Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia after severe traumatic brain injury - Cardoso Vale T, Echenique L, Barsottini OGP, Pedroso JL.
BACKGROUND: Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia (PAID) syndrome, a subset of dysautonomia, is characterized by paroxysms of marked agitation, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, hypertension, tachycardia and tachypnea accompanied by hypertonia and extens... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Parkinson’s disease symptoms: An early warning sign which affects the eyes and jaw
PARKINSON'S disease is a heart-breaking disorder which sadly gets worse and worse as the disease takes hold. Dystonia is an early warning sign, what is it? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A survey of falls in people with dystonia - Boyce MJ, Chang FCF, Mahant N, Fung VSC, Bradnam L.
OBJECTIVE: Dystonia is a chronic and sometimes progressive neurological disorder causing abnormalities in movement and function. We conducted a preliminary survey to investigate whether people with dystonia experience falls and to identify contributing fac... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Identification and management of paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity after traumatic brain injury - Zheng RZ, Lei ZQ, Yang RZ, Huang GH, Zhang GM.
Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) has predominantly been described after traumatic brain injury (TBI), which is associated with hyperthermia, hypertension, tachycardia, tachypnea, diaphoresis, dystonia (hypertonia or spasticity), and even motor fe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

What Are Some Risk Factors for Cerebral Palsy?
Discussion The term, cerebral palsy, or CP has gone through many iterations with the first description in 1861 by W.J. Little who described it as “The condition of spastic rigidity of the limbs of newborn children.” The most recent definition is from Rosenbaun et al. in 2007 which states it is “a group of permanent disorders of the development of movement and posture, causing activity limitation, that are attributed to non-progressive disturbances that occurred in the developing fetal or infant brain. The motor disorders of cerebral palsy are often accompanied by disturbances of sensation, perception, cog...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 9, 2020 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What is the Lifespan for a Child with Holoprosencephaly?
Discussion Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a clefting problem of the brain. “[HPE] the result of incomplete or absent midline division of the embryonic forebrain into distinct cerebral hemispheres (prosencephalon) between the 18th and 28th day after conception.” There are four distinct subtypes: Alobar – both hemispheres are completely fused and are not separated into the left and right hemispheres. There is agenesis of the corpus callosum, arrhinencephaly and a single ventricle with fused thalami. Facial features are almost always affected. Semilobar – the cerebral hemispheres are fused anteriorly bu...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - November 18, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Large Study Finds Predictors of Musician's Dystonia Large Study Finds Predictors of Musician's Dystonia
A review of more than 2600 cases of musicians with focal task-specific dystonias has revealed predictors of the condition and its severity. For many, effective treatment options are limited.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - October 9, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Yips May Affect More Athletes Than Previously Recognized Yips May Affect More Athletes Than Previously Recognized
Yips, a focal task-specific dystonia, may be more prevalent among golfers than has previously been thought, a Dutch study has found. It affects athletes in other sports and activities as well.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - October 2, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Depression With Dystonia Predicts Lower Quality of Life Depression With Dystonia Predicts Lower Quality of Life
Depression is the strongest long-term predictor of health-related quality of life for patients with isolated dystonia, a new study shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape Neurology and Neurosurgery Headlines - September 26, 2019 Category: Neurology Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

What can kinematic studies tell us about the mechanisms of dystonia? - Sadnicka A, Galea J, Edwards MJ.
Clinical movement disorders are classified by an algorithm implemented by a practising movement disorder specialist based on information extracted during the history and clinical examination of a patient. Most simply, dystonia, is a classifier which is rea... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Two-year-old girl becomes the youngest patient EVER to receive deep brain stimulation therapy
Viktoria Kaftanikaite, from Glasgow, had deep brain stimulation (DBS) in London to relieve the symptoms of a movement disorder called dystonia which caused her limbs to twitch uncontrollably. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scottish girl is world's youngest deep brain stimulation patient
Two-year-old has had brain surgery to treat spasms, raising hopes for other childrenA two year-old girl from Glasgow has become the youngest person in the world to undergo brain surgery that doctors say could help limit severe disability among children afflicted by uncontrollable body movements.Viktoria Kaftanikaite was just 32 months old when she had deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat a condition called dystonia, which caused her arms and legs to flail about and her mouth to twitch constantly while she was awake.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 10, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Health policy editor Tags: Neuroscience Health UK news Glasgow Scotland NHS Children Society Source Type: news

