Indian PM, health body under scrutiny for lack of transparency on COVID-19
(Natural News) Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his health ministry drew criticism from doctors and independent scientists who questioned the drug recommendations that he and the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) made.  The same group also questioned their lack of transparency on data related to the variants of the virus that emerged from India. The ICMR is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: 2 in 3 Indians have natural immunity against coronavirus, meaning "herd immunity" is already achieved
(Natural News) The latest sero survey conducted by the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) found that at least two in every three people in India have coronavirus (COVID-19) antibodies, or natural immunity, against the disease. Published Tuesday, July 20, the survey called seroprevalence study included 36,227 people from 70 districts across 21 Indian states.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Limited number of critical workers to be allowed to avoid self-isolation
Policy will only apply to named staff in approved workplaces who are fully vaccinatedWorkers from 16 key services including health, transport and energy will not have to isolate after being pinged by the NHS Covid app, as it was revealed that more than 600,000 people in England and Wales were sent self-isolation alerts last week.The raft of changes, after days of frantic talks with industry leaders, came amid open Conservative revolt over the so-called “pingdemic” with theformer health secretary Jeremy Hunt warning the government that it was facing a crisis of public trust in the system.Continue reading... (Sou...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Richard Partington, Jessica Elgot and Sarah Butler Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Economic policy Politics Business UK news Source Type: news

Covid jab uptake slows among young people in England, PHE says
Scientists say efforts to increase vaccinations by tactics seen as coercive are less useful than good communication via role modelsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageClearer information and messages from role models are needed to boost Covid vaccination uptake among young people, experts have said, as figures showed that fewer than 60% of 18- to 25-year-olds had received their first jab in England.Adults over the age of 18 have been eligible for vaccination against Covid-19 in England since 18 June. But according to the latestdata from Public Health England (PHE), uptake of the vaccine in you...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Young people Coronavirus Psychology Society Immunology Health Medical research UK news Science Source Type: news

AI firm DeepMind puts database of the building blocks of life online
AlphaFold program ’s prediction of nearly 20,000 human protein structures now free for researchersLast year the artificial intelligence group DeepMind cracked a mystery that has flummoxed scientists for decades: stripping bare the structure of proteins, the building blocks of life. Now, having amassed adatabase of nearly all human protein structures, the company is making the resource available online free for researchers to use.The key to understanding our basic biological machinery is its architecture. The chains of amino acids that comprise proteins twist and turn to make the most confounding of 3D shapes. It is t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Science correspondent Tags: DeepMind Artificial intelligence (AI) Medical research Microbiology Science UK news Technology Source Type: news

It ’s Time To Reopen Primary Schools in India
Schools in India are not just a source of education but also provide access to health, hygiene, immunisation, and nutritional safety nets. | Picture courtesy: FlickrBy External SourceJul 22 2021 (IPS) “The government should open schools, even if it’s for an hour, to facilitate some student-teacher interaction. Most teachers feel that students should be encouraged to come to school. Neither parents, students, nor teachers are worried about transmission as little has changed in the community habits such as social gatherings, shared resources, intermingling of children, and drinking, among others. Only schools hav...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Asia-Pacific Education Headlines Health Source Type: news

UK scientists back Covid boosters as study finds post-jab falls in antibodies
Exclusive:Waning antibody levels are possible warning sign of lower protection in months after vaccinationCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists have backed proposals for Covid boosters in the autumn after blood tests on hundreds of people revealed that protective antibodies can wane substantially within weeks of second vaccine shots being given.Falls in antibodies after vaccination are expected and do not necessarily mean people are more vulnerable to disease, but the researchers are concerned that if the declines persist the effectiveness of the vaccines may diminish.Continue reading...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Infectious diseases Medical research Science UK news UCL (University College London) University of Oxford Source Type: news

Witnessing England ’s response to Covid at first hand has profoundly shocked me | William Hanage
On a visit to the UK from the US, I have seen how incoherent government policy is allowing Delta to run rampantWilliam Hanage is a Harvard epidemiology professorEngland ended all pandemic restrictions on Monday. Nightclubs reopened, along with other large events and gatherings – with masks, testing and other mitigation measures “encouraged” (which is another way of saying “optional”). This is against a background ofskyrocketing case rates due to the Delta variant.In January, at the height of the second wave, the daily totalhit 60,000 cases, but at the current rate of increase that will be ecli...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: William Hanage Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Science Society Health Medical research Boris Johnson England Politics UK news Source Type: news

