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Flushing out 'zombie cells' could help stave off Parkinson's, study suggests
Possible approach to treating effects of neurodegenerative diseases – and even ageing – revealed by trialIn work that could open a new front in the war on Parkinson ’s disease, and even ageing itself, scientists have shown that they can stave off some of the effects of the neurodegenerative disease by flushing “zombie cells” from the brain.The research in mice raises hopes for a fresh approach to treating the most common forms of Parkinson ’s disease, which typically arise through a complex interplay of genetics, lifestyle andpotentially toxic substances in the environment.Continue readi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Neuroscience Parkinson's disease Medical research Ageing Society Source Type: news

Only 1 in 10 patients with anxiety disorders receives the right treatment
(IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)) The results of an international study commissioned by the World Mental Health with a sample of more than 51,500 individuals from 21 different countries, reveals that 10 percent of people suffer anxiety. Of these, only 27.6 percent have received some type of treatment, and this was considered appropriate in only 9.8 percent of the cases. It is the first time a study has described the treatment gap in anxiety disorders at an international level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Refining medical research methods for better results
Billions of euros are wasted ever year on research that is redundant, flawed, never published or poorly reported. The EU-funded project MIROR aims to reduce this waste and ensure money invested in medical research is well spent on achieving results that matter to people. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 23, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

UK jobs at risk as EC warns on safety standards post-Brexit
More than 200 UK agencies that provide ‘CE’ safety labels may lose recognition after March 2019Highly specialised jobs in Britain assessing whether products ranging from MRI scanners to phones can carry the “CE” safety label could be at risk post-Brexit after the European commission put manufacturers on notice over future standards.In an official notice, the EC said the agencies that provide the safety certificates may not have their work recognised after 29 March 2019, unless an agreement can be reached.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lisa O'Carroll Brexit correspondent Tags: Brexit UK news European Union Medical research Politics Science World news European commission Source Type: news

Nigeria:Doctor Calls for Stiff Regulation of Slimming Drugs
[Vanguard] Dr Bamidele Iwalokun, a medical researcher with the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research (NIMR) in Yaba, Lagos, has called for stiffer regulation of slimming drugs to safeguard the health of consumers. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 22, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New hope for people with rare kidney diseases
An EU-funded project has provided new hope for the 2 million people in Europe who suffer from rare kidney diseases thanks to groundbreaking research that has led to diagnostic tests and a new type of treatment. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 22, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Blood test could use DNA to spot eight of the most common cancers, study shows
DNA and biomarkers could be used to detect and identify cancers, including five types for which there is currently no screening testScientists have made a major advance towards developing a blood test for cancer that could identify tumours long before a person becomes aware of symptoms.The new test, which is sensitive to both mutated DNA that floats freely in the blood and cancer-related proteins, gave a positive result approximately 70% of the time across eight of the most common cancers when tested in more than 1,000 patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

Blood test could use DNA to spot early-stage cancers, study shows
DNA and biomarkers could be used to detect and identify cancers, including five types for which there is currently no screening testScientists have made a major advance towards developing a blood test for cancer that could identify tumours long before a person becomes aware of symptoms.The new test, which is sensitive to both mutated DNA that floats freely in the blood and cancer-related proteins, gave a positive result approximately 70% of the time across eight of the most common cancers when tested in more than 1,000 patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

New blood test could help detect eight common cancers before they spread
Researchers believe CancerSEEK will save thousands of lives and hope it will be widely available in a few yearsResearchers have said a groundbreaking new blood test that can detect eight common types of cancer before they spread will save countless lives.They said “liquid biopsy” – developed in the US – would be a game-changer in the fight against cancer, and hoped it could be widely available within a few years.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Health Cancer research Australia news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Hot or not? Bikram no more beneficial than any other yoga, says vascular study
Yoga could help to improve function of artery linings regardless of room temperature, researchers concludeWhile the popularity of practising yoga in sweltering rooms is booming around the world, researchers say benefits to blood vessels are the same whether the moves are performed in the heat or not.Bikram yoga was founded by controversial instructorBikram Choudhury and involves 26 poses and two breathing exercises, performed in a room heated to just over 40C (104F).Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Yoga Health Heart disease Life and style Society Science Source Type: news

