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Some have higher risk of chlamydia due to vaginal bacteria
A new study by researchers in the Netherlands suggests that the prevalence of a healthy, lactic acid-producing bacteria in the vagina may be linked to vulnerability to chlamydia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dutch designer creates dress with lights that mimic heart
Disruptive Dutch Anouk Wipprecht has unveiled a new dress that lights up in coordination with the wearer's heartbeat. The garment, called 'Synapse' is the latest in Wipprecht's high tech fashion line. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Designer's new dress lights up with wearer's heartbeat
Disruptive Dutch Anouk Wipprecht has unveiled a new dress that lights up in coordination with the wearer's heartbeat. The garment, called 'Synapse' is the latest in Wipprecht's high tech fashion line. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 22, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From the FDA’s clearance of Covalon’s film-drape to Bioventus launching its study, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA clears Covalon’s MediClear OTC surgical film-drape Covalon announced in a Sept. 21 press release that the FDA has cleared its MediClear PreOp to market in U.S. hospitals, clinic and directly to patients without a prescription. The MediClear PreOp is a breathable, transparent, self-adhesive, silicone barrier film-drape that can conform to a patient’s skin at a planned incision or insertion si...
Source: Mass Device - September 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Laboratory Instruments/Laboratory Supplies mHealth (Mobile Health) Research & Development Vascular Bioventus LLC Contego Medical Covalon Technologies Getinge Guerbe Source Type: news

It ’s Been One Year Since the World Took On Superbugs. Here’s What’s Changed
This week marks one year since world leaders met at the United Nations General Assembly in New York City in 2016 and unanimously committed to tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The risks of not doing so were clear: a recent report estimated that if AMR continued to spread at its current rate, there would be up to 10 million deaths globally by 2050. On Thursday, leaders gathered once again, in a less formal setting near the UN, to discuss what progress has been made one year later. “We are not where we should be,” said Professor Dame Sally Davies, the chief medical officer of England, during her keynote sp...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized AMR antibiotic resistance antibiotics rise of the superbugs UNGA United Nations United Nations General Assembly what is antibiotic resistance Source Type: news

National survey on managing minor childhood traumatic head injuries in The Netherlands shows low guideline adherence and large inter-hospital variations - Niele N, Willemars L, van Houten M, Pl ötz FB.
More than 12,000 children are seen in Dutch emergency departments with a mild traumatic head injury (MTHI) every year. In The Netherlands, the paediatric MTHI guidelines are primarily based on the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network study (1)... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Asthma medication cause nightmares and depression
Researchers at the University of Groningen, Netherlands, studied asthma medication and its side effects. They found it was more likely to increase nightmares and depression in children and adults. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Brain fog' in MS patients is reduced by winning money
Monetary rewards stimulate an area of the brain that controls cognitive problems and improves symptoms, a surprising study by US and Dutch researchers has discovered. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Asthma Drug, Montelukast, Tied to Nightmares, Depression
THURSDAY, Sept. 21, 2017 -- The asthma medication Singulair (montelukast) appears linked to neuropsychiatric side effects, such as depression, aggression, nightmares and headaches, according to a new review by Dutch researchers. But experts aren't... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

High, low levels of magnesium linked to dementia risk
Having magnesium levels that are too high or too low may put you at risk for Alzheimer's and other dementias, Dutch researchers report. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Justin Trudeau ’s Zany ‘Star Wars’ Sock Choice Is Throwing the Internet for a Loop
As we know by now, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has a dapper sense of fashion. He also has his sartorial quirks, mainly in the form of socks. And on Wednesday in New York City, Trudeau may have learned just how buzzy a thing like sock choice can be for a person at his level of visibility on the world stage. During a panel appearance at the Bloomberg Global Business Forum and at a Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation event at Lincoln Center, Trudeau chatted with fellow leaders like Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte and Melinda Gates to discuss issues ranging from international economic growth to poverty and disease ini...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raisa Bruner Tags: Uncategorized fashion Justin Trudeau Star Wars viral Source Type: news

High, Low Levels of Magnesium Linked to Dementia Risk
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 20, 2017 -- Having magnesium levels that are too high or too low may put you at risk for Alzheimer's and other dementias, Dutch researchers report. In a study of more than 9,500 men and women, the highest or lowest levels of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 20, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

See Inside a Berlin Synagogue ’s First Rosh Hashanah After World War II
When Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins on Wednesday night, it will mark the start of an annual period in which Jewish people around the world will take time to reflect on starting fresh in the new year. But few celebrants in modern history have had more cause for such reflection than the Berlin Jews who survived World War II. In 1945, legendary LIFE Magazine photographer Robert Capa was there to document the first Rosh Hashanah service held in the city since 1938, which took place on Sep. 7, 1945, at Fraenkelufer, a synagogue that the U.S. Army had helped restore after the Nazis torched it. There, he found a peopl...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized 1945 faith Holidays LIFE Magazine photography robert capa rosh hashanah Source Type: news

Avril Lavigne Has Been Named the Most Dangerous Celebrity Online. Here ’s Why
(NEW YORK) — One-time pop-punk princess Avril Lavigne has beaten superstar Beyonce at something, but she may not be totally happy with her victory — she’s been named the most dangerous celebrity on the internet. Cybersecurity firm McAfee said Tuesday that Lavigne, whose last album came out in 2013, was the most likely celebrity to land users on websites that carry viruses or malware. Searches for Lavigne have a 14.5% chance of landing on a web page with the potential for online threats, a number that increases to 22% if users type her name and search for free MP3s. Bruno Mars was second in his debut on t...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Kennedy / AP Tags: Uncategorized avril lavigne celebrities cybersecurity onetime Source Type: news

Yolanda Hadid says her Lyme disease was misdiagnosed as ME
The Dutch model, 53, who lives in New York, reveals that her six-year battle with Lyme disease began with a misdiagnosis of ME. Yolanda reveals all in her new book, Believe Me, which is out next month. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

An Exhaustive List of All the References We Could Find in Mother!
Warning: spoilers for the movie mother! follow. Eliza: So the movie mother! was…something else. Eliana: I am shook. Eliza: I am…confused? Infuriated? Discombobulated? Eliana: I’m coping by Googling as many references as possible: there’s the Genesis story, and I kept thinking about The Giving Tree, which is already depressing for a kids’ book. But this movie takes things to a whole new, bloody level. Eliza: Yeah, and it was nearly impossible to avoid chatter in the ether that the whole thing is a warning about our present path to destroying the environment. Eliana: Yes, the director, Darren...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman and Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized Jennifer Lawrence movies Source Type: news

Happy music linked to creative thinking
(Reuters Health) - Listening to happy music while working may spark the kind of divergent thinking that ’s associated with creativity and problem solving, a recent study in the Netherlands suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

We ’re Failing Student Moms
1. We’re failing student moms. By Toey Van Oot in Refinery 29 2. Let’s try tackling the world’s migration problems at the source. By Kemal Derviş in Project Syndicate 3. With technology and ruthless precision, Netherlands is feeding the world. Here’s how. By Frank Viviano in National Geographic 4. This bin could sort recyclables for you. By Emily Matchar in Smithsonian 5. This is why waiting to have kids is good for the planet. By Annaliese Griffin in Quartz The Aspen Institute is an educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C. (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: The Aspen Institute Tags: Uncategorized Agriculture Education Environment Five Best Ideas Innovation migration recycling Source Type: news

It's an alpha male thing: what dominant chimpanzees and Donald Trump have in common
When it comes to US presidents, we expect to see a combination of prestige and dominance. Donald Trump ’s Twitter tirades and demands for fealty show he prefers the latter – an ape-like strategy for successFrom early 1974 through most of 1976, a male chimpanzee named Yeroen held the position of alpha leader in the large, open-air chimpanzee colony at Burgers zoo in Arnhem in the Netherlands. His reign was roughly coterminous with the presidential administration of Gerald R Ford in the United States.Yeroen became famous (amongHomo sapiens) when the Dutch primatologist Frans de Waal showcased his leadership style...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Dan P McAdams Tags: Donald Trump Animals Psychology Science Source Type: news

Michael Flynn Failed to Disclose Middle East Trip on Security Clearance Form, Democrats Say
(WASHINGTON) — Former Trump administration national security adviser Michael Flynn faced new questions about a 2015 trip he took to the Middle East as part of a private proposal to build nuclear power plants across the region. Two top Democrats said in a letter released Wednesday that he appeared to have violated federal law by failing to report the trip when he renewed his security clearance last year. The lawmakers — Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland and Rep. Eliot Engel of New York — also said documents turned over to their staff suggested that Flynn also failed to report contacts with Israeli and Egypt...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Chad Day and Stephen Braun / AP Tags: Uncategorized Congress Middle East onetime Source Type: news

See Stunning Before and After Photos of Hurricane Irma ’s Impact on the Caribbean
Hurricane Irma tore into the Caribbean Islands and Florida with full force, killing at least 55 people and damaging thousands of properties. People and businesses, were reeling from the catastrophe. Many still are. While the damage has been brutal, its full extent still has yet to be determined. These before and after photos, taken in 2014 and 2017 respectively, show the physical impact of a storm that left so many struggling in its wake. Codrington, Antigua and Barbuda Irma made its first landfall as a category 5 in Barbuda on September 6, destroying 95 percent of structures on the Caribbean island — which is on...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alana Abramson Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma hurricane irma barbuda hurricane irma damage hurricane irma destruction hurricane irma photos hurricane irma saint marten Source Type: news

Here Are All the Books Hillary Clinton Name-Drops in Her New Memoir
Hillary Clinton doesn’t just want you to read her campaign memoir. It turns out she thinks you should read a few more books. In “What Happened,” the former Secretary of State reflects on her failed presidential campaign, reflecting on her concerns about the direction President Trump is taking the country and how she handled her loss. Clinton peppers the book with references to books that she thinks help explain Trump’s rise and how America should respond to it as well as poems, novels and essays that inspired her and helped her cope with her loss. Here’s a look at the books she namechecks: Cl...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Ryan Teague Beckwith Tags: Uncategorized 2016 Election Books hillary clinton Source Type: news

NSF announces 14 new PIRE awards to support scientific collaboration in 24 countries
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is pleased to announce 14 new Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) awards, totaling more than $66 million over the next five years. The awards will fund 14 lead U.S. institutions and U.S. partner institutions for collaborative projects involving international partners in 24 countries: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Cuba, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243068&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - September 12, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Appeals court shoots down Synthes bid to unseal grand jury records in Norian bone cement trial
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) subsidiary DePuy Synthes lost its bid to have some rand jury records unsealed for a wrongful death lawsuit brought over its Norian bone cements. At least 5 patients died during otherwise routine operations after the Norian cement was used off-label in their spine surgeries. The bone cement was initially developed by a company called Norian, which Synthes bought in 1999 for about $50 million. Synthes, in turn, was acquired by J&J for $21.3 billion in 2012. The FDA approved Norian for use in arm bones and portions of the skull, but in 2007 required Synthes to...
Source: Mass Device - September 12, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Legal News Orthopedics depuysynthes johnsonandjohnson Norian Corp. Source Type: news

Hurricane Irma ’s Damage Could Cost Us $300 Million, Antigua and Barbuda PM Says
The cost of rebuilding the Caribbean island of Barbuda left in ruins by Hurricane Irma could be as much as $300 million, the Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda has warned. He urged the international community to come to the aid of islands severely hit by the Category 5 storm. “We require probably about $250-300 million,” Prime Minister Gaston Browne told TIME in an interview in Antigua on Tuesday. “The extent of the damage is beyond the means of these islands … Global human cooperation is an absolute necessity.” The dual-island state of Antigua and Barbuda was one of the first places where...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara John / Antigua Tags: Uncategorized antigua and barbuda hurricane irma Source Type: news

St. Martin ’s Residents Are Struggling With Desperate Conditions in the Wake of Hurricane Irma
(PHILIPSBURG, St. Martin) — Dominga Tejera picked her way around fallen palm trees rotting in mud as she returned home after a nine-hour workday as a hospital janitor on a Caribbean island that until recently seemed like paradise. She collapsed into a small plastic chair that has served as a makeshift bed since Hurricane Irma ripped the roof from her home as it pummeled St. Martin as a Category 5 storm. “It’s sad when you come home to this,” she said as she began to cry. “You try to stay strong in public, but once inside, you break.” Hundreds of people across an island shared by Dutch S...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Danica Coto / AP Tags: Uncategorized carribean hurricane irma onetime St. Martin Source Type: news

The E.U. Agency Fighting Russia ’s Wildfire of Fake News with a Hosepipe
In 2015, as Russia plunged millions of dollars into an escalating disinformation campaign against the West, the European Union’s defense consisted of just one person. A former journalist had been seconded from the Czech Republic to the E.U.’s newly-established East StratCom Task Force, and was working furiously to de-bunk the Kremlin-backed fake news that flooded people’s inboxes, TV screens, and social media timelines. “[He was working] literally seven days a week,” said an E.U. official involved in the bloc’s strategic communications efforts, who asked for anonymity in order to speak f...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlotte McDonald-Gibson Tags: Uncategorized europe Source Type: news

Do Asthmatic Kids Get More Antibiotics? (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Analysis of Dutch and British data indicate inappropriate scrips (Source: MedPage Today State Required CME)
Source: MedPage Today State Required CME - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Guinea pigs can give their owners deadly pneumonia
Researchers from Bernhoven Hospital in the Netherlands found that at least three people were taken to hospital after developing life-threatening pneumonia from their furry friends in as many years. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Having a chest infection raises an adult's risk of asthma
Researchers from the Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands found suffering from a lower-respiratory tract infection before the age of five increases the risk by two to four times. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

As Hurricane Irma Lashes Florida, an Expert Explains How Cities Can Boost Their Flood Defenses
After it had raged through the Caribbean, sucked the sea back from the Bahamas coast and devastated the tiny island of Barbuda, Hurricane Irma tore up the Florida panhandle Sunday night cutting power for four million people en route to Tampa. A map produced by the U.S. National Hurricane Center showed that along parts of the State’s southwestern coast storm surge flooding could surpass nine feet; already, parts of downtown Miami were a couple of feet underwater. “Pray for us,” Florida governor Rick Scott said in an interview as the hurricane began its assault on his state. Meanwhile, a thousand miles wes...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Joseph Hincks / Hong Kong Tags: Uncategorized Floods Florida onetime weather Source Type: news

Hurricane Irma ’s Death Toll Continues To Grow
Hurricane Irma’s death toll continues to rise as the powerful storm made landfall in Florida Sunday morning, after the hurricane previously devastated a number of islands across the Caribbean. At least 24 people died as the storm hit the Caribbean last week, according to the Associated Press. Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte said Sunday that two more people died in St. Maarten, where the storm destroyed 70% of homes. It is unclear if any deaths have come as a result of the storm in Florida as of Sunday afternoon. About 127,000 people in the state have evacuated their homes and are staying in shelters, according to the...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Calfas Tags: Uncategorized hurricane irma onetime Source Type: news

Guinea pigs may harbor a hidden health hazard, researchers say
Been looking for a reason to turn down your child's pleas for a pet Guinea pig? Dutch researchers say the rodents may carry germs tied to serious pneumonia. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Repeatedly measured material and behavioral factors changed the explanation of socioeconomic inequalities in all-cause mortality - Groeniger JO, Kamphuis CB, Mackenbach JP, van Lenthe FJ.
We examined whether using repeatedly measured material and behavioral factors contributed differently to socioeconomic inequalities in all-cause mortality compared to one baseline measurement. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Data from the Dutch prospe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

Guinea Pigs Harbor a Hidden Health Hazard
FRIDAY, Sept. 8, 2017 -- Been looking for a reason to turn down your child's pleas for a pet Guinea pig? Dutch researchers say the rodents may carry germs tied to serious pneumonia. The bacteria, Chlamydia caviae (C. caviae), normally causes pink... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 8, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Bayer offloads Multi Vendor Service radiology service and repair biz
Bayer (ETR:BAYN) has reportedly sold its Multi Vendor Service medical device repair business to private investors who plan to merge it with 2 other firms to form a new company based in Pittsburgh, Penn., according to a Pennsylvania Post-Gazette report. Bayer’s MVS provides service and repairs for radiology devices, covering ultrasound probes, magnetic resonance imaging coils and other related devices, according to the paper. The business was previously part of Bayer’s radiology unit in Pittsburgh, according to the report, and will be combined with Tulsa, Okla.-based Westco Inc. and Denver-based MD MedTech....
Source: Mass Device - September 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Ultrasound Bayer innovatusimaging Source Type: news

Dutch judge orders government to do more on air pollution
A Dutch judge has ordered the government to do more to rein in air pollution, in a victory for activists who filed an injunction seeking measures to ensure cleaner air (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Home closure as a weapon in the Dutch war on drugs: does judicial review function as a safety net? - Bruijn LM, Vols M, Brouwer JG.
BACKGROUND: A widespread sense of a failing criminal justice system and increased feelings of insecurity changed the response to crime into a culture of control, which is characterized by policies that punish and exclude. In the Netherlands, these influenc... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Science: Sharpest image of Alzheimer's fibrils shows previously unknown details
(Forschungszentrum Juelich) A team of researchers from Germany and the Netherlands have determined the structure of an amyloid fibril with previously unachieved resolution. The fibrils of the body's own amyloid beta (Aβ) protein are the main constituent of Alzheimer's disease related and characteristic pathological protein deposits in the brain. The atomic-level structure displays previously unknown structural details which can answer many questions on the growth of harmful deposits and also explain the effect of genetic risk factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want your question answered quickly? Use gestures as well as words
(Springer) When someone asks a question during a conversation, their conversation partner answers more quickly if the questioner also moves their hands or head to accompany their words. These are the findings of a study led by Judith Holler of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands. The study is published in Springer's journal Psychonomic Bulletin& Review and focuses on how gestures influence language processing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA study challenges common theories on how heart disease develops
This study tells us that simply changing the way genes are packed together — even by a little bit — can have a widespread effect on the functioning of cells,” Vondriska said. This observation suggests treatments that restore the right arrangement of the chromatin might be able to restore pr oper genome-wide functioning, he said.“This is startling and quite exciting because it allows us to challenge assumptions about how cells work and about what causes disease — in this case, heart failure, which affects over 5 million Americans,” Vondriska said.The protein that investigators deleted is ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Hate to Work Out? Your DNA May Be to Blame
TUESDAY, Sept. 5, 2017 -- If a gym visit elicits more grimaces than grins, you might be genetically predisposed to dislike exercise, Dutch researchers suggest. The notion that at least part of a penchant for enjoying exercise -- or not -- may be... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 5, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How one girl's illness changed what a nation eats
How one child's illness led to a revolution in Dutch farming and dramatically reduced the use of antibiotic drugs. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Marriage increases levels of forgiveness and self-control
Researchers from Tilburg University in the Netherlands found that in the first four years of marriage, levels of both forgiveness and self-control increase (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Radium-223 less costly option in mCRPC in the Netherlands
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - September 1, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Effectiveness of a nationwide intervention to increase helmet use in Dutch skiers and snowboarders: an observational cohort study - Vriend I, Hesselink A, Kemler E, Gouttebarge V, Van Mechelen W, Verhagen E.
This study evaluated the effects of exposure to a nationwide intervention on relevant determinants of helmet use and helmet use in DRSS. METHODS: The interventi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

ProQR concludes QR-010 dosing in Phase Ib trial to treat cystic fibrosis
The Netherlands-based ProQR Therapeutics has concluded dosing patients in a Phase Ib clinical trial of QR-010 for the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - August 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Abbott Receives Approval in Russia and the Netherlands for Dydrogesterone as the First Oral Treatment to Prepare Uterus Lining for In Vitro Fertilization
-Oral dydrogesterone has the potential to become the new standard of care for an estimated 1.5 million women worldwide who undergo IVF treatment each year (1,2) (Source: Abbott.com)
Source: Abbott.com - August 30, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Concurrent validity, discriminatory power and feasibility of the instrument for Identification of Parents At Risk for child Abuse and Neglect (IPARAN) - Horrevorts EMB, van Grieken A, Mieloo CL, Hafkamp-de Groen E, Bannink R, Bouwmeester-Landweer MBR, Broeren S, Raat H.
OBJECTIVES: To determine the feasibility, concurrent validity and discriminatory power of the instrument for Identification of Parents At Risk for child Abuse and Neglect (IPARAN) among Dutch parents with a newborn child. SETTING: Community paediatrics. PA... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Vascular Dynamics touts significant BP reductions in interim MobiusHD trial results
Vascular Dynamics yesterday released interim results from the 1st-in-human trial of its MobiusHD implant designed for treating resistant hypertension, touting significant reductions in ambulatory systolic blood pressure. Results were released at the European Society of Cardiology’s annual meeting in Barcelona. The MobiusHD device is designed to help regulate blood pressure using electrodes implanted in the carotid artery to stimulate baroreceptors and increase the body’s natural response to lower blood pressure through vasodilation. Data in the interim study came from the 1st 40 patients to reach the 6-mon...
Source: Mass Device - August 29, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Blood Management Clinical Trials Vascular vasculardynamics Source Type: news