Bronchoscopes still dirty after cleaning, study says
Photo by Michaela33 courtesy of Flikr A new study has found that currently acceptable methods of reprocessing reusable bronchoscopes left most devices contaminated and damaged. “The results are worrisome as patients undergoing bronchoscopy are commonly at high risk for infection due to transplant status, critical illness, or immune-suppression due to malignancy or chronic disease,” said the study, funded by 3M and supported by sterilization product maker Healthmark Industries. It was presented last week at the Association for Professionals in Infection Control’s annual conference APIC 2018, will be p...
Source: Mass Device - June 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Diagnostics Endoscopic / Arthroscopic Regulatory/Compliance Sterilization / Calibration 3m Healthmark superbugs Source Type: news

Deep-sea marine sponges may hold key to antibiotic drug resistance
(Florida Atlantic University) FAU's Harbor Branch houses more than 1,000 strains of actinobacteria, one of the most prolific microbial groups for the production of natural products. Derived from sea sponges and other macro-organisms, several strains were identified for their potent antifungal activity, for anti-MRSA activity, and for both antifungal and antibacterial activities. A key finding was the identification of a strain that produced metabolites that are more potent than the bacterial antibiotic, vancomycin, against C. difficile. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Test can identify ICU patients at most risk of serious infections
A new test can identify intensive care patients at highest risk of potentially life-threatening secondary infections, including from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA and C difficile, according to UK researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - June 18, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Results-in-hours test could prevent 'superbug' deaths
SCIENTISTS are developing a DNA test to identify infections within hours and beat deadly hospital “superbugs”. Experts believe the government-funded research will help save lives as well as prevent the prescribing of unnecessary antibiotics, which is fuelling drug-resistant diseases. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New compound as effective as FDA-approved drugs against life-threatening infections
(Purdue University) Purdue University researchers have identified a new compound that in preliminary testing has shown itself to be as effective as antibiotics approved by the FDA to treat life-threatening infections while also appearing to be less susceptible to bacterial resistance.The compound has been potent against antibiotic-resistant pathogens such as MRSA, which is often found in hospitals and other health care settings, and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus, with vancomycin long considered a drug of last resort. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Hospital superbugs could be destroyed with sheeting inspired by shark skin
Scientists have designed a coating material infused with antimicrobials based on the patterned diamond-like texture of sharks's skin that allows bacteria to simply wash off as they swim. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could holidaymakers be causing antibiotic resistance?
The new research of 316 volunteers, by Finnish researchers at Helsinki University, is the latest in a long-line of scientific trials to try and discover what else is fueling untreatable superbugs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Test can identify patients in intensive care at risk of life-threatening infections
(University of Cambridge) Patients in intensive care units are at significant risk of potentially life-threatening secondary infections, including from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile. Now, a new test could identify those at greatest risk -- and speed up the development of new therapies to help at-risk patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on FDA ’s efforts to foster discovery and development of new tools to fight antimicrobial-resistant infections
The increase in serious antimicrobial drug resistant infections is a critical public health concern and a growing threat to patients. FDA is taking steps to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - June 12, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Statement from FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., on FDA ’ s efforts to foster discovery and development of new tools to fight antimicrobial-resistant infections
The increase in serious antimicrobial drug resistant infections is a critical public health concern and a growing threat to patients. FDA is taking steps to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - June 12, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

CDC: Invasive MRSA More Likely Among Injection Drug Users
MONDAY, June 11, 2018 -- Injection drug users are more than 16-fold more likely to develop invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, according to research published in the June 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 11, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Safety protocol breaches: ways to prevent infection transmission in health care setting
(University of Utah Health) During 325 observations, researchers at the University of Utah and University of Michigan identified 283 protocol violations, which could increase the risk of self-contamination of health care personnel and transmission of antibiotic-resistant organisms to patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists watch bacteria 'harpoon' DNA to speed their evolution
(Indiana University) Indiana University researchers have directly observed for the first time how bacteria use appendages thousands of times thinner than a human hair to absorb DNA. The work could help advance efforts stop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in the US presents a triple threat
(American Society for Microbiology) Researchers from the Emory Antibiotic Resistance Center describe the first strain of carbapenem-resistant, hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibiting colistin heteroresistance and enhanced virulence isolated from a patient in the United States. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held from June 7-11, in Atlanta, Ga. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Superbug Infections Rising Among Injection Drug Users
NEW YORK (AP) — One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs, according to a new government report. Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. "Drug use has crept up and now accounts for a substantial proportion of these very serious infections," said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University, one of the study's authors. The U.S. is in the midst of its deadliest drug epidemic ever. While overdose deaths have been the main concern, some studies ha...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - June 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Superbug infections rising among users who inject drugs
New research suggests users of heroin and other injection drugs are 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Superbug infections rising among injection drug users
Users of heroin and other injection drugs were 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA, said the report published Thursday. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Superbug infections rising among users who inject drug
New research suggests users of heroin and other injection drugs are 16 times more likely than other people to develop severe illnesses from MRSA (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Map Genetic Codes Of 3,000 Dangerous Bacteria Scientists Map Genetic Codes Of 3,000 Dangerous Bacteria
Scientists seeking new ways to fight drug-resistant superbugs have mapped the genomes of more than 3,000 bacteria, including samples of a bug taken from Alexander Fleming's nose and a dysentery-causing strain from a World War One soldier.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - June 7, 2018 Category: Pathology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Superbug infections rising among injection drug users
One type of superbug bacteria is increasingly spreading among people who inject drugs (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Scientists map genetic codes of 3,000 bacteria in desperate bid to fight drug-resistant superbugs
Specialists estimate that around 70 percent of bacteria are already resistant to at least one antibiotic that is commonly used to treat them, and the world may be facing an antibiotic shortage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists map genetic codes of 3,000 dangerous bacteria
(Reuters) - Scientists seeking new ways to fight drug-resistant superbugs have mapped the genomes of more than 3,000 bacteria, including samples of a bug taken from Alexander Fleming's nose and a dysentery-causing strain from a World War One soldier. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

