Post #52 Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.

Overkill: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far by Paul Offit M.D.I am admittedly a huge fanboy of Paul Offit, an infectious disease guru at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, one of the preeminent pediatric hospitals in the world. His latest bookOverall: When Modern Medicine Goes Too Far, is a collection of medical facts that are already known to the well-read individual, but fly in the face of wrongly-held, out-dated, commonly-believed medical concepts. The majority of the incorrect information was previously considered the standard of care, but newer and better science and studies have clearly demonstrated updated - often conflicting - medical truths.I have summarized some of the more salient facts here as a quick read for the over-worked and under-rested parent, so that they can take better care of their precious little ones without having to read the whole book (although I highly recommend it). Chapter 1: Treating Fever Can Prolong or Worsen IllnessFever-reducing medicines are found to prolong and worsen infections in experimental animals and people. Societies that use fever-reducing meds suffer a 5% increase in flu cases and deaths. Researchers have estimated that avoiding fever-reducers during a flu season would save about 700 lives in the USA and about 40,000 lives worldwide every year.In my pediatric practice I only recommend fever-reducers for two reasons:If a fever is affecting a child ’s activity level to the point they refuse to drink, fev...
Source: A Pediatrician's Blog - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Authors: Rombauts A, Abelenda-Alonso G, Cuervo G, Gudiol C, Carratalà J Abstract INTRODUCTION: Despite adequate antibiotic coverage, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality worldwide. It induces both a local pulmonary and a systemic inflammatory response, particularly significant in severe cases. The intensity of the dysregulated host response varies from patient to patient and has a negative impact on survival and other outcomes. AREAS COVERED: This comprehensive review summarizes the pathophysiological aspects of the inflammatory response in CAP, brie...
Source: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther Source Type: research
Publication date: 15 February 2021Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Volume 404, Part BAuthor(s): Yanhua Liu, Yang Li, Shanshan Dong, Lu Han, Ruixin Guo, Yourong Fu, Shenghu Zhang, Jianqiu Chen
Source: Journal of Hazardous Materials - Category: Environmental Health Source Type: research
We describe the most highly recommended generic and disease-specific PRO tools in SCD and discuss the challenges of incorporating them in clinical practice. EXPERT OPINION: PRO measures are essential to incorporate into SCD clinical trials either as primary or secondary outcomes. The use of PRO measures in SCD facilitates a patient-centered approach, which is likely to lead to improved outcomes. Significant challenges remain in adapting PRO tools to routine clinical use and in developing countries. PMID: 33034214 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Authors: Musio F Abstract INTRODUCTION: Anemia has and will continue to be a central theme in medicine particularly as clinicians are treating a burgeoning population of complex multi-organ system processes. As a result of multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs), meta-analyses, and societal recommendations overly restrictive paradigms and under-administration of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) have likely been followed by clinicians among all specialties. AREAS COVERED: A review of anemia in the context of chronic kidney disease, hematologic malignancies and cancer is presented with focus on the e...
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Conclusion: These findings suggest that consumption of peanuts high in oleic acid (D7) may have the potential to delay primary fatty liver symptoms. PMID: 33033472 [PubMed]
Source: Food and Nutrition Research - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Food Nutr Res Source Type: research
Publication date: November 2020Source: Language &Communication, Volume 75Author(s): Ben Ó Ceallaigh
Source: Language and Communication - Category: Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 10 October 2020Source: Meta GeneAuthor(s): Mansour Zamanpoor, Hamid Ghaedi, Mir Davood Omrani
Source: Meta Gene - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2021Source: Safety Science, Volume 133Author(s): Helen Lingard, Tracy Cooke, Greg Zelic, James Harley
Source: Safety Science - Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research
Authors: Sabet Sarvestani F, Azarpira N Abstract Heart and cerebral infarctions, as two important ischemic diseases, lead to the death of tissues due to inadequate blood supply and high mortality worldwide. These statuses are started via blockage of vessels and depletion of oxygen and nutrients which affected these areas. After reperfusion and restoration of oxygen supply, more severe injury was mediated by multifaceted cascades of inflammation and oxidative stress. microRNAs (miRNAs) as the regulator of biological and pathological pathways can adjust these conditions by interaction with their targets. Also, miRNAs...
Source: Immunological Investigations - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Immunol Invest Source Type: research
Publication date: January 2021Source: Urology Case Reports, Volume 34Author(s): Nina Al-Saadi, Safa Al-Musawi, Yousuf Khan, Daben Dawam
Source: Urology Case Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
More News: Academies | Acid Reflux | Advertising | Allergy | Allergy & Immunology | Appendicitis | Arthritis | Aspirin | Australia Health | Babies | Babies Heart Conditions | Baylor College of Medicine | Bladder Cancer | Blogging | Breast Cancer | Breastfed | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Children | Coffee | Conjunctivitis | Depression | Diabetes | Eating Disorders & Weight Management | Eczema | Endocrinology | Gastric (Stomach) Cancer | Gastroenterology | Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease | GERD | Heart | Hospitals | Infectious Diseases | International Medicine & Public Health | Ireland Health | Itchiness | Milk | Netherlands Health | New Zealand Health | Obesity | Opthalmology | Orthopaedics | Pain | Peanuts | Pediatrics | Pneumonia | Rheumatology | Schools | Science | Skin | Stroke | Study | Superbugs | Switzerland Health | Taiwan Health | Thyroid | Thyroid Cancer | Urology & Nephrology | USA Health | Vitamin C | Vitamin D | Vitamins | WHO