Obese patients more likely to survive infection in hospital
Study reveals obesity paradox where normal weight patients are less likely to recover from pneumoniaObesitycan shorten lives, but obese people who are hospitalised for infectious diseases, pneumonia and sepsis have a better chance of surviving than those who are of normal weight, according to new research.The so-called “obesity paradox” was illustrated by three separate presentations at the European Congress on Obesity in Vienna. A study of more than 18,000 people admitted to hospital with an infectious disease in Denmark found those who were overweight were 40% less likely to die, and those who were obese 50% ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Obesity Society Health Hospitals Research UK news US news Science Source Type: news

ANOTHER drop in US life expectancy
Death rates rose for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, flu and pneumonia, and three other leading causes of death, according to numbers posted online Wednesday by the CDC. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

King of Prussia biopharm firm posts positive study data for experimental pneumonia therapy
Nabriva Therapeutics announced positive results Monday from its second large-scale, late-stage clinical trial of its experimental therapy for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). The biopharmaceutical company, which has operations in Dublin, Ireland and King of Prussia, plans to file a new drug application for the therapy – called Lefamulin – with the Food and Drug Administration during the fourth quarter of this year. Nabriva’s stock surged by more than 20 percent in pre-market… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 21, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Nabriva shares tumble as safety worries plague pneumonia drug
(Reuters) - Nabriva Therapeutics Plc's antibiotic drug to treat a common form of pneumonia met the main goal of a key clinical trial, but concerns over its side effects sent the drug developer's shares down 13 percent on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Nabriva's pneumonia drug succeeds late-stage study, shares surge
(Reuters) - Nabriva Therapeutics Plc said on Monday its antibiotic to treat adults with a common form of pneumonia met the main goal of a second late-stage study, putting the company on track to file for the drug's approval in the fourth quarter of 2018. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Nabriva's pneumonia drug succeeds in late-stage study
(Reuters) - Nabriva Therapeutics Plc's pneumonia drug for adults met the main goal of a late-stage study, the company said on Monday, putting it on track to file a marketing application with U.S. regulators later this year. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Ultrasound finds more pneumonia than x-ray
Lung ultrasound finds more cases of pneumonia in children and young adults...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Can AI diagnose pneumonia better than radiologists? AIUM: Lung US can handle diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia Most pediatric chest x-rays appear unnecessary DR tomo holds promise for fungal pneumonia surveillance H7N9 bird flu pneumonia scans show common imaging findings (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - May 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Sepsis: the silent killer
Felicity Cottle discusses the impact of sepsis and what trusts can do to continue improving early recognition and treatment Related items fromOnMedica New drive to reduce sepsis deaths unveiled Treat sepsis with same urgency as suspected heart attacks, clinicians told Emergency sepsis care improving but treatment still not given fast enough Pneumonia or sepsis linked to increased risk of CVD New drive to fight ‘silent killer’ sepsis (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - May 18, 2018 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Hotel Pools and Hot Tubs Are Major Sources of Waterborne Illness Outbreaks, CDC Says
You may want to think twice before taking a dip on your next vacation, according to the results of a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Between 2000 and 2014, the CDC recorded 493 disease outbreaks related to treated recreational water, resulting in more than 27,000 illnesses and eight deaths. And in almost a third of those outbreaks, the infections could be traced back to hotel pools, hot tubs and spas, the CDC says. In hotels, pools were a major culprit, but 65 cases stemmed from hot tubs or spas. Of the outbreaks with a confirmed cause, the vast majority — 94% — were due t...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Automated system better identifies patients at risk for ventilator-associated pneumonia
(Massachusetts General Hospital) An automated system developed at Massachusetts General Hospital for identifying patients at risk for complications associated with the use of mechanical ventilators provided significantly more accurate results than did traditional surveillance methods, which rely on manual recording and interpretation of individual patient data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'It was too late for us': Nunavut mother says son's pneumonia death preventable
A mother from Igloolik, Nunavut, says her four-year-old son's death could have been prevented if he had been medevaced for care sooner instead of being sent home multiple times during what she says was a shortage of nurses at the local health centre. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/North Source Type: news

Recipe to Save 700,000 Young Children a Year: Clean Water & Decent Toilets
This study adds to the evidence that the lives of hundreds of thousands of young children could be saved each year if these pillars of development were combined with other health interventions.WaterAid and Defeat DD are calling on governments and donors to align child health and water, sanitation and hygiene programmes, policies and financing to address this unnecessary health crisis more effectively and more efficiently. These investments create a positive cycle that builds human capital, strengthens economies, reduces future healthcare costs and contributes to national development.This July the UN’s Sustainable Dev...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Savio Carvalho Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