UV-light cleaning shown to cut superbugs hospital-wide
A new study led by researchers from Duke University has found that adding short-wavelength ultraviolet-C light (UVC) to standard room cleaning strategies modestly decreases hospital-wide incidence of two common healthcare-associated infections. (Source: HSR Information Central)
Source: HSR Information Central - June 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibiotics supply lines crumbling as pharma medical system reaches point of total failure
(Natural News) Pharmaceutical antibiotics have caused the emergence of antibiotic-resistant traits in infectious bacteria. Now many of these antibiotics are considered worthless at treating life-threatening infections. As these drugs have become ineffective, the antibiotic supply line has become increasingly vulnerable to shortages. The Access to Medicine Foundation (AMF) reports that the world is becoming dependent... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For when TEOTWAWKI happens: How to protect yourself from biohazards
(Natural News) The end of the world as we know it (TEOTWAWKI) could result from pandemics of antibiotic-resistant superbugs used by terrorists. But there are steps you can take to protect yourself and your loved ones from the threat posed by these biological hazards, as stated by a Beans, Bullets, Bandages and You article. Biohazards are harmful organic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Latest Poop On Fecal Transplants Vs. Antibiotics For C. Difficile Diarrhea
How can more poop actually help with severe diarrhea? Well, when the diarrhea is caused by the antibiotic-resistant bacteria Clostridium difficile, a poop transplant may help get to the bottom of the problem. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Another Antibiotic Crisis: Fragile Supply Leads to Shortages Another Antibiotic Crisis: Fragile Supply Leads to Shortages
Shortages of some life-saving antibiotics are putting growing numbers of patients at risk and fueling the evolution of"superbugs" that do not respond to modern medicines, according to a new report on Thursday.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - June 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

£ 30 million of funding to tackle antimicrobial resistance
This news story states that funding includes: £ 20m to Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator; £ 5m for new partnership with Argentina; £ 5m invested in Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics; and £ 1m in Global Antibiotic Research and Development Partnership. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another antibiotic crisis: fragile supply leads to shortages
LONDON (Reuters) - Shortages of some life-saving antibiotics are putting growing numbers of patients at risk and fuelling the evolution of "superbugs" that do not respond to modern medicines, according to a new report on Thursday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Hospital superbug uses tiny sticky fingers to infect medical tools and devices
(University of Turku) The antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacterium is one of the most globally harmful bacteria that causes nosocomial infections. Researchers at the University of Turku have discovered that the bacterium attaches to plastic medical devices using tiny finger-like structures. The researchers were able to develop antibodies that prevent the bacterial spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 31, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New compound effective against drug-resistant pathogens, could lead to new antibiotics
(North Carolina State University) Researchers have synthesized an analog of lipoxazolidinone A, a small molecule that is effective against drug-resistant bacteria such as MRSA. This molecule, a new synthetic compound inspired by a natural product, could be a useful chemical tool for studying other Gram-positive infections and may have implications for future drug creation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Could we work together with our bacteria to stop infection?
(University of Oxford) The benefits of antibiotics to both human and animal health are undisputed. However, as microbes have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobials and other drugs, scientists have become interested in new solutions to the growing superbug crisis, including the use of defensive microbes and fecal transplants. In new research, Oxford University scientists have developed a lab-based approach, creating positive co-dependent relationships between hosts and bacteria, termed 'mutualisms,' quickly. These lab-developed bacterial relationships demonstrate how microbes can work with their hosts to prevent in...
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 29, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Collaboration Needed to Fight Antimicrobial Resistance
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is one of the greatest threats to human health throughout the world, warns Gary Cohen, executive vice president of global health for BD. “There is an increasing risk of going back to the pre-antibiotic era,” he told MD+DI. “Resistance is not a new issue—it is just a bigger problem, at an accelerated pace. Because antibiotics have been overprescribed for humans as well as overused in food production, antimicrobial resistance is not just a theoretical threat.” Everyone needs to play a role, including diagnostics manufacturers and even medical device innovators, he ...
Source: MDDI - May 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Boston nonprofit tackling 'superbugs' gets $52M from Gates foundation, U.K.
An accelerator program based at Boston University that funds the development of potential life-saving antibacterial drugs will receive up to $52 million from the U.K. government and the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. The public-private partnership, called Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator — or CARB-X — announced the new funding on Tuesday. CARB-X said it has now raised more than $500 million since being launched in July 2016 by the U.S. Department of Health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 22, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

