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Flesh-eating ulcer: Coalition will spend $1.5m to try to control disease's spread
Buruli ulcer funding will be matched by Victorian government and two local councilsMore than $1m will be spent tackling a mysterious flesh-eating bug and reducing its spread in Australia.The federal government on Thursday announced it is investing $1.5m into researching the Buruli ulcer,which has spread throughout Victoria and far north Queensland.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Health Infectious diseases Australia news Medical research Microbiology Victoria Source Type: news

Some antidepressants linked to dementia risk
Scientists say doctors should consider weaning patients with depression, Parkinsons or bladder problems off anticholinergic drugsSome antidepressants and bladder medicines could be linked to dementia, according to a team of scientists who are calling for doctors to think about “de-prescribing” them where possible.Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, which are also prescribed for pain and to help with sleeping, and one of the SSRI class, paroxetine (also known as Seroxat), are implicated by the largest ever study to look at this possible risk.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Dementia Mental health Medical research Science University of East Anglia Depression Parkinson's disease Source Type: news

UCLA research may explain some causes of infertility and miscarriage
A new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.Infertility affects around 10 percent of the U.S. population, and roughly 15 to 20 percent of all pregnancies in the U.S. end in miscarriage. In many cases, the causes of infertility and miscarriage are unknown.A team led by Clark, a UCLA professor of molecular cell and developmental biology and member of the  Eli and Edythe Br...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 25, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Dose entire population with anti-malaria drugs to eradicate disease – study
Research shows that treating whole populations could wipe out the illness, but it requires decisive political action and a lot of moneyMalaria could be quickly eliminated in south-east Asia by an all-out effort to dose whole populations with drugs that treat the disease, regardless of whether people have symptoms or are healthy, say experts.The radical programme may be the best way to outpacerapidly spreading resistance to anti-malarial drugs, they believe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Malaria Global health Medical research Global development World news Science University of Oxford Source Type: news

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(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 25, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Transcending disease boundaries
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 25, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Novel technique achieves 32-fold increase in nanometric bactericide's activity
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Silver nanoparticles used in hospital materials and cutting-edge medical research can be obtained by a method that intensifies their potency and also reduces production costs, as demonstrated by Brazilian researchers in a Scientific Reports article. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clean, quiet hybrid electric aircraft take flight
Hybrid and electric vehicles are increasingly common on Europe's roads. Now similar clean and quiet technologies are taking to the skies, thanks to an EU-funded project developing and testing innovative aircraft propulsion systems. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 25, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Fresh search for a vaccine against malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax
Hundreds of millions of people each year are infected with Plasmodium vivax, the most widespread form of malaria worldwide. An EU-funded project is tackling the mosquito-borne parasite, leading cutting-edge research efforts to accelerate the development of effective vaccines. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 25, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

An effective vaccine for the deadliest malaria
EU-funded researchers are using the latest vaccine technologies and antigen discovery tools to develop a multi-stage, multi-antigen vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for the deadliest form of malaria. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 25, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

What is HTLV-1? The devastating health crisis afflicting central Australia
Between 5% and 10% of those with the virus will develop a rapidly fatal form of leukaemiaHuman T-lymphotropic virus type 1 is spread through contaminated blood, unprotected sex and breastmilk. Like HIV, there is no cure. Like HIV, the virus causes potentially fatal complications but unlike HIV it takes much longer for symptoms to appear. Some people may carry the virus for 30 years before chronic complications appear.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lorena Allam Tags: Health Indigenous Australians Membership Membership (Australia) Australia news Medical research Science Source Type: news

More efficient plane engines ready for take-off
An EU-funded project is advancing technology that will enable new, more fuel-efficient and quieter aircraft engines to take to the skies. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 24, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