The Kilauea Eruption Has People Worried About Volcanic Smog. Here ’s How Dangerous ‘Vog’ Really Is
Thinking of Hawaii typically brings to mind pristine white-sand beaches and crystal-clear seas. In contrast to these picturesque scenes, however, is the Kilauea Volcano, situated on the state’s Big Island, which saw a major explosion this week and has some reports warning of a volcanic smog (or “vog”). Since it started continuously erupting in 1983, Kilauea has each day pumped out at least 300 metric tons of sulfur dioxide gas, a pollutant also produced by power plants and industrial manufacturing operations. Over the course of a year, Kilauea’s sulfur dioxide production is equivalent to somewhere b...
Source: TIME: Health - May 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Environmental Health healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Antibiotic therapy for preventing infections in people with acute stroke
This review article concludes preventive antibiotics had no effect on functional outcome or mortality, but significantly reduced the risk of'overall'infections. This reduction was driven mainly by prevention of urinary tract infection; no effect for pneumonia was found. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Assessment & Treatment of Five Diabetic Emergencies
Patients experiencing a diabetic emergency should be placed on a cardiac monitor due to the potential for severe electrolyte disturbances. Photos courtesy Nashville Fire Department EMS calls for patients with diabetes are common for many reasons, including their increased risk for cardiac disease, cerebrovascular disease, pneumonia, infection and their many diabetic complications. Knowing and recognizing common emergencies encountered in diabetics is important due to both their frequency and that they are often life-threatening. In this article, we focus on five diabetic emergencies: 1) diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA); 2) h...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: H. Evan Dingle, MD Tags: Patient Care Source Type: news

Study reveals how bacteria communicate in groups to avoid antibiotics
(University of Notre Dame) researchers from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that a bacterium that causes pneumonia, sepsis and other infections, communicates distress signals within a group of bacteria in response to certain antibiotics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Over-the-counter acid-reflux drugs may cause pneumonia, study finds
Researchers from the University of Exeter found that taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for at least a year is significantly linked to people developing the lung condition. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heartburn drugs linked to pneumonia in older people
Commonly used heartburn drugs have been statistically linked to pneumonia in people 60 years and older, according to a study conducted in Britain. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

From Declaration to Action: Improving Immunization in Africa
Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, got her granddaughter immunized using a mix of private and public clinics. Credit: Veronique Magnin – Habari Kibra VolunteerBy Joyce NgangaNAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 25 2018 (IPS)Inviolate Akinyi, a 46-year-old grandmother, is certain that her grand-daughter needs to get all her vaccines for her to grow up healthy and strong. She uses a mix of private and public clinics in Kibera, one of the largest informal settlement in Nairobi, to get the 15-month-old the shots she needs. Mary Awour, mother to two-year-old Vilance Amondi, also believes immunization is important to protect her ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joyce Nganga Tags: Africa Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia
Proton-pump inhibitors, commonly used to neutralise stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers, are linked to an increased risk of pneumonia in older patients, warn researchers. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - April 24, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adults
(University of Exeter) Researchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralise stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adults
(American Geriatrics Society) Researchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralize stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers. Although proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are still a valuable group of medicines, research is indicating that PPIs are not as completely safe for older people as previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Metal-free tomosynthesis spots success of hip implants
Chinese researchers found that digital tomosynthesis with a metal artifact...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CAD of chest tomosynthesis works best for new readers Digital tomo refines postoperative imaging of hand fractures Digital tomosynthesis works well for spinal tuberculosis DR tomosynthesis gives wrist radiography a hand DR tomo holds promise for fungal pneumonia surveillance (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 23, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

What Causes Hyponatremia?
Discussion Normal kidneys regulate water balance to maintain a plasma osmolality of 275-290 mOsm/kg normally. Thirst and arginine vasopressin or antidiuretic hormone (ADH) are the primary regulators of plasma osmolality. ADH is made in the hypothalamus and released by the posterior pituitary gland. ADH acts on the kidney’s distal collecting duct to increase water reabsorption. ADH is appropriately released in hypovolemic states, such as dehydration caused by gastroenteritis. ADH has an ~10 minute half-life and therefore can respond to rapid changes in volume status. Sodium balance is regulated by aldosterone (as part...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 23, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

