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Solar scientists gather to calibrate the sun's strength
How much solar power does a photovoltaic solar power unit produce? The answer isn't obvious. The strength of sunshine changes depending where you are in the world and what time of day it is, affecting the energy output of solar panels and cells. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 22, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Diving deeper to find answers to climate questions
EU-funded researchers are reconstructing how the chemical composition of the world's sea water evolved, using brachiopod shells. Their findings should advance understanding of recent changes to our climate. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 22, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Flint water crisis blamed for lower fertility rates, increased fetal death rates
According to a new medical research study, fetal death rates increased by 58 percent in Flint after the city switched its water source in April 2014 (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Get up, stand up: including exercise in everyday life healthier than gym, says study
Taking the stairs and getting off the bus a stop early are more likely to protect against heart disease and early death than working out, research showsIncorporating physical activity into our everyday lives, from taking the stairs to holding “walkaround” meetings in the office, is more likely to protect us from heart disease and an early death than buying a gym membership, according to the author of a major new global study.The study, published in the Lancet medical journal, found that one in 20 cases of heart disease and one in 12 premature deaths around the globe could be prevented if people were more physic...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: Health Heart disease & wellbeing Society Science Medical research Source Type: news

Better understanding of colon cancer to help guide treatment
EU-industry funded researchers have worked to identify and characterise signs of cancer, particularly colon cancers, and patients' responses to different types of treatment. The aim is to help doctors choose the best possible treatment for an individual patient's condition, potentially improving and saving lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 21, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Controversial Lightning Process 'helps children with chronic fatigue syndrome'
Trial unexpectedly shows combination of osteopathy, life coaching and neuro-linguistic programming helps children with CFS/ME get betterA controversial treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) called the Lightning Process can help children get better, a trial has shown, much to the surprise of the doctor who put it to the test.One in every 100 children of secondary school age hasCFS, also known as ME, and it can wreck their lives. Those affected miss a year of school on average, many of them getting to classes on just two days a week. Half are bedbound at some stage.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: ME / Chronic fatigue syndrome Society Health Medical research Science Children Source Type: news

Too few antibiotics in pipeline to tackle global drug-resistance crisis, WHO warns
Nowhere near enough new drugs are currently in development says report, which calls for urgent investment and responsible use of existing antibioticsToo few antibiotics are in the pipeline to tackle the global crisis of drug resistance, which is responsible for the rise of almost untreatable infections around the world, the World Health Organisation (WHO) warns.Among the alarming diseases that are increasing and spreading ismulti-drug resistant tuberculosis (TB), which requires treatment lasting between nine and 20 months. There are 250,000 deaths a year from drug-resistant TB and only 52% of patients globally are successf...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Antibiotics Drug resistance Society Medical research Health Science World Health Organization Tuberculosis Microbiology Source Type: news

How biomarkers can speed-up drug development
EU and industry-funded researchers have gathered data on new biological indicators that could help to identify - accurately and early - the potential side effects of certain drug treatments. The research could help speed up drug development and improve diagnoses and patient care. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 20, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Body's 'bad fat' could be altered to combat obesity, say scientists
By blocking a particular protein, unhealthy ‘white’ fat could be transformed into calorie-burning ‘beige’ fat, experiments show“Bad fat” could be made to turn over a new leaf and combat obesity by blocking a specific protein, scientists have discovered.Most fat in the body is unhealthy “white” tissue deposited around the waist, hips and thighs. But smaller amounts ofenergy-hungry “brown” fat are also found around the neck and shoulders. Brown fat generates heat by burning up excess calories.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Obesity Health Science Medical research Society Source Type: news