A new aircraft propulsion system to cut CO2 emissions
Air traffic volumes are projected to double by the mid-2030s, with CO2 emissions from aircraft expected to do likewise without new fuel-efficient aircraft entering the market. EU-funded researchers are exploring a propulsion method to reduce fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions - good for the environment and the industry's competitiveness. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 24, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cochrane Classmate webinar - 17 May 2018
Looking for an innovative tool to teach evidence production?Cochrane Classmate might well be the answer!Classmate is a trainers ’ toolkit that allows you to create exciting, interactive tasks that help your students learn about evidence production. It is easy to use, and its first release is now available free of charge to anyone interested.Register for our webinarto learn about Classmate and the benefits of using this new online learning environment. The webinar is on Thursday 17th May, 12.30-1.30pm BST.Who is Classmate for? Anyone who teaches on topics related to evidence production, such as evidence-based medicine...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Let ’s talk about cancer treatment, not ‘cancer journeys’ | Letters
Oversharing may be better than the dreadful silence that once surrounded ‘the big C’, but many patients might prefer more practical adviceIt is astonishing that “cancer diaries” (Why I live in dread of another cancer confessional, 18 April) have proliferated to the extent that some of your correspondents (As a cancer patient, I needed distraction, Letters, Anne Hay, 23 April) can describe them as cliches or tediously omnipresent.Perhaps there has been a trend towards “oversharing”, but on the whole this is surely a corrective to the dreadful mandatory silence that surrounded cancer ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Science UK news Source Type: news

Big Data, Healthcare, and the Evolution of the Health Science Librarian
In the NNLM Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles course, we asked participants, as they progressed through the course to consider the following questions: Do you think health sciences librarians should get involved with big data in healthcare? Where should librarians get involved, if you think they should? If you think they should not, explain why. You may also combine a “should/should not” approach if you would like to argue both sides. NNLM will feature responses from different participants over the coming weeks. Written by: Lisa Mastin, Medical Librarian, WellStar Atlanta Medical Center, Atlanta,...
Source: Dragonfly - April 23, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Science Source Type: news

Helping businesses improve through smarter maintenance systems
Well-thought-out maintenance of a physical system, whether it is a factory or a wind turbine, can add value to a business. Now the EU, ECSEL Participating States and industry-funded research is helping to introduce a new approach to maintenance technology. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 23, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Smart road studs guide drivers to safety
Since their invention in the 1930s, reflective road studs have helped drivers stay safe at night. EU-funded research has now demonstrated that upgrading such devices with smart energy-saving technology has the potential to save lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 23, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Prostate cancer breakthrough as UK team develops more accurate test
Ultrasound technique overcomes problems with current methods to diagnose the most common cancer in menScientists have announced the development of a highly accurate and reliable technique for diagnosing prostate cancer. The Dundee University-based team say they have used an ultrasound process called shear wave elastography (SWE) to detect prostate tumours. The method is non-invasive and cheaper than current detection techniques.Prostate cancer has become the most common cancer in men in the UK. One in eight men will develop the condition at some point in their lives with more than 47,000 new cases being diagnosed every yea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Prostate cancer Health Society UK news Medical research Science Men's health & wellbeing Life and style Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Biomedical tattoo' might catch cancer early
Medical research is reaching a new frontier with implants that can accurately spot early signs of cancer. Yet the road from laboratory to patient is long. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Medical research needs big data – Tessa Jowell gets the ball rolling | Sonia Sodha
We think nothing of sharing personal information with tech giants so why are we so suspicious about our health records?Half of us born after 1960 will be told we havecancer at some point in our lives. Virtually no one will go through life untouched by the disease, whether as a sufferer, a survivor or supporter. So every year, millions of us lace up running shoes, bake cakes and cultivate moustaches in memory of loved ones to raise the cash needed for cancer research.But money is not the only critical ingredient in developing new cures. An important constraint on the pace of progress is the lack of large datasets that conta...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sonia Sodha Tags: Medical research Tessa Jowell Cancer Cancer research Data protection Science Health Politics UK news Source Type: news

Neurosurgeon Eric Leuthardt: ‘An interface between mind and machine will happen’
The US researcher – and sci-fi author – on how brain implants will drive the next turning point in human evolutionDr Eric C Leuthardt, 45, is a neurosurgeon at Washington University in St Louis. He is also the co-founder of NeuroLutions, a research laboratory developing directinterfaces between mind and computer. Leuthardt is pioneering the use of electrical brain implants to help restore motor function to the paralysed limbs of stroke victims. He is also helping to develop electrode systems that can directly decode the unspoken “inner voice” of the mind, and use it to direct external action; for ex...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Ethics Health Technology Biology Source Type: news

