Offshoot of Covid Delta variant on the rise in England
UK Health Security Agency monitoring AY.4.2 as daily cases at highest level since late JulyCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA newly detected coronavirus variant is on the rise in England, with the virus believed to be an offshoot of Delta.According to a briefing from the UK Health Security Agency,released on Friday, “a Delta sublineage newly designated as AY.4.2 is noted to be expanding in England”, with the body adding that the variant is being monitored and assessed.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Coronavirus World news Science Infectious diseases Vaccines and immunisation Health Medical research Society Source Type: news

Covid-19: v | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical biologist, about why it took so long for these errors to be traced back to the lab, and what the consequences could beContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anand Jagatia and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Covid-19: how 43,000 false negative tests were uncovered as wrong | podcast
Last week, testing at a private Covid lab in Wolverhampton was halted, after the UK Health Security Agency found tens of thousands of people may have been falsely given a negative PCR result. But since the start of September, scientists had been alerted to strange patterns in the testing data which suggested something was out of the ordinary. Anand Jagatia speaks to Dr Kit Yates, a mathematical biologist, about why it took so long for these errors to be traced back to the lab, and what the consequences could beContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anand Jagatia and produced by Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Source Type: news

Valneva Covid vaccine could be as effective as Oxford jab, study suggests
Vaccine produced by French company uses inactivated Sars-CoV-2 virus and can be stored in fridgeCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageA coronavirus jab based on traditional vaccine technology might be as effective as the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, data suggests, offering new hope for global vaccination efforts.Vaccines currently approved for use in the UK deliver instructions for producing the coronavirus “spike” protein to cells in order, which triggers an immune response. However, the jab produced by the French pharmaceutical company Valneva involves delivering the whole – b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Health Medical research UK news Science France World news Source Type: news

Cystic Fibrosis Genetherapy Development Option Excercise
Boehringer Ingelheim and Partners to Accelerate Development of First-In-Class Gene Therapy for Patients with Cystic FibrosisBoehringer Ingelheim has exercised intellectual property options from IP Group regarding research results generated by the UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium, and from Oxford Biomedica regarding their lentiviral vector technology   Partners aim to expedite the development of the novel, inhaled cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene therapy BI 3720931 as a long-lasting therapeutic option for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - October 18, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

TGA dismisses bid to make contraceptive pill available over the counter in Australia
Two applications were made to amend poisons legislation so that the pill would not need ongoing prescriptions from doctorDownload the free Guardian app;get our morning email briefingA push to make the contraceptive pill available over the counter has been dismissed by Australia ’s drugs regulator.In an interim decision, now open for further consultation, the Therapeutic Goods Administration found the risk of making the contraceptive pill available over the counter outweighed the benefits.Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morningContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Medical editor Tags: Australia news Medical research Contraception and family planning Health Science Pharmaceuticals industry Source Type: news

Factory farms of disease: how industrial chicken production is breeding the next pandemic
At least eight types of bird flu, all of which can kill humans, are circulating around the world ’s factory farms – and they could be worse than Covid-19One day last December, 101,000 chickens at a gigantic farm near the city of Astrakhan in southern Russiastarted to collapse and die. Tests by the state research centre showed that a relatively new strain of lethal avian flu known as H5N8 was circulating, and within days 900,000 birds at the Vladimirskaya plant werehurriedly slaughtered to prevent an epidemic.Avian flu is the world ’s other ongoing pandemic and H5N8 is just one strain that has torn through...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Global health Food Bird flu Coronavirus Farming Environment Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science Society World news Wildlife & drink industry Business China Asia Pacific Global development Source Type: news

Australia could see Covid surge from new variants even after 80% vaccination when border reopens
Modelling shows increased risk of outbreaks if a mutation similar to the transmissibility of Delta were to circulate with international arrivalsFollow our Covid live blog for the latest updatesVaccine rollout and rates tracker; cases and data trackerGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingIf the Australian international border is reopened while highly transmissible Covid-19 variants are circulating overseas or locally, large and disruptive outbreaks will still be possible after 80% of people aged 16 years are fully vaccinated, modelling published in the Medical Journal of Australia on Monday says.It comes after...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Medical editor Tags: Australia news Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Health Medical research Travel Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Polygenic screening of embryos is here, but is it ethical?
The first child born using the technique arrived last year. But can it really help reduce diseases in a new generation, or is it ‘techno-eugenics’?The birth of the first IVF baby, Louise Brown, in 1978 provoked a media frenzy. In comparison, a little girl named Aurea born by IVF in May 2020 went almost unnoticed. Yet she represents a significant first in assisted reproduction too, for the embryo from which she grew was selected from others based on polygenic screening before implantation, to optimise her health prospects.For both scientific and ethical reasons, this new type of genetic screening is highly contr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Philip Ball Tags: Genetics Biology Science Ethics Health World news Medical research Source Type: news

