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DIY faecal transplants carry risks including HIV and hepatitis, warn experts
Faecal transplants have been used in medical settings to tackle superbugs, but following YouTube videos at home is too risky, say researchersConcerns have been raised about the growing trend for DIY faecal transplants, with experts fearing such attempts could put individuals at an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis as well as conditions ranging from Parkinson ’s and multiple sclerosis to obesity and sleep disorders.Thetransfer of faeces from one human to another has gained attention as a growing number of studies have suggested links between microbes in the gut anda host of health problems, from autoimmune diseases ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Microbiology Human biology Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

A Potentially Powerful New Antibiotic Is Discovered in Dirt
The world is facing an epidemic of infections that no longer respond well to the drugs used to treat them—also known as super bugs. In the United States, an estimated 2 million Americans are diagnosed each year with an infection that doesn’t respond to antibiotics, and 23,000 will die from those infections. But New York and New Jersey researchers published a new paper in the journal Nature Microbiology about their hopeful discovery: a potentially new class of antibiotic that they found in dirt. In the lab, the researchers used a method to extract, clone and sequence DNA from soil samples to see if there are gen...
Source: TIME: Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

Could a Rare, Deadly ‘ Superbug ’ Fungus Be Gaining a Foothold? Could a Rare, Deadly ‘ Superbug ’ Fungus Be Gaining a Foothold?
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the number of confirmed cases of Candida auris in the U.S. has climbed from seven in 2016 to at least 200.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Crystal Whitley on life support after two strains of flu  
Crystal Whitley, 35, of Mullin, Texas, is on life support after contracting two strains of the flu virus. She was diagnosed with sepsis, double pneumonia, and MRSA, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New antibiotic has literally been unearthed
Researchers from The Rockefeller University in New York found an antibiotic family, known as malacidins, can kill several 'superbugs' without causing any side effects in rats. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In soil-dwelling bacteria, scientists find a new weapon to fight drug-resistant superbugs
It ’s a new class of antibiotic that promises to live up to its rough Latin translation: killer of bad guys.In a reportpublished this week in the journal Nature Microbiology, researchers describe a never-before-seen antibiotic agent that vanquished several strains of multidrug-resistant bacteria.... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

New antibiotic family discovered in dirt
The compounds are called malacidins and can kill several stubborn infections, including superbug MRSA. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mixing and Cycling Similarly Effective on Gram-negative Bacteria in ICU Mixing and Cycling Similarly Effective on Gram-negative Bacteria in ICU
Cycling and mixing, two strategies for rotating antibiotics, do not differ significantly in their impact on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria in the ICU, new research from Europe shows.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Teacher, 35, on life support after catching the flu  
Crystal Whitley, 35, of Mullin, Texas, is on life support after contracting two strains of the flu virus. She was diagnosed with sepsis, double pneumonia, and MRSA, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beewolves have been successfully using the same antibiotics for 68 million years
(Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology) A team of scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena have now found that beewolves, unlike humans, do not face the problem of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These insects team up with symbiotic bacteria which produce up to 45 different antibiotic substances to protect their offspring against mold fungi. This antibiotic cocktail has remained surprisingly stable since the symbiosis emerged, about 68 million years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

This UV Lamp Could Prevent the Flu Virus From Spreading in Public Places
Researchers have developed an ultraviolet (UV) lamp that kills the influenza virus but isn’t harmful to human skin or eyes, according to a new study in Scientific Reports. They hope the technology can be commercialized and marketed to prevent the spread of seasonal flu in public places, such as schools, hospitals, and airports. “We’ve known for a century that UV light is extremely efficient at killing microbes, bacteria, and viruses,” says study leader David Brenner, director of the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. For that reason, UV devices are often u...
Source: TIME: Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Pentax Medical recalls ED-3490TK duodenoscopes
Hoya‘s Pentax Medical is recalling its ED-3490TK duodenoscopes looking to replace parts of the scopes to prevent leakage of patient fluids into the device, according to an FDA release. The company is looking to replace the forceps elevator mechanism, o-ring seal and distal end covering to prevent leakage of fluids into the closed elevator channel and under the distal cap, according to the FDA release. The federal watchdog said it cleared updated design and labeling for the duodenoscope, and that it is closely monitoring the association between so called ‘superbug’ outbreaks and the use of reproc...
Source: Mass Device - February 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Endoscopic / Arthroscopic Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Recalls Pentax Medical Source Type: news