Higher levels of omega-3 acids in the blood increases life expectancy by almost five years
(IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)) Researchers have found that omega-3 levels in blood erythrocytes are very good mortality risk predictors. The study used data from a long-term study group, the Framingham Offspring Cohort, which has been monitoring residents of this Massachusetts town, in the United States, since 1971 and concludes that " Having higher levels of these acids in the blood, as a result of regularly including oily fish in the diet, increases life expectancy by almost five years " , (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognitive decline may help predict future fracture risk in women
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) A 16-year study has revealed a link between cognitive decline, bone loss and fracture risk in women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Covid has caused ‘hidden pandemic of orphanhood’, says global study
1.5 million children lost a caregiver during pandemic, including thousands in the UKAn estimated 1.5 million children worldwide under the age of 18 have lost a parent, grandparent or caregiver due to Covid-19, according to a global study.Of those, more than 1 million experienced the death of one or both parents during the first 14 months of the pandemic, leading to what one researcher called “the hidden pandemic of orphanhood”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Helen Pidd Tags: Coronavirus Children Bereavement World news Society Infectious diseases UK news University of Oxford Medical research Source Type: news

Lockdowns do not harm health more than Covid, say researchers
Little evidence that social restrictions during the pandemic have added to rates of death and ill-healthCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageSince early in the coronavirus pandemic, critics of unprecedented lockdown measures seen worldwide have argued that these interventions cause more harm than the disease itself. But an analysis of global health data suggests there is little evidence to support the idea that the cure is worse than the disease.The analysis,published in the journal BMJ Global Health, considered claims that lockdowns cause more health harms than Covid-19 by examining their impa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover, Science correspondent Tags: Health Health policy Coronavirus Science World news Medical research Source Type: news

Scientist casts doubt on validity of Boris Johnson ’s ‘workplace pilot’
Statistician says PM ’s initial excuse for not self-isolating is part of pattern of pilot studies that lack transparencyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA scientist has cast doubt on the validity of aworkplace pilot scheme used by Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak to initially avoid self-isolation, accusing the government of secrecy surrounding it and other research.On Monday, 24 hours on from ahasty U-turn by the prime minister and chancellor, Downing Street faced freshquestions about the workplace study and was still unable to provide basic details such as its criteria, protocols and na...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ben Quinn and Rajeev Syal Tags: Coronavirus Science UK news Medical research Boris Johnson Rishi Sunak Politics Source Type: news

Are enough people vaccinated in time for England ’s ‘freedom day’?
Four charts that show why the big unlocking could be coming too soonCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe government has technically hit its 19 July target of offering all adults in the UK a Covid-19 vaccine.But although all adults have been offered a first dose, not all of them have had it, and a significant number have had only one dose, not two. Only 68% of UK adults are fully vaccinated. If you include under-18s, only 54% of the total population is fully vaccinated.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Anna Leach Tags: Coronavirus UK news Infectious diseases Medical research Science Source Type: news

What is the Covid workplace testing scheme Downing Street is part of?
Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak were due to be part of a pilot trialling tests instead of self-isolationCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt emerged on Sunday morning that Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak could have avoided the need to self-isolate for 10 days despite being contacts of the health secretary, Sajid Javid, who tested positive for Covid-19.They were due to be part of a workplace pilot scheme trialling tests instead of isolation. An abruptU-turn in the face of public anger means the prime minister and chancellor will now self-isolate.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ben Quinn Tags: Boris Johnson Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Rishi Sunak Politics UK news Source Type: news

Nigeria: Increase in Covid-19 Cases Is Sign of 3rd Wave
[Vanguard] Professor Babatunde Salako, Director-General, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR), has said that the recent increase in COVID-19 cases could be a signal of a third wave of the pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 18, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: Increase in Covid-19 Cases, Sign of 3rd Wave - - Nimr Director-General
[Vanguard] Professor Babatunde Salako, Director-General, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR), has said that the recent increase in COVID-19 cases could be a signal of a third wave of the pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 18, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Keep wearing masks to slow spread of Covid, scientists warn Britons
Experts point to risks of indoor Covid-19 transmission: ‘If you don’t wear a mask, the virus spreads further. It’s as simple as that’Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageScientists have strongly endorsed the continued wearing of masks in enclosed public spaces over summer. As Covid-19 cases continue to spiral, face coverings offer people the most robust way of limiting the spread of the disease in cafes, theatres and restaurants, they said last week.Rates of new Covid-19 cases topped 50,000 a day last week, leading scientists and health experts to warn that the country c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Observer science editor Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science UK news Medical research Source Type: news