Teenagers' eyes reveals their future heart-disease risk
Researchers from The Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Australia, found that for every one point increase in a person's health quality-of-life, their retinal vessels narrow by  0.00005mm, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zero-emissions ferry skims the waves
It's sleek. It's fast. It's green, and that's not just the colour of the hull. EU-funded researchers have developed an award-winning battery electric commuter ferry that can reach up to 30 knots - an impressive speed, which many had deemed unattainable for such a vessel. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Keeping track of ocean plastic
EU-funded research is developing advanced modelling tools to help assess the full extent of the problem of plastic pollution in our oceans and how it is affecting the marine environment. The tools will help policymakers design targeted measures to address a big and growing issue. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

New treatment may improve speech after stroke
A new treatment has been shown to significantly improve the speech and word production of stroke patients with aphasia. It uses special software which encourages patients to produce words increasingly quickly. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 19, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Albert Einstein: brain for medical research - archive, 19 April 1955
19 April 1955 One of the greatest and probably most original of the minds which have created modern science, dies at the age of 76We much regret to announce the death at Princeton, New Jersey, yesterday of Dr Albert Einstein. He was 76. Dr Einstein had entered hospital in Friday for treatment of arterio-sclerosis.Related:From the archive, 19 April 1955: Einstein as a manContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Albert Einstein Science Source Type: news

New research: Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease
(Westmead Institute for Medical Research) New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research found that adolescents with poorer scores in the social and mental well-being domains of HRQoL have structural changes in their retinal blood vessels that could be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attributing extreme weather to man-made climate change
EU-funded researchers have developed a sophisticated modelling system capable of gauging the influence of man-made climate change on extreme weather wreaking havoc around the globe, from heat waves and droughts to floods and storm surges. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 19, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

UKRI Superheroes vs Superbugs live at the Science Museum
Join us at the‘UKRI Superhero Funfair’ on 25 April at London’s Science Museum, for fun, hands-on activities about why public-funding is vital for the fight against Superbugs (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 18, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Transplanted livers help body defend against organ rejection, Mayo Clinic study finds
ROCHESTER, Minn. ??Transplanted livers change the profile of blood cells in the recipients, reducing the potential for organ rejection, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings are published in Kidney International. For decades, transplant experts have observed that liver transplant recipients often need less anti-rejection medication, known as immunosuppressive drugs, than recipients of other solid organs. [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - April 18, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Innovative rotor sail to cut commercial shipping carbon emissions
One of the world's most environmentally friendly passenger ships is harnessing the wind for propulsion, cutting CO2 emissions and fuel consumption, thanks to the installation of an innovative rotor sail developed by an EU-funded project. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 18, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

ICARE Academy: June 18-20, Chicago, IL
ICARE Academy (3-day)Training for IACUC Members and Animal Program Personnel​June 18-20, 2018 | Chicago, IL Register Now!  Can ’t make it to Chicago? A few spaces remain for theMay ICARE Academy in Newport Beach and registration just opened for theSeptember ICARE Academy in Denver.  (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - April 17, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Diet and lifestyle of both parents play a key role in health of offspring
Parents’ diets and health can have profound implications for the growth, development, and long-term health of their children before their conception, according to a series of three papers published in The Lancet. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 17, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

We ’ re Bad at Evaluating Risk. How Doctors Can Help.
What to do when we don ’ t know what to do. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DHRUV KHULLAR Tags: Medicine and Health Tests (Medical) Research Source Type: news

We ’ re Bad at Evaluating Risk: How Doctors Can Help
What to do when we don ’ t know what to do. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DHRUV KHULLAR Tags: Medicine and Health Tests (Medical) Research Source Type: news