Motor domain in psychotic disorders: the rebirth of a concept - Hirjak D, Kubera KM, Sambataro F, Wolf RC.
We were very pleased to read the excellent article by Swets et al. [1], who examined longitudinally for 3 years motor (akathisia, dyskinesia, parkinsonism and dystonia) and obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS) in psychotic patients and individuals with i... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

What Causes Temporomandibular Joint Problems?
Discussion The mandible normally grows in a symmetric downward and forward movement relative to the skull base. The condyle is the primary growth center. “The mandible is unique in that its 2 joints and growth centers function together as a single unit.” It is the last bone in the body to reach skeletal maturity. The mandible and its growth are important for maxillary growth and therefore many problems that affect the mandible affect the facial and skulls structures as well. These growth problems can be relatively insidious and therefore may need monitoring over longer periods of time such as patients with unde...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 27, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

What Should You Do About Head Banging?
Discussion Head banging and body rocking are common habits that young children exhibit that can be worrisome or frustrating for parents but that do not cause harm to the child. In a normally developing child they occur around 6-9 months age, and generally resolve around 2-3 years with most behaviors gone by 6-8 years. Children usually do not cause harm to themselves, but it can cause furniture to move causing noise, or potentially the child could lose balance and fall off a bed, or strike an object unintentionally and hurt themself (hit edge of a bed just right in a way that causes a small bruise). The behaviors appear to ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - February 11, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

People With Movement Disorders May Become Immune to Botox Therapy
FRIDAY, Dec. 28, 2018 -- Some people who receive botulinum toxin injections for disorders that cause muscle tightness and contractions develop resistance to the treatment, researchers say. The new study included nearly 600 patients with dystonia or... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 28, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Patients May Become Immune to Botulinum Toxin Treatments
TUESDAY, Dec. 11, 2018 -- About 15 percent of patients treated with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) for dystonia or spasticity can develop an immune response to the treatment itself, according to a study published online Nov. 21 in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

High Rate of Waning Botox Efficacy in Dystonia, Spasticity High Rate of Waning Botox Efficacy in Dystonia, Spasticity
A'surprisingly high'number of patients with dystonia or spasticity who receive botulinum neurotoxin type A develop neutralizing antibodies to the toxin over time, new research shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Toward Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation for Dystonia Toward Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation for Dystonia
Can neural oscillations serve as potential biomarkers that might be used as feedback signals for controlling adaptive deep brain stimulation in patients with dystonia?Neurosurgical Focus (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Treatment Advances Give Hope to People with Brain Metastases
Treatment TermsMetastatic Brain and Spine Tumors Author Erin Hull Overview Lisa VanTress didn ’t know why she couldn’t regain her land legs after a 13-hour fishing trip in the summer of 2016. When the dizziness caused her to stumble and fall, she went to the emergency room. She soon learned she had lung cancer that had spread to her brain. Hero Imagebrainmets1932x862.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks CTA Header Learn More CTA ButtonBrain and Spine Metastases Patient Name Lisa VanTress Patient Photo Featured Doctors Peter E. Fecci, MD, PhD Jeffrey Melson Clarke, MD Scott R. Floyd, MD, PhD Relate...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - June 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: efh7 at duke.edu Source Type: news