Protecting archaeological heritage in Eastern Europe
An EU-funded project has helped expand the practice of 'preventive archaeology' in Eastern Europe, contributing to the preservation of important heritage sites. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 19, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Genetic sequencing points to endemic origin of monkeypox virus outbreak in Nigeria
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) Scientists working to control a human outbreak of monkeypox virus (MXPV) in Nigeria performed genetic sequencing of patient samples, revealing that the outbreak likely originated from a source within the country. Their results emphasize the value of local surveillance for the early detection of viral spillovers and the need for advanced genetic characterization to help determine the origins of outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers develop first cortisol treatment specifically designed for infants
EU-funded researchers have developed a treatment tailored for babies and children lacking the stress hormone cortisol. The drug, the first hydrocortisone formulation specifically designed for infants, could become available next year following successful clinical trials. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 18, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Obesity surgery 'halves risk of death' compared with lifestyle changes
Latest study lends support to experts who say more operations should be carried out in UKObese patients undergoing stomach-shrinking surgery have half the risk of death in the years that follow compared with those tackling their weight through diet and behaviour alone, new research suggests.Experts say obesity surgery is cost-effective, leads to substantial weight loss and can help tackletype 2 diabetes. But surgeons say not enough of thestomach-shrinking surgeries are carried out in the UK, with figures currently lagging behind other European countries, including France and Belgium – despite the latter having a smal...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Obesity Medical research Health Science Society Source Type: news

Sea snail poison promises new medicines
EU-funded researchers have uncovered how venomous sea snails manufacture organic molecules with important applications in treatments for pain relief and diabetes. This basic research also offers unexpected, new insights into the field of cell biology. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 17, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Obesity surgery 'halves risk of death' compared to lifestyle changes alone
Latest study of long-term impact of bariatric surgery lends support to experts who say more operations should be carried out in UKObese patients undergoing stomach-shrinking surgery have half the risk of death in the years that follow compared with those tackling their weight through diet and behaviour alone, new research suggests.Experts say obesity surgery is cost-effective, leads to substantial weight loss and can help tackletype 2 diabetes. But surgeons say not enough of thestomach-shrinking surgeries are carried out in the UK, with figures currently lagging behind other European countries, including France and Belgium...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Obesity Medical research Health Science Society Source Type: news

Obesity and overweight multiply the risk of suffering cancer and heart disease
(IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)) Obese women are 12 times more like to get cancer than those of a normal weight. Obese men are twice as likely to develop this disease. The data is the result of the largest Spanish study ever in this field, involving a 10-year follow up of 54,000 people from 7 autonomic communities. Only 26 percent of those taking part had a normal weight. The rest were either obese or overweight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Achoo! Why letting out an explosive sneeze is safer than stifling it
Following the case of a man who ruptured this throat, medics say holding in a sneeze can cause ear damage or a brain aneurysmIn a season where colds are rife, holding your nose and closing your mouth might seem like a considerate alternative to an explosive “Achoo!”. But doctors have warned of the dangers of such a move after a man was found to have ruptured the back of his throat when attempting to stifle a sneeze.Medics say the incident, which they detail in the British Medical JournalCase Reports, came to light when a 34-year old man arrived in A&E with a change to his voice, a swollen neck, pain when sw...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Science Health Biology Source Type: news

Calling all Citizen Scientists! Join the CitSciMed Blitz!
Got a burning passion for health? Ready to make a difference? We ’ve got you covered.JoinCochrane Crowd, our partner platformsMark2Cure andStall Catchers and our collective global volunteer network for the CitSciMed Blitz. Together we can speed up medical research and make a difference.Cochrane Crowd is Cochrane ’s new citizen science platform. Our main focus is identifying studies that provide the best possible evidence of the effectiveness of a health treatment. Once identified by the Crowd the studies go into a central register where health researchers and practitioners can access them. The more studie s ide...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Digital Science launches Dimensions: next-generation research and discovery platform
Ground-breaking research information database links publications, grants, policy, data and metrics for the first time Global technology company Digital Science is proud to announce the launch of Dimensions, a new platform that aims to democratise and transform scholarly search. A collaboration between six Digital Science portfolio companies (Altmetric, Digital Science Consultancy, Figshare, Readcube, Symplectic and ÜberResearch) and more than 100 research funders and universities, Dimensions offers a better, faster way to discover, understand and analyse the global research landscape, without wasting time searching fo...
Source: News from STM - January 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