New technology could reduce spread of antibiotic resistance genes through compost
(University of York) Scientists at the University of York have found a way to remove antibiotic resistant genes from industrial compost, which could prevent them entering the food chain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New results point out the need to modify the current strategy for yaws eradication
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) An international collaboration led by ISGlobal provides new evidence that will help improve the current WHO strategy to eradicate yaws. It concludes that eradication will require more than a single round of mass drug treatment in order to capture those absent during the first round; that a bigger geographical area needs to be targeted in order to prevent imported cases; and that drug resistance monitoring is needed to prevent the spread of antibiotic-resistant strains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Snooping around in hospital pipes, scientists find DNA that fuels the spread of superbugs
The pipes carrying away the effluvia of very sick people are bound to be nasty, dirty places.But just how unwholesome they are is made clear in anew report showing that the pipes beneath a hospital intensive care unit are a throbbing, seething hookup zone for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.Even... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

A Hidden Source of 'Superbugs' in Hospitals?
U.S. National Institutes of Health researchers collected samples from pipes beneath a hospital's intensive care unit and from manholes covering sewers draining hospital wastewater. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Big Pharma is polluting the environment as well as your health: Pharma factories leak waste, worsening the superbug problem
(Natural News) Big Pharma’s many wrongdoings are well-documented, but most of us focus on the damage they’ve caused to human health. Unfortunately, a new report shows that the environment is also suffering because of their practices – and it’s setting a chain of events in motion that could undo all of the medical progress made... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wastewater Systems A Hidden Source of'Superbugs' in Hospitals?
TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 -- Hospital wastewater systems may play a role in antibiotic resistance, a new study suggests. U.S. National Institutes of Health researchers collected samples from pipes beneath a hospital's intensive care unit and from... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Post-baby mesh operation is linked to superbug infections
Annette Power, 56, from Cambridgeshire, has had to take antibiotics for more than a decade due to complications from the mesh, but now fears that she'll be at risk of dying from blood poisoning. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors are finally helping stop superbugs
A new kind of thinking is helping curb the over-prescribing of antibiotics. @NightshiftMD explains why doctors are finally starting to get the message. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Radio/White Coat, Black Art/Blog Source Type: news

New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infections
After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph). The findings, publishing online in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, open new doors to someday developing vaccines to prevent staph skin infections, which account for 14 million outpatient visits, nearly 500,000 hospital admissions and $3 billion to $4 billion in inpatient health care costs in the U.S. per year. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infections
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) After years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Appointment of Jonathan E. Gold as Interim Chief Financial Officer
NEW YORK, Feb. 02, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Motif Bio plc (AIM:MTFB) (NASDAQ:MTFB) ("Motif Bio" or the "Company"), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company specialising in developing novel antibiotics, today a... Biopharmaceuticals, Personnel Motif Bio, multi-drug resistant bacteria, MRSA (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Surfers Swallow Lots of Seawater. So Is It Harmful?
TUESDAY, Jan. 30, 2018 -- Surfers aren't just catching waves. They're also three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their digestive tracts than land lubbers, a new British study shows. " Antimicrobial resistance has been... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 30, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

UN health agency finds high levels of antibiotic resistance to world ’ s most common infections
Antimicrobials have been a driver of unprecedented medical and societal advances, but their overuse has resulted in antibiotic resistant bacteria, with the World Health Organization (WHO) reporting new surveillance data on Monday which reveals widespread resistance to some of the world ’ s most common infections, includingE. coli and pneumonia. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UN health agency finds high levels of antibiotic resistance to world ’s most common infections
Antimicrobials have been a driver of unprecedented medical and societal advances, but their overuse has resulted in antibiotic resistant bacteria, with the World Health Organization (WHO) reporting new surveillance data on Monday which reveals widespread resistance to some of the world ’s most common infections, including E. coli and pneumonia. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FT Health: New benchmarks in superbug struggle
Ann Aerts, drugmaker deal frenzy, India’s ‘menstrual man’ (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - January 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Advocacy group calls on McDonald's to remove antibiotics from beef, pork
(Reuters) - A consumer and public health group is pressing McDonald's Corp to set a timeline for phasing out the routine use of medically important antibiotics in the beef and pork it serves, amid warnings that the practice fuels dangerous drug-resistant superbug infections in people. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

'Forgotten' antibiotic offers hope against worst superbugs
(University of Queensland) An antibiotic overlooked since its discovery 40 years ago could help develop new drugs against life-threatening infections caused by some of the world's most dangerous superbugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Drug resistance: Could these onions help us win the war?
Researchers find that compounds from a species of onion can kill the tuberculosis bacterium. Could this be the key to combatting drug resistance? (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: MRSA / Drug Resistance Source Type: news

Global Health: New Index Rates Drug Companies in Fight Against ‘ Superbugs ’
Glaxo and Johnson& Johnson top a new measure of how drugmakers do against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which are becoming a global emergency. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Antibiotics Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Antimicrobial Resistance World Health Organization Access to Medicines Foundation Davos (Switzerland) Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus Source Type: news