As a Buddhist Priest, Duke Neurosurgeon Finds Deeper Connection with Patients
Treatment TermsNeurosurgery Author Bryan Roth Overview Dr. Patrick Codd, MD, a Duke neurosurgeon, has been practicing Zen for two decades. The practice, he says, allows him to reflect on his work and relationships with patients and, ultimately, to deliver better care. Content Blocks Preview Image Featured Doctors and Providers Patrick J. Codd, MD Related Blog Posts 5 Minutes with Duke Neurosurgeon Oren Gottfried, MD Robot Reduces Need for Open Brain Surgery to Map Epileptic Seizures Deep brain stimulation surgery while asleep brings relief from dystonia BodyDisplay in Announcement Section:  Archived (Sou...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: efh7 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Report: Doctors warn that lightning can affect deep brain stimulation devices
Deep brain stimulation devices, used to treat neurological movement disorders like Parkinson’s disease, are vulnerable to strong electromagnetic fields that are created by other electrical devices. But when a 66-year-old Slovenian woman’s DBS implant stopped working, it wasn’t due to interference from a device – the malfunction was caused by lightning. In a case report published this week in the Journal of Neurosurgery, doctors described a unique case they encountered with a patient using a rechargeable DBS system to treat her neck dystonia. When her apartment was struck by lightning, the patie...
Source: Mass Device - May 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Neurological Source Type: news

Botulinum Toxin A Injection Effective for Laryngeal Dystonia, Including Tremor Botulinum Toxin A Injection Effective for Laryngeal Dystonia, Including Tremor
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Dystonia chronic pain 'completely changed my life'
Ann Pierce-Jones used to be full of confidence but now lives "day-to-day" in chronic pain. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dystonia patients' 'distress' over cancelled Botox clinics
People with the condition require regular Botox injections to prevent painful muscle spasms. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study explains how your brain helps you learn new skills
(Gladstone Institutes) Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes uncovered how a special type of neuron improves the efficiency of procedural learning. They initially wanted to show how the specialized brain cells, called fast-spiking interneurons, cause movement disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome, dystonia, and dyskinesia. As it turns out, that isn't the case. But their work led them to an even greater discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deep brain stimulation: Improving outcomes in the treatment of movement disorders
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) For the first time, researchers from Charit é have shown that, in patients with a type of movement disorder known as dystonia, a particular pattern of brain activity is linked to both the severity of symptoms and the clinical outcomes achieved through deep brain stimulation. Results from this study, which has been published in the journal Annals of Neurology*, may help to improve the way in which treatment is adapted to an individual patients needs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Seizures & Progressive Dystonia Case / Liver Transplant Indications Changing / New Mexico IM Opportunity
Take a look at today's offering from NEJM Group: NEJM Clinical Practice Center: Case Record: A 20-year-old woman was evaluated for seizures and... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - December 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Jacob ’s story: What it’s like to have a stroke as a kid
My name is Jacob and I’m 8 years old. Two years ago, I had a stroke. At first, I didn’t realize what that meant, and I didn’t understand why I couldn’t move the way I used to. With time, I’ve been able to get most of my function back, but my right arm has something called dystonia. That means the muscles cramp up and sometimes my arm moves on its own or gets stiff. I can’t control it, and that makes life hard sometimes. I come to Boston Children’s Hospital every few months to see Dr. Michael Rivkin at the Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center there. Nobody likes having to go to the do...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 26, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jacob Downing Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Dr. Michael Rivkin stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Validation of fear of falling and balance confidence assessment scales in persons with dystonia - Boyce MJ, Lam L, Chang F, Mahant N, Fung VSC, Bradnam L.
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Falls are problematic for people living with neurological disorders and a fear of falling can impact on actual falls. Fear of falling is commonly assessed using the Falls Self-Efficacy Scale International (FES-I) or the Activities-s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Calvin ’s gift: Second opinion provides answers and hope
It’s not often that parents breathe a sigh of relief when their child is diagnosed with a chronic, potentially debilitating condition. But that sense of peace is just what Paula and Scott Hurd felt when they were told that their son, Calvin, had a rare movement disorder. “We were so happy to finally understand what was happening,” says Paula. Slipping away The search for answers had begun several years earlier, when Calvin started limping. At first, his family thought he had simply tripped over something and injured himself. But when he didn’t improve, they took him to the doctor. A series of appoi...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - September 13, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories cerebral palsy Cerebral Palsy Program Dr. Benjamin Shore Dr. David Coulter dystonia Second opinion Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic picks up 11% stake in neuromod startup NeuroOne
The Mayo Clinic as acquired an 10.9% stake in epilepsy treatment neuromod startup NeuroOne’s parent firm, according an SEC filing from the company. NeuroOne is developing a “thin film” electrode technology, originally from the University of Wisconsin, designed to be implanted in the brain. The film can detect irregular brain activity, accurate to single neurons, to pinpoint the source of seizures and tremors, according to the filing, and has been used in testing at the Mayo Clinic. The technology combines detection alongside deep brain stimulation treatment and ablation capabilities to monitor and treat i...
Source: Mass Device - August 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Mayo Clinic neuroone Source Type: news

