Hope for those with Huntington's – podcast
Robin McKie, the Observer ’s science and environment editor, discusses an innovative drug that may soon offer ways to fight Huntington’s disease, while Mark Newnham describes being diagnosed with the inherited condition. Plus: Peter Beaumont describes his trip to the Costa Rican cloud forest, at threat from climate chang eForMark Newnham and thousands of others who havebeen told they have inherited Huntington ’s disease, the future would appear bleak, a prospect of inexorable physical and mental decline. But scientists believe they areclosing in on a treatment to control its worst effects.Anushka Asthana ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Anushka Asthana with Robin McKie, Mark Newnham and Peter Beaumont, produced by Amy Walker, Brenna Daldorph, Ammar Kalia, Elizabeth Cassin and Eloise Stevens; executive producers Phil Maynard and Nicole Jackson Tags: Huntington's disease Science Climate change Costa Rica Medical research Source Type: news

The revival of pigs ’ brains inspires hopes – and fears | Kenan Malik
Scientists at Yale may not have found an answer to eternal life but they have advanced the frontiers of neuroscienceA team of neuroscientists at Yale School of Medicine, led by Nenad Sestan, last week reported that they had managed torevive brains from pigs that had been decapitated in an abattoir four hours earlier.Well, “revive” in the sense of getting certain neurons to fire. This was no “brain in a vat” experiment. The brains were neither alive nor possessed consciousness.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Kenan Malik Tags: Neuroscience Medical research UK news Source Type: news

Discovery of genetic variants could lead to new weight loss medicines
Around four million people in the UK carry genetic variants that protect them from obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to a new paper co-authored by MRC researchers. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 19, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Pig brains partially revived four hours after death
The study could aid medical research and fuel debate about the difference between life and death. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers 'reboot' pig brains hours after animals died
Scientists say ability to revive some brain functions will not change definition of deathThe brains of decapitated pigs can be partially revived several hours after the animal has died, researchers have revealed, with some of the functions of cells booted back up when an oxygen-rich fluid is circulated through the organ.The scientists stress that the brains do not show any signs of consciousness – for example, there was no sign that different parts of the brain were sending signals to each other – and that it does not change the definition of death.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Medical research Science Source Type: news

Even moderate intake of red meat raises cancer risk,  study finds
People more or less keeping to NHS guidelines at higher risk than those who eat littleEating even the moderate amounts of red and processed meat sanctioned by government guidelines increases the likelihood of developing bowel cancer, according to the largest UK study of the risks ever conducted.The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) suggests anyone who eats more than 90g of red or processed meat per day should try to cut down to 70g or less, because of the known link with bowel cancer. TheNHS describes 90g of red meat as “equivalent to around three thinly cut slices of beef, lamb or pork, where each slice is...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Bowel cancer Medical research Meat UK news Health Science Society Food Source Type: news

Deconstructing the terrorism discourse on social media
Although social media has infiltrated our daily lives and become a powerful tool it is not always put to good use. EU-funded research is looking at how the Islamic State group has used social media to promote the terrorist agenda and attract followers - and aims to shape policy to counter this movement. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 17, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

annual_results_press_conference_2019
Financial year 2018:  Boehringer Ingelheim grows and invests Well-filled research pipeline in oncology, fibrotic diseases, immunology and metabolic diseasesOperating growth outpaces the market in all businessesTechnical integration of the animal health business acquired in 2017 successfully completed (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 16, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

New study explains how inflammation causes gastric cancer
(Kanazawa University) Researchers from Kanazawa University and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development have solved the decades-old mystery of how stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer. Using mouse models and human cancer cell lines, they showed that inflammation resulting from bacterial infection leads to the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, which ultimately form gastric tumors. By blocking the protein pathway responsible for this proliferation, they prevented gastric tumor formation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation shows promise for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis
(Northwell Health) Bioelectronic medicine scientists at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research collaborated with counterparts from Academic Medical Center at University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands to carry out a series of pilot clinical studies to assess the effect of a novel bioelectronic stimulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improving disease detection through ultra-high-field MRIs
The widespread adoption of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revolutionised clinical medicine, and the revolution has not stopped. Scientists in an EU-funded project are exploring ways to make MRIs even more effective - aiming to help patients get the best possible treatment through early disease detection. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 16, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Causes of cancer may leave 'fingerprints' in DNA, scientists say
Research raises hope that triggers of individual tumours could be pinpointedFrom smoking to alcohol, air pollution to sunlight, a host of factors in our environment can cause cancer. Now scientists say they might be able to pinpoint the culprits for individual tumours.Experts say they have managed to link particular environmental triggers with specific genetic mutations that give rise to cancer, opening up the possibility that researchers could look for clues in a tumour to deduce what triggered its formation.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and agencies Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Health Society Source Type: news

