDA too slow to handle the pandemic?
The FDA plays a critical role in our nation ’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It helps decide which medicines are safe and effective to treat the disease. It evaluates the accuracy and reliability of laboratory tests. And it will play a central role in assessing potential vaccines. But will the FDA bureaucracy move with the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 21, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Worried about sleep apnea? Home-based testing is now the norm
If your bed partner complains about your loud snoring, it might be a disruptive nuisance — or something more serious. High-volume snoring punctuated by snorts, gasps, and brief pauses in breathing is the hallmark of obstructive sleep apnea. Although this condition occurs most often in men over 40 who are overweight or obese, it can affect people of all ages and sizes. The resulting daytime sleepiness — a direct result of not getting enough high-quality sleep — can leave people moody and forgetful. Even more worrisome: car accidents are two to three times more common in people with sleep apnea. Sleep apnea...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Health Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Sleep Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs

Adenosine Injected into Arthritic Joints Produces Cartilage Regrowth
Researchers here provide evidence for injections of adenosine into damaged joint tissue to provoke meaningful degrees of cartilage regrowth in an animal model of degenerative joint disease. Finding ways to force the regrowth of tissues, such as cartilage, that normally exhibit little regenerative capacity is an important goal for the research community. Many varied approaches are presently under development; this one has the merit of being comparatively simple when compared to the more logistically challenging cell therapy and tissue engineering strategies. Previous research had shown that maintaining supplies of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 21, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Air Force announces research platform to harness closed-loop neurotechnology and accelerate learning “on the fly”
U.S. Air Force illustration/Richard Eldridge Air Force Neurotechnology Partnership Aims to Accelerate Learning (Military Spot): The Individualized Neural Learning System, or iNeuraLS, is a new augmented learning platform that will enable rapid learning by closed-loop modulation of cognitive states during skill acquisition. Essentially, the AFRL team seeks to develop a capability that will give Airmen the ability to rapidly acquire knowledge and skills on the fly through direct brain interfaces with the help of neurotechnologies… “We’re going to have unprecedented access to the brain using a novel brain-...
Source: SharpBrains - August 18, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Peak Performance Technology Air-Force Airmen augmented learning brain interfaces brain stimulation brain-machine interface cognitive states electroencephalography Individualized Neural Learning System iNeuraL Source Type: blogs

Have You Caught an ‘Emotional Virus’?
Have you ever found yourself suddenly ill at ease? You might feel flustered or agitated. Your heart starts to race, or you catch yourself darting toward the door or to the kitchen to do some mindless comfort eating. The next time this happens, reflect and ask yourself: Who is in the room with me? Who did I just talk with? What did I just experience? What’s going on around me? Negative emotions from the people around us — including fear, worry, anxiety, and stress — pass from one person to another quickly, often with few or no words, like a highly contagious virus. If you spend an evening, for instance, ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 17, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Paul Napper, PsyD and Anthony Rao, PhD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Habits Self-Help Stress Alcoholism Binge Eating Contagion Coping Skills coronavirus COVID-19 drinking habits Eating Habits Source Type: blogs

Glucose, Methionine, and the Study of Calorie Restriction in Yeast
Beneficial changes to metabolism take place in response to a lowered intake of nutrients, upregulating cell maintenance processes and extending life span. This evolved a very long time ago indeed, a way to ensure greater odds of survival in the face of famine. As a consequence of its distant origins, the mechanisms of the calorie restriction response are similar in near all species, from single celled yeast through to higher animals such as mammals. The research noted here reinforces this point: calorie restriction in yeast cells in culture is usually achieved by reducing the surrounding amount of glucose, a far cry...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 17th 2020
In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. A Fisetin Variant, C...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 16, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Critics Wonder Whether the FDA Is Too Slow to Handle a Pandemic
The FDA plays a critical role in our nation’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It helps decide which medicines are safe and effective to treat the disease. It evaluates the accuracy and reliability of laboratory tests. And it will play a central role... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Shape Of A Glass Can Influence How Much We Drink
By Matthew Warren Recent years have seen the government take measures to try and limit people’s consumption of sugary drinks and other unhealthy foods. Take the so-called “sugar tax” placed on soft drinks, for instance, or the proposal to ban adverts for junk food before the 9pm watershed. Some psychologists hope that small changes in design can also help “nudge” people into healthier behaviours. For example, a study from last year found that the order in which drinks are presented on the McDonald’s menu could encourage people to choose the sugar-free options more often. Now a new p...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Alcohol Health Perception Source Type: blogs

