A more efficient way of designing proteins
Thanks to the algorithms that are being developed by an EU-funded project, scientists have an easier time finding the information they need to more efficiently design new proteins that can be used, for example, in the development of new medicines. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 16, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

New Efforts Taking Root to Ease Off-Label Drug Promotion New Efforts Taking Root to Ease Off-Label Drug Promotion
The Goldwater Institute is pushing for state legislation to ease FDA restrictions on off-label drug promotion. Critics see this effort as likely to erode medical research and put patients at risk.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

Inauguration of new integrated Asian Veterinary R & D Center in China
Inauguration of new integrated Asian Veterinary R&D Center in China (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - May 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Medical News Today: The common cold: Could we be close to a cure?
A recent paper describes a newly designed drug that brings us closer to the holy grail of medical research: a cure for the common cold. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Scientists crack how primordial life on Earth might have replicated itself
(Medical Research Council) Scientists have created a new type of genetic replication system which demonstrates how the first life on Earth -- in the form of RNA -- could have replicated itself. The scientists from the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology say the new RNA utilizes a system of genetic replication unlike any known to naturally occur on Earth today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New EMBO members announced
MRC-supported researchers are among the 62 scientists elected as new EMBO Members. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - May 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Turning waste into wastewater treatment
Water scarcity in the Mediterranean, South America, Africa... It is a growing global problem, as climate change pressure mounts and inefficiencies in water use and treatment continue, particularly in water-intensive industries. An EU-backed team - working with international partners - has developed an innovative, low-cost inorganic wastewater treatment using agricultural and industrial leftovers. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 15, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Genomics and nanotechnology to benefit from $393m research funding boost
Government allocates new funding after recommendations from chief scientist Alan FinkelSign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noonNanotechnology, genomics and remote ocean sensors to improve the health of the Great Barrier Reef are among the projects that will benefit from $393m over five years in new federal research funding.On Tuesday, the federal government released its response tothe national infrastructure roadmap, allocating funding to its research priorities after recommendations by an expert group led by the chief scientist, Alan Finkel.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Paul Karp Tags: Australian budget 2018 Science Australia news Nanotechnology Medical research Source Type: news

Big Pharma now "owns" and controls nearly all university medical research funding
(Natural News) The pharmaceutical industry has been heavily scrutinized in the past for trying to buy and influence the favor of medical professionals like doctors. But now that flat-out bribery has gotten harder to pull off, the industry has found more insidious means of keeping their fingers in the pot: Funding medical research at the university... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New chemical compound 'stops common cold in its tracks'
Scientists working on human cells in a dish find new way to tackle rhinovirus – though a cure is a long way offIt ’s a conundrum that hasstumped scientists for centuries, but now researchers say they have taken a tantalising step forward in the quest to tackle the common cold.The scourge of workplace, home and school playground, the common cold is predominantly caused by the rhinovirus. But attempts to thwart the pathogen by vaccination or antiviral drugs face a number of difficulties – not least because the virus comes in many forms and can mutate rapidly leading to drug resistance.Continue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Common cold Society Health Medical research Source Type: news

Uganda:UVRI Partners With London School for Cancer Research
[Monitor] Kampala -The Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI) have partnered with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) to conduct research into cancer and other non-communicable diseases (NCDs). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 14, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

How to build a large spacecraft
Need to retrieve a few tonnes of cargo from Mars? Send some seriously heavy gear into deep space? Fly out sufficient mass to deflect an asteroid? Current spacecraft would not be nearly big or powerful enough, say EU-funded researchers who have looked into a possible next-generation design based on nuclear electric propulsion. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 14, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Brain cancer to get more funding in tribute to Tessa Jowell, says No 10
Research funding will double to £40m and all NHS hospitals will perform gold standard tumour diagnosis testsBrain cancer research will have its government funding doubled to £40m and gold standard tumour diagnosis tests will be rolled out to all NHS hospitals, in tribute toDame Tessa Jowell, Downing Street announced on Sunday.No 10 announced it would fulfil two key campaign aims of the late former Labour cabinet minister, including a national rollout of a brain cancer diagnosis test, gold standard dye, used to identify tumours.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Elgot Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Tessa Jowell Politics NHS Hospitals Labour Theresa May Jeremy Hunt Health policy Conservatives UK news Source Type: news