NYC Mice Are Carrying Antibiotic-Resistant Germs
People who live in cities are used to the company of furry vermin. But a new study reveals that mice and men may be sharing much more than just living quarters. In a study published in the journal mBio, researchers led by Dr. Ian Lipkin, professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, studied the gut microbes of 416 mice collected from mostly residential buildings all over New York City. Lipkin and his team did a thorough genetic analysis of the microbes they extracted from the feces of the mice, and found that they contained a number of disease-causing bacteria. Nearly 40% of the ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Bacteria healthytime Source Type: news

Comment on Cerland, L. et al. Incidence and consequences of near-drowning-related pneumonia-a descriptive series from Martinique, French West Indies. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1402 - Queiroga AC, Webber J, Schmidt AC, Sempsrott JR, Barcala-Furelos R, Tipton M, Szpilman D.
We read with great interest the recent paper by Cerland et al. on the frequency, nature, and consequences of post-drowning pneumonia[...]. Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Drowning, Suffocation Source Type: news

Mali:Mali - Vaccinating 10,000 Children Over 60,000KM of Desert Roads
[MSF] Being vaccinated against diseases like diphtheria, measles, whooping cough, meningitis, pneumonia, yellow fever, and other potentially fatal illnesses is a commonplace event for many children. But in northern Mali, where a combination of insecurity, isolation, and limited health infrastructure means that many communities cannot access health facilities, it can prove difficult to protect children against these illnesses. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 10, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Survival strategy: How one enzyme helps bacteria recover from exposure to antibiotics
(University of Notre Dame) Researchers at the University of Notre Dame focused on an enzyme in gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia and sepsis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Mortality Risk Factor of CAP Patients With COPD The Mortality Risk Factor of CAP Patients With COPD
A new study examines the mortality risk factors among COPD patients hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia.BMC Pulmonary Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

Boosting natural defenses to fight antibiotic-resistant pneumonia
(Boston Children's Hospital) Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat in bacterial pneumonia. While immune-stimulating treatments can help the body fight the invaders, they can also cause inflammation that damages and weakens lung tissue. But new research suggests a way to enhance bacterial killing without the inflammation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Firefighter, 19, loses his feet, hand and fingers after the flu turned into septic shock
Willy McCue, 19, was hospitalized with the flu in early February that led to pneumonia and septic shock requiring the amputation of his extremities in Rockland County, New York. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Michigan boy diagnosed with a Gorham-Stout bone disease
Leonardo Aguillon, two, of Zeeland, Michigan, was admitted to the hospital on March 9 for pneumonia. A routine chest X-ray and a CT scan revealed that half of his left rib cage was missing. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

West Michigan boy, 2, diagnosed with a vanishing bone disease
Leonardo Aguillon, 2, of Zeeland, Michigan, was admitted to the hospital on March 3 for pneumonia. A routine chest X-ray and a CT scan revealed that half of his left rib cage was missing. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More Bad Flu News: It May Raise Your Heart Attack Risk
THURSDAY, March 22, 2018 -- Suffering a nasty bout of the flu or pneumonia is bad enough, but now research suggests it might also spell trouble for your heart. In a study of nearly 2,000 people in Scotland, those who had battled the flu or... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Rehabilitation and Mortality in ICU Patients With CAP Rehabilitation and Mortality in ICU Patients With CAP
Could early rehabilitation help reduce in-hospital mortality among community-acquired pneumonia patients admitted to the ICU?American Journal of Critical Care (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - March 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Flu and pneumonia infections increase risk of having a heart attack and stroke
(European Lung Foundation) People who have had flu or pneumonia may be six times more likely to suffer from a heart attack or stroke in the days after infection, according to new research published in the European Respiratory Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Utah mom loses hands and legs after rare complications from a cold
Tiffany King, 38, caught a cold in Springsville, Utah, in January that led to viral and bacterial pneumonia and sepsis. When she woke from a coma she learned four of her limbs needed to be amputated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Shingles Is Nasty, And The New Vaccine Works Well. Why Do Adults Avoid Shots?
Beyond annual flu shots, federal health officials say older adults need protection against shingles, pneumonia, tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. But many grown-ups aren't getting vaccinated.(Image credit: Andrew Brookes/Getty Images/Cultura RF) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - March 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michelle Andrews Source Type: news