UK trial aims to find hidden lung damage caused by long Covid
Study is part of £20m research drive that scientists hope will end stigma around the conditionCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA clinical trial has been launched to detect currently invisible lung damage in people withlong Covid, as part of a £20m research drive that scientists hope will end stigma around the condition.Patients still suffering breathlessness will be drawn from long Covid clinics in Sheffield, Manchester and Cardiff to undergo special scans using xenon gas to reveal damage that does not show up on conventional CT scans, leading to a mystery about why people are n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Robert Booth Social affairs correspondent Tags: Coronavirus Medical research UK news Health Sheffield Manchester Cardiff Source Type: news

Latest round of Australian covid lockdowns announced as beginning of "new world order"
(Natural News) Brad Hazzard, the “Minister for Health and Medical Research” in New Wales, Australia, has announced that the latest “wave” of Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) lockdowns marks the beginning of the “new world order.” Disturbing footage – see below – shows Hazzard casually announcing the arrival of the new world order, urging everyone to “accept”... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Odile Bain Memorial Prize 2021
: Brilliant early-career scientists in parasitology recognizedResearchers in the field of parasitology celebrated for contributions early in their scientific careersTogether with scientific publisher Parasites& Vector, Boehringer Ingelheim has sponsored the award since its founding in 2014Award serves to foster career growth in parasitology as well as keep memory of parasitologist Odile Bain alive (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - July 16, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Flood-disaster-in-Germany-donation-from-Boehringer-Ingelheim
Flood disaster in Germany: Boehringer Ingelheim increases donation amount to EUR 1 millionDramatic situation requires rapid and comprehensive helpDonation of EUR 100,000 to the German Red CrossInitial measure with 2,300 meals for Ahrweiler district (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - July 16, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

We ’ll soon know more about our bodies than ever before – but are we ready? | Daniel M Davis
Tests could show the probability of illnesses occurring in five, 10 or 20 years, with huge moral and ethical implicationsWe ’re soon going to have to make our own choices about social distancing, wearing masks and travel. When the legal enforcement of rules is lifted, the way in which each of us deals with the risk of Covid-19 will be down to personal judgment. But how well equipped are we to make these decisions?Graphs and data can help explain things, but what ’s also needed is a deep understanding of how science works, and, perhaps most important of all, a sense of how to weigh up the odds of coming down wit...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Daniel M Davis Tags: Medical research Science Biology Psychology Cancer research Health Health policy Society UK news Source Type: news

Australia Covid outbreak: Delta variant cases rise among fully vaccinated people
‘Vaccines aren’t perfect,’ epidemiologist says, but offer lower risk of hospitalisation and prevention against spread of virusFollow our Australia Covid live blog for the latest updatesVic hotspots;Vic restrictions;NSW hotspots;NSW restrictionsVaccine rollout tracker;get our free news app;get our morning emailEpidemiologists warn of more breakthrough Covid infections as the number of fully vaccinated people catching the Delta variant rises.Queensland reported a Covid case in a fully vaccinated person on Thursday, a worker at the Brisbane international airport.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 16, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Health Australia news World news Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science Medical research Vaccines and immunisation Source Type: news

Paralyzed man ’s brain waves turned into sentences on computer in medical first
Study marks important step toward restoring more natural communication for people who can ’t talkIn a medical first, researchers harnessed the brainwaves of a paralyzed man unable to speak and turned what he intended to say into sentences on a computer screen.It will take years of additional research but the study, reported Wednesday, marks an important step toward one day restoring more natural communication for people who can ’t talk because of injury or illness.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Science Medical research US news World news Source Type: news

Death disruptor: how an Australian funnel-web spider may help human hearts
University of Queensland researchers are investigating if protein in venom of Fraser Island spider can stop cardiac cells dyingA protein in the venom of adeadly Australian funnel-web spider may be able to reduce cardiac damage from heart attacks and extend the life of donor hearts used in transplants, according to new research.Venom from the Fraser Island funnel-web, named for the south-east Queensland island where it is found, contains aprotein known as Hi1a.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Heart disease Science Medical research Australia news Queensland Source Type: news