Real-world-study-comparing-NOACs-in-AF-patients
Independent large real-world study comparing NOACs in AF-patientsA recently published large retrospective comparative study investigated stroke, bleeding and mortality risks in older US Medicare patients treated with commonly marketed oral anticoagulants for non-valvular atrial fibrillation1  Results of the real-world study showed that Pradaxa ® (dabigatran etexilate) was associated with a more favourable benefit-risk profile in comparison to both warfarin and rivaroxaban1Data from an earlier FDA-funded Medicare study published in 2015, which investigated cardiovascular, bleeding and mortality risks among patients...
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim acquires a stake in SoundTalks
Boehringer Ingelheim acquires stake in SoundTalks NV, begins pilot programme Boehringer Ingelheim plans a pilot programme using the innovative SoundTalksTM system in select pig barnsThe goal is to harness the power of digital innovation and technological change to detect possible respiratory distress in swine quickly (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

How slime is breaking the biosensor mould
An EU-funded project is using slime mould to produce accessible sensing devices with a wide range of applications, including environmental monitoring and health - helping European industry become more competitive in the growing biosensor device market. The devices can also be used for citizen science applications. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists recreate our dusty origins
We are all made of stardust! But what is cosmic dust and how is it made? An EU-funded project is recreating cosmic dust by simulating interstellar conditions in the laboratory and developing innovative processes that could lead to benefits for communication, transport and nanotechnology - boosting industry's competitiveness. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

effectiveness-analysis-in-diabetic-kidney-disease-and-type-2-diabetes
New post-hoc analysis of EMPA-REG OUTCOME ® examined cost-effectiveness of empagliflozin versus standard of care in a subgroup of people with type 2 diabetes and diabetic kidney disease Empagliflozin, in addition to standard of care, has the potential to improve economic outcomes for people with type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease who also have diabetic kidney disease, from a US payer perspective1  Cost effective analysis used modeling and simulations based on subgroup data from EMPA-REG OUTCOME ® to predict clinical events and estimated costs for people with type 2 diabetes and diabeti...
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Europe at risk from spread of tropical insect-borne diseases
Scientists warn of danger from dengue fever in hotter, wetter climate in northern latitudesInsect-borne diseases such as dengue fever, leishmaniasis and encephalitis are on the rise and are now threatening to spread into many areas of Europe, scientists have warned.Outbreaks of these illnesses are increasing because of climate change and the expansion of international travel and trade, theEuropean Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases was told in Amsterdam on Saturday.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Infectious diseases Insects Europe Medical research Microbiology Science Environment World news Source Type: news

Psychedelic renaissance: could MDMA help with PTSD, depression and anxiety?
As Australia ’s first trial for psychedelic therapy for terminally ill patients gets under way, a growing movement says it could also help other conditionsIn August 2016 I went to New York for the first time. On the second evening, as the sun slipped behind the building across the street, I was sitting on a long couch on the top floor of an old church. All around me instruments were scattered on the floor – singing bowls, tuning forks, rainsticks, Tibetan bells. At the foot of a wall carpeted completely in moss, dripping like the jungle in the baking heat, was a large bronze gong.On the table in front of me two...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jesse Noakes Tags: Drugs Medical research Health Science Australia news Source Type: news

New MRC Health Innovation Champion appointed
Professor Dame Anna Dominiczak has been appointed as MRC Health Innovation Champion. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 12, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Experts warn of fatty liver disease 'epidemic' in young people
Study finds substantial numbers of young people at risk of liver cancer, diabetes and heart attacksExperts are warning that high levels of fatty liver disease among young people, caused by being overweight, could signal a potential public health crisis.Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is fairly common among older adults, detectable in about a quarter of the population. But a study has found that substantial numbers of 24-year-olds are also affected, putting them at risk of serious later health problems, such as liver cancer, type-2 diabetes and heart attacks.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Obesity UK news Medical research Diets and dieting Health Society Life and style Science Source Type: news

