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Gene therapy for 'bubble baby' syndrome approved on NHS
GlaxoSmithKline ’s Strimvelis is the first such treatment to be funded in the UKThe NHS will fund gene therapy for the first time after the UK ’s healthcare cost watchdog approved treatment for the so-called “bubble baby” syndrome, despite a price tag of more than £500,000.The treatment is used against adenosine deaminase deficiency, or ADA-SCID, which disables the immune system and means that children with the illness have to be kept in isolation to avoid infection – hence the “bubble baby” name.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Reuters Tags: NHS The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) Genetics Biology Science GlaxoSmithKline Immunology Medical research UK news Pharmaceuticals industry Society Source Type: news

I joined the 100,000 Genomes Project to prevent a heart attack ​
The benefits of the project go far beyond genetic testing, it could enable new medical discoveries and diagnosesAs chief executive of the British Heart Foundation (BHF), talking publicly about cardiovascular research and its life-saving effects is something I ’m used to. But I never expected to find myself sitting on the other side of the bench, participating in a life-changing study.I have been invited to participate in the100,000 Genomes Project, a unique and large-scale project to sequence the full genetic code of 70,000 people with rare genetic diseases.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 23, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Simon Gillespie Tags: Healthcare Network Voluntary Sector Network Medical research Science Genetics Biology Heart disease Society Charities NHS Policy Innovation Source Type: news

EU funds promising breast cancer risk research
October marks Breast Cancer Awareness Month, highlighting the plight of patients and efforts to fight this potentially deadly disease that claims around 570 000 lives a year around the world. The EU is doing its part by funding a range of promising research projects, including two that are developing tools to better determine a woman’s breast cancer risk in order to optimise screening and prevention - and ultimately save lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 23, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

New rugby warm-up regime can halve number of injuries
Programme may be rolled out nationwide to cut soaring risk to playersA series of exercises performed before rugby matches can dramatically reduce injury, according to a benchmark study that the game ’s coaches hope will rebut the charge that they do not take the issue of concussion seriously.The programme,known as Activate, is the result of a project by health researchers at the University of Bath and England Rugby. The results, published in theBritish Journal of Sports Medicine, suggest that the exercises can significantly reduce concussion and lower limb injuries.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Doward Tags: Concussion in sport Rugby union UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Robin Ling obituary
Orthopaedic surgeon whose ‘Exeter stem’ implant transformed hip replacement surgeryRobin Ling, who has died aged 90, was an orthopaedic surgeon at thePrincess Elizabeth Orthopaedic hospital in Exeter whose contribution to hip surgery resulted in an improved quality of life for millions of people. His research and teaching had a profound influence on the development of hip replacement operations and of revision (re-do) hip surgery. He was responsible for establishing many of today ’s surgical techniques.His research built on the work ofSir John Charnley, who pioneered the total hip replacement in the early...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: A John Timperley Tags: Medical research Medicine Science Hospitals University of Exeter Scotland Source Type: news

Biomarker tests to speed up cancer drug development
EU and industry-funded research into validating more imaging biomarkers for use in cancer drug trials seeks to speed up development of successful new drugs and avoid exposing patients to treatment that does not work for them. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 20, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists find where HIV 'hides' to evade detection by the immune system
In a decades-long game of hide and seek, scientists from Sydney's Westmead Institute for Medical Research have confirmed for the very first time the specific immune memory T-cells where infectious HIV 'hides' in the human body to evade detection by the immune system. The team, led by Associate Professor Sarah Palmer from the University of Sydney, developed a pioneering full-length genetic sequencing assay for HIV. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Legumes see new life in flowerpots
Each year in Europe, the food industry discards millions of tonnes of vegetable residue and legumes. In Italy, scientists are using these leftovers to make bioplastics, an innovative and ecological material. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 19, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Are you prepared for a disaster? Help is at hand
An online platform developed by EU-funded researchers is helping emergency services, public authorities and communities to better prepare for and cope with disasters, potentially saving lives and protecting key infrastructure. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 19, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Dana-Farber and Brigham and Women & #39;s researchers laud FDA approval of CAR T-cell therapy for non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's one of the only centers certified to offer new approach (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - October 19, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Creating a one-stop-shop for smooth travel
From passengers to operators and retailers, everyone is in favour of a more intuitive and seamless travel experience. The Co-Active project will contribute to making this a reality. Initiatives include facilitating the purchase, exchange and refund of tickets for multimodal products and services through a 'one-stop-shop'. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 18, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