Introduction to forensic gerontology - Popov VL, Safra ĭ AE, Korobova DG, Rukavishnikova AA.
OBJECTIVE - to substantiate the identification of a new direction in forensic medicine - forensic gerontology. A statistical analysis of the structure of forensic medical research of corpses in terms of age for a twenty-year period has been carried out. Th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Covid: how did error over wrong PCR test results in UK happen?
An estimated 43,000 people may have been given false negative results. Here are the key issuesCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAn estimated 43,000 people may have been given wrong negative PCR Covid test results, the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has said.Here we answer key questions about the error:Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson Tags: Coronavirus NHS World news Health Society Infectious diseases Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Covid PCR tests: at least 43,000 in UK may have had false negatives
Health Security Agency suspends operations at privately run lab in WolverhamptonCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageAt least 43,000 people may have been wrongly given a negative Covid test result, the UK Health Security Agency has said, as it announced the suspension of operations at a privately run lab in Wolverhampton.NHS test and trace has suspended testing operations by Immensa Health Clinic at its laboratory in Wolverhampton, the agency said.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Grierson, Steven Morris and Rowena Mason Tags: Coronavirus England Infectious diseases Medical research UK news Science Source Type: news

Kenya: Kenyan Doctor at Centre of Ground-Breaking Malaria Vaccine
[Nation] A top Kenyan scientist who participated in a ground-breaking medical research is confident of a malaria-free future after the World Health Organization (WHO) approved the first vaccine for children. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - October 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

People taking statins less likely to die from Covid, study suggests
Experts warn findings do not prove cholesterol-lowering drugs can reduce death ratesMillions of people who take statins may be less likely to die from Covid, research suggests.The cholesterol-lowering drugs are one of the world ’s most popular medications. They can also reduce inflammation in blood vessels, which has prompted questions over whether they could help with outcomes in coronavirus patients.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Statins Coronavirus Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

Lupus sufferers pleaded for hydroxychloroquine before Clive Palmer ’s doses were destroyed
Drug ’s potential as Covid treatment, since dispelled, affected availability for people with proven medical needGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingLupus sufferers pleaded for more supplies of hydroxychloroquine two months before the federal government told billionaire Clive Palmer it didn ’t want more of the 33m doses he wanted to donate as a potential Covid-19 treatment.One tonne of Palmer ’s hydroxychloroquine – equivalent to 5m doses – was destroyed after it was left unclaimed in Melbourne due to a lengthy standoff with the commonwealth, Guardian Australiarevealed on Wednes...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Christopher Knaus Tags: Clive Palmer Australia news Health Coronavirus Medical research Source Type: news

Africa: UN Honours Henrietta Lacks, Whose Cells Transformed Medical Research Worldwide
[UN News] For the past seven decades, the cells of Henrietta Lacks, a Black American woman who died of cervical cancer, have saved countless lives, and made numerous scientific breakthroughs possible, such as the human papillomavirus and polio vaccines, drugs for HIV treatment, together with cancer and COVID-19 research. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 14, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

‘Debilitating’: health impacts of smoke from Australia’s black summer bushfires revealed in study
Only one in five people sought medical attention but half reported anxiety, depression and sleep lossGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingThe film-makerShaun Humphreys vividly remembers the miserable summer of the 2019-20 bushfires.His house, in a north Canberra suburb, was far from the burning fires, but the surrounding smoke was thick and stifling.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Bushfires Health Canberra Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Medical research Science Australia news Source Type: news

UN honours  Henrietta Lacks, whose cells transformed medical research worldwide 
For the past seven decades, the cells of Henrietta Lacks, a Black American woman who died of cervical cancer, have saved countless lives, and made numerous scientific breakthroughs possible, such as the human papillomavirus and polio vaccines, drugs for HIV treatment, together with cancer and COVID-19 research.    (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - October 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ultrasound trial offers hope for brain cancer patients
New technique temporarily allows drugs to cross blood brain barrier to treat tumoursA technique has been developed that could revolutionise thetreatment of brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases by temporarily allowing drugs and other substances to cross the blood brain barrier – a structure that separates the brain’s blood vessels from the rest of its tissues.A trial in four women whose breast cancer had spread to the brain showed that magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) could safely deliver the antibody therapy Herceptin into their brain tissue, causing the tumours to shrink.Continue r...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Medical research Neuroscience Breast cancer Alzheimer's Health Society Source Type: news