Satellite data highlights optimal sites for aquaculture
An EU-funded project has developed a satellite-based service to support the aquaculture industry in finding the best sites and providing continuous monitoring of fish and shellfish farms, helping to ensure global food security for a growing population. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 12, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Discovery of biomarkers brings new hope for heart health
Coronary heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide, but identifying those at high risk remains difficult. EU-funded research has helped identify new biomarkers that will improve diagnosis and lead to new and better treatment options. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 12, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Celebrating 20 years of Metacam for cattle
Boehringer Ingelheim celebrates 20 years of Metacam ® for cattle2019 marks the anniversary of Metacam ® (meloxicam) for cattleOriginally licenced for dogs, Metacam ®can be used in other species to treat inflammatory and painful conditionsBoehringer Ingelheim celebrates this 20-year milestone since pioneering meloxicam for use in both humans and animals (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 11, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Major investment for respiratory diseases completed
105 million euros invested into expansion of production facilities in Ingelheim and DortmundEuropean launches of next-generation inhaler kicked off  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 11, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

What teachers can learn from teens in a transmedia world
Transliteracy, or the ability to read, write and interact across diverse platforms, tools and media including print, radio, TV and digital channels, has come to symbolise the gap emerging between modernity and tradition, and how this plays out in schools and society. International research has now shed light on what has become one of the hottest subjects today; the evolution of learning in the transmedia digital age, and how it affects (and is affected by) youths. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 11, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Affordable 3G for isolated villages - in the Amazon rainforest, for example
Even for populations that already had access to landlines, smartphones have revolutionised work and play. Imagine how they could transform life in isolated communities that may currently rely just on rare radio contacts… An EU-funded project developed a low-cost way to provide 3G coverage in remote areas, along with a new business case for operators. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 11, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Different brain disorders, similar psychosocial problems
A wide variety of conditions can affect the brain, complicating patients' interaction with the world around them. Although the psychosocial difficulties faced by people living with such illnesses are often underestimated, an EU-funded project has revealed they are often similar across a wider range of mental disorders. Thus, more general and cross-cutting approaches can help to mitigate a wide range of common disease-associated psychosocial problems. Greater awareness of this should help improve patient care. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 10, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Novel drug delivered direct to brain may halt Parkinson's
A clinical study led by EU-funded researchers is administering a promising Parkinson's drug to the first human patients - delivering it directly to the brain using an innovative drug device. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 10, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

'Clean' perfume – should you worry about what’s in your fragrance?
Michelle Pfeiffer ’s new line claims to be free of so-called ‘toxic’ substances. But what are they? Here’s what you need to know about your favourite scentsThe world is, we seem to be warned by so many articles, full of chemicals that may give us cancer, nerve damage and maybe worse. Now perfume is feared as potential poison.And so comes the idea of “clean perfume” – much like clean eating, or clean beauty, certain ingredients are left out because it is purported they are bad for us. The actor Michelle Pfeiffer is leading the charge, launching a perfume line called Henry Rose that,...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tania Sanchez Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Medical research Source Type: news

Coalition announces $10m for endometriosis research and awareness
Women living with crippling pain experience average eight- to nine-year diagnostic delayAfter allocating $4.7m in 2018 towards a national action plan to tackle endometriosis, the health minister on Tuesday announced a further $10m towards researching and raising awareness about the crippling and chronic menstrual condition.Related:Endometriosis action plan follows decades of lobbying – and sufferingContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Davey Tags: Endometriosis Health Women Australia news Australian politics Greg Hunt Medical research Source Type: news

Arctic spotlights socio-economic cost of climate change
The effects of climate change are most apparent in the Arctic where sea ice loss is having far-reaching socio-economic consequences. EU-funded research brought together an international team of experts to advance understanding of the region's transformation and its potential global impact. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Early intervention and nutrition key to fighting dementia
EU-funded researchers have shown that a daily medical nutrition drink can help to stabilise everyday cognitive and functional performance in elderly people. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 9, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists reverse memory decline using electrical pulses
Working memory of older group temporarily improves to match younger group in studyA decline in memory as a result of ageing can be temporarily reversed using a harmless form of electrical brain stimulation, scientists have found.The findings help explain why certain cognitive skills decline significantlywith age and raise the prospect of new treatments.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Memory Ageing Science Neuroscience Medical research Health Society Source Type: news