MassDevice.com +5 | The top 5 medtech stories for June 28, 2017
Say hello to MassDevice +5, a bite-sized view of the top five medtech stories of the day. This feature of MassDevice.com’s coverage highlights our 5 biggest and most influential stories from the day’s news to make sure you’re up to date on the headlines that continue to shape the medical device industry. Get this in your inbox everyday by subscribing to our newsletters.   5. Sirtex shares jump on restructuring plan, 15% headcount reduction Sirtex Medical saw shares jump today after revealing plans for a major restructuring as the company looks to cut its headcount and focus on its “profitable...
Source: Mass Device - June 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: MassDevice Tags: News Well Plus 5 Source Type: news

Medtronic wins CE Mark for SureTune3 deep-brain stimulation software
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today that it won CE Mark approval in the European Union for its SureTune3 deep-brain stimulation software, which is designed to map lead locations and indicate the level of stimulation. The Fridley, Minn.-based Medtronic said its DBS devices are approved in the E.U. for treating Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, essential tremor, obsessive-compulsive disorder and epilepsy, claiming the portfolio as the only one to be full-body MR-conditional and able to operate during MRI scans. and is the only DBS complete portfolio that, under specific conditions, is full body MR conditional and can be ...
Source: Mass Device - June 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Regulatory/Compliance Medtronic Source Type: news

Impairments of balance, stepping reactions and gait in people with cervical dystonia - Barr C, Barnard R, Edwards L, Lennon S, Bradnam L.
BACKGROUND: Impaired balance is common in neurological disorders. Cervical dystonia is a neurological movement disorder affecting the neck. The effect of this aberrant head posture on physical function is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To compare balance, mo... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 25, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

23andMe is back: FDA allows marketing of genetic health risk tests
[Image courtesy of 23andMe]FDA this month allowed genetic testing company 23andMe to market genetic health risk tests for 10 diseases and conditions including Parkinson’s disease and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. The de novo premarket review authorization, announced April 6, also included celiac disease, which results in the inability to digest gluten; alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, which raises the risk of lung and liver disease; early-onset primary dystonia, a movement disorder; factor XI deficiency, a blood clotting disorder; Gaucher disease type 1, a disorder involving organs and tissue; glucose-6-p...
Source: Mass Device - April 21, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Genomics Molecular Diagnostics News Well Regulatory/Compliance 23andme 23andMe Inc. MedTech Source Type: news

Study finds cause of rare neurological disorder
Researchers at the University of Liverpool in England have uncovered how a single gene mutation can cause the rare neurological disorder known as dystonia. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cause of an inherited neurological disorder discovered
Researchers have identified the basis for how a single gene mutation can cause a rare neurological movement disorder known as dystonia. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 10, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Cervical Spine Fusion for the Treatment of Refractory Idiopathic Cervical Dystonia Cervical Spine Fusion for the Treatment of Refractory Idiopathic Cervical Dystonia
Case study illustrating the multifaceted approach necessary to treat refractory cervical dystonia with concomitant rigid cervical kyphosis, in the face of neuromuscular pathology.HSS Grand Rounds Complex Cases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Orthopaedics Clinical Case Source Type: news

