'We are worried': Indians hopeful but anxious as vaccination drive begins
India launches bid to vaccinate 300m people amid fears over efficacy of domestically produced vaccineEmerging from Holy Family hospital in New Delhi, Ram Verma, a sanitation worker, breathed a deep sigh of relief. As one of the first in India to receive a coronavirus vaccine on Saturday – marking the start of the world’s largestvaccination programmes– he had been feeling a little jittery.“I must admit I was nervous,” said Verma, who had received his Covaxin jab in a centre set up in the hospital car park. “A lot of us were. I thought I might faint or have side-effects. After all, it is s...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Ellis-Petersen and Amrit Dhillon in Delhi Tags: Global development India Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Narendra Modi Health Infectious diseases Society South and Central Asia Medical research World news Source Type: news

Turn it down: how to silence your inner voice
Your internal monologue shapes mental wellbeing, says psychologist Ethan Kross. He has the tools to improve your mind ’s backchatAs Ethan Kross, an American experimental psychologist and neuroscientist, will cheerfully testify, the person who doesn ’t sometimes find themselves listening to an unhelpful voice in their head probably doesn’t exist. Ten years ago, Kross found himself sitting up late at night with a baseball bat in his hand, waiting for an imaginary assailant he was convinced was about to break into his house – a figure conju red by his frantic mind after he received a threatening letter...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Cooke Tags: Psychology Science Coronavirus US news Medical research Source Type: news

How to care for people with Covid at home
As coronavirus cases rise across the UK, here are steps to take if someone falls ill in your householdCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWith roughlyone in 30 Londoners testing positive for coronavirus, and other areas of the country experiencing rapid rises in cases, there ’s a fair chance that someone in your household may become infected at some point.The growing burden on hospitals may also meanmore patients being discharged early, leaving other household members to pick up their care.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus UK news Carers Infectious diseases Medical research Social care World news Source Type: news

Now we have the coronavirus vaccine, how soon can we get back to normal life?
The government has ordered sufficient doses to inoculate the entire population of the UK against Covid-19 but we are in for a long haulCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen will the Covid-19 vaccine begin to have an effect on the nation?The government has pledged to offer vaccines to 15 million people – the over-70s, healthcare workers and those required to shield by mid-February, and millions more by spring. This should slowly bring the virus under control although it will take many weeks before we can be sure the vaccine is having an effect. Numbers of daily cases of Covid-19 may dr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Health Science UK news Society Source Type: news

Experts remain divided over merits of mass Covid tests in schools
Analysis: some say lateral flow tests could help cut outbreaks, but others argue they offer false reassuranceRegulator refuses to approve mass Covid testing at schools in EnglandCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe education secretary, Gavin Williamson, has put mass testing for coronavirusat the heart of his strategy to reopen schools after the lockdown. It is a controversial strategy that has divided scientists. Some believe mass testing can help reduce outbreaks at schools, while others argue it could make matters worse by giving teachers and pupils false reassurance.Mass testing relies o...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Coronavirus Health Health policy Schools Infectious diseases Medical research Education UK news Society Source Type: news

UK Covid: arrivals from South America and Portugal banned from Friday over Brazilian variant concerns – as it happened
Latest updates:arrivals from Brazil, Argentina and the rest of South America, alongside Portugal, banned from Friday. This live blog is now closed -please follow the global live blog for the latest updatesUK bans travellers from South America and Portugal from FridayEngland ’s schools told not to provide free school meals at half-termCovid vaccines and immunity: does past infection help?Pimlico Plumbers to introduce ‘no jab, no job’ work contracts6.05pmGMTRelated:Coronavirus live news: curfew in Brazil's largest state after surge in fatalities; record deaths in Sweden6.05pmGMTA further 48,682 lab-confirme...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Sparrow Tags: Coronavirus Politics UK news Boris Johnson Infectious diseases Science Medical research Patrick Vallance Health NHS Northern Ireland Brexit Fishing industry Wales Welsh politics Keir Starmer Labour Conservatives Scottis Source Type: news

