Medical researchers debate validity of including race in studies
Race and medical research have a long history together, much of it lamentable, and new genetic discoveries raise new questions about the role race should play in the future, three essays in the Journal of the American Medical Association indicate. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - September 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Extreme biohacking: the tech guru who spent $250,000 trying to live for ever
Silicon Valley millionaire Serge Faguet thinks pills, injections and implants will turn him into a superhuman. Could they?In September last year, the young Silicon Valley entrepreneur Serge Faguetposted an article on the tech website Hacker Noon. It was headlined: “I’m 32 and spent $200k on biohacking. Became calmer, thinner, extroverted, healthier& happier. ” Significantly more intelligent, too, he added, with an increased sex drive that dovetailed nicely with his newfound ease at “picking up girls”.These last two points especially grabbed the attention of the site ’s hundreds of th...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Stefanie Marsh Tags: Science Technology Silicon Valley Medical research Life and style Source Type: news

Solving the genome puzzle
With advances in gene technology helping to diagnose very rare diseases, has the new era of personalised medicine finally arrived?Evie Walker sits on her mother ’s lap, playing a game she never grows tired of: turning her mother’s hand over and over, stroking and examining it. When she takes a break and looks around, it is with the open-mouthed look of curiosity and awe that you see in many infants. Evie’s vocabulary currently consists of a repertoire of squawks and “mmm” sounds. In the past few months, she has begun to stand unaided for short periods – even taking a few steps in her wal...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Genetics Health Society Politics Children Cancer Cancer research Medical research Science Biology Source Type: news

Making sense of commitment
An EU-funded project is exploring what keeps people committed to a task even when they get bored, distracted or are tempted to stop. The findings could foster productivity-boosting strategies, improve robot-human interactions and even help treat borderline personality disorder. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 21, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

I was 14 when I was told I had cancer. It inspired me to pursue my dream | Lucy Speechley
It was devastating at the time, but I met amazing people who helped me pursue a career in medical scienceI was 14 years old when I was told I had cancer. It was just before Christmas in 2009 and I ’d had terrible pain in my side for several weeks. After being seen at four different hospitals, I ended up at Birmingham children’s hospital. It was there that I was told I had alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, words that meant absolutely nothing to me at first. I soon realised they meant cancer.Before my diagnosis, I was far more concerned with schoolwork and my friends – normal things 14-year-olds have to deal with....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lucy Speechley Tags: Society Health Cancer Cancer research Medical research Science Careers Education Students Higher education Children NHS Source Type: news

Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's and provide a solution
MRC-funded scientists have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer’s disease, which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Too much gluten while pregnant linked to increased diabetes risk for baby
Experts warn against switching to a gluten-free diet because that may reduce intake of fibre, iron and B-vitaminsEating a high gluten diet when pregnant appears to be linked to an increased risk of having a child who develops type 1 diabetes, new research suggests, although experts say expectant mothers shouldn ’t rush to ditch bread and pasta.While studies in rodents have suggested there a possible link between low gluten consumption in mothers and a lower incidence of type 1 diabetes in offspring, no such link has previously been found in humans.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Pregnancy Diabetes Science Health & wellbeing Life and style Medical research Food Source Type: news

An integrated response to food-borne disease
Human welfare is closely linked to the health of animals and the environment. An EU-funded joint research programme has been created to align developments in medicine, veterinary science and consumer health protection to tackle food-borne health threats in a more integrated way across Europe. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