How my ivermectin research led to Twitter death threats | Dr Andrew Hill
I was sent images of coffins and hanged Nazi war criminals after finding medical fraud in clinical trialsThe story of online threats and abuse is very dark. In early 2021, my research team was analysing a new drug called ivermectin. In the first clinical trials, this drug seemed to prevent new infections and improve survival. When I first wrote about this, I started getting regular threats on Twitter, demanding that ivermectin should be approved worldwide and questioning the safety of vaccines.In March 2021, I received my first vaccine dose and posted a photo on Twitter from the clinic. Within minutes I was receiving stran...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Hill Tags: Coronavirus Vaccines and immunisation Infectious diseases Microbiology Medical research Science Health UK news Source Type: news

Homegrown Covid vaccines fill gap as UN Covax scheme misses target
India, Egypt and Cuba among first states to develop and make their own vaccines as Covax falls behindDeveloping countries are increasingly turning to homegrown Covid vaccinations as the UN-backedCovax programme falls behind.Whilewestern countries roll out booster jabs to their own populations, Covax, which was set up by UN agencies, governments and donors to ensure fair access to Covid-19 vaccines for low- and middle-income countries, has said it will miss its target to distribute 2bn doses globally by the end of this year.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Hazem Badr, Helen Mendes and Papiya Bhattacharya Tags: Global development Vaccines and immunisation Coronavirus Infectious diseases Science World news Health Medical research Society Microbiology Egypt Indonesia India Brazil Pharmaceuticals industry China European Commission Source Type: news

Drug trial offers new hope for those with metastatic breast cancer
Scientists are studying whether talazoparib could help treat those with incurable breast cancerScientists have launched a new trial that could offer hope to those with incurable breast cancer.They are studying whether an existing drug, talazoparib, also known by the brandname Talzenna, may offer a new treatment to people with incurable breast cancer that has spread to the brain.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science UK news Source Type: news

New orthopaedic research center planned for SA
The Alamo City will soon be home to a new medical research and training center, the first of its kind in the region. TSAOG Orthopaedics& Spine is teaming with the  Burkhart Research Institute for Orthopaedics, or BRIO, to develop the new facility, which will include a training lab. The new venture will be within the Ridgewood Orthopaedic Center, a nearly 100,000-square-foot structure in Stone Oak off interstate 281 that opened in late 2020 and is home to TS AOG. It will support innovative orthopedic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 12, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

U.S. Task Force Reconsiders Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Use for Preventing Heart Attacks in Adults Over 60
Older adults without heart disease shouldn’t take daily low-dose aspirin to prevent a first heart attack or stroke, an influential health guidelines group said in preliminary updated advice released Tuesday. Bleeding risks for adults in their 60s and up who haven’t had a heart attack or stroke outweigh any potential benefits from aspirin, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said in its draft guidance. For the first time, the panel said there may be a small benefit for adults in their 40s who have no bleeding risks. For those in their 50s, the panel softened advice and said evidence of benefit is less clear....
Source: TIME: Health - October 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lindsey Taylor/AP Tags: Uncategorized healthscienceclimate Research wire Source Type: news

Vagina lasering for postmenopausal women ‘may be placebo’
UK study suggests therapy for dryness, itching and pain should be used with caution, say expertsAn expensive laser treatment purporting to help women with postmenopausal vaginal symptoms such as dryness, itching and pain when having sex may be no better than a placebo, research suggests.According to theUK ’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence(Nice), vaginal laser therapy involves inserting a laser device into the vagina to heat the vaginal wall and create tiny holes or “micro-traumas”. It has been claimed this stimulates the production of collagen, helping to alleviate postmenopausal vagina...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Women's health Menopause Medical research Society Science UK news Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic celebrates 35 years in Florida
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — In the 35 years since its opening, Mayo Clinic in Florida has become one of the premier medical destination centers in the Southeast while garnering the No. 1 spot in U.S. News& World Report's "Best Hospitals" rankings in Florida and contributing more than $2 billion annually to Florida's economy. In 1986, Mayo Clinic brought its team approach to health care from Rochester, Minnesota, to the Southeast when it opened the clinic… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - October 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic collaborates with Personalis Inc. to expand cancer genomic testing
ROCHESTER, Minn., and MENLO PARK, Calif. — Mayo Clinic announced an agreement on Tuesday, Oct. 12 that will allow it to offer clinical-grade comprehensive cancer genomic sequencing to cancer patients who choose to participate. Test results will be available to patients and their treating health care providers to guide therapeutic decisio ns, advance cancer research, and support the development of new diagnostic tests and therapies for cancer treatment. Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic's Department of… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - October 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