China records first Covid death since May as WHO team arrives in Wuhan
Delegation arrives as China suffers growing outbreak of coronavirus in Hebei provinceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageMainland China has reported its first Covid-19 death in eight months, as a team of experts from the World Health Organisation landed in Wuhan to investigate the origins of the pandemic.The delegation will quarantine for two weeks before beginning their inquiries. Their arrival, which was live-streamed by state media, came after almost a year of negotiations with the WHO, and diplomatic spats between China – which has beentrying to change the narrative about where the v...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Helen Davidson in Taipei Tags: China Coronavirus Asia Pacific Infectious diseases World Health Organization Medical research Science Source Type: news

Covid-19: how and why is the virus mutating?
The new Covid variant, B117, is rapidly spreading around the UK and has been detected in many other countries. Although it is about 50% more infectious than previous variants, B117 does not seem to cause more severe disease or be immune to current vaccines. Yet it has raised concerns over how the virus may adapt to our antibodies and vaccines in the future. To explore these issues, the health editor,Sarah Boseley, speaks to Prof Ravi Gupta about how and why viruses mutateContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Sarah Boseley and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Source Type: news

A niche for the eye
(Stowers Institute for Medical Research) What if the degenerative eye conditions that lead to glaucoma, corneal dystrophy, and cataracts could be detected and treated before vision is impaired? Recent findings from the lab of Investigator Ting Xie, PhD, at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research point to the ciliary body as a key to unlocking this possibility. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineers put the squeeze on cancer cells
EU-funded researchers have applied engineering know-how to understand what controls the mechanical strength of living cells. Their findings offer new insights into the spread of cancers as well as into diseases of the heart and nervous system. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 13, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Florida Medical Doctor Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Falsify Clinical Trial Data
FDA OCI, Yvelice Villaman Bencosme, Miami FL, guilty, plea, wire fraud, primary investigator, Unlimited Medical Research, UM Research, asthma medication, children, Lisett Raventos, study coordinator, fabricated data, fabricated subjects, safety, efficacy, testing, consumer protection, (Source: Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) Press Releases)
Source: Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) Press Releases - January 12, 2021 Category: Medical Law Authors: DOJ Source Type: news

Experts call for rethink of lateral flow mass testing for Covid in UK
Government urged to pause non-lab tests for asymptomatic cases amid fears over accuracyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageExperts are calling on the UK government to halt or pause its mass testing programme for people without symptoms in care homes, schools, communities and potentially at home, warning that the lateral flow devices it has bought are inaccurate and can do more harm than good.Prof Jon Deeks, of Birmingham University and the Royal Statistical Society, and colleagues say the public is being misled.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Coronavirus UK news Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Source Type: news

What are the new coronavirus variants and how do we monitor them? – podcast
Over the course of the pandemic, scientists have been monitoring emerging genetic changes to Sars-Cov-2. Mutations occur naturally as the virus replicates but if they confer an advantage – like being more transmissible – that variant of the virus may go on to proliferate. This was the case with the ‘UK’ or B117 variant, which is about 50% more contagious and is rapidly spreading around the country. So how does genetic surveillance of the virus work? And what do we know about the new variants? Ian Sample speaks to Dr Jeffrey Barrett, the director of the Covid-19 genomics initiative at the Wellcome Sa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Genetics Microbiology Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim partners with PetMedix
Boehringer Ingelheim has entered into a partnership with PetMedix, a UK based research and development stage biopharmaceutical company.Strengthening partnerships to accelerate innovation and growth is now one of the key elements of Boehringer Ingelheim ’s refocused strategy. (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