The List: Austin-area top bioscience R & D companies
The 2017 Austin Business Journal list of bioscience/pharmaceutical research and development firms is open to a wide array of firms doing medical research. Eligible firms must perform research and development activity locally. Besides drug development, the list is open to researchers developing biological test kits, implants, and other biomedical devices and diagnostic tools, including software used for research analytics. Companies listed can focus on internal R&D for their own products, or they can be contract research organizations (CRO). ABJ surveys local R&D firms annually. Only companies that responded to requ...
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 17, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Sharper focus on gravitational waves
The detection of gravitational waves in 2015 provided groundbreaking information about the Universe. Building on this discovery, EU-funded scientists have now detected waves at three observatories, a first in astrophysics, making it possible to locate the signals’ origin and better apply the data they provide. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 17, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Development of an evidence-based complex intervention for community rehabilitation of patients with hip fracture using realist review, survey and focus groups - Roberts JL, Din NU, Williams M, Hawkes CA, Charles JM, Hoare Z, Morrison V, Alexander S, Lemmey A, Sackley C, Logan P, Wilkinson C, Rycroft-Malone J, Williams NH.
OBJECTIVES: To develop an evidence and theory-based complex intervention for improving outcomes in elderly patients following hip fracture. DESIGN: Complex-intervention development (Medical Research Council (MRC) framework phase I) using realist li... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

The eyes have it: how technology allows you to speak when all you can do is blink
Developments in eye-gaze technology – which converts minute movements of the eye into spoken words – are opening up undreamed of opportunities for people with motor neurone syndromeSteve Thomas and I are talking about brain implants. Bonnie Tyler ’s Holding Out For a Hero is playing in the background and for a moment I almost forget that a disease has robbed Steve of his speech. The conversation breaks briefly; now I see his wheelchair, his ventilator, his hospital bed.Steve, a software engineer, was diagnosed with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a type ofmotor neurone disease) aged 50. He knew i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Montague Tags: Motor neurone disease Medical research Technology Society Science Health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

ESnet's science DMZ design could help transfer, protect medical research data
(DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) As medicine becomes more data-intensive, Berkeley Lab& ESnet's Medical Science DMZ eyed as secure solution for transferring data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food sharing puts sustainability on the menu
EU-funded researchers are carrying out a comprehensive analysis of urban food-sharing schemes, examining how they embrace modern technologies like the internet and smart phones. The worldwide study could help people living in cities make more sustainable use of food resources. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 16, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

IACUC Administrators Best Practices Meeting: November 29-30, State College, PA
The IACUC Administrators Association (IAA) will present a Best Practices Meeting on November 29-30, 2017, in State College, PA. This meeting is for IACUC staff and animal program operations personnel to present and share best practices in the humane care and use of laboratory animals. For additional information, visitIAA (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - October 13, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Apply Today! Health science librarians are invited to participate in a rigorous online biomedical and health research data management training course, sponsored by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Training Office (NTO). Details. The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the newly created position of All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - October 13, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

More than 25 million people dying in agony without morphine every year
Concern over illicit use and addiction is putting morphine out of reach for millions of patients globally who need it for pain reliefMore than 25 million people, including 2.5 million children, die in agony every year around the world, for want of morphine or other palliative care, according to a major investigation.Poor people cannot get pain relief in many countries of the world because their needs are overlooked or the authorities are so worried about the potential illicit use of addictive opioids that they will not allow their importation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah BoseleyHealth editor Tags: Drugs Health Medical research Science Society Source Type: news