New treatment destroys head and neck cancer tumours in trial
Exclusive: combination of drugs causes tumours to vanish in some terminally ill patients, study findsA new cancer treatment can wipe out tumours in terminally ill head and neck cancer patients, scientists have discovered.In a landmark trial, a cocktail of immunotherapy medications harnessed patients ’ immune systems to kill their own cancer cells and prompted “a positive trend in survival”, according to researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), London, and the Royal Marsden NHS foundation trust.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Cancer Medical research Health Science NHS UK news Source Type: news

The development of an early intervention for supporting families of persons with acquired brain injuries: the SAFIR( ©) Intervention - de Goumoëns V, Ayigah K, Joye D, Ryvlin P, Ramelet AS.
Families of persons with acquired brain injuries need to be supported from the early phase of hospitalization. To date, no known early family intervention is available for this population. Using the Medical Research Council Framework, we developed a new in... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

New cancer treatment destroys tumours in terminally ill, finds trial
Exclusive: combining immunotherapy drugs may prove effective treatment with fewer side-effects than chemotherapyA new cancer treatment can wipe out tumours in terminally ill patients, scientists have discovered.In a landmark trial, a cocktail of immunotherapy medications harnessed patients ’ immune systems to kill their own cancer cells and prompted “a positive trend in survival”, according to researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR), London, and the Royal Marsden NHS foundation trust.One patient, who was expected to die four years ago, told the Guardian of the “amazing” moment nu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Gregory Health editor Tags: Cancer Medical research Health Science NHS UK news Source Type: news

university-of-medical-excellence-harvard
Boehringer Ingelheim Launches University of Medicine ExcellenceInaugural ’Accelerate’ program designed and delivered by Harvard Medical School Executive Education with the goal of accelerating clinical development and medical affairsThe University of Medicine Excellence will help Boehringer Ingelheim to accelerate progress in turning patient-focused innovation into life-changing treatmentsHarvard Medical School will deliver the first customized program, ‘Accelerate’, to create the next generation of leading experts in clinical development and medical affairsInvestment of 3.4 million USD until end of...
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - October 11, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Australian scientists fear job insecurity as morale plummets amid Covid, survey finds
Professional Scientists Australia chief points to problem of short-term contracts, as one in five say they intend to leave the professionFollow our Covid live blog for the latest updatesNSW Covid vaccination rate by postcode – check your suburbNSW restrictionsVaccine rollout and rates tracker; Cases and data tracker5km and 10km from home map: check your travel radiusGet our free news app; get our morning email briefingThe coronavirus pandemic has had a stark impact on scientists, with widespread job insecurity, worker fatigue and plummeting morale prompting warnings many may leave the profession without more governme...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Donna Lu Tags: Australia news Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Higher education Medical research Health Source Type: news

Epigenetics, the misunderstood science that could shed new light on ageing
The study of the epigenome came with claims that trauma could be inherited, but now researchers are more excited about its potential to measure the risk of diseaseA little over a decade ago, a clutch of scientific studies was published that seemed to show that survivors of atrocities or disasters such as the Holocaust and theDutch famine of 1944-45 had passed on the biological scars of those traumatic experiences to their children.The studies caused a sensation, earning their ownBBCHorizon documentary and the cover ofTime (I also wrote about them, forNew Scientist) – and no wonder. The mind-blowing implications were ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Genetics Biology Science Cancer Dementia Health Medical research Source Type: news