PET imaging tracks Zika virus infection, disease progression in mouse model
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) For the first time, scientists have used Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging to study brain inflammation following Zika virus infection in mice, according to a study recently published online in Molecular Imaging and Biology. Traditional methods of infectious disease research using animal models provide limited information about disease progression until the study's endpoint, when investigators can analyze tissues from those animals. Imaging studies allow longitudinal studies of the same animal during the course of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectio...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stem cell bio-bank could lead to new drugs
Europe has identified the need for a central, standardised stem cell repository providing researchers with access to quality controlled cell lines and data for future drug development. EU and industry funding helped this new bio-bank facility establish initial operations and create a 'foundational collection'. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 19, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Dame Margaret Turner-Warwick obituary
Pioneering physician who played a fundamental role in the development of modern respiratory medicineWhen Margaret Turner-Warwick, who has died aged 92, entered the field of respiratory medicine in the 1950s, it was a time of great change. Effective treatment fortuberculosis had recently been introduced, and the adverse effects of cigarette smoking on the lung were beginning to be appreciated.The focus of academic research had been limited to understanding and measuring lung function, but with her colleagues Jack Pepys andDeborah Doniach, Margaret expanded it to include the immunology of the lung, and particularly of the fi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Anthony Newman Taylor Tags: Medical research Science Health Society Health policy Public services policy Politics Source Type: news

Ipf world week 2017
IPF WORLD WEEK 2017 (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 18, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Faster testing for deadly Ebola
EU and industry-funded researchers have developed a portable device to test in the field whether a person has caught the deadly Ebola disease. It gives reliable results in 75 minutes, which can help contain outbreaks and save lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 18, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

HRT won't kill you - but menopausal women still face a difficult decision
A study this week concluded HRT does not shorten lives – but it still increases the risk of cancer, leaving those suffering symptoms with a tough choice to makeHormone replacement therapy (HRT), possibly the most controversial medicine ever invented,will not kill you. That was theconclusion this week of a big, respectable study in the United States that was one of the first to flag up the risk of breast cancer. Women who took the tablets to alleviate the hot flushes and night sweats that assail them, prevent them sleeping and can make life intolerable were no more likely to be dead 18 years later than women who did n...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Menopause Medical research Women Health Science Society & wellbeing Source Type: news

CHMP RE-CIRCUIT label update
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 15, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Women more likely than men to lose interest in sex
Conclusion This study appears to suggest that many factors increase the likelihood of both men and women reporting a lack of interest in sex. Overall, women seem to be more likely to lose interest than men. While this large study provides some insight into the possible reasons behind having a lack of interest in sex, it has a few limitations: As so many factors were considered, there were bound to be some that showed statistical significance – this could just be by chance. The cross-sectional nature of the study means we can't be sure if the specific factors reported on caused the lack of interest, or vice versa. Peo...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Quinoa, amaranth: Ancient grains hold promising future
The answer to future global food challenges may well come from the past. Since the 1960's, diets in many Western countries have relied heavily on meat. But with global food demand soars set to soar by 70 percent by 2050, other sources of high-quality proteins are needed. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 15, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Focusing on the next major advance in medical imaging
Medical-imaging technologies have revolutionised healthcare, enabling doctors to safely peer deep inside the human body to diagnose disease. The EU-funded BE-OPTICAL project is helping to train the next generation of researchers in the field, contributing to the development of even more advanced life-saving imaging systems. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 15, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

SCAW IACUC Wildlife Conference: Oct. 30 – Nov. 1, San Diego, CA
The Scientists Center for Animal Welfare (SCAW) will present a Wildlife Conference “Meeting the Challenges of IACUC Oversight in Fish and Wildlife Research” on October 30 to November 1, 2017, in San Diego, CA. This 3-day conference is for individuals who work with laboratory animals in research, testing and education. These include IACUC members and administrators, Principal I nvestigators, veterinarians, regulatory personnel and laboratory animal care staff. (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - September 14, 2017 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

New technology could allow multiple vaccines to be delivered in single jab
A new technique allowing drugs or vaccines to be encapsulated within tiny biodegradable particles could see an end booster jabsMultiple injections for vaccinations could become a thing of the past, according to scientists who have developed an approach for delivering many doses of different substances in just one jab.The technology involves encapsulating drugs or vaccines within tiny particles made of biodegradable polymers. Depending on their makeup, these polymers break down at different points in time, releasing their contents into the body.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Health Science Society Microbiology Drugs Source Type: news

Multiple time-delayed drugs could be given in single injection, say scientists
A new technology allowing drugs or vaccines to be encapsulated within tiny biodegradable particles could see an end booster jabsMultiple injections for vaccinations could become a thing of the past, according to scientists who have developed an approach for delivering many doses of different substances in just one jab.The technology involves encapsulating drugs or vaccines within tiny particles made of biodegradable polymers. Depending on their makeup, these polymers break down at different points in time, releasing their contents into the body.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Medical research Health Science Society Microbiology Drugs Source Type: news

