First-in-human trial shows promise for hard-to-treat ventricular tachycardia heart rhythms
ROCHESTER, Minn. — A first-in-human multicenter trial involving Mayo Clinic used a new ablation technique for patients with ventricular tachycardia, an abnormally rapid heart rhythm that is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death worldwide. The trial tested needle ablation using in-catheter, heated, saline-enhance d, radio frequency energy, also known as SERF, to substantially increase heat transfer, compared to conventional ablation methods. The new process produces deeper, controllable lesion scars at sites inside the heart muscle.… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - August 2, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: The Living Breast Biobank
Mayo Clinic ’s Living Breast Biobank has proved invaluable in a recent breakthrough study that demonstrates a novel mechanism through which female carriers of the BRCA1 gene may be at increased risk for breast cancer. According to the study, this is because the gene contributes to poorly organized divisions of mammary progenitor cells. “For the first time, it was possible to recreate various pathogenic BRCA1 mutations in a cell line and track living cells during their division to… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - July 30, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Lupus rates increasing, communities of color especially vulnerable
New research led by Mayo Clinic shows that more people are being diagnosed with lupus than in the past, while risks of severity and death remain the same. The study is published in BMJ Annals of the Rheumatologic Diseases. Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disorder that causes inflammation and pain throughout the body. Most common in women (9 of 10 diagnosed cases); it attacks both joints and organs – including the skin. "In our study, we confirmed that in… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - July 23, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Mobile app for improving heart health among African Americans shows promise, Mayo study finds
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mobile apps are popular tools for people looking to improve their health, but are they effective? They can be if the app is culturally tailored to the needs of its users. In a study published on Monday, July 18, in Circulation, Mayo Clinic researchers evaluated the effectiveness of a culturally relevant mobile app designed to improve heart health among African Americans in faith communities. The researchers found that people who participated in… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - July 18, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Leveraging technology to transform Anatomic Pathology
In January, as part of Mayo Clinic ’s Digital Pathology Program, the Division of Anatomic Pathology in Mayo ’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology in Rochester, Minnesota, transitioned a significant portion of its clinical practice, including both surgical and biopsy cases, into digital workflows. The transition means all surgical — or frozen section — biopsy slides will be scanned into digital images prior to a pathologist’s review. Historically, patient tissue has been evaluated by generating glass slides, applying stains, and evaluating… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - July 9, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: The art and science of never giving up
Anya in February 2018, just before being discharged after her third brain surgery.  Photo credit: Colleen Kelly In March 2020, at the start of the pandemic, Anya Magnuson's own health was in crisis. The 21-year-old Minnesotan had already endured four brain surgeries, 35 lumbar punctures and about 11 weeks of hospitalization. At various times during the preceding 28 months, she wa s treated for fungal meningitis, an inflammatory disease known as neurosarcoidosis, and finally a rare blood… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - June 25, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Disparities in opioid treatment access remain for women, Black and Hispanic people
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Buprenorphine is a prescription approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that effectively treats opioid dependence or addiction. But women, as well as Black and Hispanic populations, do not have equal access to this potentially lifesaving medication, new Mayo Clinic research finds. The study published Friday, June 3, in JAMA Network Open. The research team used the OptumLabs Data Warehouse to examine 3,110 filled prescriptions of buprenorphine from 72,055 emergency department visits across the… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - June 3, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: In neurodegenerative diseases, Mayo Clinic research finds shared gene patterns, widespread damage
Damage to brain cells in two separate neurodegenerative diseases — Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy — is not limited to specific parts of the brain and these diseases share a pattern of gene alterations within the brain, according to researchers at Mayo Clinic, the University of Florida and other collaborating organizations. The research ers say this finding suggests the neurodegenerative diseases may have the same underlying disease links. The finding, which is published in The Journal… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 28, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday:  The regenerative operating room of the future
Envisioning the future of regenerative medicine elicits images of an operating room that also is a manufacturing facility. Patients undergoing surgery could have immediate access to products biomanufactured within the operating room or even within their own bodies. Products such as tissue engineered for targeted healing or 3D-printed scaffolds that repair diseased organs, bones or cartilage could be customized to address individual needs. This health care vision at the crossroads of biomanufacturing, engineering and regenerative… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 21, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Using metal detectors to ward off wayward specimens
The  Histology Laboratory in Mayo Clinic’s Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology processes more than 350,000 paraffin-embedded blocks every year as lab staff prepare tissue slides for pathologists to evaluate. Each of those blocks represents a patient waiting for answers. Although lost s pecimens within the Histology Lab are rare — less than one-half of 1% are ever misplaced — if even one specimen goes missing, it has the potential to be devastating for that patient. "We're aiming for zero.… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 14, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Researchers seek to improve success of chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A study published by researchers from Mayo Clinic Cancer Center at Mayo Clinic in Florida and Case Western, Cleveland Medical Center, investigates the reasons for decreasing remission rates for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy (CAR-T cell t herapy). The study is published in Cancer Discovery. "CAR-T cell therapy is a promising treatment for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, especially for patients who have relapsed or those who have not responded… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 12, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: What you should know about genetics, colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer begins when healthy cells in the colon or rectum develop mutations, or changes, in their DNA. These damaged cells then become cancerous, grow and divide uncontrollably, and form a tumor. Genetic factors play a role in this process. Some gene mutations passed through generations of your family can increase your risk of colorectal cancer significantly. The most common inherited syndromes that increase colorectal cancer risk are familial adenomatous polyposis and Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - May 7, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Uncovering disparities in local communities -- the case of the HPV vaccine
Where you live may affect whether you receive the cancer-preventing HPV vaccine, suggests a new study published in the journal Vaccine. The first human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was approved for use in the U.S. by the Food and Drug Administration in 2006. According to the National Cancer Institute, the types of HPV the current vaccine covers are those which cause 90% of genital warts, as many as 90% of cervical cancers, as well as a majority of oropharyngeal (a type of throat cancer), anal, penile, vaginal and vulvar cancers.… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - April 30, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Expert Alert: Laser therapy brings the heat to minimally invasive epilepsy treatment  
ROCHESTER, Minn. — For roughly one-third of people with epilepsy, medication does not control their seizures. Depending on where seizures originate in the brain, laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) may be a minimally invasive surgery option. As the name suggests, lasers are used to increase the temperature o f the tissue to disable a small portion of brain tissue. Real-time MRI monitoring helps the surgeon and radiology team pinpoint the treatment while protecting other important areas of the brain. … (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - April 29, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic study confirms living kidney donor surgery is low risk for most patients
ROCHESTER, Minn. — The risk of major complications for people who donate a kidney via laparoscopic surgery is minimal. That is the conclusion of a 20-year Mayo Clinic study of more than 3,000 living kidney donors. Only 2.5% of patients in the study experienced major complications, and all recovered completely. "Th e results of this study are extremely reassuring for individuals who are considering being living kidney donors. We found that this lifesaving surgery, when performed… (Source: Mayo Clinic Research News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Research News - April 25, 2022 Category: Research Source Type: news