NexGard COMBO for cats EMA marketing authorization
Boehringer Ingelheim receives EMA marketing authorization  for NexGard® COMBO, the first isoxazoline-based full endectocide for catsThe product features a triple action formula that includes esafoxolaner – the newly developed form of afoxolaner - combined with eprinomectin and praziquantel.This innovative broad spectrum topical parasiticide is easy and convenient for cat owners.It kills a wider range of parasites than any other product on the market, covering core external parasites like fleas and ticks as well as internal parasites, including tapeworms. (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Strategic-collaboration-with-EnaraBio
Boehringer Ingelheim and Enara Bio Enter Strategic Collaboration and Licensing Agreement to Discover Novel Shared Antigens for Cancer Immunotherapies  Collaboration focuses on up to three types of lung and gastrointestinal (GI) cancersLatest in a series of strategic acquisitions and partnerships that strengthens Boehringer Ingelheim ’s position in the cancer vaccine and T-cell engager spacesAgreement and partnership with Boehringer Ingelheim provides additional validation of Enara Bio ’s  EDAPT™ platform and Dark Antigen™ discovery work and supports ongoing cell therapy based therapeutic a...
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Le onde di spin per la computazione di prossima generazione
Oggi gli scienziati stanno lavorando allo sviluppo di sistemi informatici di prossima generazione in grado di elaborare informazioni in modo rapido e flessibile, oltre che efficiente sotto il profilo energetico. Anche il progetto SWING, finanziato dall'UE, contribuisce attivamente a questo obiettivo concependo un nuovo metodo per trasferire questi «super computer» dal progetto alla produzione. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Les ondes de spin pour l'informatique de prochaine génération
Les scientifiques développent actuellement des systèmes informatiques de prochaine génération capables de traiter des informations de manière rapide, modulable et éco-énergétique. Le projet SWING financé par l’UE a activement contribué à cet objectif. Ses recherches ont produit une nouvelle méthode innovante qui pourrait s’avérer essentielle pour donner vie à ces «supercalculateurs». (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Fale spinowe umożliwiają budowę komputerów nowej generacji
Naukowcy stale dążą do opracowania systemów komputerowych nowej generacji, które będą w stanie wydajnie i elastycznie przetwarzać dane przy zachowaniu niskiego zużycia energii. Finansowany przez UE projekt SWING również skupiał się na tym celu. Powstała w ramach badań innowacyjna metodologia może okazać się kluczem do urzeczywistnienia szybkich, elastycznych i energooszczędnych „superkomputerów”. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Ondas de espín para la informática de nueva generación
Los científicos trabajan en desarrollar sistemas informáticos de nueva generación que procesen información de forma rápida, flexible y eficiente en materia de energía. El proyecto SWING, financiado con fondos europeos, contribuyó activamente a ello. Su investigación ha creado un método nuevo e innovador que podría ser clave para llevar estos «superordenadores» de la mesa de diseño a la realidad. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Spin waves for next-generation computing
Scientists are currently working to develop next-generation computer systems which can process information quickly and flexibly but are also energy-efficient. The EU-funded SWING project also actively contributed to this goal. Their research has produced an innovative new method that could prove key to bringing these 'super computers' from the drawing board to reality. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Spinwellen für die Datenverarbeitung der Zukunft
Die Wissenschaft arbeitet an der nächsten Generation von Computersystemen, die Informationen schnell und flexibel verarbeiten können und gleichzeitig energieeffizient sind. Auch das EU-finanzierte Projekt SWING war daran aktiv beteiligt und hat eine innovative Methode vorgelegt, die diese „Supercomputer“ vom Reißbrett in die Wirklichkeit katapultieren könnte. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Construction sites are aiding spread of Covid | Letters
A construction worker says they are being forced to work under unsafe conditions,Shirley Osborn highlights the gaps in financial support for low-paid workers andJohn Lynhamlaments the absence of effective government communicationI have been closely following the Guardian ’s reporting of NHS workers treating Covid patients and their pleas for the public to follow the lockdown restrictions (ICU medics in London plead with public to follow Covid rules, 9 January). I am a project manager working on a commercial construction site in London. I work in a site office where capacity remains at pre-Covid levels and no efforts ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Coronavirus Construction industry Inequality Infectious diseases Health policy Medical research Politics Science Society NHS Source Type: news

The new UK Covid variant: your questions answered
You asked us about the fast-spreading coronavirus variant, here are the answersCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageHow do scientists know the new UK variant is 70% more transmissible, and how certain are they of this figure?Our gift to the world: the UK variant of Sars-CoV-2. There are sufficient data to quote 70% greater infectivity, but how was this figure ascertained? ”D Moon, BrightonContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news