2018 Ruminant Well-Being Awards open for application
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Gene editing – and what it really means to rewrite the code of life
We now have a precise way to correct, replace or even delete faulty DNA.Ian Sample explains the science, the risks and what the future may holdSo what is gene editing?Scientists liken it to the find and replace feature used to correct misspellings in documents written on a computer. Instead of fixing words, gene editing rewrites DNA, the biological code that makes up the instruction manuals of living organisms. With gene editing, researchers can disable target genes,correct harmful mutations, and change the activity of specific genes in plants and animals, including humans.What ’s the point?Much of the excitement aro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Genetics Medical research Science Health Biology Source Type: news

Feinstein Institute discovers genes that repair spinal cord in fish are also in humans
(Northwell Health) Northwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Associate Professor Ona E. Bloom, PhD, along with colleagues at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), published today in Scientific Reports that many of the genes that repair an injured spinal cord in a fish called the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected families
(Medical Research Council) Researchers have shown for the first time how children can inherit a severe -- potentially fatal -- mitochondrial disease from a healthy mother. The study, led by researchers from the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, reveals that healthy people harbor mutations in their mitochondrial DNA and explains how cases of severe mitochondrial disease can appear unexpectedly in previously unaffected families. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A close eye on suicidality in the young
Are there medicines that could destroy a young person's will to live? An EU-funded project has developed a suite of web-based tools to shed new light on suicidality in children and teenagers, with an emphasis on any risks arising from medication. It has also produced a predictive system to identify persons in particular danger. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Everything you've ever wanted to know about my colonoscopy (but never dared to ask)
When I had rectal bleeding, I went for a colonoscopy. The doctor prescribed more fiber – but could anxiety be the source of the pain in my backside?The thing about writers – the thing that makes us hated and occasionally liked – is that very often we have our heads up our asses. There are two ways that people in my profession can address this.We could develop a deeper sense of humility, looking beyond ourselves and try to use our voices to amplify the experiences of other people in this cruel, cruel world.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mona Chalabi Tags: Anxiety Medical research Health US news World news Science Society & wellbeing Life and style Psychology Source Type: news

Small, 'smart' satellite showcases cutting-edge technologies
A mini satellite launched by an EU-funded project is demonstrating a range of cutting-edge technologies to improve the performance, cost, stability and longevity of small space-based platforms for applications such as atmospheric monitoring, Earth imaging, communications and aerospace research. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Anxiety: An Early Indicator of Alzheimer ’s Disease?
A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer ’s disease in older (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - January 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Five things to remember after getting the dreaded cancer diagnosis | Ranjana Srivastava
As if cancer treatment wasn ’t trying enough, a common stress will be unwanted advice. But you can benefit from the wisdom of othersAmid the greetings of the new year arrives a simple text message, “What do you think?” The story is familiar enough but this time, the cast is different. The patient is related to my childhood friend and across continents and time zone, I feel it all. The desperate bid to find an oncologist, the labyrinth of investigations, the profusion of advice, and above a ll, the acrid taste of fear arising unbidden.Related:As cancer progresses some patients weep, some get angry and othe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ranjana Srivastava Tags: Cancer Health Cancer research Medical research Source Type: news

Dementia is too big a problem to walk away from – for Pfizer or any of us | Bart De Strooper
The financial and social costs of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer ’s are devastating. It’s essential that big pharma be part of the effort to end themIf you were to go out on the street today and run a straw poll on big pharma, I doubt that it would come back very positive. More often than not, these companies are seen by the public as corporate behemoths committed only to the bottom line, and not particularly patient-focused. This week ’s news thatPfizer is pulling out of neuroscienceresearch will likely bolster that impression. It ’s a tragedy for the millions suffering from Alzheimer&rsqu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bart De Strooper Tags: Dementia Mental health Society Pfizer Pharmaceuticals industry Business Alzheimer's Medical research Science UK news Source Type: news