New drugs could reduce risk of heart disease when added to statins
New drugs that lower levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in blood could further reduce the risk of heart attack when added to statins, according to new research conducted by MRC scientists. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 19, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Is AI the Key to Diving Deeper into Images and Pathology?
In a tale of two studies, it appears artificial intelligence is helping researchers analyze cells in ways that weren't possible before. In one study, published this week in Nature Methods, scientists at the Allen Institute in Seattle, WA used machine learning to train computers to see parts of the cell that the human eye cannot easily distinguish. Using 3D images of fluorescently labeled cells, the team taught computers to find structures inside living cells without fluorescent labels, using only black and white images generated by an inexpensive technique known as brightfield microscopy. Fluorescence microscop...
Source: MDDI - September 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Removing faulty brain cells staves off dementia in mice
Researchers say that when they swept away the senescent brain cells in mice, the outwards symptoms of their dementia vanishedPurging “zombie cells” from the brain could stave off the effects of dementia, a groundbreaking study has found.The research in mice is the first to show that so-called senescent cells, which enter a state of suspended animation as the body ages, contribute to neurodegeneration. Flushing out these cells was shown to prevent damage, potentially opening a new line of attack against Alzheimer ’s and other forms of dementia.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Ageing Science Dementia Parkinson's disease Alzheimer's Health Society Source Type: news

The medicinal cannabis panel is already failing children like my daughter | Tannine Clarry
CBD oil is being treated as the option of last resort. This is simply no good to my four-year-old and many othersBefore I took the decision to try treating my daughter Indie with medicinal cannabis she was on a trial of a “traditional” pharmaceutical drug. My four-year-old hasDravet syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy. It was the eighth different drug that we had tried, none of which had reduced her seizures. We refer to the trial as Indie ’s “zombie phase”. For those five harrowing months, Indie spent every waking moment laid on the floor, distressed and “body-rocking”. She would ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tannine Clarry Tags: Cannabis Epilepsy Drugs Health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

LSTM and TB Alliance collaborate to develop new TB therapies
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) This new partnership is supported by the Medical Research Council (MRC) to research drug regimens to fight drug-resistant tuberculosisLSTM and TB Alliance are collaborating to investigate novel combination drug therapies that could help the fight against multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), following an award of £ 1 million from the Medical Research Council (MRC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cell mechanism regulating protein synthesis in stress conditions discovered
(Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona) Researchers from the Universitat Aut ò noma de Barcelona, and the Medical Research Council Cambridge (UK), for the first time describe the mechanism used by cells to optimise the production of proteins in stressful situations by altering tRNA abundance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Big data solutions for big farming challenges
Vast volumes of data from satellites in space, drones in the air and sensors on the ground will be harnessed by a pioneering EU-funded project that promises to revolutionise farming, land use, agricultural sustainability and food security. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 19, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Air pollution linked to much greater risk of dementia
Risk in over-50s increases by 40% where highest nitrogen oxide levels exist, study showsAir pollution may increase the chance of developing dementia, a study has suggested, in fresh evidence that the health of people of all ages is at risk from breathing dirty air.People over 50 in areas with the highest levels of nitrogen oxide in the air showed a 40% greater risk of developing dementia than those with the least NOx pollution, according to the research, based on data from London.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Air pollution Environment Dementia Health Society Medical research London Science UK news Cities Source Type: news

Eating healthy foods and cutting out junk DOES cut your risk of developing cancer, finds major study
Researchers at the French Institute for Health and Medical Research studied the diets of more than 470,000 Europeans to discover those with fattier diets have a an 11 per cent higher cancer risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Take-up of MMR vaccine falls for fourth year in a row in England
Proportion of children being immunised down to 91.2% as experts warn of measles riskThe proportion of children in England getting immunised for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) has fallen for the fourth year in a row, as uptake for a further nine out of the 12 routine vaccinations has dropped, figures show.Related:Resurgence of deadly measles blamed on low MMR vaccination ratesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Marsh Tags: MMR Vaccines and immunisation Health Infectious diseases Medical research NHS Microbiology Children Science Society Source Type: news

40,000 volunteers sought for largest ever UK study of depression
Researchers are asking people who have suffered from depression and anxiety to provide DNA samples so they can look for common genesGenetic links to anxiety and depression are to be explored in the largest ever study into the issue, experts have announced.Researchers are calling on people in England to sign up to theGenetic Links to Anxiety and Depression (Glad) study. It is hoped that 40,000 volunteers aged 16 and over will agree to be part of a database which will be used in future research studies to better understand the genetic aspects of mental health conditions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Depression Mental health Medical research Science Society UK news & wellbeing Source Type: news