Should Medical Research Stick to More'Serious' Topics? Should Medical Research Stick to More'Serious' Topics?
Lighter study subjects may be distracting us from more important matters.Medscape Reader Polls (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Cell-free heart valve offers promise of normal life
EU-funded researchers have developed and tested a way to make human heart valve implants more tolerable and longer lasting, enabling recipients of all ages to avoid follow-up surgery and live largely normal lives, cutting hospital stays and healthcare costs. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 11, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Be'Mindful' of The Hype
Scientists call for rigorous research to back up mindfulness marketing claimsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Evaluating Health Information, Understanding Medical Research (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - October 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How your blood may predict your future health
New research into bloodstream ‘biomarkers’ aims to unlock the full impact of social status on people’s lifetime health outcomes. The key is exposure to stressHealth is a well-knowninequality issue. While ageing is inevitable and most of us will get sick at some point, the rate of your decline is likely to be faster thelower down the socioeconomic ladder you started.The intriguing thing is, nobody exactly knows why. Tempting though it is to blame the usual suspects –poor diet, obesity, smoking– they don’t account for the whole story.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Kat Arney Tags: Inequality Health Medical research Science Biology Society Poverty Ageing Income inequality Social exclusion US income inequality Source Type: news

A step towards a new drug to treat fungal infections that kill 1.6 million people annually
(Westmead Institute for Medical Research) A team from Sydney's Westmead Institute for Medical Research is a step closer to developing a drug to treat life-threatening fungal infections that cause more than 1.6 million deaths annually. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meeting an Unmet Need: Surgical Implant that Grows with a Child
A novel growth-accommodating implant could revolutionize cardiac repair (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - October 10, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Better privacy protection online
How safe is your personal data? How do you know? With our various connected devices, our extensive browsing histories and all the apps running on our smartphones, it's hard to keep tabs on the details we might be making available willingly or unwittingly. An EU-funded project has set out to help people monitor and control their privacy online. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 10, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

New Congenital Heart Disease Genes Uncovered
Discoveries from “Bench to Bassinet” investigators may help answer parents’ questions about the genetic causes of heart conditions and long-term effects. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - October 9, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Test for breast cancer risk could reduce pre-emptive mastectomies
Researchers develop gene test that will give more detailed information on risk to women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutationsA genetic test that accurately predicts the risk of developing breast cancer could soon be used on high-risk groups.Researchers behind the test say it could reduce the number of women choosing pre-emptive mastectomy surgery as they will be able to make more informed decisions about their care.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Slawson Tags: Breast cancer Health Society NHS Genetics Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Six Nobel prizes – what’s the fascination with the fruit fly?
Drosophila share 60 per cent of human DNA, making them perfect for research that has led to vital strides in treating cancer, autism, diabetes and many other ills. Now scientists in the field have won yet another NobelAm not IA fly like thee?Or art not thouA man like me?With these lines, fromThe Fly, William Blake posed a question of unusual prescience for a poet writing 200 years ago. At first glance, there seem to be few similarities between Homo sapiens and airborne insects. Yet Blake was not so sure. He could see connections. And in recent years, science has found that he was probably correct. Fruit flies, it transpire...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie, science editor Tags: Medical research Genetics Nobel prizes Insects Biology Science Science prizes Source Type: news

