‘Now we have to deal with it’: what’s going on in the UK with monkeypox?
It ’s not the first time the virus has been found in Britain but now there are chains of transmissionThe person was sick when they boarded the plane. Five days before leaving Nigeria for Britain, they noticed a rash that spread into a scattering of fluid-filled bumps. When the plane touched down on 4 May, they wasted no time. The person attended hospital where doctors, alerted by their recent travel, immediately suspected monkeypox. The patient was isolated and a doctor, clad in full PPE, took a swab from a blister on their skin.Because monkeypox is listed as a “high-consequence infectious disease”, the situation mov...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 20, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Monkeypox Health Infectious diseases Medical research Science World news Source Type: news

Recovery of mice raises hopes drug could help people with spinal injuries
Condition of rodents with spinal cord damage improved after they had lung disease drug, say researchersMice with spinal cord injuries have shown remarkable recovery after being given a drug initially developed for people with lung disease, researchers have revealed, saying the treatment could soon be tested on humans.It is thought there are about2,500 new spinal cord injuries in the UK every year, with some of those affected experiencing full loss of movement as a result.Despite a number of promising areas of research,at present damage to the spinal cord is not reversible.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 20, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Science UK news Source Type: news

Contact lens that can release drug could be used to treat glaucoma
Invention can deliver medication after detecting pressure in the eye from fluid buildup, scientists sayA contact lens that can release a drug if it detects high pressure within the eye has been created by scientists who say it could help treat glaucoma.Glaucoma is an eye disease that involves damage to the optic nerve, and can lead to blindness if not treated.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Blindness and visual impairment Health Science Society World news Source Type: news

Osteoporosis patients should not be afraid to exercise regularly, say experts
UK ’s first exercise guidance on bone disease affecting 3m in Britain encourages people to move moreMillions of people with osteoporosis should not be afraid to exercise regularly, experts have said in guidance aimed at boosting bone health, cutting the risk of falls and improving posture.The condition, which weakens bones and makes them more likely to break, affects more than 3 million people in the UK and more than 150 million worldwide.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory health editor Tags: Osteoporosis Society Health NHS Medical research Science Source Type: news

Infertile men may be twice as likely to develop breast cancer, study suggests
Researchers find link between fertility issues and cancer risk, but say biological reason unclearInfertile men may be twice as likely to develop breast cancer than those without fertility issues, according to one of the largest ever studies of the disease.Breast cancer in males is less common than in females and its relation to infertility had previously been investigated only in small studies. The new research was published in the journal Breast Cancer Research.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Breast cancer Fertility problems Men Science Health Medical research Society UK news Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Using metal detectors to ward off wayward specimens
The  Histology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology processes more than 350,000 paraffin-embedded blocks every year as lab staff prepare tissue slides for pathologists to evaluate. Each of those blocks represents a patient waiting for answers. Although lost s pecimens within the Histology Lab are rare — less than one-half of 1% are ever misplaced — if even one specimen goes missing, it has the potential to be devastating for that patient. "We're aiming for zero.… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 14, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

‘Phage therapy’ successes boost fight against drug-resistant infections
Two US patients recover from intractable infections, giving hope for treatments beyond antibioticsTwo US patients have recovered from intractable infections after being treated with a pioneering therapy involving genetically engineered bacteria-killing viruses.The cases raise hopes that so-called phage therapy could be used more widely to combat the global crisis of drug-resistant infections. One of the patients, Jarrod Johnson, a 26-year-old man with cystic fibrosis, was approaching death after suffering a chronic lung infection that resisted treatment by antibiotics for six years. After being given the phage therapy, his...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Antibiotics Society Science UK news US news World news Colorado Source Type: news

Viewpoint: Long-overlooked killer needs attention, funding
The accelerated development of effective Covid-19 vaccines affirms the commonwealth ’s status as home to many of the most innovative life sciences research institutions in the world. And while some medical research attracts significant government funding, other crucial work receives little or no federal support.  Brain aneurysms — a weak spot in a cerebral artery that can bur st, often causing brain damage, disabilities or death — impact almost 7 million Americans each year. Yet scientists… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 13, 2022 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Groundbreaking new study finds possible explanation for SIDS
A medical research breakthrough might have just solved the mystery of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome . #breakthrough (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 12, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers seek to improve success of chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A study published by researchers from Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida and Case Western, Cleveland Medical Center, investigates the reasons for decreasing remission rates for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy (CAR-T cell t herapy). The study is published in Cancer Discovery. "CAR-T cell therapy is a promising treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, especially for patients who have relapsed or those who have not responded… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 12, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Half of Covid-hospitalised still symptomatic two years on, study finds
Research on Wuhan patients reveals effects of long Covid, with 11% still not having returned to workMore than half of people hospitalised with Covid-19 still have at least one symptom two years after they were first infected, according to the longest follow-up study of its kind.While physical and mental health generally improve over time, the analysis suggests that coronavirus patients discharged from hospital still tend to experience poorer health and quality of life than the general population. The research was published inthe Lancet Respiratory Medicine.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 11, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Coronavirus Long Covid Science Medical research World news China Infectious diseases Microbiology Source Type: news

Time to end this right royal charade | Brief letters
The so-called Queen ’s speech | Animal-to-human transplants | Parliamentary seating | Dress sense | Teaspoon treatIf the Queen doesn ’t write her own speech and is no longer able to read it (Report, 9 May), isn ’t it time to stop the charade and call things by their accurate names? The prime minister disguises his autocratic powers under the royal prerogative. If it’s his speech, let’s say so and stop pretending the monarch has anything to do with it. We must sever the monarchy from the political sys tem: a democratic imperative that is centuries overdue.Nick InmanLarreule, France• Xenotransplantation “is a r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 10, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Monarchy The Queen House of Commons Politics Medical research Health Source Type: news

Intranasal proteins could protect against COVID-19 variants
Proteins designed to be resistant to new SARS-CoV-2 variants protected mice against infection with when given through the nose. (Source: NIH Research Matters)
Source: NIH Research Matters - May 10, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Study links synthetic chemicals to liver damage
A review of more than one hundred studies found that PFAS, synthetic chemicals found in many common products, are linked to markers of liver damage. (Source: NIH Research Matters)
Source: NIH Research Matters - May 10, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Fourth Covid jab can give higher immunity than initial booster, study finds
UK-based team finds antibodies peaked higher after fourth jab given after gap of more than six months than after thirdA fourth dose of a Covid vaccine can ramp up the body ’s immune defences beyond the peak achieved after a third dose, research suggests.A second booster – often a fourth dose of a Covid vaccine – is currently offered in theUK to those aged 75 or over, people living in care homes for older people, and those over the age of 12 who are immunosuppressed.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 9, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Omicron variant Medical research Coronavirus Health Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news