Novel syndrome highlights the importance of rare disease research
(The Company of Biologists) Tuesday Feb. 28, 2017 is Rare Disease Day, and this year's slogan is 'With research, possibilities are limitless'. Disease Models& Mechanisms is marking the day by spotlighting a recent paper on a newly discovered deafness-dystonia syndrome documented in a family from Pakistan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel syndrome highlights the importance of rare disease research
(The Company of Biologists) Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017, is Rare Disease Day, and this year's slogan is 'With research, possibilities are limitless.' Disease Models& Mechanisms is marking the day by spotlighting a recent paper on a newly discovered deafness-dystonia syndrome documented in a family from Pakistan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Gene Discovery Helps Children with Dystonia and Movement Disorder Walk Again
Researchers discover new genetic cause for dystonia, a movement disorder, enabling treatment with Deep Brain Stimulation which has been so successful that children have been able to walk again (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - December 20, 2016 Category: Disability Tags: Medical Research Source Type: news

Children with dystonia can walk again with the help of a brain implant
The research from University College London, Great Ormond Street Hospital, and Cambridge University found that the effects were strongest in the youngest patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists develop new drug screening tool for dystonia
Researchers have identified a common mechanism underlying separate forms of dystonia, a family of brain disorders that cause involuntary, debilitating and often painful movements, including twists and turns of different parts of the body. The research has led to the development of a new cell-based test that is being deployed on a large scale to identify new drug candidates to treat dystonia. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 8, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists develop new drug screening tool for dystonia
(Duke University) Duke University researchers have identified a common mechanism underlying separate forms of dystonia, a family of brain disorders that cause involuntary, debilitating and often painful movements, including twists and turns of different parts of the body. The research has led to the development of a new cell-based test that is being deployed on a large scale to identify new drug candidates to treat dystonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Impaired heart rate variability in cervical dystonia is associated to depression - Hentschel F, Dressler D, Abele M, Paus S.
Causes of cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in cervical dystonia (CD) are poorly understood. Studies examining effects of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) therapy on heart rate variability (HRV) yielded contradictory results. There is compelling evidence tha... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

Deep brain stimulation surgery while asleep brings relief from dystonia
Treatment TermsParkinson's and other movement disorders CategoriesTreatments/research advancementsWomen's healthMen's health Additional SEO Keywords deep brain stimulation, dbs surgery, dbs, brain stimulation, dystonia, SEO Meta Description Thomas Galvin suffered dystonia symptoms for decades —until technology at Duke allowed him to have deep brain stimulation surgery while asleep Overview Raleigh resident Thomas Galvin suffered involuntary muscle contractions for decades —until technology at Duke allowed him to have surgery while asleep to quell the repetitive movements. Hero Imagetom_ga...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - August 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mf205 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Botox and Dystonia
LAS VEGAS, Nev. (Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Long before it wiped out worry lines and age wrinkles, Botox was originally created to stop muscle spasms in the eye. Besides its fountain-of-youth qualities, it’s being used to relieve exhausting and sometimes debilitating effects of a neurological disorder called dystonia. (Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com)
Source: Medical Headlines From Ivanhoe.com - July 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

St. Jude wins CE Mark, launches SyncAV CRT algorithm
St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ) said today it won CE Mark approval in the European Union and launched its SyncAV CR software algorithm designed to optimize the company’s MultiPoint pacing technology. The newly released software algorithm is designed to address and treat heart failure patients who are not responsive to other pacing options, and can automatically adjust pacing based on real-time changes in cardiac condition. “Although we have made substantial improvements in how we treat heart failure patients, there are still certain patients who are not getting the outcomes with traditional CRT that we would l...
Source: Mass Device - June 23, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Regulatory/Compliance Software / IT St. Jude Medical Source Type: news

St. Jude launches Infinity deep brain stim system in the EU
St. Jude Medical (NYSE:STJ) today announced the European launch of its Infinity deep brain stimulation system and direction DBS lead, designed to support treatments for movement disorders. The Infinity DBS system won CE Mark approval in the European Union last September. “The Infinity system is the 1st DBS system I’ve encountered that adjusts to the patient’s individual needs, rather than forcing the patient to adjust to the system. Offering my patients a DBS system with exceptional ease of use and smooth manageability is an exciting step in the treatment of debilitating movement disorders,...
Source: Mass Device - June 16, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Neurological St. Jude Medical Source Type: news