Britain ’s use of contaminated blood was no ‘tragedy’ – it was a scandal | Simon Hattenstone
The latest inquiry must discover how thousands of haemophiliacs contracted HIV or hepatitis C from blood products, and why it was covered up for so longIn two weeks ’ time Sir Brian Langstaff will take up his post as chair of thepublic inquiry into contaminated blood and contaminated blood products. Today, World Haemophilia Day, is the perfect occasion to remind Langstaff what the thousands of haemophiliac victims need from this inquiry if they are to get justice.In the 1970s and 1980s more than 4,600 haemophiliacs contracted HIV or hepatitis C after being infected by contaminated blood-clotting products. Much of the...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Simon Hattenstone Tags: Health Society Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Aids and HIV NHS Health policy Politics UK news Science Medical research Source Type: news

A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancer
(University of Adelaide) Researchers at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the University of Adelaide have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Clean Sky 2 - the largest research programme for aviation ever launched in Europe
It develops innovative, cutting-edge technologies aimed at reducing CO2, gas emissions and noise levels produced by aircraft, for incorporation into the next generations of aircraft from 2025 onwards. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 17, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Tapping the full potential of Europe's health data
An EU and industry-funded project is helping researchers tap into Europe's treasure trove of electronic health data, saving them time and money in their quest to cure and develop better drugs for debilitating diseases. The effort has already led to promising findings linked to Alzheimer's and obesity. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 17, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Technology networks awarded £3m to solve life science challenges
Five research networks, awarded£3m through a joint technology initiative, will harness new and emerging developments from the engineering and physical sciences to advance life sciences discovery research.    (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Flesh-eating ulcer spreading rapidly in Australia
Buruli ulcer cases surging and now at epidemic proportions in parts of Victoria, researchers sayA severe tissue-destroying ulcer once rare in Australia is rapidly spreading and is now at epidemic proportions in regions of Victoria, prompting infectious diseases experts to call for urgent research into how it is contracted and spread.In an article published in the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) on Monday, authors led by associate professor Daniel O ’Brien from Barwon Health said incidents of Buruli ulcer were on the rise but researchers were baffled as to why Victoria was being particularly affected. There have be...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Health Australia news Victoria Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

High-tech filter designs... this way for clean water!
New high-tech filter designs and technology developed by EU-funded researchers for use in salt-water purifiers could solve one of the most intractable problems on the planet - providing clean, affordable drinking water to millions who lack access. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Making less common EU languages more accessible
An EU-funded project has developed a cost-efficient, high-quality machine translation tool for less widely spoken European languages such as Croatian, facilitating communication and helping smaller companies enter new markets. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Exposing Paraguay's complex social history of ethnic groups
An EU-funded project narrated the social tensions between Paraguay's different ethnic groups through the history of a tannin factory - the first to hire indigenous people. It aimed to foster discussion on the current and future socio-political situation in the former Spanish colony. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

High-tech filter designs … this way for clean water!
New high-tech filter designs and technology developed by EU-funded researchers for use in salt-water purifiers could solve one of the most intractable problems on the planet - providing clean, affordable drinking water to millions who lack access. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Painkillers in pregnancy may affect baby's future fertility
Taking painkillers during pregnancy could affect the fertility of the unborn child in later life, research suggests. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Tissue-destroying ulcer frequently found in Africa spreading rapidly in Australia
Buruli ulcer cases surging and now at epidemic proportions in parts of Victoria, researchers sayA severe tissue-destroying ulcer once rare in Australia is rapidly spreading and is now at epidemic proportions in regions of Victoria, prompting infectious diseases experts to call for urgent research into how it is contracted and spread.In an article published in the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) on Monday, authors led by associate professor Daniel O ’Brien from Barwon Health said incidents of Buruli ulcer were on the rise but researchers were baffled as to why Victoria was being particularly affected. There have be...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Health Australia news Victoria Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

More than 100g/week of alcohol linked to a shorter life expectancy
Recommended alcohol limits in many countries should be lowered to around 100g/week for men and women, according to an analysis of data from nearly 600,000 current drinkers in 19 countries, published today in The Lancet. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 14, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Discovering a missing link in DNA damage repair
For years, researchers have known that our genome is protected by a system of detection, evaluation and repair processes that activate any time DNA damage occurs. Upon detection, the damage is assessed, repaired in one way or another, or, if it can?t be repaired the cell is cued to self-destruct. Much of that effort is [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - April 14, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news