Soil study digs deep to improve land management
Our soil is a vital environmental resource which is increasingly coming under threat. EU-funded research is assessing the impact of soil degradation on a range of ecosystem services to find ways of protecting and restoring soils across Europe. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 18, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Study of one million people leads to major advance in blood pressure genetics
Over 500 new gene regions that influence people’s blood pressure have been discovered in the largest global genetic study of blood pressure to date. The research was co-funded by the MRC. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 17, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Midwives call for pregnancy weight targets after study highlights health risks
Eating for two is a myth, say researchers, with weight gain linked to insulin resistanceMidwives should be given guidelines on how to advise expectant mothers about managing their weight, their professional body has said, reacting to research that suggested the commonly held belief that pregnant women needed to eat for two was a myth.Gaining too much weight during pregnancy could put the future offspring at an increased risk of insulin resistance and affect their blood pressure in childhood, according to the study published in the journal,Diabetologia.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis and Kevin Rawlinson Tags: Pregnancy Parents and parenting Science Family Health & wellbeing Life and style Medical research Society Source Type: news

Here's where the PBJ's 2017 '5 Under 40' health care pros are now
The Portland Business Journal honored five young health care professionals last year during our Health Care of the Future event. The inaugural winners were a varied bunch, from the realms of health policy, advocacy, medical research and technology. This week, we will honor five more young health care pros. But first, we thought we would check in with last year’s 5 under 40 winners to see what they’re up to a year later . You can still purchase tickets to this year’s event, which will be held… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 17, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Here's where the PBJ's 2017 '5 Under 40' health care pros are now
The Portland Business Journal honored five young health care professionals last year during our Health Care of the Future event. The inaugural winners were a varied bunch, from the realms of health policy, advocacy, medical research and technology. This week, we will honor five more young health care pros. But first, we thought we would check in with last year’s 5 under 40 winners to see what they’re up to a year later . You can still purchase tickets to this year’s event, which will be held… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

World's Largest Alzheimer's Survey Reveals Most Adults Believe a Cure Will be Developed in Their Lifetime
From a Sample of Over 10,000 Adults, 62 Percent are Worried They may Develop Alzheimer's Disease and 91 Percent Believe the Solution to Tackling Diseases Lies in Medical Research(1) 79 Percent are Willing to Take Part in Medical Research, but Three-Quarters (75 Percent) Have no Idea how to get Involved(1) This World Alzheimer's Month, in Association With Alzheimer's Disease International, Amgen, Novartis and Banner Alzheimer's Institute are Raising Awareness About how to get Involved in Alzheimer's Research THOUSAND OAKS, Calif., Sept. 17, 2018 /PRNewswire/ -- Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN), Novartis and Banner Alzheime...
Source: Amgen News Release - September 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Cure for cocaine addiction in reach, say scientists
Gene therapists have developed a stem cell implant that could help overcome addiction and prevent overdosesA radical gene therapy for drug addiction has been shown to dampen down cravings for cocaine and protect against overdoses of the substance that would normally be lethal.The therapy uses implants of stem cells which have been genetically engineered to release a powerful enzyme that removes the class A drug from the bloodstream.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Drugs Drugs trade Genetics Society World news Medical research Stem cells Biology Source Type: news

Protecting the rights of intersex people
An EU-funded project has made recommendations to protect the rights of intersex people and prevent unnecessary, non-consensual medical interventions. This could strengthen European efforts to support sexual minorities. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 17, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

An Interview with Doug Altman
Roberto D ’Amico from Cochrane Italy sharesan interview with Doug Altman. Everyone within the Cochrane community was sad to learn of the death of Professor Doug Altman this year.Doug Altman was a Cochrane leader and pioneer since the Collaboration ’s beginning in 1993. He is best known for his work on improving the reliability and reporting of medical research and for highly cited papers on statistical methodology. Doug’s long-serving contributions to Cochrane have been universally acknowledged across the world. He was a long standing co- convenor ofCochrane ’s Statistical Methods, and more recently...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Real-world study reports effects of Spiolto Respimat
Large European real-world study reports effects of Spiolto ® Respimat® for people living with COPD in daily clinical practice1OTIVACTO study reported improvements in both physical functioning and general condition in people living with COPD receiving Spiolto ®(tiotropium/olodaterol) Respimat® therapy14 out of 5 patients reported high satisfaction with their Respimat ® inhaler and tiotropium/olodaterol treatment overall1Data presented at European Respiratory Society International Congress 20181 (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

INSTAGE data for nintedanib in advanced IPF published
Clinical trial data for nintedanib in patients with advanced IPF published   INSTAGE ® trial results published in the New England Journal of Medicine1Trial provides clinical data on patients with IPF and severe impairment in gas exchange usually excluded from clinical trials1Efficacy and safety profile of nintedanib in patients with advanced IPF was consistent with that observed in patients with less advanced disease in earlier trials1,2,3,4Sildenafil plus nintedanib did not provide significant benefit   versus nintedanib alone1  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

INPULSIS-ON shows ofev slows progression of IPF
New study results provide evidence that Ofev ® (nintedanib) slows progression of IPF beyond four years with consistent safetyINPULSIS ®-ON study indicates safety and efficacy of Ofev®(nintedanib) are maintained over the long term and consistent with prior findings from INPULSIS® trials1Results from INPULSIS ®-ON, the open-label extension from the two INPULSIS® Phase III trials, published in Lancet Respiratory Medicine1  (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

LSTM led partnership awarded £ 1.5 million for NTD drug development
(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) An LSTM led partnership has been awarded nearly £ 1.5 million from the Medical Research Council (MRC) for the pre-clinical development of a candidate drug to treat onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, by targeting the bacterial symbiont Wolbachia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coming soon... a new app for independent hotels
Home2nite is where the hospitality industry meets mobile technology. A new app is designed to give Europe's independent hotels a smart advantage over the big chains in improving customer experience. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 14, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Could cold water swimming help treat depression?
24-year-old who reduced her medication while swimming weekly in open water was drug-and symptom-free within four monthsA year ago, a 24-year-old woman with depression was given an unusual prescription by her doctor: a weekly swim in cold water.The patient, Sarah, was filmed as part of the BBC documentary seriesThe Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs, presented by Christoffer van Tulleken, a doctor and researcher at University College London.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Layal Liverpool Tags: Science Depression Society Drugs Medical research Swimming Mental health Source Type: news

Keeping captured carbon dioxide safely locked away
Storing man-made carbon dioxide deep underground is a promising intermediate solution for tackling climate change. An EU-funded project has developed innovative techniques to help ensure the potent greenhouse gas stays safely locked up. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 13, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Prevent allergies before birth: Taking fish oil while pregnant found to reduce allergies in children
(Natural News) Children whose mothers took fish oil during pregnancy have less risk of having some types of allergies, according to a study. The study was carried out by a team of researchers from the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI). It was the largest in the world to observe the effects that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boehringer Ingelheim acquires all ViraTherapeutics shares
Boehringer Ingelheim Acquires All ViraTherapeutics Shares to Develop Next Generation Viral-Based Immuno-Oncology Therapies  Boehringer Ingelheim exercises its option to acquire all shares of oncolytic virus company ViraTherapeuticsViraTherapeutics will operate in Innsbruck, Austria as a distinct unit of Boehringer Ingelheim ’s Discovery Research organization, maintaining its innovative biotech heritage and close connections to the Medical University of Innsbruck and the regional scientific communityAcquisition strengthens Boehringer Ingelheim ’s commitment to research and development of viral-based immuno-...
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cyltezo-Phase III -in Psoriasis
Biosimilar Cyltezo ® demonstrates clinical equivalence to Humira® in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasisData show that Cyltezo © (adalimumab- adbm) and Humira®* have similar efficacy, safety and immunogenicity in people with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis1At week 16, the study met the primary endpoint, demonstrating clinical equivalence to Humira ®1Data will be presented at the European Association of Dermatology and Venereology Annual Meeting (EADV 2018) (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Early warning for widespread and deadly diseases
EU-funded researchers are applying innovative techniques to detect early-warning signs of some of the most widespread and deadly diseases in Europe, enabling underlying health conditions to be treated sooner and more effectively, and ultimately saving lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 12, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