More frequent checks control MRSA in newborns, but can hospitals afford them?
(Drexel University) Checking more often on newborns in the NICU provided positive results for preventing MRSA transmission, but hospitals must balance the high costs, a new study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Clears Expanded Claims for 'Superbug' Test
Xpert® Carba-R now FDA-cleared to aid clinicians in determining appropriate therapeutic strategy for pure colony specimens SUNNYVALE, Calif., May 15, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Cepheid today announced that it has received cle... Diagnostics, FDA Cepheid, Xpert Carba-R, carbapenemase-producing CRE (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study: Superbug MRSA infections less costly, but still deadly
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Drug-resistant staph infections continue to be deadlier than those that are not resistant and treatable with traditional antibiotics, but treatment costs surprisingly are the same or slightly less, a new national analysis shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 15, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

' Superbug' Surfaces at Poultry Farm in China
MONDAY, May 14, 2018 -- E. coli that's resistant to a " last-resort " antibiotic has been discovered on a commercial poultry farm in China, researchers report. Specifically, the strain found on the farm carried genes resistant to the antibiotic... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - May 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Using MRSA's strength against it
(Michigan State University) MRSA evolved to become a deadly killer because it's wily and resilient. A new Michigan State University study, however, is figuring out how to turn one of its strengths against it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Multi-drug resistant infections rising in children
(Rush University Medical Center) Antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections, one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in children across the United States, are on the rise, according to results of a recent study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society on March 22. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CA-MRSA Rates Among Student Athletes Highest in Contact Sports CA-MRSA Rates Among Student Athletes Highest in Contact Sports
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - May 10, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Treatment for MRSA no longer more costly than for susceptible Staph aureus infections
(Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics& Policy) A new study found that infections caused by one of the most common drug resistant bacteria in the US -- methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA -- are no more expensive to treat than MSSA, the methicillin-susceptible version of the same bacteria. These findings are contrary to earlier studies that have found that MRSA was much more expensive to treat than MSSA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers discover cellular messengers communicate with bacteria in the mouth
This study establishes that there is a clear channel of communication between RNA messengers and bacteria in our mouth,” said Wong, who holds the Felix and Mildred Yip Endowed Chair in Dentistry. “Furthermore, we have shown that these messengers may play an important role in mediating interac tions between bacteria and their host.”Another significant study finding was the majority of tRNA bacteria sequences that show high sequence similarity with salivary tsRNAs came from antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. This observation could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the growth ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Agricultural waste could be contributing to the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(Natural News) While there are plenty of issues within the factory farming industry, one aspect in particular could spell big trouble for us all: antibiotic overuse, and the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Literal tons of antibiotics are purchased and fed to livestock every year, around the world. Approximately 131,000 tons of antibiotics were used to... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover cellular messengers communicate with bacteria in the mouth
This study establishes that there is a clear channel of communication between RNA messengers and bacteria in our mouth,” said Wong, who holds the Felix and Mildred Yip Endowed Chair in Dentistry. “Furthermore, we have shown that these messengers may play an important role in mediating interac tions between bacteria and their host.”Another significant study finding was the majority of tRNA bacteria sequences that show high sequence similarity with salivary tsRNAs came from antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. This observation could lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the growth ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 7, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

National Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (PNCAR)
Government of Italy. 12/2017 This five-page brochure describes the National Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance (PNCAR), which provides for national coordination, specific objectives, and actions to face the increasing resistance and spread of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. It does so through the synergy between national, regional, and local levels; the different key stakeholders involved; and a governance, in which the roles of the institutions, both in the human and the veterinary sector, are clearly defined. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Study identifies ways smaller hospitals can effectively reduce antibiotic overuse
(Intermountain Medical Center) Researchers completed a study identifying how community hospitals with fewer than 200 beds can develop antibiotic stewardship programs that work to prevent the growth of superbugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Infectious Diseases A-Z: Can you be sickened by antibiotics in the food supply?
Antibiotic-resistant germs cause more than 2 million illnesses a year. And more than 400,00 people became?sick from?infections caused by antibiotic-resistant, foodborne bacteria, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "When you look at all of the antibiotics that are prescribed in the U.S., about 70 percent of those actually go to animals [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 30, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Nearly Three-Quarters of Commonly Used Medical Scopes Tainted by Bacteria Nearly Three-Quarters of Commonly Used Medical Scopes Tainted by Bacteria
The ‘ scary ’ findings show a discouraging lack of progress in cleaning the devices, despite more vigorous efforts in the wake of deadly superbug outbreaks, experts say.Kaiser Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news