Overexpression of VRK-1 Extends Life Span in Nematode Worms
In this study, we sought to elucidate the role of VRK-1 in regulation of adult life span in C. elegans. We found that overexpression of VRK-1::GFP (green fluorescent protein), which was detected in the nuclei of cells in multiple somatic tissues, including the intestine, increased life span. Conversely, genetic inhibition of vrk-1 decreased life span. We further showed that vrk-1 was essential for the increased life span of mitochondrial respiratory mutants. We demonstrated that VRK-1 was responsible for increasing the level of active and phosphorylated form of AMPK, thus promoting longevity. Link: https://doi.org...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 11, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 602
 This week's case was generously donated by Dr. Harsha Sheorey. The following object was submitted from a middle-aged man with hematuria. The specimen source is urine, and accompanying instructions asked the laboratory to rule out a fluke or cestode. The patient had traveled to Southeast Asia in the past.Identification? What are the clinical implications for this patient? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 10, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

The Management Script in Action: Putting a Practical Tool to Work
In our recent Academic Medicine Perspective, we proposed the term “management script” as a concept for teaching management reasoning. Analogous to the illness script, an essential component of diagnostic reasoning, management scripts are high-level, precompiled, conceptual knowledge structures of the courses of action that a clinician might undertake to address a patient’s health care problem(s). Not to be confused with a checklist, where specific interventions are mandated in a sequence, management scripts are more like a menu: a collection of options in various categories (e.g., appetizers, courses, des...
Source: Academic Medicine Blog - August 4, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Guest Author Tags: Featured care management decisions clinical decision making residency training residents Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 3rd 2020
In this study, we examined the effects of oxytocin on the Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic plasticity in mice. To investigate the effect of oxytocin on synaptic plasticity, we prepared acute hippocampal slices for extracellular recording and assessed long-term potentiation (LTP) with perfusion of the Aβ active fragment (Aβ25-35) in the absence and presence of oxytocin. We found that oxytocin reversed the impairment of LTP induced by Aβ25-35 perfusion in the mouse hippocampus. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with the selective oxytocin receptor antagonist L-368,899. Furthermore, the tr...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Eating Ourselves into Shorter, Less Healthy Lives
We humans have not evolved for optimal function given a continually high calorie intake. We, and all other species, evolved in an environment characterized by periods of feast and famine: we desire food constantly, but nonetheless need some amount of hunger in order to be healthy. Periods of low calorie intake spur increased activity of tissue maintenance mechanisms throughout the body. A lower overall calorie intake minimizes excess visceral fat tissue that causes chronic inflammation and metabolic disease. In this modern society of comfort and cheap calories, all too many people are eating themselves into shorter, less h...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 30, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Glucosamine Supplementation Correlates with Lower All Cause Mortality
An analysis of a large study population here shows that glucosamine supplementation results in about a 15% reduction in mortality, a sizable effect size in the context of what is known of the effects of lifestyle choices and supplementation on aging. Glucosamine is used as an anti-inflammatory intervention, but there is at best only mixed evidence for it to actually do much good as a treatment for specific inflammatory conditions such as arthritis. It is nonetheless widely used, hence the ability to see outcomes in sizable group of people. The effect on mortality is certainly an interesting outcome, given the lack of robus...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

TWiV 645: Lions and tigers and zookeepers (oh my)
Daniel Griffin provides a clinical report on COVID-19, followed by a review of the State Department document on the Wuhan BSL-4 laboratory, the report on infection of tigers and lions in the Bronx Zoo, and, answers to listener questions. Click arrow to playDownload TWiV 645 (98 MB .mp3, 163 min)Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Show notes […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - July 27, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: This Week in Virology Bronx Zoo BSL-4 laboratory coronavirus COVID-19 diagnostic test lion pandemic SARS-CoV-2 tiger viral viruses Wuhan Source Type: blogs

Age Related Hearing Loss is Caused by Damage to Hair Cells
Researchers here provide evidence for age-related deafness to be caused by the loss of viable hair cells in the inner ear, rather than other possible mechanisms. As pointed out, this is perhaps the best outcome for such a study, given the numerous approaches to hair cell regeneration or hair cell replacement that are underway in the scientific community. While it is interesting to compare this result with earlier data suggesting that hair cells survive in old individuals, but are disconnected from the brain, it nonetheless boosts the prospects for near term reversal of age-related hearing loss. Scientists have dem...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Excess weight and Covid-19: insights from new evidence
This report brings together findings from UK and international studies published during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. It offers information about excess weight and its association with Covid-19 for the following outcomes: laboratory confirmation; hospitalisation; admission to intensive or critical care and treatment; and risk of mortality. The report offers some important insights into the prevalence, causes and risks of being overweight and also includes information regarding food and drink purchases and physical activity during the lockdown. It is intended to provide insights for policymakers and those in health m...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - July 27, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

This Is The Fax Machine Story Of The Year I Reckon. Surely The USA In 2020 Can Do Better?
This appeared in the New Your Times last week: Bottleneck for U.S. Coronavirus Response: The Fax Machine Before public health officials can manage the pandemic, they must deal with a broken data system that sends incomplete results in formats they can ’t easily use. By Sarah Kliff and Margot Sanger-Katz ·         July 13, 2020 Public health officials in Houston are struggling to keep up with one of the nation ’s largest coronavirus outbreaks. They are desperate to trace cases and quarantine patients before they spread the virus to others. But first, they must negot...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - July 23, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs