Empirical Anti-MRSA vs Standard Antibiotic Therapy and Risk of 30-Day Mortality in Patients Hospitalized for Pneumonia
US-based cohort study of 88,605 hospitalisations for pneumonia did not find a mortality benefit for treatment with empirical anti –methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) therapy vs standard antibiotics for any group of patients examined, even those with risk factors for MRSA. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

$3.2 million NIH award to support technology to fight deadly bacterial lung infections
(Purdue University) A Purdue University team has received a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for its work to treat antibiotic-resistant lower respiratory infections - the fourth-leading cause of death worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research team tackles superbug infections with novel therapy
(University of Cincinnati) Superbug infections kill 35,000 people in the US annually. A team of researchers has found that a treatment known as AB569 kills pseudomonas aeruginosa in humanized cells in mouse models. The treatment does not harm these humanized cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fist Bumps vs. Handshakes: How COVID-19 Does —and Doesn’t—Spread
With more than 73,000 people confirmed with COVID-19 infection as of Feb. 18, and nearly 2,000 deaths around the world, questions about how the virus spreads are becoming more urgent. Here’s what you should remember: COVID-19 spreads when the virus responsible for the disease, SARS-CoV-2, a coronavirus, is transmitted by one person to another in respiratory droplets. That means the virus can spread when an infected person coughs or sneezes and releases these droplets into the air, where they are either inhaled by others, or can land on other people’s mouths or noses if they’re near enough—generally ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Antibiotic-resistant superbugs could leave chemotherapy ineffective within the next decade
Half of British oncologists believe chemotherapy could be wiped out within the next ten years. Superbugs make chemotherapy less safe to use because of the infection risk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dawn of the cockroach "superbugs": Roaches are becoming cross-resistant to various insecticides, warn researchers
(Natural News) Even the most hardened, nature-loving, tree-hugging, environmentally conscious animal lover would draw the line at allowing cockroaches to roam free in their home. Quite frankly, cockroaches are super gross, and anybody who detects them in their environment would be quick to call out the exterminator to get rid of them. But there’s a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hancock reappointed as health and social care secretary in cabinet reshuffle
No excuse now to further delay tackling social care reform, say healthcare leaders Related items fromOnMedica Government publishes vision for future of general practice GP leader warns against 'political meddling' Scotland fights to prevent privatisation of general practice Watchdogs say health reforms are slow 'Government targets intefere with war on superbugs' (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 14, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Effect of Vancomycin or Daptomycin With vs Without an Antistaphylococcal β-Lactam on Mortality, Bacteremia, Relapse, or Treatment Failure in Patients With MRSA Bacteremia: A Randomized Clinical Trial
RCT (n=352) found no significant difference in the primary composite end point of mortality, persistent bacteremia, relapse, or treatment failure for addition of an antistaphylococcal β-lactam to standard antibiotic therapy (vancomycin or daptomycin) vs standard therapy alone. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - February 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drug Combo No Better in MRSA Blood Infections, Ups Risk Drug Combo No Better in MRSA Blood Infections, Ups Risk
Adding a beta-lactam to standard therapy for MRSA bacteremia does not improve outcomes and appears to up the risk for kidney injury, data from a randomized controlled trial showed.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines)
Source: Medscape Internal Medicine Headlines - February 11, 2020 Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Trial shows using two drugs not better than one when treating MRSA blood infections
(University of Melbourne) Researchers attempting to improve the treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood infections have discovered the combination of two antibiotics was no better than one, and led to more adverse effects. In what is the biggest trial of MRSA bloodstream infections to date, (352 participants from Australia, Singapore, New Zealand and Israel), the CAMERA2 clinical trial, researchers were surprised to see the drug combination wasn't as effective as anticipated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Microbes linked to cancer in threatened California foxes, report Princeton researchers
(Princeton University) Microbes are known to affect digestion, mood and overall health, but cancer? A Princeton University-led team of researchers lay out a multi-step process: First, Santa Catalina foxes become infested with ear mites, which change the foxes' microbiome and allow a staph infection to take hold. The antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infection leads to chronic inflammation of the foxes' ears -- and in that inflamed tissue, tumors can flourish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Tells Purell Maker to Stop Making False Claims
The agency warned Gojo Industries that unsubstantiated claims that Purell can help prevent illnesses such as the flu, Ebola virus, norovirus and the MRSA superbug violate federal laws, The New York Times reported Tuesday. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Color-changing bandages sense and treat bacterial infections
(American Chemical Society) According to the World Health Organization, antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health. Sensing and treating bacterial infections earlier could help improve patients' recovery, as well curb the spread of antibiotic-resistant microbes. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed color-changing bandages that can sense drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria in wounds and treat them accordingly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

One quarter of bacterial pathogens can spread antibiotic resistance directly to peers
(Duke University) Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that at least 25 percent of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria found in clinical settings are capable of spreading their resistance directly to other bacteria. At the same time, the study shows that, despite common beliefs, the use of antibiotics does not significantly affect the rate at which the genes responsible for resistance are swapped between bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Discovery reveals antibiotic-resistant strep throat may be too close for comfort
(Houston Methodist) Infectious disease scientists identified strains of group A streptococcus that are less susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, a sign that the germ causing strep throat and flesh-eating disease may be moving closer to resistance to penicillin and other related antibiotics known as beta-lactams. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Antibiotic-resistance in Tanzania is an environmental problem
(Washington State University) WSU study finds that environmental transmission rather than antibiotic use explains the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in people, domestic animals and wildlife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can this newly developed compound help fight antibiotic-resistant superbugs?
(Natural News) People who believe that the next massive health threat would be the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria or “superbugs” slightly missed their mark: the threat is no longer on the horizon; it’s already here, says a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a statement, Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, said that the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Warns Purell To Stop Making Unproven Claims About Hand Sanitizers
(CNN) — The US Food and Drug Administration is giving the maker of Purell products a stern warning: Stop making unproven claims that over-the-counter hand sanitizers help eliminate Ebola, MRSA or the flu. In a “warning letter” to Purell’s parent, Gojo Industries, the agency called out the company for making numerous marketing claims that potentially position its sanitizing products as a pharmaceutical drug rather than an over-the-counter topical antiseptic. The letter from the agency’s director of compliance cited numerous examples of what the FDA says are unproven claims for Purell products m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Hand Sanitizer Source Type: news

Researchers explore health benefits of African plants and spices
(Natural News) Spices aren’t just good for adding flavor and kick to your meals: They’re good for treating skin infections too. According to a study in the Journal of Medical Plants Research, several compounds extracted from native Cameroonian spices have been proven effective when it comes to treating skin infections, including those from antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers from the University... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New portable tool analyzes microbes in the environment
(Rutgers University) Imagine a device that could swiftly analyze microbes in oceans and other aquatic environments, revealing the health of these organisms - too tiny to be seen by the naked eye - and their response to threats to their ecosystems. Rutgers researchers have created just such a tool, a portable device that could be used to assess microbes, screen for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and analyze algae that live in coral reefs. Their work is published in the journal Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Lethal' mutation made tuberculosis bacteria resistant to important antibiotic
(Uppsala University) Antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis is a common and serious problem globally. In a new article, researchers from Uppsala University describe how tuberculosis bacteria that carries a mutation that in theory should kill them manages to stay alive. The researchers discovered that the same trick that kept the bacteria alive also made them resistant to a very important type of antibiotic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nasal and Skin Decolonization Safely Replaces Contact Precautions for MRSA-Colonized Patients Nasal and Skin Decolonization Safely Replaces Contact Precautions for MRSA-Colonized Patients
Nasal and skin decolonization safely and less expensively replaced contact precautions for patients colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at one U.S. hospital network, according to a new report.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 27, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

UK still free of coronavirus cases
Patients with symptoms advised to call GP rather than attend practice Related items fromOnMedica Warn patients that natural malaria immunity fades Single-dose malaria drug eliminates parasite from liver Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Parents still following folklore methods for cold prevention Double check patients with ‘penicillin’ allergy to avoid MRSA risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 27, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Dust in home may be spreading SUPERBUGS by carrying genes that give antibiotic resistance
Scientists at Northwestern University in Illinois studied 166 indoor dust samples and found that bacteria living within them were able to share antibiotic resistant genes with each other. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The poo panacea: inside the strange, surprising world of faecal transplants
When treating antibiotic-resistant infections, injecting patients with other people ’s excrement can be highly effective. Could it be the answer to dementia, anorexia and obesity too?The man and woman are wearing blue hospital gowns and clear face shields. Dr James Sones and Dr Indu Srinivasan are in a room in the Division of Digestive Diseases at the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. They are about to create something that has spread through medicine like, well, a shitstorm.Sones takes a brown gloopy material and spoons it into what looks like a regular kitchen blender. The camera zooms in to a la...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 22, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rose George Tags: Health & wellbeing Digestive disorders Microbiology Life and style Science Society Source Type: news

Urine fertilizer: 'Aging' effectively protects against transfer of antibiotic resistance
(University of Michigan) Recycled and aged human urine can be used as a fertilizer with low risks of transferring antibiotic resistant DNA to the environment, according to new research from the University of Michigan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pharma firms not making enough progress against superbugs: report
Drug companies are not making progress against the spread of antibiotic resistance at a scale and speed great enough to tackle the global health threat posed by superbugs, a key benchmark analysis found on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Lack of antibiotics in low income countries 'worsening  superbugs threat'
Only three new treatments available in 10 or more poorer countries, report findsMany antibiotics are unavailable in poorer countries despite higher infection rates, exacerbating the threat of drug-resistant superbugs, according to a report to bepresented to world leaders and the bosses of top pharmaceutical companies in Davos.The report, released by the Access to Medicine Foundation, an Amsterdam-based non-profit group, also shows that the number of new treatments being developed for common infectious diseases such as pneumonia, tuberculosis and gonorrhoea has fallen.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Julia Kollewe Tags: Antibiotics Business Davos 2020 Drugs MRSA and superbugs Health Source Type: news

South Africa: Ten Babies Killed By Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria At Tembisa Hospital
[Daily Maverick] Overcrowding, understaffing and poor hygiene are said to be the main reasons for the deaths of the 10 newborns at Tembisa Hospital. (Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis)
Source: AllAfrica News: Tuberculosis - January 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

South Africa: Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Outbreak Claimed Lives of 10 Babies At Tembisa Hospital Last Year
[News24Wire] The Gauteng Department of Health has confirmed that 10 babies died at Tembisa Hospital's neonatal unit between November and December last year, due to a Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) outbreak. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 20, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria found in infected wound
(University of Gothenburg) A hitherto unknown antibiotic-resistant bacteria species, in the same family as E. coli and Salmonella spp., has been found and classified in Sweden. The proposed taxonomic name of the species -- the first of the new genus -- is Scandinavium goeteborgense, after the city of Gothenburg, Sweden, where the bacterium was isolated and the research was done. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cannabis compound could be weapon in fight against superbugs
Mice cured of MRSA, raising hopes of treating antibiotic-resistant bacteriaA compound made by cannabis plants has been found to wipe out drug-resistant bacteria, raising hopes of a new weapon in the fight against superbugs.Scientists screened five cannabis compounds for their antibiotic properties and found that one, cannabigerol (CBG), was particularly potent at killing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), one of the most common hospital superbugs.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Drug resistance Antibiotics Medical research Cannabis Science UK news Source Type: news

Novel Drug Candidate Aims To Tackle Superbug Infections In Cystic Fibrosis Patients
What makes the Antabio ’s molecule candidate so unique is that it’s not an antibiotic. Antibiotics typically work by killing bacteria, whereas this molecule aims to disable the bacteria, making it less able to attack and inflame the lungs. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 17, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Dana Dovey, Contributor Source Type: news

Fears whooping cough is evolving into a SUPERBUG as doctors say a new vaccine is desperately needed
Scientists behind the study, at the University of New South Wales, say new vaccines must be developed in the next five to 10 years to avoid bordetella pertussis morphing into a superbug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers Create Non-stick Coating That Repels External Molecules, Even Viruses and Bacteria; Clinical Laboratories May Soon Find It Easier to Keep Surfaces Free from Bacterial Contamination
Hospital-acquired infections could finally be prevented and no longer threaten the health of patients and hospital workers In what may be the most significant development in healthcare’s fight against hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), researchers at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, have developed an ultra-repellent coating that prevents anything—including viruses and bacteria—from adhering to surfaces covered […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - January 17, 2020 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Uncategorized ACS ACS Nano american chemical society anatomic pathology antibiotic resistant bacteria Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy CDC clinical laboratory clinical pathology Dark Daily dark intelligence group Dark Report Source Type: news

