New insight into body's response to killer fungus
MRC scientists have made a new discovery that could help in the fight against a fungus that kills around 200,000 people every year and causes lung and allergic diseases in millions of others. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - February 28, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Can 'pop-ups' help UCSF move faster, cheaper with medical research?
Temporary, specific pop-up research institutes could shave costs and boost efficiency. Here's how UCSF and another institution are approaching the concept. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - February 28, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

How YSM integrates sex and gender into the medical curriculum
Yale medical students are trained to understand how sex and gender affect medical research and practice, and to carry those lessons throughout their careers. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 28, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Survey finds UK cannabis market dominated by high-potency skunk
The first comprehensive survey of cannabis strength published in the UK for almost 10 years finds that high-potency varieties made up 94% of police seizures in 2016. It highlights the potential threat posed to mental health by a market dominated by strong cannabis. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - February 28, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

IPFwhywait
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - February 28, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Echolocation could help blind people learn to navigate like bats
Study confirms accuracy of using mouth clicks to identify location of objects, and uncovers insights which could help teach the skillSome people who are blind learn the extraordinary skill of echolocation, using mouth clicks to explore their environment in a way comparable to how bats navigate.Now scientists have uncovered new insights into how this feat is performed, which could help others to learn the skill.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Blindness and visual impairment Disability Health Society Science Medical research Biology Source Type: news

Faster access to better and safer medicines
A potential drawback of clinical trials of new drugs is that they do not always reflect how well these will work in the 'real world'. EU and industry-funded research brought together key stakeholders to help add more such evidence into the design of trials, increasing confidence in new medicines and helping to get them to patients more quickly. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 28, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

PRIM & R 2018 IACUC Conference: March 20-21, Columbus, OH
The Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) 2018 IACUC Conference will be held March 20-21, with pre-conference programs on March 19, in Columbus, OH.Learn more. (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - February 27, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Antidepressants work, but for children there's a better way | Mike Shooter
Pills may help adults, but most depression has its roots in our early years, and helping children who are struggling could stop it before it beginsSian was just 14, brought by her misery to the edge of self-harm, when I met her in a cafe at the top end of one of the old mining valleys. Neutral ground. She told me about her rugby-playing older brother and her bright little sister who had lots of pets and wanted to be a vet. She felt that her parents doted on them and that there could be no room in anyone ’s heart for her. She told me about her only friend, who had been killed in a road accident just as they went up to...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 27, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mike Shooter Tags: Mental health Depression Society Children Psychology Drugs Medical research Death and dying Life and style UK news Source Type: news

Insilico to present the latest developments in AI for healthcare to advance medical research
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) Insilico Medicine's founder and CEO, Dr. Alex Zhavoronkov, at the HIMSS18 Conference, 7 March 2018, organized by Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Millennials set to be the fattest generation of Britons, research shows
Cancer Research UK says people born between early 80s and mid-90s set to overtake baby boomersMillennials are set to be the fattest generation of Britons, with 70% dangerously overweight before they hit middle age, research shows.People born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s are set to overtake baby boomers as the age group with the highest proportion of overweight or obese people, according to Cancer Research UK.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 26, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Obesity Cancer Cancer research UK news Health Medical research Science Society Source Type: news

ELF is leading the way to discovering new medicines
An EU-and industry-funded project has created an integrated platform which is providing an innovative range of free services, expertise and a huge collection of compounds for researchers who are developing new drugs to treat all types of human diseases. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 26, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Why we are sceptical of antidepressant analysis | Letters
Academics dispute the claims made for these drugs in a recent study, while one long-term user recounts how they have worked for her and other readers point to the usefulness of meditation and community in fending off depressionIt was disappointing to read such an uncritical description of the latest analysis of antidepressant trials that does not address doubts about the widespread use of these drugs (The drugs do work, says study of antidepressants, 22 February).The analysis consists of comparing “response” rates between people on antidepressants and those on placebo. But “response” is an artificia...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Medical research Depression Mental health Drugs Pharmaceuticals industry Science Society Business Source Type: news

Searching for an Alzheimer ’s cure while my father slips away – podcast
At the beginning, we hunted frantically for any medical breakthrough that might hint at a cure. Then hope gave way to the unbearable truthRead the text version hereSubscribe viaAudioboom,iTunes,Soundcloud,Mixcloud,Acast&Sticherand join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Written by Peter Savodnik, read by Christopher Ragland and produced by Simon Barnard Tags: Alzheimer's Medical research Dementia Health Source Type: news