GSK leads drugmakers’ fight against superbugs
Report says generics manufacturers trailing in battle against antibiotic resistance (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - January 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Drug companies told to do more to tackle 'superbug' crisis
LONDON (Reuters) - Drugmakers' response to the threat posed by "superbugs" remains patchy even after years of warnings, according to the first analysis of individual companies' efforts to tackle the antibiotic resistance crisis. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Surfers May Be Swallowing Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Surfers May Be Swallowing Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Surfers and body-boarders were three times more likely to have potentially dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their guts than non-surfers, new research from the UK shows.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Judge Orders New Olympus Trial Over Superbug Death Judge Orders New Olympus Trial Over Superbug Death
A Seattle judge said Olympus Corp. failed to properly disclose internal emails that raised safety concerns about a redesigned medical scope as early as 2008, several years before the device was publicly tied to deadly superbug outbreaks.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Surfers may be swallowing antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(Reuters Health) - Surfers and body-boarders were three times more likely to have potentially dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their guts than non-surfers, new research from the UK shows. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Lymphatics limp along after MRSA
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Pujanandez, L. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Mass. General study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Massachusetts General Hospital investigators find that MRSA infection impairs the ability of lymphatic vessels to pump lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes in mouse models, which may contribute to the frequent recurrences of MRSA infection experienced by patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Surfers infected by superbug after swallowing sea water
Surfers and body boarders are being infected by a dangerous superbug after swallowing sea water. They are exposed to bugs from sewage and water run-off from farm crops treated with manure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in guts
(University of Exeter) Scientists compared fecal samples from surfers and non-surfers to assess whether the surfers' guts contained E. coli bacteria that were able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic cefotaxime. Cefotaxime has previously been prescribed to kill off these bacteria, but some have acquired genes that enable them to survive this treatment.The study found that 13 of 143 (9 percent) of surfers were colonized by these resistant bacteria, compared to just four of 130 (3 percent) of non-surfers swabbed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Guidelines Issued on Contact Precautions for MRSA, C. difficile
The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has issued guidelines on how long contact precautions in acute-care hospitals should persist for numerous drug-resistant... (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - January 12, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs
(Case Western Reserve University) Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But in a recent Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy study, researchers confirmed a new drug compound kills drug-resistant C. auris, both in the laboratory and in a mouse model that mimics human infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

SURGICEL & #194; & #174; Powder Absorbable Hemostat is used in surgeries.
SURGICEL® Powder Absorbable Hemostat is used for broad-surface oozing and stops bleeding fast. Unit is suitable for gynecologic, oncologic, cardiovascular and general procedure applications. Product offers bactericidal activity in vitro against MRSA, MRSE, VRE, PRSP, E Coli pathogens.This story is related to the following:Hemostats (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - January 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

Promise of new antibiotics lies with shackling tiny toxic tetherballs to bacteria
(University of Texas at Austin) Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a method for rapidly screening hundreds of thousands of potential drugs for fighting infections, an innovation that holds promise for combating the growing scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The method involves engineering bacteria to produce and test molecules that are potentially toxic to themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Superbug bacteria found to DEVOUR rivals, then assimilate their genetic code to become RESISTANT to all known antibiotics
(Natural News) The current superbug epidemic may take a turn for the worse as recent research showed that certain bacteria not only develop resistance to antibiotics, but may also copy and assimilate characteristics from their rival microorganisms that may further strengthen their immunity. The study published in the journal Cell Reports shed light on how certain bacteria species fortify their defenses against antibiotics.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sugar alternative is NOT so healthy after all: Trehalose, a substitute used in many processed foods, is giving rise to a superbug, severe disease, study warns
(Natural News) A sugar alternative that was deemed “healthy” appears to be not so healthy after all. A new study discovered that the artificial sugar additive known as trehalose, which is found in many food products, potentially played a role in the increase of a deadly superbug called Clostridium difficile, which is a bacterium that causes infection,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
(Technical University of Denmark) A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Supercharged antibiotics could turn tide against superbugs
(University of Queensland) An old drug supercharged by University of Queensland researchers has emerged as a new antibiotic that could destroy some of the world's most dangerous superbugs.The supercharge technique , led by Dr Mark Blaskovich and Professor Matt Cooper from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), potentially could revitalise other antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A popular sugar additive may have fueled the spread of not one but two superbugs
Two bacterial strains that have plagued hospitals around the country may have been at least partly fueled by a sugar additive in our food products, scientists say. Trehalose, a sugar that is added to a wide range of food products, could have allowed certain strains of Clostridium difficile to become... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - January 3, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Sugar additive in cakes has fueled rise of superbug
The study by Baylor College of Medicine in Houston shows that the sugar - known as trehalose - is metabolized by the potentially deadly bacterium Clostridium difficile. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news