Department of Defense Kidney Cancer Research Program
The FY17 Defense Appropriations Act provides $10 million (M) to the Department of Defense Kidney Cancer Research Program (KCRP) to support United States Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity (USAMRAA). As directed by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, the Defense Health Agency (DHA) J9, Research and Development Directorate manages the Defense Health Program (DHP) Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) appropriation. The managing agent for the anticipated Program Announcements/Funding Opportunities is the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP).09/30...
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - September 14, 2017 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

Positive CHMP opinion for adalimumab biosimilar CYLTEZO
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Rare Genetic Cause of Peritoneal Mesothelioma Points to Targeted Therapy
Genetic rearrangement in the ALK gene found in young women with mesothelioma may be targetable with FDA-approved drugs. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - September 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

New Genetic Cause Discovered for Photosensitive Blood Disorder
Researchers from BWH have uncovered a new genetic cause for erythropoietic protoporphyria (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - September 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Disease-resistant cereals to strengthen food security
Cereals such as maize, wheat and rice account for almost half of all food calories consumed worldwide, but millions of tonnes of these essential crops are lost to disease each year before they reach our plates. An EU-funded project is waging war on cereal diseases to increase yields, strengthen food security and support a growing world population. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 14, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

HRT will not shorten lives, women told after new research published
Follow-up to alarming reports issued at turn of century says women on therapy do not die sooner than those on placebosWomen will be able to take hormone replacement pills without worrying that the therapy will shorten their lifespans, according to the longest follow-up yet of research that raised fears about the risks of a once-popular treatment.That earlier research was stopped early when unexpected harm was found to be caused by the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) – oestrogen alone or in combination with progestin, a synthetic hormone.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press in Chicago Tags: Menopause Medical research Health Cancer & wellbeing Society Science World news Source Type: news

Next-generation electric motor hits the road
Is it possible to produce electric cars on a very large scale? At the moment, this can depend on costly materials that must be imported. More specifically, this concern relates to the rare earth magnets on which their motors tend to rely. EU-funded researchers have developed promising technology that works without them. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 13, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

No change to alcohol guidelines for pregnancy
Conclusion The results of this review found that low-to-moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy was linked with a slightly increased risk of having a baby small for gestational age. However, there was no evidence for any other links, including any difference in the average birth weight of babies born to drinkers and non-drinkers. There are some important limitations of the research to note: • The evidence still doesn't prove that drinking directly increases the risk of a baby born small for gestational age. Studies were observational and varied widely in accounting for the extensive number of confounding fa...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Source Type: news

Easd 2017
EASD 2017 (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 12, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

We ’re more likely to get cancer than to get married. This is a wake-up call | Ranjana Srivastava
Macmillan Cancer Support says one in two people will get a cancer diagnosis. Yet our treatment still focuses on the disease, not the person ’s specific needs“I need you to see this patient now,” a nurse whispers, her quiet tone masking a mountain of concern.“I am an oncologist,” I introduce myself to the stricken stranger. “We haven’t met before, but you don’t look so well so I am going to help.”Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ranjana Srivastava Tags: Cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Science Doctors UK news Source Type: news

Little evidence that light drinking in pregnancy is harmful, say experts
Women worried by guidance advising abstinence should be told there is little evidence that the odd glass of wine causes harm to the baby, says studyMothers who are consumed by anxiety and guilt for having drunk the odd glass of wine when they are pregnant should be reassured by a new study showing there is very little evidence that it harms the baby, say experts.Drinking in pregnancy is a fraught issue and causes much anxiety. Last year new guidance to the NHS in England urged women to try not to drink at all, but in the real world, say the new study ’s authors, up to 80% in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Alcohol Pregnancy Family Health & wellbeing Life and style Parents and parenting Society Science Medical research Source Type: news