Huge study supporting ivermectin as Covid treatment withdrawn over ethical concerns
The preprint endorsing ivermectin as a coronavirus therapy has been widely cited, but independent researchers find glaring discrepancies in the dataThe efficacy of a drug being promoted by rightwing figures worldwide for treating Covid-19 is in serious doubt after a major study suggesting the treatment is effective against the virus was withdrawn due to “ethical concerns”.The preprint study on the efficacy and safety of ivermectin – a drug used against parasites such as worms and headlice – in treating Covid-19, led by Dr Ahmed Elgazzar from Benha University in Egypt, was published on the Research S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Medical research Coronavirus Infectious diseases Health Craig Kelly Australia news Science World news Source Type: news

Long Covid has more than 200 symptoms, study finds
Calls for national screening programme as symptoms revealed range from brain fog to tinnitusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe largest ever international study of people with long Covid has identified more than 200 symptoms and prompted researchers to call for a national screening programme.The study found the myriad symptoms of long Covid – from brain fog and hallucinations to tremors and tinnitus – spanned 10 of the body’s organ systems, and a third of the symptoms continued to affect patients for at least six months.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Medical research Doctors Health policy Infectious diseases Heart disease Science Hospitals GPs UK news World news Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Innovation Announces Extension Of Innovation Partnering Office at Monash University In Collaboration With Victorian State Government To Accelerate The Life-Sciences Hub
MELBOURNE, Australia, July 15, 2021 -- Johnson & Johnson Innovation announced today the extension of the Johnson & Johnson Innovation Partnering Office at Monash University's Clayton Campus in Melbourne (JJIPO@Monash) in collaboration with the Victorian State Government.This joint initiative between Johnson & Johnson Innovation, the Victorian Government and Monash University will be extended for approximately two years through June 30, 2023. The agreement will allow JJIPO@Monash to continue connecting with the Victorian innovation ecosystem, nurturing and accelerating innovative research, new product developmen...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - July 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Stroke caused 7 lakh deaths in India in 2019: Study
The paper is a collaborative effort between the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR), Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI), Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) and a number of other organisations. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - July 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol caused 740,000 cancer cases globally last year – study
Researchers behind estimate say more needs to be done to raise public awareness of linkAlcohol is estimated to have caused more than 740,000 cancer cases around the world last year, and experts say more needs to be done to highlight the link.There is strong evidence that alcohol consumption can cause various cancers including those of the breast, liver, colon, rectum, oropharynx, larynx and oesophagus. Research suggests that evenlow levels of drinking can increase the risk.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Alcohol Cancer Medical research Breast cancer Health Science Society Source Type: news

A new approach to metastatic melanoma discovered
(IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)) Combining chemotherapy with a BRAF oncogene inhibitor proves effective at treating this disease. The study, published in the journal Oncogene, was led by researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute, Hospital del Mar and CIBERONC. This alternative paves the way towards a new approach for patients affected by this type of tumour, which has no cure in the most advanced stages or cases of relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BioBonds Use Wall Street Tools to Fund Medical Research
Karen Petrou invented a new funding model for curing blindness. Proposed legislation aims to apply it to medical research more generally. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ephrat Livni Tags: Clinical Trials Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Law and Legislation Petrou, Karen Shaw Research Lobbying and Lobbyists Health and Human Services Department Rush, Bobby L Fitzpatrick, Brian K (1973- ) Source Type: news

Hygiene theatre: how excessive cleaning gives us a false sense of security
Covid-19 is a mainly airborne disease. So does our endless disinfecting and hand sanitising serve any purpose – or could it be worse than useless?Claudia, a 26-year-old beauty worker, dreads it when her clients ask to go to the toilet. “It’s a whole other thing to clean,” she says. “They could have touched anything in there. I have to wipe down the whole thing with antibacterial spray and wipes.”It is her job to maintain stringent cleaning protocols at the London skincare clinic where she works. When clients arrive for their appointments, Claudia checks them in, offers them a drink &ndas...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sirin Kale Tags: Hygiene Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Source Type: news

Health campaigners call for an end to the use of the word leper
Derogatory use of the “L-word” has increased during Covid and is said to be further marginalising people with the curable diseaseHealth campaigners are calling for an end to the use of the word leper, saying the language frequently used by politicians and others during the pandemic has made people with leprosy even more marginalised.The metaphor of the socially outcast “leper” has been used often, whether in media reports on stigma againstearly Covid-19 patients or by politicians inItaly andBrazil complaining about being seen as “leper colonies”. Campaigners now want an end to the use of...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Kaamil Ahmed Tags: Global development Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Philippines World Health Organization Asia Pacific Source Type: news