New technologies slash energy costs for public buildings
Europe is not doing enough to reduce the energy consumption of its ageing public buildings. An EU-funded project has tested a number of new energy-saving technologies in a school, a university and two hospitals. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 23, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists make cells glow so brightly they can be seen outside the body
Synthetic bioluminescent molecules allows researchers to track individual cells in animals with unprecedented accuracyScientists have stolen a trick from fireflies and jellyfish to make animals with cells that glow so brightly they can be seen from outside the body.The Japanese team created mice and marmosets whose brains contain nerve cells that produce light which can be picked up by a camera to study the tissues inside the living animals.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Science Animals Neuroscience Source Type: news

Manufacturing innovation set to take the 'rare' out of rare-earth magnets
Although rare-earth magnets are vital to many modern devices, from cell phones and electric cars to hospital equipment and wind turbines, few of these essential metal alloys are produced in Europe. An EU-funded consortium is revolutionising production, enabling these super-strong permanent magnets to be fully recycled and manufactured sustainably. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 22, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

It's official: antidepressants are not snake oil or a conspiracy – they work | Mark Rice-Oxley
Agroundbreaking new study shows antidepressants are effective – we should get on with taking and prescribing themIt ’s official: antidepressants work.They are not a multibillion-dollar conspiracy dreamed up by Big Pharma Bond villains. They are not a snake oil distilled in secret laboratories, designed to stupefy us all. They are not a futile cop-out from overextended family doctors.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Rice-Oxley Tags: Depression Drugs Medical research Science Society Mental health Source Type: news

The drugs do work: antidepressants are effective, study shows
Doctors hope study will put to rest doubts about the medicine, and help to address global under-treatment of depressionIt ’s official: antidepressants are not snake oil or a conspiracyAntidepressants work – some more effectively than others – in treating depression, according to authors of a groundbreaking study which doctors hope will finally put to rest doubts about the controversial medicine.Millions more people around the world should be prescribed pills or offered talking therapies, which work equally well for moderate to severe depression, say the doctors, noting that just one in six people receive ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Drugs Depression Mental health Medical research Science Society Pharmaceuticals industry Source Type: news

It's official: antidepressants are not snake oil or a conspiracy – they work
Agroundbreaking new study shows antidepressants are effective – we should get on with taking and prescribing themIt ’s official: antidepressants work.They are not a multibillion-dollar conspiracy dreamed up by Big Pharma Bond villains. They are not a snake oil distilled in secret laboratories, designed to stupefy us all. They are not a futile cop-out from overextended family doctors.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Rice-Oxley Tags: Depression Drugs Medical research Science Society Mental health Source Type: news

Just one soft drink a day could increase cancer risk, study finds
Researchers hail ‘surprising’ findings about sugar after analysing more than 3,000 casesPeople who regularly consume at least one sugary soft drink a day, no matter the size of their waist, could be at increased risk of cancer, according to a new study.Researchers from Cancer Council Victoria and University of Melbourne studied more than 35,000 Australians who developed 3,283 cases of obesity-related cancers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Sugar Soft drinks Health Cancer Obesity Melbourne Victoria Australia news Medical research Science Source Type: news

Einstein Ranks 7th in NIH Awards Per Principal Investigator Among Top U.S. Medical Schools
February 20, 2018—(BRONX, NY)—Asreported earlier, investigators at Einstein and Montefiore secured $174 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in federal fiscal year 2017. Now, an analysis byBlue Ridge Institute for Medical Research shows that Einstein ranks 7th in award dollars per investigator (28th in total funding) among the nation’s top medical schools. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - February 21, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Chronic heavy drinking leads to serious risk of dementia, study warns
Questions also raised for moderate drinkers of alcohol about their social habitHeavy drinkers are putting themselves at risk of dementia, according to the largest study of its kind ever conducted.Research published in the Lancet Public Health journal provides powerful evidence that people who drink enough to end up in hospital are putting themselves at serious risk of vascular dementia and Alzheimer ’s disease. It will also raise questions for moderate drinkers about the possible long-term consequences of their social habit.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Alcohol Dementia Alcoholism Mental health Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Weight loss linked to healthy eating not genetics, study finds
Participants who ate the most vegetables and consumed the fewest processed foods, sugary drinks and unhealthy fats shed the most kilogramsThe amount and quality of food and not a person ’s genetics will lead to weight loss, a US study has found.It has been suggested that variations in genetic makeup make it easier for some people to lose weight than others on certain diets.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Australian Associated Press Tags: Diets and dieting Health US news Medical research Science Nutrition Australia news & wellbeing Genetics Source Type: news

Making shopping centres beacons of energy efficiency
Shopping centres from Italy to Norway have undergone radical retrofitting as part of an EU-funded project seeking to re-conceptualise commercial buildings as lighthouses of energy-efficient architectures and systems. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 21, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Three I ’s & Biosecurity: March 14-16, Chapel Hill, NC
Three I ’s& Biosecurity ConferenceMarch 14-16, 2018 | Chapel Hill, NC  (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - February 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

New committee to examine safety, rationality of over 300 drugs banned since 2016
The committee will be headed by Dr Nilima Kshirsagar, chair of clinical pharmacology at the Indian Council of Medical Research, Mumbai, according to the notification. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - February 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

PRRS Research Award open for submissions until July 1st
(Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - February 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Preparing for climate change: geospatial services for Europe's cities
It's hard to map a path forward if you don't understand the lie of the land. City planners concerned with the implications of climate change thus need detailed information on the districts within their remit. New services developed by EU-funded researchers are available to support them with intelligence notably derived from Earth observation and open data. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 20, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Are we poisoning our children with plastic?
The chemical BPA is widely added to food and drink packaging, and more than 80% of teenagers have it in their bodies. But how dangerous is it?Can exposure to plastics harm your health? It ’s a question currently being explored by researchers after a recent study suggested that traces of a synthetic chemical called Bisphenol A (BPA) can be found inmore than 80% of teenagers. BPA is added to plastic to create a special form called polycarbonate plastic, used in making robust, impact-resistant materials for everything from food and drink packaging to DVD cases and medical devices. First created in 1891, it has been used...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Health & wellbeing Life and style Society Plastics Environment Chemistry Science Cancer Cancer research Medical research Source Type: news

New test can detect autism in children, scientists say
Blood and urine test, believed to be first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disordersScientists in Britain say they have developed a blood and urine test that can detect autism in children.Researchers at the University of Warwick said the test, believed to be the first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children who could then be given appropriate treatment much earlier in their lives.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Autism Medical research Genetics Biology Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Scientists seek drug to ‘rewire’ adult brain after stroke
Therapies may one day enable healthy part of brain to take over tasks from damaged areasAdults who have experienced a stroke may one day be able to take a drug to help their brain “rewire” itself, so that tasks once carried out by now-damaged areas can be taken over by other regions, researchers have claimed.The ability for the brain to rewire, so-called “brain plasticity”, is thought to occur throughout life; however, while children have a high degree of brain plasticity, adult brains are generally thought to be less plastic.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Stroke Medical research UK news Science Health Source Type: news

Scientists unravel secrets of ‘superagers’
Researchers find elderly people with high cognitive function have more of a certain type of brain cell“Superagers” have long puzzled scientists, but now researchers say they are unpicking why some people live beyond 80 – and still appear to be in fine fettle, with cognitive capacities on a par with adults decades younger.Researchers have spent years studying superagers in an attempt to understand what sets the senior citizens apart.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Austin, Texas Tags: Older people Mental health Medical research Science Alzheimer's US news World news Source Type: news

A shot in the arm for vaccine manufacture
Using innovative nanotechnologies, an EU-funded project is developing more efficient and sustainable vaccine manufacturing processes. The cost of vaccines puts a brake on wider immunisation, so these new processes will find broad application - especially in developing economies. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 19, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

George Church: "Genome sequencing is like the internet back in the late 1980s."
The pioneering geneticist on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

How can I make money from my DNA?
If you have your DNA sequenced, someone somewhere will be making money from the data. A new start-up aims to make sure that you get your share• A share in the future of DNA: Prof George Church Q&AIf you unlock the secrets of your DNA by paying a company to read your genes, behind the scenes it is probably making money by selling on your data for research. Companies like23andMe andAncestryDNA charge consumers under £150 to learn about their health and/or origins, while others do whole genome sequencing for a little over £1,000 (although in the US it is cheaper at just under $1,000). The model works like...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Medical research Genealogy Human Genome Project Source Type: news

A share in the future of DNA sequencing
Professor George Church on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas• How can I make money from my DNA?A new genetic testing company calledNebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about his latest venture, what ’s cooking in his lab and how falling asleep on the job can sometimes be a godsend.What is the value of getting your genome sequenced? Why do it?One very compelling argument that I think justifies alm...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Genetics Science Biology Medical research Stem cells Source Type: news

Breakthrough as scientists grow sheep embryos containing human cells
Advance brings us closer to growing transplant organs inside animals or being able to genetically tailor compatible organs, say researchersGrowing human organs inside other animals has taken another step away from science-fiction, with researchers announcing they have grown sheep embryos containing human cells.Scientists say growing human organs inside animals could not only increase supply, but also offer the possibility of genetically tailoring the organs to be compatible with the immune system of the patient receiving them, by using the patient ’s own cells in the procedure, removing the possibility of rejection.C...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Genetics Organ donation Embryos Biology Health Science Society Medical research Source Type: news

DOD-Backed MeMed Feels the Need for Speed
An Israeli startup that has developed a platform to differentiate between viral and bacterial infections in 15 minutes just got a big boost toward bringing the product to market. The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) has given Haifa-based MeMed a $4 million grant to fund its manufacturing efforts. MeMed’s technology measures three blood-borne immune markers to detect whether a patient has a bacterial or viral infection. Its first generation product, ImmunoXpert, has been cleared for use in laboratories in the EU, Switzerland, and Israel. The platform under development, ImmunoPoC, is designed for point-of-care use to h...
Source: MDDI - February 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: IVD Source Type: news

New treatment strategies for chronic kidney disease from the animal kingdom
(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Biomimetics offers an innovative approach to solving human problems by imitating strategies found in nature. Medical research could also benefit from biomimetics, as a group of international experts from various fields, including a scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna, point out using the example of chronic kidney disease. In future research, they intend to study the mechanisms that protect the muscles, organs and bones of certain animals during extreme conditions such as hibernation. Nature Reviews. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Developing a taste for high-protein plants
An EU-funded project is investigating protein-rich crops in Europe as attractive alternatives to meat - a means to reduce the environmental impact of livestock on the planet and provide farmers with a new source of income. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

USDA AWIC Workshop: March 13-14, Beltsville, MD
Meeting the Information Requirements of the Animal Welfare Act: A WorkshopMarch 13-14, 2018 | Beltsville, MD The USDA Animal Welfare Information Center (AWIC) teaches a one and a half day workshop at the National Agricultural Library (NAL) in Beltsville, MD, for individuals who are responsible for providing information to meet the requirements of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA). The workshop is targeted for principal investigators, members of IACUCs, information providers, administrators of animal use programs, and veterinarians. (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - February 15, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

DIY faecal transplants carry risks including HIV and hepatitis, warn experts
Faecal transplants have been used in medical settings to tackle superbugs, but following YouTube videos at home is too risky, say researchersConcerns have been raised about the growing trend for DIY faecal transplants, with experts fearing such attempts could put individuals at an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis as well as conditions ranging from Parkinson ’s and multiple sclerosis to obesity and sleep disorders.Thetransfer of faeces from one human to another has gained attention as a growing number of studies have suggested links between microbes in the gut anda host of health problems, from autoimmune diseases ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Microbiology Human biology Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

Blood-thinning drugs designed to cut stroke risk may actually increase it
Scientists call for caution in prescribing anticoagulants after some patients with other conditions found to suffer more strokesBlood-thinning drugs may increase rather than cut the risk of stroke in some people over 65 who have an irregular heartbeat and also chronic kidney disease, according to a new study.The researchers are calling on doctors to be more cautious in prescribing the drugs, called anticoagulants, until there has been more research.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Medical research Stroke Drugs Health Science Society Doctors Source Type: news

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?
(Westmead Institute for Medical Research) New research, led by Professor Anna deFazio from the Westmead Institute and Westmead Hospital, has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tackling big data challenges in shades of grey
EU-funded researchers have assisted in the development of China's first commercial passenger plane by applying data mining concepts that overcome the challenge of working with limited and incomplete information. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented case
Doctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature.Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The account was published inTransgender Health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza in New York Tags: Medical research Health Breastfeeding Society Life and style US news Science World news Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Doctors Struggle to Treat Youngest Victims of Opioid Epidemic
CHICAGO (AP) — Two babies, born 15 months apart to the same young woman overcoming opioid addiction. Two very different treatments. Sarah Sherbert's first child was whisked away to a hospital special-care nursery for two weeks of treatment for withdrawal from doctor-prescribed methadone that her mother continued to use during her pregnancy. Nurses hesitated to let Sherbert hold the girl and hovered nervously when she visited to breast-feed. Born just 15 months later and 30 miles away at a different South Carolina hospital, Sherbert's second child was started on medicine even before he showed any withdrawal symptoms a...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 14, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Tanner, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news