The 'people politician': Tessa Jowell obituary
Former Labour cabinet minister, described as ‘the ultimate sensible loyalist’ by Tony Blair, was not afraid to speak her mindUntil the revelation of her brain tumour last September, Tessa Jowell, Lady Jowell, the former secretary of state for culture, media and sport, who has died aged 70, was best known outside Westminster as the minister for the Olympics in the run-up to the hugely successful London games in 2012. It was directly as a result of her enthusiasm and personal pressure on the then prime minister, Tony Blair, that the UK first mounted its bid and then subsequently won the competition to stage the e...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Julia Langdon Tags: Tessa Jowell Politics Cancer Cancer research Health Medical research Science Society Labour Source Type: news

Michael Pollan: ‘I was a very reluctant psychonaut’
The bestselling author and activist has been exploring the use of psychedelic drugs in medical research for his book How to Change Your Mind. And yes, he had to try them for himselfMichael Pollan first became interested in new research into psychedelic drugs in 2010, when a front-page story in theNew York Timesdeclared, “Hallucinogens Have Doctors Tuning in Again”. The story revealed how in a large-scale trial researchers had been giving terminally ill cancer patients large doses of psilocybin – the active ingredient in magic mushrooms – to help them deal with their “existential distress&rdquo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Drugs Medical research Psychology Health, mind and body books Science Society Source Type: news

MRC researchers join Fellowship of Academy of Medical Sciences
MRC-supported scientists are among the 48 distinguished medical researchers elected as Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - May 10, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

MRC scientists elected Fellows of the Royal Society
MRC-supported researchers are among the 60 eminent scientists elected as Fellows of the Royal Society. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - May 9, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Prostate cancer screening test is overused for older men, experts say
Overuse of the PSA test can lead to painful and unnecessary biopsies as well as over-diagnosis and over-treatmentAdult American men aged between 55 and 69 should balance the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening carefully before getting tested, the United States Preventive Task Force (USPTF) has recommended. Men older than 70 should not receive routine tests.The recommendation, published in theJournal of the American Medical Association on Tuesday, specifically addresses a blood test called the prostate specific-antigen test, or PSA. The changed guidelines were first published about a year ago.Continue reading......
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza in New York Tags: Prostate cancer Health Cancer research Medical research Science Society Source Type: news

Regulation of the Hoxb gene cluster maintains blood-forming cells and inhibits leukemia
(Stowers Institute for Medical Research) New research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research reveals that a DNA regulatory element within the Regulation of the Hoxb cluster globally mediates signals to the majority of Hoxb genes to control their expression in blood-forming stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

£ 53 million for research to probe genetic links to health and disease
(University of Edinburgh) Research into human genetics has received a £ 53 million boost from the Medical Research Council (MRC). Funds will support work at the MRC Human Genetics Unit, University of Edinburgh for the next five years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Children?s Hospital Colorado, Mayo Clinic announce collaboration on rare congenital heart defect
AURORA, Colorado ? Mayo Clinic?s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Children?s Hospital Colorado are collaborating to provide solutions for patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of the heart is severely underdeveloped. ?We are thrilled [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 8, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Delivering cost-effective clean energy to consumers
EU-funded research is ensuring that new policy tools supporting the renewable energy sector - such as auctions - deliver on their promise to provide cost-efficient, carbon-free energy for consumers, helping Europe meet its environmental and economic targets. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 8, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Challenging gender stereotypes in science
By developing gender-inclusive guidelines and criteria for schools, museums, science centres and industry, an EU-funded project aims to attract more young people, especially girls, to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 8, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

New light on sub-Saharan nutrition research
Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa still suffer from high rates of malnutrition, despite international efforts to address the issue. An EU-funded project brought together African researchers and stakeholder organisations to define research priorities that could improve results and strengthen the continent's capacity in this field. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 8, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Symposium on Social Housing of Laboratory Animals: June 4-5, Beltsville, MD
Symposium on Social Housing of Laboratory AnimalsJune 4-5, 2018 | Beltsville, MD  (Source: OLAW News)
Source: OLAW News - May 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: hamptonl Source Type: news