'Western society is chronically sleep deprived': the importance of the body's clock
The 2017 Nobel prize for medicine was awarded for the discovery of how our circadian rhythms are controlled. But what light does it shed on the cycle of life?The cycle of day and night on our planet is age-old and inescapable, so the idea of an internal body clock might not sound that radical. In science, though, asking the questions “why?” and “how?” about the most day-to-day occurrences can require the greatest leaps of ingenuity and produce the most interesting answers.This was the case for three American biologists, Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young, who earlier this weekwere award...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Nobel prizes People in science Science prizes Biology Medical research Health Sleep & wellbeing Society Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the newly created position of All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). View the full posting for more information about the position. Renew your membership today! If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, see our recent blog post about the benefits of renewal and NNLM Membership. Are you having trouble...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - October 6, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Creating value from stony ground
An EU industry-funded project uses marginal land and hardy native plants to produce valuable chemicals for the possible manufacture of a range of products including cosmetics and bioplastics. The goal is to harness the potential of local areas and build a sustainable, profitable and job-creating value chain. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 6, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cancer patients need more than survival | Fay Schopen
The hunger for ‘miracle cures’ has skewed our understanding of medical research. We need greater emphasis on quality of lifeThe horror of a cancer diagnosis is unforgettable. It is the grimmest and most personal bad news. The solemnness of the doctor; the loaded pause as the nurse asks: “Is anyone with you today?”; the strategically placed box of tissues.Related:Over half of new cancer drugs 'show no benefits' for survival or wellbeingContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fay Schopen Tags: Cancer research Medical research Health Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Scientists 'concealed' death of patient at centre of vegetative state breakthrough
Therapy which restored consciousness hailed as huge advance, but researchers criticised for withholding fact that patient died of lung infection months after treatmentFrench scientists have been criticised for concealing the death of the patient at the centre of abreakthrough in which consciousness was restored to a man in a persistent vegetative state.The treatment was hailed as a major advance in the field and suggested that the outlook for these patients and their families might be less bleak than was previously thought.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Source Type: news

Many new cancer drugs show 'no clear benefit', argues review
Conclusion Most of us assume that when a drug has been approved by a regulator for use, that means it has been shown to work. This study suggests that is not necessarily the case, or that even if it works they might not make a meaningful difference. The absence of evidence about the two outcomes that matter most to patients and their families – how long they will live, and how good their quality of life will be during that time – from half of the cancer drugs approved during a five-year period, is worrying. Patients cannot be expected to make informed decisions about which treatments to take, without good quali...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Eat organic during pregnancy to prevent brain tumours
Researchers from the French Institute of Health and Medical Research found exposure to chemicals commonly sprayed on to crops raises the risk of childhood brain cancers by 1.4 times. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Over half of new cancer drugs 'show no benefits' for survival or wellbeing
Of 48 cancer drugs approved between 2009-2013, 57% of uses showed no benefits and some benefits were ‘clinically meaningless’, says BMJ studyMost cancer drugs that have recently arrived on the market have come with little evidence that they boost the survival or wellbeing of patients, research reveals.Forty-eight cancer drugs were approved by the European Medicines Agency between 2009 and 2013 for use as treatments in 68 different situations.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Pharmaceuticals industry Cancer research Drugs Regulators Medical research Drugs policy Health policy Life expectancy Business Medicine Science UK news Source Type: news

How good gut health benefits mind and body
EU-funded researchers have achieved a deeper understanding of how microbes in the gut can influence energy balance and behaviour. This could lead to new ways of tackling weight gain, eating disorders and even psychiatric conditions such as anxiety and depression. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 5, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Charlatans threaten stem cell research with unproven cures, say experts
Stem cell medicine has huge potential but unscrupulous clinics offering unrealistic hopes are endangering its futureThe credibility of stem cell research is at risk because of charlatans and dodgy clinics peddling unproven cures for diseases, according to a group of eminent scientists in the field.Stem cell research, or regenerative medicine, has great potential and has already delivered some breakthroughs, but its future is threatened by poor science, unrealistic hopes, unclear funding models and unscrupulous private clinics, they say in the Lancet medical journal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Stem cells Biology Medical research Science UK news Parkinson's disease Multiple sclerosis World news Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Picked Its New Leaders. Most of Them Are Women
The World Health Organization announced its new senior leadership team Tuesday, and more than 60% of the appointees are women. “The team represents 14 countries, including all WHO regions, and is more than 60% women, reflecting my deep-held belief that we need top talent, gender equity and a geographically diverse set of perspectives to fulfill our mission to keep the world safe,” WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in a statement. The five men selected to lead the agency are Dr. Peter Salama, Dr. Bernhard Schwartländer, Dr. Ranieri Guerra, Dr. Ren Minghui, and Stewart Simonson. WHO ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized onetime United Nations women's empowerment Source Type: news