Long Covid: rogue antibody discovery raises hope of blood test
Test could be available from GPs within six months, as scientists warn of ‘a lot of damage to a lot of lives’Scientists have raised hopes of a blood test for long Covid after discovering distinctive patterns of rogue antibodies in patients whose symptoms persisted for months.Researchers at Imperial College London identified so-called “autoantibodies” in long Covid patients that were absent in people who recovered quickly from the virus, or who had not tested positive for the disease.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Long Covid Coronavirus Imperial College London Medical research Infectious diseases Health Science BBC UK news Source Type: news

Flu jab may reduce severe effects of Covid, suggests study
Analysis of 75,000 coronavirus patients found fewer major health problems among people with flu jabCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coveragePeople who are vaccinated against influenza may be partly protected against some of the severe effects of coronavirus, and be less likely to need emergency care, according to a major study.The analysis of nearly 75,000 Covid patients found significant reductions in stroke, deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and sepsis, and fewer admissions to emergency departments and intensive care units, among those who had been given the flu jab.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Health UK news Source Type: news

Covid live news: UK reports 31,772 daily infections and 26 new deaths; new restrictions in Libya after record cases
This blog is now closed. Catch up withall our coverage of the pandemic here.11.53pmBSTThis blog is closing now. We ’ll be back in a few hours with more rolling coverage of the pandemic from all around the world.In the meantime you can catch up withall our coverage of the pandemic here.11.25pmBSTHere are the key developments from the last few hours:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Miranda Bryant (now) and Alexandra Topping (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Politics UK news Source Type: news

Covid live: public in England expected to wear masks when measures lift; Indonesia reports 1,007 daily deaths
UK minister saysmask guidance indoors is set to stay in England; Indonesian death tollrises to total of 66,464 after deadly dayTory MP fears Boris Johnson will delay winter Covid restrictionsZahawi: England reopening going ahead, but mask wearing ‘expected’Surge in Sydney cases leads to first locally acquired Covid death of yearWoman, 90, infected with Alpha and Beta Covid variants at the same timeSee all our coronavirus coverage3.15pmBSTVaccinations at a site in Brighton have been postponed following anti-lockdown demonstrations in the city.The Press Association reports:As we have rising cases, it is incredibl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Topping Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Politics UK news Source Type: news

UK research group: Coronavirus vaccine "unsafe for humans" due to adverse events
(Natural News) A medical research group in the U.K. pointed out that the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines are “unsafe for humans” based on adverse event reports. Scientists and doctors looked at data from the British government’s Yellow Card vaccine event reporting system. They found that the “overwhelming” number of adverse reactions from COVID-19 vaccines definitely... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaxxers by Sarah Gilbert and Catherine Green; Until Proven Safe by Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley – reviews
The story of the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is part manifesto for good science communications, part biomedical thriller, while a smart history of quarantines makes their utility resoundingly clearOn the first day of Wimbledon, Dame Sarah Gilbert, professor of vaccinology at Oxford ’s Jenner Institute, wastreated to a standing ovation from grateful spectators on a packed Centre Court. Together with her Oxford colleague Catherine Green, Gilbert had delivered the AstraZeneca vaccine against Covid-19in record time, and tennis fans, enjoying a rare maskless day out in SW19, were keen to show their appreciation. But as Gil...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Science and nature books History books AstraZeneca Immunology Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Culture Source Type: news

Baby gets go-ahead for world ’s most expensive drug from NHS
NHS approved to use gene therapy to treat baby born with spinal muscular atrophyThe parents of a baby with a fatal condition have succeeded in their campaign for their son to be treated with the world ’s most expensive drug.A new gene therapy, Zolgensma, will be used to treat 10-month-old Edward, from Colchester, who has severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), after his parents were given the green light earlier this week. The genetic condition, which is caused by a missing protein, weakens the muscles and affects movement and breathing.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Clea Skopeliti Tags: NHS Medical research Health Society Science UK news Source Type: news