Sickening experiments using baby body parts only confirm the humanity of unborn children
(Natural News) It has been five years since David Daleiden and the Center for Medical Progress broke the story that body parts retrieved from aborted babies were being used for medical research in a modern-day feticidal Frankenstein story. Abortionists, it was revealed, were amending surgical procedures to ensure that some body parts weren’t crushed so... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

mRNA Technology Gave Us the First COVID-19 Vaccines. It Could Also Upend the Drug Industry
“No!” The doctor snapped. “Look at me!” I had been staring her in the eyes, as she had ordered, but when a doctor on my other side began jabbing me with a needle, I started to turn my head. “Don’t look at it,” the first doctor said. I obeyed. This was in early August in New Orleans, where I had signed up to be a participant in the clinical trial for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. It was a blind study, which meant I was not supposed to know whether I had gotten the placebo or the real vaccine. I asked the doctor if I would really been able to tell by looking at the syringe. &...
Source: TIME: Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Walter Isaacson Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Innovative metal recycling for sustainable tech
EU-funded researchers are developing low-polluting techniques for recovering valuable metals from communications and green technology waste. This 'urban mining' could help to reduce pollution and ensure a secure supply of metals critical to a low-carbon, connected economy. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 11, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

One in five in England have had Covid, modelling suggests
Analysis shows 12.4 million people infected since start of pandemic, against 2.4 million detected by test and traceCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageOne in five people in England may have had coronavirus, new modelling suggests, equivalent to 12.4 million people, rising to almost one in two in some areas.It means that across the country as a whole the true number of people infected to date may be five times higher than thetotal number of known cases according to the government ’s dashboard.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ashley Kirk, Anna Leach and Pamela Duncan Tags: Coronavirus England Infectious diseases Medical research UK news Health Source Type: news

Salim Abdool Karim: 'None of us are safe from Covid if one of us is not. We have mutual interdependence'
The face of South Africa ’s Covid science on why Africa has been hit less hard than Europe, the new variant in the region, and the danger of vaccine nationalismCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe epidemiologist Salim Abdool Karim could be considered South Africa ’sAnthony Fauci. As co-chair of the South African Ministerial Advisory Committee on Covid-19, he is the government ’s top adviser on the pandemic and hasbecome the country ’s face of Covid-19 science. He also sits on the Africa Task Force for Novel Coronavirus, overseeing the continent ’s response to t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Coronavirus South Africa Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Science Aids and HIV Health Source Type: news

Make face masks compulsory outdoors | Letters
Face coverings should be mandatory the moment you step outside, writesChristine Whatford, whileMichael Weedy wants joggers to wear masks“It is inescapable that the facts are changing and we must change our response,” Boris Johnson told the Commons last week (Boris Johnson ‘extremely cautious’ on when England’s schools will reopen, 6 January), so I am surprised this changed response doesn ’t include making masks compulsory outside. Masks were considered last spring, and rejected as not being effective. And while it is true that if only some people are wearing them sometimes, they are not ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Health policy Politics Running Life and style Society Source Type: news

GPs in England see big drop in common cold and flu cases
Exclusive: coronavirus restrictions and increased uptake of flu vaccine is likely explanation, say expertsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGPs in England have reported a big drop in cases of influenza, colds and other common infections – with cold rates now about a quarter of the five-year average, and flu at about a 20th of the usual level for this time of year.Social restrictions brought in to curb transmission of coronavirus combined with an increased uptake of flu vaccine is the most likely explanation, experts say.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Flu Common cold World news Infectious diseases Medical research Society Science Health policy England UK news GPs Source Type: news

How race to track mystery gene with links to three cancers saved millions
25 years ago, a mutation was discovered that makes some people susceptible to the disease, and now it has transformed treatmentTen years ago, Tony Herbert developed a lump on the right side of his chest. The clump of tissue grew and became painful and he was tested for breast cancer. The result was positive.“I had surgery and chemotherapy and that worked,” he said last week. But how had Herbert managed to develop a condition that is so rare in men? Only about 400 cases of male breast cancer are diagnosed every year in the UK compared with around 55,000 in women. A genetic test revealed the answer. Herbert had i...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Breast cancer Genetics UK news Cancer research Medical research Health Science Source Type: news

Now we have the coronavirus vaccine, how soon can we get back to normal life?
The government has ordered sufficient doses to inoculate the entire population of the UK against Covid-19 but we are in for a long haulCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageWhen will the Covid-19 vaccine begin to have an effect on the nation?The government has pledged to offer vaccines to 15 million people – the over-70s, healthcare workers and those required to shield by mid-February, and millions more by spring. This should slowly bring the virus under control although it will take many weeks before we can be sure the vaccine is having an effect. Numbers of daily cases of Covid-19 may dr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Health Society Source Type: news