UCLA scientist shares 2018 Lasker Prize for figuring out how genes turn on and off
Michael Grunstein, a longtime professor of biological chemistry at UCLA who uncovered the key role that DNA ’s “packing material” plays in turning genes on and off, haswon the Albert Lasker award for basic medical research.He shares the prize with Rockefeller University biochemist C. David Allis,... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

NAS, NAM Members Receive Prestigious Lasker Awards
The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced today that National Academy of Sciences members Michael Grunstein and C. David Allis share the 2018 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for discoveries into how gene expression is influenced by the chemical modification of histones— the proteins that package DNA within chromosomes. Joan Argetsinger Steitz, a member of both the NAS and the National Academy of Medicine, is the recipient of the 2018 Lasker~Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science for four decades of leadership in biomedical science— exemplified by pioneering discoveries in RNA bio...
Source: News from the National Academies - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cutting-edge microscope revealed at opening of new £5m structural biology centre
The MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research (CVR) opened an innovative new structural biology centre today, home to a cutting-edge JEOL CryoARM 300, the first cryo-electron microscope of this model in the United Kingdom. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 11, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

2018 Max Perutz Science Writing Award shortlist announced
Ten outstanding articles have been shortlisted for this year’s Max Perutz Science Writing Award, the MRC’s annual writing competition (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - September 11, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

UCLA ’s Michael Grunstein wins 2018 Lasker Award for medical research
Michael Grunstein, a distinguished professor of biological chemistry at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, has been awarded the 2018 Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for his groundbreaking research on gene expression. He shares the award with C. David Allis of Rockefeller University in New York.Grunstein provided the first demonstration that histones — the proteins that package DNA within chromosomes — are more than inert structures that serve simply as spools for DNA. Working with his team at UCLA, he showed via experiments with yeast that histones actually play an important role in gene exp...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 11, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

British vet wins top research award for breakthrough anaesthetic
John Glen given 2018 Lasker award for discovery of propofol, now used in 90 countries, enabling millions of surgical operations every yearA British veterinarian has won America ’s top biomedical research prize for his discovery of a new way to knock people out.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Source Type: news

2018 Lasker Awards for basic and clinical medical research and special achievement
(Rubenstein Associates, Inc.) The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation today announced the winners of its 2018 Lasker Awards: C. David Allis from Rockefeller University and Michael Grunstein from the University of California, Los Angeles will receive the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award; John B. Glen, formerly from AstraZeneca, will be honored with the Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award; and Joan Argetsinger Steitz from Yale University will receive the Lasker~Koshland Special Achievement Award in Medical Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Shaping the future of Europe's energy policy
The transition toward clean, efficient and secure energy will require more than just technological innovation. An EU-funded project is applying research insights from across the social sciences and humanities to help guide European energy policy. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 11, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

East Coast Scientists Win Patent Case Over Medical Research Technology
Scientists affiliated with Harvard and MIT have been battling with colleagues at University of California, Berkeley over who deserves patents for a revolutionary technology used in medical research. On Monday, the east coast scientists won their case in a federal appeals court. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Harris Source Type: news

Changes to the Leadership of Boehringer Ingelheim
’s Corporate Department Medicine (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - September 10, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news