Africa shouldn't be forced to go it alone when it comes to Covid vaccines | Paul Farmer, Ishaan Desai and Agnes Binagwaho
Europe and the US have won the scramble for vaccines – now they must help African nations produce their ownMore than 3bn doses of the Covid-19 vaccine have now been administered worldwide. But as the campaign forges ahead, one continent lags far behind the rest. Africa, home to 17% of the global population, accounts forless than 2% of the shots given to date.In the scramble for vaccines, wealthy countries have come out on top, shoving Covax – the global procurement mechanism on which most of Africa relies – to the end of the queue. The continent’s drive was dealt another blow when India, overwhelmed...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Paul Farmer, Ishaan Desai and Agnes Binagwaho Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Vaccines and immunisation Health Africa Source Type: news

Africa can ’t be left to go it alone when it comes to Covid vaccines | Paul Farmer, Ishaan Desai and Agnes Binagwaho
Europe and the US have won the scramble for vaccines – now they must help African nations produce their ownMore than 3bn doses of the Covid-19 vaccine have now been administered worldwide. But as the campaign forges ahead, one continent lags far behind the rest. Africa, home to 17% of the global population, accounts forless than 2% of the shots given to date.In the scramble for vaccines, wealthy countries have come out on top, shoving Covax – the global procurement mechanism on which most of Africa relies – to the end of the queue. The continent’s drive was dealt another blow when India, overwhelmed...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Paul Farmer, Ishaan Desai and Agnes Binagwaho Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Vaccines and immunisation Health Africa Source Type: news

Africa can ’t be left to go it alone when it comes to Covid vaccines | Paul Farmer and Ishaan Desai
Europe and the US have won the scramble for vaccines – now they must help African nations produce their ownMore than 3bn doses of the Covid-19 vaccine have now been administered worldwide. But as the campaign forges ahead, one continent lags far behind the rest. Africa, home to 17% of the global population, accounts forless than 2% of the shots given to date.In the scramble for vaccines, wealthy countries have come out on top, shoving Covax – the global procurement mechanism on which most of Africa relies – to the end of the queue. The continent’s drive was dealt another blow when India, overwhelmed...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Paul Farmer, Ishaan Desai and Agnes Binagwaho Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Science Vaccines and immunisation Health Africa Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Researchers find widespread sex bias in molecular biology tools
Widely used sex-biased maps of molecular biology are holding back individualized medicine, say Mayo Clinic scientists. Maps clarify how places are connected.  In biology, the same is true for databases that map out how aspects of biology are connected. Different biological databases examine genes (genomics), how those gene instructions are read (transcriptomics), what is made from the gene instructions (proteomics), and how that gene product breaks down in the body (metabolomics). Called omics for simplicity,… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - July 10, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Non-Covid respiratory illnesses on rise in UK, medical experts say
Increase in cases of bronchitis and common colds attributed to people mixing after easing of lockdownCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageNon-Covid respiratory illnesses and other conditions that were suppressed over the winter by lockdown are slowly “marching upwards” again, albeit at a level below what doctors expect for this time of year.The increase in conditions such as bronchitis and the common cold was attributed by an expert at the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) to the onset of people mixing again amid the lifting of lockdown measures.Continue reading... (Sour...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ben Quinn Tags: Infectious diseases Coronavirus Health Medical research UK news Hospitals England Source Type: news

FreVAX smartphone application piglet vaccination
New FreVAX ™ smartphone application brings piglet vaccination to another levelFreVAX ™ is an innovative intramuscular needle free vaccine injection device for pigs around weaning until the end of nursery. This recent development has resulted from a partnership with Henke-Sass Wolf1Boehringer Ingelheim has introduced the FreVAX ™ app 2.0 that aims to enhance the interaction with the FreVAX™ device  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - July 9, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

First year of pandemic claimed lives of 25 youngsters in England
Analysis, showing 4% of 5,830 children hospitalised in 12 months to February entered ICU wards, could inform vaccine policyDuring the first year of the pandemic 25 children and teenagers died as a direct result of Covid-19 in England and about 6,000 were admitted to hospital, according to the most complete analysis of national data on the age group to date.Children seen to be at greatest risk of severe illness and death from the coronavirus were in ethnic minority groups, or had other medical conditions or severe disabilities.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes and Ben Quinn Tags: Coronavirus Infant and child mortality Medical research Long Covid Vaccines and immunisation Hospitals Children Sars Health policy Politics Source Type: news

GW4 BioMed2 MRC Doctoral Training Partnership secures major boost as part of MRC ’ s £ 79 million investment
The GW4 Alliance, comprising Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter Universities, has been awarded a share of £ 79 million funding from the Medical Research Council (MRC) to support 64 studentships over the next three years. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - July 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Grants and Awards; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience; Press Release Source Type: news