With big data, researchers identify new targets for lung disease treatments
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Every year, approximately 12 million adults in the US are diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, and 120,000 die from it. For people with COPD, Haemophilus influenzae, a bacterium, can be particularly dangerous. Now, researchers have unraveled how the bacterium adapts quickly, which may open new avenues for therapy for COPD and other diseases such as ear infections or pneumonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 19, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Pneumonia during pregnancy: What you need to know
Pneumonia during pregnancy can cause serious complications if left untreated. Learn to recognize the symptoms and help prevent maternal pneumonia. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

Hospitals with higher post-discharge ER visits have fewer readmissions
A Yale team analyzed the files of Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized for heart attack, heart failure, and pneumonia between July 2011 and June 2012. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 15, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Famed Physicist Stephen Hawking Has Died at the Age of 76
(LONDON) — Stephen Hawking, whose brilliant mind ranged across time and space though his body was paralyzed by disease, died early Wednesday, a University of Cambridge spokesman said. He was 76 years old. Hawking died peacefully at his home in Cambridge, England. The best-known theoretical physicist of his time, Hawking wrote so lucidly of the mysteries of space, time and black holes that his book, “A Brief History of Time,” became an international best seller, making him one of science’s biggest celebrities since Albert Einstein. “He was a great scientist and an extraordinary man whose work a...
Source: TIME: Science - March 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robert Barr / AP Tags: Uncategorized onetime overnight remembrance Source Type: news

Die-off of fur seal pups attributed to mites, pneumonia and changing sea temperatures
(Morris Animal Foundation) Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers uncovered several key factors contributing to a die-off of South American fur seal pups, including mites, pneumonia and sea surface temperature. The findings, published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases, help scientists better understand the link between environmental factors and health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Helping Women, Period
By Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Mar 9 2018 (IPS)The United Nations Headquarters and Brooklyn Bridge were lit up on Thursday night not to help tourists navigate the major landmarks but to bring attention to a key issue that many women and girls face today: period poverty. In commemoration of International Women’s Day, the innovative menstruation-proof underwear company THINX shed the light on period poverty and urged world leaders to ensure that menstrual equity exists around the world.“Today of all days on Women’s Day, we want to come together and light the path forward for greater equality,&rdquo...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Aid Financial Crisis Gender Global Headlines Health Inequity Labour Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Blood stored longer may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shock
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) In a collaborative study using a mouse model, researchers have found mechanistic links between older stored red blood cell transfusions and subsequent bacterial pneumonia. This may reveal new approaches to improve safety of stored red blood cell transfusions. The key player is free heme, a breakdown product from degraded red blood cells (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New vaccine targets pneumonia, blood poisoning, meningitis among children in Canada's North
Federal researchers have collaborated to develop a preventative vaccine for a potentially deadly bacteria that causes pneumonia, blood poisoning and meningitis in children and affecting predominantly children in northern and Indigenous communities. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - March 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

Research project on dangerous hospital germ extended
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Cases of multi-resistant bacteria in hospitals have increased dramatically in recent years and the health system faces tremendous problems as a result. Alongside 'old acquaintances', such as Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Klebsiella pneumonia, another pathogen has now arrived on the scene: Acinetobacter baumannii. In order to find new weapons for the fight against this aggressive germ, in 2014 the German Research Foundation established a Research Unit led by Goethe University Frankfurt which has now been extended for a further three years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Influenza and MRSA Pneumonia Influenza and MRSA Pneumonia
Dr Paul Auwaerter discusses the antimicrobial options for postinfluenza MRSA pneumonia, and makes the case for a universal flu vaccine.Medscape Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - March 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Commentary Source Type: news

Nerve cells found to suppress immune response during deadly lung infections
(Harvard Medical School) Neurons that carry nerve signals to and from the lungs suppress immune response during fatal lung infections with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus.Animal experiments show that disabling these neurons can boost immune response and promote bacterial clearance to aid recovery.Targeting neuro-immune signaling in the lungs can pave the way to nonantibiotic therapies for bacterial pneumonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flu Has ‘ Definitely Peaked ’ Nationally; Remains High In Mass.
By Susan Scutti, CNN (CNN) — Flu has been shown the door in the United States. Illness activity peaked and began to decline during the eighth week of the year, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s weekly surveillance report indicated Friday. Just 5% of people who visited their doctors did so while complaining of flu-like illness, down from 6.4% the previous week. Caused by viruses, flu is a contagious respiratory illness with mild to severe symptoms that can sometimes lead to death. “We have definitely peaked,” CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said, quickly adding, “that doesn&r...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Source Type: news