Impact of mass breast cancer screening has been overrated | Letter
It has not been shown to affect women ’s life expectancy overall, but does increase invasive interventions, saySusan Bewley, Nick RossandMargaret McCartney of HealthWatchThe announcement that thousands missed out on mammography tests caused distress to many women and their families (Report, 4 May). The implication was that they now risked premature death from cancer. In fact, as many experts have been pointing out, mass screening for breast cancer has not been shown to have any impact on women ’s life expectancy overall – but it does increase invasive interventions like mastectomy. This is why Prof Mike B...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Breast cancer Health Society Cancer research Medical research Science Women Life and style UK news Jeremy Hunt Politics Source Type: news

Sweeping up space junk
An EU-funded project developed and commercialised an innovative device for safely removing so-called space junk, inoperable and defunct satellites and other debris cluttering up Earth's orbit. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 7, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Improving testing and repair of oil and gas pipelines
Novel testing and maintenance methods for oil and gas pipelines developed by EU-funded researchers are helping to ensure the reliability and safety of the extensive pipeline networks that are critical to Europe's energy security. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 7, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Cancer: 'If exercise was a pill it would be prescribed to every patient'
Leading Australian researchers back world-first campaign for activity to be part of any treatment•Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noonExercise should be prescribed to all cancer patients, and not to do so would be harmful, some of Australia ’s leading experts on cancer have warned.The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia has launched its position statement on the role of exercise alongside surgery, chemotherapy or radiation in cancer care.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Guardian staff Tags: Cancer Health Medical research Australia news Source Type: news

Missing the fizz: my long battle to understand the mysteries of ME
Is chronic fatigue syndrome physiological or psychological? The medical world remains divided – leaving millions unsure about the efficacy of the treatment they receiveThe point at which I realised just how confounding some illnesses – and the human beings that suffer them – are was when, three years into a mysterious illness, someone told me that I could beat it by eating a clove of garlic each morning.This person – not a medical professional, it is perhaps unnecessary to point out – swore by its efficacy. By this stage, I had tried all sorts of things to get better – yoga, meditation, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nick Duerden Tags: ME / Chronic fatigue syndrome Health & wellbeing Society Medical research Science Source Type: news

Nature or nurture: unravelling the roots of childhood behaviour disorders
Studies on young children have identified a genetic link for some such disorders, but environmental factors also have an effectHumans have succeeded as a species in large part because of our ability to cooperate and coordinate witheach other. These skills are driven by a range of “moral emotions” such as guilt and empathy, which help us to navigate the nuance of social interactions appropriately.Those who lack moral emotions are classed as having “callous-unemotional” traits: persistent personality characteristics that make negotiating social situations difficult. The combination of callous-unemotio...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Greg Chapman, research scientist, Boston University Twin Project Tags: Psychology Science Mental health Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder Genetics Biology Society Medical research Source Type: news

Genomics is disrupting the healthcare sector
(Garvan Institute of Medical Research) Affordable, rapid DNA sequencing is causing a revolution in medicine and healthcare globally -- and it's happening now, says Thomas Barlow (Barlow Advisory), the author of the landmark Garvan Global Genomics Report, which launches today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Banking on construction materials for eco-benefits
Building materials produce a significant volume of waste which, in turn, creates a sizeable environmental impact. EU-funded research and innovation is exploring how the construction sector can embrace the circular economy, as well as increase the reuse and recycling of materials, components and building functionalities. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 4, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Fighting crime and terrorism with voice recognition
Voice-recognition technology can play a valuable part in preventing and solving crimes, including terrorist acts. The EU-funded project SIIP is developing software to reliably identify speakers in legally intercepted phone calls and social media. The database will be accessible to enforcement authorities through Interpol. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 4, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Assistive technology offers a helping hand
An EU co-funded research network is working on pioneering assistive technologies which can support independent living and enable choice among those diagnosed with intellectual disabilities and/or autism, in a bid to improve their quality of life. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 4, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Scientists develop new test to safely diagnose peanut allergies
MRC scientists have developed a new laboratory test to diagnose peanut allergy. The test has 98% specificity and, unlike current options, it doesn’t run the risk of false-positives or causing allergic reactions. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Pre-eclampsia blood test: Melbourne hospital helps develop world-first
Test predicts likelihood of pregnant women developing the condition, which can be fatalA world-first blood test that can help predict the potentially deadly pregnancy condition pre-eclampsia is being introduced at Melbourne ’s Royal Women’s hospital.The hospital helped develop the blood test, which predicts the likelihood of pregnant women developing the condition.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Calla Wahlquist Tags: Melbourne Victoria Health Australia news Science Pregnancy Medical research Indigenous Australians Source Type: news

Scientists develop a new test to safely and accurately diagnose peanut allergies
(Medical Research Council) Scientists have developed a new laboratory test to diagnose peanut allergy. The test has 98 percent specificity and, unlike current options, it doesn't run the risk of false-positives or causing allergic reactions such as anaphylactic shock. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New online tools to shine light on public spending
Corruption in public spending wastes taxpayers' money and erodes trust in governments. The EU-funded project DIGIWHIST aims to make public procurement more efficient and transparent with online tools that use big data and empower citizens to report abuses. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Digitally enhanced networks for optimal crisis management
How can new technologies be used most effectively in crisis response? How can responders be better coordinated, damage mitigated and lives saved? An EU-funded project has sought to answer those questions and many more through far-reaching research into networked crisis management. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Tackling the growing menace of forest wildfires
Researchers from Europe and Australia have joined forces to improve our understanding of forest wildfires. The EU-funded project promises to deliver new knowledge and develop software tools that will help emergency services deal with wildfires more effectively. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

What now for the EU and Turkey?
The EU and Turkey each face internal, regional and global challenges. The EU-funded FEUTURE project is examining the dynamics of these challenges. Its recommendations will help policymakers make informed decisions on future relations between the EU and Turkey. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Arthritis Research UK joins forces with Medical Research Council to tackle childhood arthritis
This study will look at differences in genes, immune cells, blood proteins and other features that are seen in patients who respond well to treatments, and those who develop uveitis, a condition that causes eye inflammation and affects approximately 15% of children with arthritis.It is hoped the study will allow researchers to tailor personalised treatments and create a biomarkers test for childhood arthritis which would:Identify potential new treatmentsHelp doctors determine what the right treatment plan is for each patientIdentify which children are at risk of developing uveitisProject long-term outcomes for children wit...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 2, 2018 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Calling all MRC-funded PhD students!
The MRC’s 2018 Max Perutz Science Writing Award is now open. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - May 2, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Kenya:Health Scare as Researchers Find Traces of Polio Virus in Eastleigh
[Nairobi News] The government is on a high alert after experts from the Kenya Medical Research Institute (Kemri) and Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported finding traces of a vaccine-derived polio virus in environmental samples from Eastleigh, Nairobi. (Source: AllAfrica News: Polio)
Source: AllAfrica News: Polio - May 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Marginalised indigenous youth, a story that resonates
An EU-funded research project is using state-of-the-art visual data and co-mapping exercises to better understand the impact of social exclusion and displacement among marginalised indigenous youth in Santiago, Chile. A better understanding of their lives could feed into programmes to better meet their needs and expectations. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 2, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Anti-mosquito innovation boosts malaria battle
In the long-running fight against malaria in Africa, current anti-mosquito measures are reaching their limits. An EU-funded project has developed new ways to protect people and prevent the spread of the potentially fatal disease. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 2, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Advanced 3D models improve breast cancer detection
An EU-funded project is developing advanced three-dimensional computational and physical models of breast tumours, providing the medical community with powerful new instruments to tackle breast cancer. The initiative will reveal the possibilities for improved diagnostic techniques for detecting a disease that affects one in eight women in Europe at some point in their lives. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 2, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

From divergence to dialogue about historical memory
Almost 140 years after the Russian-Ottoman War, an EU-funded project aimed to bridge the divide between contradictory national memories of the conflict that continue to stir political, social and cultural controversy across Southeastern Europe and the Caucasus. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 2, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

Ecstasy ingredient could help ease PTSD symptoms, study finds
Research suggests MDMA could reduce symptoms when combined with talking therapiesMDMA, the main ingredient of the party drug ecstasy, could help reduce symptoms among those living with post-traumatic stress disorder, research suggests.Post-traumatic stress disorder is commonly treated with drugs, psychotherapies or both. However, some find little benefit, with certain talking therapies linked to high dropout rates.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 1, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Drugs Post-traumatic stress disorder Mental health Medical research Science Society World news Psychology Source Type: news