Covid by numbers: 10 key lessons separating fact from fiction
To make sense of coronavirus data, the Observer asked David Spiegelhalterand Anthony Masters of the Royal Statistical Society Covid taskforce to write a column. That column has now inspired a book. Here are some of its insightsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageGenomic sequencing has identified more than 1,000 different seeds of Sars-CoV-2 introduced in early 2020. Instead of one central outbreak, reverberating outwards like an explosion, we now know there were many erupting simultaneously across the country. There were far more imports of Sars-CoV-2 from France, Italy and Spain than from Chi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Spiegelhalter and Anthony Masters Tags: Coronavirus Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Science World news Focus Source Type: news

Can migraines be untangled by new medical thinking?
Dr Peter Goadsby ’s pioneering work has changed our understanding of migraines. Eva Wiseman, who has endured them since she was a child, hears how he found his way to the source of the pain – and what can be done about itI started yawning, and that was it. That was the sign a migraine was beginning, that I was rolling slowly down that padded cliff. It was inevitable that this would happen half an hour before my interview with neurologist Dr Peter Goadsby, the man forcing the world to take migraines seriously, inevitable but not ideal, so I sipped my water and watched as he scrolled through his Zoom backgrounds....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Eva Wiseman Tags: Health Medical research Science Society Source Type: news

Unions call for tighter Covid safety measures in schools
Government urged to take action as one in 14 secondary school children in England infected last weekCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageUnions have called on the government to stop “standing by” and reinstate safety measures at schools to prevent further disruption to education this winter as the rate of Covid surges among teenagers.The spread of the virus appears to besignificantly outpacing the government ’s vaccination programme, with one in 14 secondary school-age children in England infected with Covid last week,figures from the Office for National Statistics show, up fr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Clea Skopeliti Tags: Schools Coronavirus Trade unions Secondary schools Education Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Science Teaching Politics UK news Source Type: news

UK unions call for tighter Covid safety measures in schools as cases surge
Government urged to take action as one in 14 secondary school children in England infected last weekCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageUnions have called on the government to stop “standing by” and reinstate safety measures at schools to prevent further disruption to education this winter as the rate of Covid surges among teenagers.The spread of the virus appears to besignificantly outpacing the government ’s vaccination programme, with one in 14 secondary school-age children in England infected with Covid last week,figures from the Office for National Statistics show, up fr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Clea Skopeliti Tags: Schools Coronavirus Trade unions Secondary schools Education Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Vaccines and immunisation Science Teaching Politics UK news Source Type: news

NSW Covid vaccination verification app update still weeks away despite Monday reopening
Service NSW says pilot still has weeks to run in order to test connectivity and security between the app and the Australian Immunisation RegisterFollow the Australia Covid liveblogLess than 0.1% of NSW health staff have quit due to Covid vaccination mandatesNSW andVic restrictions;Vic hotspotsVaccine rollout and rates tracker; Cases and data trackerGet our free news app;get our morning email briefingA government app update designed to verify the vaccination status of New South Wales residents is still weeks away, despite the state reopening to double-jabbed people on Monday.Late last month, the NSW digital minister, Victor...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Josh Taylor Tags: New South Wales Coronavirus Australia news Infectious diseases Science Medical research New South Wales politics Source Type: news

additional-investment-in-Lyon-Jonage
Boehringer Ingelheim to expand veterinary vaccine capacity for emerging and transboundary diseases in France (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - October 8, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

Convergence: Courage in a Crisis review – nine stories from the Covid frontlines
This pandemic film delivers emotional punch, but the documentary ’s desire for a global message blunts its impact“I can’t breathe” went mainstream as a rallying cry during theBlack Lives Matter protests of summer 2020, just as respiratory difficulties of a different kind were beginning to exact an increasingly frightening toll across the world. This panoramic and often moving Netflix documentary about Covid-19 courageously tries to draw a straight line between the pandemic and the underlying social inequalities it flushed out everywhere. But as it spans nine different stories in eight countries, it ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Phil Hoad Tags: Film Documentary films Coronavirus Culture Health US healthcare Infectious diseases Hospitals Medical research World news Source Type: news

Could the global Covid death toll be millions higher than thought?
A data scientist and economics student joined forces in search of the real pandemic death toll – and the results are startlingCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageFor the past 18 months, hunkered down in his Tel Aviv apartment, Ariel Karlinsky has scoured the web for data that could help him calculate the true death toll of Covid-19.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Laura Spinney Tags: Coronavirus World news Science Infectious diseases Medical research Source Type: news