Tracking the evolution of content delivery online
The internet ecosystem is becoming increasingly complex, and is matched by the unprecedented growth of users - from 1 billion in 2005 to a current 3.5 billion. An EU-funded project has developed new techniques to assess the state and health of the internet so as to improve content delivery in this rapidly expanding and dynamic climate. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 12, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Green gold in our sea water
Microscopic green algae may be the scourge of swimming pools, but scientists and businesses have started cultivating them on a large scale to explore how they could in fact improve our lives in a sustainable way. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 12, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Does Study Claim a Cure? Beware of Scientific'Spin '
'Breakthroughs' are rare, so view bold claims with skepticism, researcher warnsSource: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Understanding Medical Research (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

On-board processor 'survival kit' for deep space
Space exploration demands high performance on-board computers with low power requirements that can survive the rigours of aggressive radiation. The EU-funded APEX project has developed the advanced technologies needed to design an ultra-reliable processor for future space missions as far away as Saturn and Jupiter. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 11, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Could electrical implants replace pills for some illnesses?
A pacemaker-liked device that ‘hacks’ the body’s neural circuits could alleviate symptoms of diseases from rheumatoid arthritis to Crohn’s, say researchersA pioneering approach to tackling a host of diseases using an electrical implant could eventually reduce or even end pill-taking for some patients, researchers have claimed.The technology relies on electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve – a bundle of nerve fibres that runs from the brain to the abdomen, branching off to organs including the heart, spleen, lungs and gut, and which relays signals from the body’s organs to the brain an...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 8, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Science Technology Health Biology Society Source Type: news

INJOURNEY results
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 8, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Later Circadian Timing of Food Intake Is Associated with Increased Body Fat
BWH investigators examine the relationships between body fat and body mass index, and the timing of food consumption, to time of day and to the body ’s circadian or body clock. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - September 8, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Later Circadian Timing of Food Intake Is Associated with Increased Body
BWH investigators examine the relationships between body fat and body mass index, and the timing of food consumption, to time of day and to the body ’s circadian or body clock. (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - September 8, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Meet the robot designed to look after our elderly relatives
You're old, you live alone, maybe you lose your glasses a lot or you forget to take your medicine on time. So what do you need? Zacharias the prototype robot of course - at least that is what an EU funded research consortium are banking on. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 8, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Citizen scientists take cutting-edge research beyond the lab
Amateur inventors, health hackers and DIY technology enthusiasts are at the forefront of an EU-funded initiative to help make cutting-edge science accessible, engaging and interactive for the public, blurring the lines between citizen and scientist to spur dialogue, collaboration and innovation. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 8, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Phase IIa initiation in Diabetic Retinopathy
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 7, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

This RSS Feed Will be Discontinued
Due to the low number of subscribers, NIGMS is discontinuing this RSS feed. We encourage you to follow us on ourFeedback Loop and Biomedical Beat blogs, sign up for email updates, or follow us on social media. (Source: NIGMS New on the Site)
Source: NIGMS New on the Site - September 7, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Collaboration for next generation obesity treatments
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 7, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

New treatment on the horizon for type 1 diabetes sufferers
(Westmead Institute for Medical Research) Patients suffering from type 1 diabetes may soon have access to improved approaches to treat the disease, courtesy of new research out of Sydney's Westmead Institute for Medical Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Investigating Earth and fluid dynamics
Understanding how fluids and other materials flow in response to applied forces is critical to many industrial applications, energy production processes and even determining the stability of the ground beneath our feet. The field of study, known as rheology, is being advanced by an EU-funded research network combining expertise in geodynamics, mineral physics, seismology, fluid mechanics and materials science. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 7, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Statins cut the risk of heart disease death by 28% among men, study shows
Longest study of its kind concludes current prescribing guidelines are correct, and that statins show impressive benefits for men with high cholesterol levelsStatins cut the risk of dying from heart disease by 28% among men, according to the longest study of its kind.The 20-year project examined data from 2,560 men taking part in a randomised clinical trial to test the effects of statins versus a placebo.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Statins Science Health Medical research Society Source Type: news

NAS, NAM Members Receive Lasker Awards
The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced today that NAS member Michael N. Hall, professor, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Switzerland, is the recipient of the 2017 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for"discoveries concerning the nutrient-activated TOR proteins and their central role in the metabolic control of cell growth." Dual NAS/NAM member Douglas Lowy, acting director of the National Cancer Institute, has been awarded the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award, along with John T. Schiller of the NCI, for"technological advances that enabled development of HPV vaccines for p...
Source: News from the National Academies - September 6, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news