Turning forest waste into an air freshener
Buildings in Spain and Estonia have been fitted with novel construction and insulation materials made from natural fibres and forest waste as part of an EU-funded project demonstrating innovative applications of biocomposites. These materials not only comply with building codes and boost sustainability but also reduce the risk of residents becoming sick. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 11, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Screening for osteoporosis 'can be effective in preventing hip fractures'
Providing women with opportunities to attend community screening forosteoporosis could significantly reduce the number of hip fractures they suffer. This is the conclusion of a new study led by the University of East Anglia, with funding by the Medical Research Council andArthritis Research UK, which has suggested that screening could catch as many as one-quarter of all hip fractures before they happen. How the screening works The study brought together researchers from universities across the country, with a total of 12,483 women aged 70 to 85 recruited from 100 GP practices in seven regions - Birmingham, Bristol, Manches...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 11, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Alzheimer's setback as promising drug shows no benefit in clinical trials
Disappointment as idalopirdine fails at trial to improve cognition and limit decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer ’s diseaseThe quest to develop drugs to treat Alzheimer ’s disease has experienced a new setback, with a promising medication failing to show benefits in the latest series of clinical trials.Earlier trials had suggested that the drug idalopirdine, from the Danish international pharmaceutical company Lundbeck, might improve cognition in those with Alzheimer ’s disease when taken alongside existing drugs – known as cholinesterase inhibitors – acting to improve symptoms...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 10, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Alzheimer's Medical research Drugs Science Health Society Source Type: news

Winemaking gets a high-tech makeover
EU-funded researchers have developed new ways to study the DNA of plants and soils used in winemaking as part of a wider effort to better understand how and when microbes help or harm different stages of production. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 10, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Every £1 invested in medical research delivers a return equivalent to 25p every year, forever
This study shows that funding research into these conditions not only delivers direct health benefits to patients, it is also hugely beneficial to the UK economy, helping to lay the foundations for a healthier, wealthier future.“This report supports previous findings that investing in biomedical research delivers an annual return of about 25 pence per pound in perpetuity, offering an indisputable economic benefit. This new figure ably illustrates why scientific research has earnt its place at the heart of a modern industrial strategy.”Dr Louise Wood, Director of Science, Research and Evidence, Department of Hea...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - January 10, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Drinking too much can cause cancer, damaging cellular DNA, study finds
(Natural News) An animal study published in the journal Nature revealed how excessive alcohol intake might lead to the subsequent onset of cancer. A team of researchers at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge gave mice models ethanol to examine the effects of alcohol on the animals. The experts then analyzed the animals’ DNA structure... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BeiGene and Boehringer Ingelheim Announce Commercial Supply Agreement
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 9, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists Turn Skin Cells Into Muscle Cells, a Potential Boon for Research
TUESDAY, Jan. 9, 2018 -- In a potential advance for medical research, scientists say they've created the first functioning human muscle from skin cells. The breakthrough could lead to better genetic or cell-based therapies, as well as furthering... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Ibuprofen may increase risk of fertility issues in men, study suggests
High doses of the common painkiller over a long period of time may put men at greater risk of fertility problems and other health issues, research indicatesMen who take high doses of ibuprofen for months at a time may be at greater risk of fertility issues and also other health problems, such as muscle wastage, erectile dysfunction and fatigue, scientists have found.Research on healthy young men who took the common painkiller for up to six weeks showed that the drug disrupted the production of male sex hormones and led to a condition normally seen in older men and smokers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Drugs Medical research Health Society Fertility problems Men's health & wellbeing Source Type: news