Africa: Could Covid-19 Result in a 'Brain Gain' for Africa?
[Nation] The continent's brightest science students are engaging far more with their African alma-maters, bolstering the quality of academic literature as the Covid-19 pandemic creates new demand for high-end medical research and raising the possibility of a "brain gain" as top students return to the continent. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 8, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Covid travel: which countries are on the red list?
There are dozens of countries on England ’s red list for international travel – but do the rules match case and vaccine data?Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDespite scrapping its traffic light system for international travel, England is still operating a “red list” for the countries that are deemed to be the highest risk for coronavirus.The red list dictates different rules for testing and quarantining travellers. A country may be placed on the list based on a number of factors including the percentage of the population that has been vaccinated, infection rates and ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Pablo Guti érrez and Ashley Kirk Tags: Coronavirus Travel Business Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology World news Science Source Type: news

Psychiatrist adds two KC businesses to his physician practice
CEO of Integrated Psychiatric Consultants Dr. Vishal Adma acquired a business in Overland Park and part ownership another in Prairie Village, according to a release from IPC. Adma aims to establish an all-encompassing psychiatric services group in Kansas City area, the release said. The Overland Park business is called Responsive Centers for Psychology and Learning, and the Prairie Village operation is Collective Medical Research. Combined, the three groups can offer assistance in psychotherapy,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 7, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Ellen Cagle Source Type: news

Kenya: After 30 Years' Search, World Gets First Ever Malaria Vaccine
[Nation] The incredible work by the Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri) and contribution by children in Kericho, Kisumu and Kilifi has finally paid off, giving the world its first ever malaria vaccine. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - October 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Expert Alert: Advancing individualized medicine through genomics
ROCHESTER, Minn. – The virtual 10th Annual Individualizing Medicine Conference on Oct. 8 –9 will highlight the latest discoveries, diagnostics, therapeutics and emerging approaches in the field of genomics. Attendees will hear from renowned experts and learn first-hand how individualized medicine is transforming clinical practice, research and education. Highlighted topics will includ e artificial intelligence, health disparities, precision oncology, microbiome, genomic clinical applications and challenges, and many others. Taking the virtual center stage will be keynote speakers Gianrico… (Source: ...
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - October 7, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news

The World Health Organization Just Endorsed The World ’s First Malaria Vaccine
LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization (WHO) on Wednesday endorsed the world’s first malaria vaccine and said it should be given to children across Africa in the hope that it will spur stalled efforts to curb the spread of the parasitic disease. WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus called it “a historic moment” after a meeting in which two of the U.N. health agency’s expert advisory groups recommended the step. “Today’s recommendation offers a glimmer of hope for the continent, which shoulders the heaviest burden of the disease. And we expect many more African child...
Source: TIME: Health - October 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Chang / AP Tags: Uncategorized Disease wire Source Type: news

WHO endorses use of world ’s first malaria vaccine in Africa
World Health Organization ’s director general hails ‘historic day’ in fight against parasitic diseaseThe World Health Organization has recommended the widespread rollout of the first malaria vaccine, in a move experts hope could save tens of thousands of children ’s lives each year across Africa.Hailing “an historic day”, the WHO’s director general, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said that after a successful pilot programme in three African countries the RTS,S vaccine should be made available more widely.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Lizzy Davies Tags: Global development Malaria Global health World news Society World Health Organization Africa Medical research Science GlaxoSmithKline Business Pharmaceuticals industry Children's health Source Type: news

‘Covid toe’ may be side-effect of immune response, says study
Chilblain-like inflammation causes redness on hands and feet and can last for monthsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageThe skin condition known as Covid toe may be a side-effect of the immune system ’s response to fighting off the virus, according to a study.The symptom results in chilblain-like inflammation and redness on the hands and feet, with the condition sometimes lasting for months at a time. It typically develops within a week to four weeks of being infected and can result in toes and fingers becoming swollen or changing colour.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Kevin Rawlinson and agency Tags: Coronavirus Medical research Health World news Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

NIH Director Francis S. Collins to Step Down by End of Year
Dr. Francis S. Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health for 12 years, said Tuesday he is stepping down, capping a career in which he directed crucial research into the human genome and the fight against serious diseases like cancer, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and COVID-19. Collins said he was “grateful and proud of the NIH staff and the scientific community, whose extraordinary commitment to lifesaving research delivers hope to the American people and the world every day.” He said the decision to step down at year’s end was “a difficult one.” “I fundamentally believe, howe...
Source: TIME: Health - October 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DINO HAZELL/AP Tags: Uncategorized Public Health wire Source Type: news