Impact of vaccines on antimicrobial resistance
This review shows how vaccines can decrease AMR by preventing bacterial and viral infections, thereby reducing the use/misuse of antibiotics, and by preventing antibiotic-resistant infections. Vaccines are less likely to induce resistance. Some future uses and developments of vaccines are also discussed. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers explore health benefits of African plants and spices
(Natural News) Spices aren’t just good for adding flavor and kick to your meals: They’re good for treating skin infections too. According to a study in the Journal of Medical Plants Research, several compounds extracted from native Cameroonian spices have been proven effective when it comes to treating skin infections, including those from antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers from... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wockhardt gets DGCI approval for 2 new antibiotics
"DCGI (Drug Controller General of India) has approved Wockhardt's two new antibiotics, EMROK (IV) and EMROK 0 (Oral), for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections including diabetic foot infections and concurrent bacteraemia...," the drug firm said. The new drug will target superbug like Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - January 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Probiotic drink could combat bugs by 'blocking DNA molecules that carry antibiotic-resistant genes
The drink would work by targeting DNA molecules inside bacterial cells which help bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics, researchers at the University of Birmingham said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Probiotic drink could offer new way to combat antibiotic resistance
(University of Birmingham) A probiotic drink could become a promising new weapon in the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria, after a team of scientists at the University of Birmingham engineered and patented a key genetic element that can tackle the genetic basis of resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Into pharma's roaring twenties
“I drained the last of my cocktail, gazing up at the ceiling. It was one of those moments that curls the hairs on your neck. At once, the grand scale of this labyrinth of cathedrals became clear, the desert wind blowing through the clever hieroglyphics carved into every available surface. I turned my head back down to ground level just in time to see the man draw back his fist in anger, and then.And then.With a piercing shriek, he lunged straight at my jaw –”Do you ever wake from a dream, marvelling at the inventiveness and detail of your subconscious mind? That disorienting moment where you lie blinking ...
Source: EyeForPharma - January 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Paul Simms Source Type: news

Israeli docs strike big blow to superbugs
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) In a study published in Science magazine, the researchers showed that aggressive bacteria can be controlled -- but only if doctors administer treatment within a short window of opportunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NHS declares victory on MRSA and takes fight to E coli
Trusts and clinical commissioning groups face new annual targets designed to combat rising levels of four bloodstream infections, but sanctions relating to MRSA and C difficile could be scrapped. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - January 10, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Can this newly developed compound help fight antibiotic-resistant superbugs?
(Natural News) People who believe that the next massive health threat would be the rise of multidrug-resistant bacteria or “superbugs” slightly missed their mark: the threat is no longer on the horizon; it’s already here, says a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In a statement, Robert Redfield, director of the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gaithersburg company lands $10.2M DOD contract for war on superbugs
The federal government has tapped a local company to help defend against superbugs. Gaithersburg’s Adaptive Phage Therapeutics Inc. has earned a $10.2 million contract with the Department of Defense to help advance PhageBank, APT's collection of viruses that target specific pathogens and kill drug-resistant bacteria. The ultimate goal is to make its therapy for drug-resistant i nfections available to the U.S. military and the public, APT said Wednesday. A cure for superbugs represents a major… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 8, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Sara Gilgore Source Type: news

Patients Often Bring Undetected'Superbug' to the Hospital: Study
TUESDAY, Dec. 31, 2019 -- One in 10 hospital patients who develop Clostridioides difficile infections may already have the dangerous germ when admitted, but no diarrhea symptoms, a new study finds. The new report suggests that such infections... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 31, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Pharmacies Don ’t Know How to Dispose of Leftover Opioids and Antibiotics
Today (Dec. 30), a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco and the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., published the results of an investigation into whether or not pharmacy workers could provide accurate information on the disposal of two classes of drugs: opioids and antibiotics. The results are frightening: The researchers enlisted volunteers to place calls to nearly 900 pharmacies in California, posing as parents with leftover antibiotics and opioids from a “child’s” recent surgery. They asked the pharmacy employees on the line—either pharmacists...
Source: TIME: Health - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Pharmacies Don ’t Know How to Dispose of Leftover Opioids and Antibiotics
Today (Dec. 30), a team of researchers from the University of California, San Francisco and the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., published the results of an investigation into whether or not pharmacy workers could provide accurate information on the disposal of two classes of drugs: opioids and antibiotics. The results are frightening: The researchers enlisted volunteers to place calls to nearly 900 pharmacies in California, posing as parents with leftover antibiotics and opioids from a “child’s” recent surgery. They asked the pharmacy employees on the line—either pharmacists...
Source: TIME: Science - December 30, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Elijah Wolfson Tags: Uncategorized data visualization embargoed study Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Ganges is teeming with 'astronomical' amounts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Scientists in India said they found 'astronomically high' levels of superbugs in water downstream of the sacred town of Gangotri (pictured), which is near the river's source so it should be clean. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news