Modelling the forces that affect cosmic inflation
In physical cosmology, the term 'cosmic inflation' refers to the potential accelerated expansion of space in the early universe. An EU-funded project is using satellite and other ground-based facilities to model cosmological phenomena to further the study of cosmic inflation. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 8, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Sensors, drones and satellites watch buildings to save lives
A smart system developed by EU-funded researchers for assessing the structural health of buildings in near real time could help save lives, time, and money in the aftermath of a natural or manmade disaster. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 8, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Arti-cell Forte stem cell-based veterinary product
Boehringer Ingelheim launches the first-ever registered stem cell-based veterinary medicineEuropean Commission has granted marketing authorisation for the first stem cell-based product in animal healthArti-Cell ® Forte is a unique ready-to-use solution for the treatment of equine lamenessThe partnership of Boehringer Ingelheim and GST proves its commitment to bring highly innovative therapeutics for horses to customers (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 7, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Collective behaviour in the digital age
How do people behave in a world connected by technology? What mechanisms shape the actions and reactions of large groups? And how could they be explored through controlled experiments? EU-funded researchers have generated new knowledge to inform the development of a behaviour simulator. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 5, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Lignite-based humus as instant, lasting soil booster
Unlike fresh humus such as compost, stable humus makes a long-term contribution to soil fertility. It takes many years to form naturally - but now, for the first time, a manufactured granulate is available. The SME offering this product as an instant, lasting fix for tired soils is carrying out EU-funded research and development for its commercialisation. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 5, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Farmer-led networks deliver innovations for egg production
An EU-funded project demonstrated how farmer-led networks can generate practical farm-level innovations. The project created networks in the laying hen sector that came up with solutions to make businesses more efficient and more sustainable. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 4, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Enhancing radiotracers for better disease diagnosis
Biomedical imaging has revolutionised medicine, granting doctors a window into miniscule molecular and cellular processes inside the body. An EU-funded project helped to expand the view, developing innovative radiochemistry concepts and techniques that could lead to earlier diagnosis of diseases - saving lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 4, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

New approach to tackle Ebola and other deadly infections
MRC scientists have isolated therapeutic antibodies from healthy volunteers exposed to the Ebola vaccine but not Ebola virus itself, suggesting that protective therapies could be developed from people who are disease-free. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 3, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Kenya: Kemri, Cuba to Have Scientific Cooperation for Developing Crucial Vaccines
[Capital FM] Nairobi -The Kenya Medical Research Institute and the Government of Cuba are working on scientific cooperation s to come up with a vaccine for Hepatitis B, HIV and foot problems associated with diabetes. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 3, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Meisser Madera
Cochrane is made up of  13,000 members and over 50,000 supporters come from more than 130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.  Many  of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 3, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Do animals hold the key to the global organ shortage?
Gene-editing technology has accelerated progress on animal organ transplant to the point where scientists will soon begin the first human trialsScientist Wenning Qin holds up a Petri dish, carefully sloshes around the pink liquid inside, and slides it under a microscope. Some identical tiny slashes come into focus. These cells, she explains, are derived from the ear of a pig. And they may contain the future of animal to human organ transplantation.Researchers in South Korea are expected to transplant pig corneasinto humans within a year. A handful of groups across the US are also working toward pig organ clinical trials in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Karen Weintraub in Cambridge, Massachusetts Tags: Medical research Gene editing Science Health Organ donation Society Source Type: news

Using animal organs in humans: 'It's just a question of when'
Gene-editing technology has accelerated progress on animal organ transplant to the point where scientists will soon begin the first human trialsScientist Wenning Qin holds up a Petri dish, carefully sloshes around the pink liquid inside, and slides it under a microscope. Some identical tiny slashes come into focus. These cells, she explains, are derived from the ear of a pig. And they may contain the future of animal to human organ transplantation.Researchers in South Korea are expected to transplant pig corneasinto humans within a year. A handful of groups across the US are also working toward pig organ clinical trials in...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Karen Weintraub in Cambridge, Massachusetts Tags: Medical research Gene editing Science Health Organ donation Society Source Type: news

Positivity... just a paw away
Positivity … just a paw awayOwners claim that their pet has a strong positive impact on their daily lives.1   According to experts, “pets benefit the lives of their owners, both psychologically and physically”.2 Acknowledging this, Boehringer Ingelheim launches global initiatives to improve the positivity of their employees, patients and animals alike. (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 3, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

‘uniqueness’ by championing both human and animal health
Boehringer Ingelheim celebrates its ‘uniqueness’ by championing both human and animal health in new campaign Boehringer Ingelheim changes perception due to its dedication to human and animal health“A Unique Bond” explores stories of the positive impact animals can have on patient’s lives  Launched in 28 countries, the company affirms its dedication to both human and animal health with local initiatives   (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - April 3, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

New campaign encourages organ and tissue donation to advance medical research
(Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine) The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine -- a nonprofit with more than 175,000 members including doctors, scientists, and laypeople -- has launched a new effort today to encourage people to become organ and tissue donors to help scientists save human lives and reduce and replace animal experiments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new perspective on rural land management
Through a series of recommendations encouraging local stakeholders to explore environmental, social and economic issues in rural land management, EU-funded researchers have set out new ways in which agriculture and forestry could become more sustainable. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - April 3, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news