Rapid Covid testing across England will help identify symptomless carriers
Tens of thousands are unwittingly spreading coronavirus – lateral flow devices will confirm infection in under 30 minutesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageRapid testing to findsymptomless carriers of Covid-19 is to be launched in England this week. The aim of the programme is to identify some of the tens of thousands of infected people who are unwittingly spreading the virus across the country.The dramatic escalation of the programme – which uses detectors known as lateral flow devices – comes asCovid death rates have continued to soar and hospitals have reported alarming n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Source Type: news

Partnering-with-google-in-quantum-computing
Quantum Computing: Boehringer Ingelheim and Google Partner for Pharma R&D  Quantum computing offers the potential to significantly accelerate and optimize the discovery of future new medicines for patientsScientists from both companies will be breaking new ground in the application of quantum computing to molecular dynamics simulationsBoehringer Ingelheim has set up a dedicated Quantum Lab with leading experts  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 9, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: A mathematical index to distinguish healthy microbiome
What causes some people to develop chronic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer and metabolic syndrome while others stay healthy? A major clue could be found in their gut microbiome -- the trillions of microbes living inside the digestive system that regulate various bodily functions. To utilize the huge population of tiny organisms as a [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - January 9, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Conquering cancer by targeting its genetic abnormalities
Joanne Garnett has harrowing memories of that life-changing day back in 1981. She was a 39-year-old land use planner living in Wyoming when she received a call from her doctor confirming she had uterine cancer.  "I was shocked, and it was strange because I didn't fit any profile for uterine cancer," Garnett recalls. "I got a [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - January 9, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

COVID-19 vaccine race: Where they stand currently
Developed by Bharat Biotech in collaboration with the Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Institute of Virology, the indigenous vaccine was granted emergency use authorisation in 'clinical trial mode' by the Indian government this week. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - January 9, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pfizer vaccine protects against new Covid variants, study suggests
Blood sample tests from 20 people show vaccine is effective against UK and South Africa variantsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe Covid-19 vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech appears to protect against viruses carrying at least one of the key mutations found intwo coronavirus variants that are causing rapid spread across the UK, according to a study.However, further research is needed to confirm that the level of protection afforded by the vaccine is as high as against older variants – and to ensure it protects against viruses carrying another significant mutation found in the South A...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation UK news World news Pfizer Health Infectious diseases Science Medical research Business Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Fears Covid vaccines would not work against South Africa variant led to travel curbs
Minister says extra check on travellers introduced as ‘we simply cannot take chances’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFears that Covid vaccines will not work against the new South African strain of the virus have prompted the introduction of testing for new arrivals into England and Scotland from abroad, the transport secretary, Grant Shapps, has said.Outlining the new testing regime for England and Scotland, he told Sky News: “This is an extra check and we’re doing this now because there are these variants that we’re very keen to keep out of the country, like ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Matthew Weaver Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Grant Shapps Health Politics Society UK news Source Type: news

IMA asks its members to participate in COVID-19 vaccination drive
"With the vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 at our doorsteps, it is worth remembering that indigenous vaccines have been developed after the tireless efforts of Indian scientists in collaboration with the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) and the National Institute of Virology (NIV)," the doctors' body said. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Arthritis drugs could help save lives of Covid patients, research finds
Results suggest tocilizumab and sarilumab could cut relative risk of death of those in intensive care by 24%Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageTwo drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis could help to save the lives of one in 12 intensive care patients with severe Covid, researchers have found.The NHS will begin using tocilizumab to treat coronavirus patients from Friday, health officials said after results from about 800 patients confirmed the drug brings benefits, potentially cutting the relative risk of death by 24%.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus UK news Medical research Infectious diseases Source Type: news

U.S. Is Blind to Contagious New Virus Variant, Scientists Warn
It ’s not too late to curb the contagious variant’s spread in the U.S., experts say — but only with a national program for genetic sequencing. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Politics and Government Genetics and Heredity Tests (Medical) Research your-feed-science your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news