New software creates opportunities for TWIP steel
EU-funded researchers have successfully demonstrated that a particular class of steel offers greater flexibility and strength for automotive part manufacturing. Using cutting-edge software analysis that is now commercially available, the project hopes to encourage the rollout of industrial-scale production of this promising material. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 9, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Slow-Release Pill Developed to Deliver HIV Therapeutics
Using an ingestible “mini pill box,” researchers investigate a once weekly pill to combat HIV (Source: BWH for Journalists)
Source: BWH for Journalists - January 9, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Second-largest grant in KU's history will grow medical research footprint
A $25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will give a big boost to The University of Kansas' research efforts. The five-year award from the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) will support the university's efforts to discover new treatments and better understand how to prevent disease. It is the second-largest grant in KU's history. "This is money we're trying to get out the door as quickly as we can to help stimulate research," said Dr. Richard Barohn,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Gas-sniffing pill that transmits from the gut passes first human trials
Scientists from Australia ’s RMIT University reveal promising results from human trials of swallowable capsule that transmits data to a mobile phoneAn electronic gas-detecting pill could help in diagnosing gastrointestinal ailments, including irritable bowel syndrome.Scientists from Melbourne ’s RMIT University first unveiled their swallowable capsule early in 2015 in the hope it would it would help doctors work out what foods were problematic for their patients by detecting and measuring intestinal gases produced by gut bacteria.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Health Australia news Cancer research Medical research Science World news Society Source Type: news

Second-largest grant in KU's history will grow medical research footprint
A $25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will give a big boost to The University of Kansas' research efforts. The five-year award from the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) will support the university's efforts to discover new treatments and better understand how to prevent disease. It is the second-largest grant in KU's history. "This is money we're trying to get out the door as quickly as we can to help stimulate research," said Dr. Richard Barohn,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elise Reuter Source Type: news

Why Bill Gates Isn & #039;t Sweating the US & #039; Role in Medical Research
If you ask one of the world's wealthiest and most philanthropic people if he's concerned that the United States may be losing its foothold as the world leader in biomedical research, the answer might surprise you. Following a keynote presentation on the opening day of the 36th annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco, Bill Gates was joined on stage for an interview with CNN's Sanjay Gupta, MD, who picked the multi-billionaire's brain about public funding trends for global health initiatives. Don't miss the MD&M West Conference and Expo, February 6-8, 2018. Use promo code "MDDI"...
Source: MDDI - January 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

Neural Analytics raises $15m in Series B
Neural Analytics said today it raised $15 million in a Series B round of financing led by Alpha Edison to support the continued development of its Lucid transcranial doppler ultrasound system designed to assess blood vessels in the brain from outside the body. The Lucid M1 system is a portable all-in-one ultrasound system designed for measuring and displaying cerebral blood flow velocities in patients with brain disorders, the Los Angeles, Calif.-based company said. “This round of funding will allow us to build on the momentum we have generated in 2017 and expand our team as we further advance the developme...
Source: Mass Device - January 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neurological Neural Analytics Source Type: news

Training for IACUC Trainers at the ICARE TTI: February 20-23, Atlanta, GA
Interagency Collaborative Animal Research Education (ICARE)Train the Trainer Institute (TTI)February 20-23, 2018 | Atlanta, GA Register Here!  (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - January 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Intelligent technology for farms of the future
Smart technology can greatly benefit farms but selecting and deploying it can be a daunting process. An EU-funded network is stimulating the uptake of ICT-backed innovation that can help make agriculture more productive, resource efficient and profitable. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - January 8, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

5th International Conference of the Basel Declaration Society: February 14-15, San Francisco, CA
5th International Conference of the Basel Declaration SocietyOpenness and Transparency: Building Trust in Animal Research February 14-15, 2018 | San Francisco, CA (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - January 5, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Mirror neuron activity predicts people ’s decision-making in moral dilemmas, UCLA study finds
It is wartime. You and your fellow refugees are hiding from enemy soldiers, when a baby begins to cry. You cover her mouth to block the sound. If you remove your hand, her crying will draw the attention of the soldiers, who will kill everyone. If you smother the child, you ’ll save yourself and the others.If you were in that situation, which was dramatized in the final episode of the ’70s and ’80s TV series “M.A.S.H.,” what would you do?The results of a new UCLA study suggest that scientists could make a good guess based on how the brain responds when people watch someone else experience pain....
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 5, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news