'The enemy within': Mars crews could be at risk from onboard microbes – study
Mocked-up Mars spacecraft inhabited for 17 months full of microbial life despite adequate cleaning, raising issues for craft design and human healthOf the many potential hazards astronauts might ponder on a trip to Mars, radiation poisoning, weightlessness and the foibles of crewmates might top the list.But according to scientists, there ’s another potential problem. Researchers examining a mocked-up spacecraft inhabited for 17 months by a six-man crew say parts of the capsule were rife with microbial life.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Mars Microbiology European Space Agency Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

Country diary: huge jellyfish shipwrecked on the sands
Morfa Harlech, GwyneddThey have drifted on ocean currents for 500m years, pulsing gently towards landfallThe wave smudges out something written in the sand with a stick. I imagine it as a spell cast to charm ashore those lost at sea. And so it does, as tides ebb and flow, stranding the barrel jellyfish. These extraordinary creatures, also known as dustbin-lid jellyfish because of their size and shape, have been shipwrecked after an epic voyage.Rhizostoma pulmoor R octopus is the largest jellyfish in British waters (they can grow to nearly 90cm in diameter) and is harvested around Wales for high-valuemedical-grade collagen....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Paul Evans Tags: Marine life Environment Wildlife UK news Rural affairs Birds Animals Medical research Science Source Type: news

Healing and Sealing
New Surgical Sealant Derived from Human Protein Seals Without Sutures (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - October 4, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

How global warming is changing when Europe's rain arrives
Along with the rest of the planet, Europe is bracing for the impacts of climate change. Some areas are facing a range of risks, ranging from droughts to floods, but how well do we understand what to expect and how to respond? (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 4, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Putting lesser-known cereal crops on the table
Minor species of cereals - such as spelt, oat and rye - could provide European consumers with healthy, nutritious food that is sustainably produced. An EU-funded project is looking to bring these underused crops from farm to table by improving their genetic and commercial viability. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 4, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic, Oxford Announce Transatlantic Partnership for Medical Research, Education and Healthcare
ROCHESTER, Minn.???Mayo Clinic, the University of Oxford, and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust have signed?an agreement to work together, driving advances in medical research and patient care. This agreement will underpin collaboration in all areas of innovation. Mayo Clinic and Oxford will bring together their respective expertise to improve patient care, make scientific?discoveries and [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - October 3, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Saving Europe's fruit crops from invasive pests and disease
Increasing global trade and climate change have helped the spread of non-native pests and diseases across Europe, posing major challenges to plant health. The EU-funded Dropsa project is working with 26 partners in Europe, Asia, New Zealand and North America to find safe and sustainable ways to protect Europe's fruit industry. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - October 3, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Most important meal of the day? Skipping breakfast may be linked to poor heart health
Study suggests those who miss breakfast have a greater buildup of fatty material in their arteries, likely to be down to indirectly linked lifestyle effectsFrom the full English to a continental croissant, the importance of a hearty breakfast has long beendebated– now scientists say skipping the morning meal could be linked to poorer cardiovascular health.The findings reveal that, compared with those who who wolfed down an energy-dense breakfast, those who missed the meal had a greater extent of the early stages of atherosclerosis – a buildup of fatty material inside the arteries.Continue reading... (Source: Gu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Heart disease Health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Nobel prizes 2017: everything you need to know about circadian rhythms
The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology was awarded for research on the body ’s clock, which is at work in all multicellular life. But what exactly is it?In the age ofinternational travel, shift work andpersonal gadgets that stave off sleep, the award of the Nobel prize for research on the body ’s clock, or circadian rhythms, could hardly be more timely.First identified in fruit flies, the tiny molecular components of the clock are at work in all multicellular life, humans included. The internal clock is now regarded as a key feature of life on Earth, one that wired the rotation of the planet into the fabric...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 2, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Nobel prizes Science People in science Science prizes Medical research Biology Source Type: news