For Cempra, feasibility of FDA-suggested study yet to be determined
Following Cempra ’s announcement Friday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not approve its new drug applications for pneumonia drug solithromycin, the feasibility of an FDA-suggested study to progress approval forward has yet to be determined, according to acting CEO David Zaccardelli. Concerns over h epatotoxicity, or liver damage, surfaced at a briefing ahead of an FDA advisory committee hearing last month, and those same safety concerns, along with unspecified manufacturing deficiencies,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 29, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

FDA Rejects Cempra's Pneumonia Antibiotic
The U.S. FDA has rejected Cempra's antibiotic, solithromycin, for treating community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - December 29, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA rejects Cempra's antibiotic for pneumonia, shares sink
(Reuters) - Cempra Inc said on Thursday the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had rejected its antibiotic for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), citing inadequate data on the drug's impact on the liver and manufacturing issues. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Cempra's stock down over FDA rejection
Stocks of Chapel Hill-based Cempra sank Thursday morning after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rejected its pneumonia drug. By late morning, stocks were trading for about $2.65 per share – down 56 percent from Wednesday’s close. The stock price is a far cry from the company’s 52-week high of $32. The company’s shares had been trading in the $20 range until they fell sharply in November following an FDA advisor y panel review on its drug solithromycin, which aimed to treat community-acquired… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - December 29, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Marc DeRoberts Source Type: news

Make the Diagnosis: An Excavator's Emergency
(MedPage Today) -- Case Findings: A 52-year-old African American man went to urgent care 2 weeks after returning home from a visit to an archaeological site in Utah. He complained of pneumonia-like symptoms including pleuritic chest pain, a dry cough, fever, arthralgia, and myalgia. However, when he developed a rash of smooth plaques he grew concerned it was more serious. Can you diagnose the patient? (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - December 29, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Legionnaires'
disease is caused by exposure to a bacterium that is found in water and soil. It ranges in severity from a mild influenza-like illness to a serious and sometimes fatal form of pneumonia. Symptoms include fever, headache, lethargy, muscle pain, diarrhoea and sometimes coughing up blood. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: water [subject], safe water, wastewater, greywater, clean water, Q & A [doctype] Source Type: news

GOP Congressman Urges Self-Rationing Of Health Care After Obamacare Repeal
WASHINGTON ― Rep. Bill Huizenga (R-Mich.) says there’s “definitely” going to be changes in health care delivery after Republicans repeal the Affordable Care Act, and people are going to need to take more responsibility for the cost of their treatment. He gave a personal example of how do this: When his 10-year-old son recently fell on the driveway one evening and injured his arm, Huizenga waited until the next day to take him to the doctor because it cost less than bringing him to the emergency room that night. “We weren’t sure what was going on,” the GOP lawmaker said in a Monday...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Older Patients With Female Doctors Are Less Likely To Die, Harvard Study Finds
CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – Want to live longer? Having a woman for a doctor instead of a man may help. A new Harvard University study reveals that older patients are less likely to die or end up back in the hospital if they have female doctors. The study looked at more than 1 million patients over the age of 65 who were hospitalized for common conditions including pneumonia, stroke and heart attack. Researchers say women physicians are more likely to practice evidence-based medicine and stick with clinical guidelines. “The difference in mortality rates surprised us,” said lead study author Yusuke Tsugawa. “T...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 20, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Harvard University Source Type: news

'Nightmare' Superbug May Have Spread Outside Hospitals
Six people in Colorado recently became infected with a “nightmare” superbug that until now, has mostly been limited to people in hospitals, according to a new report. The new cases suggest the superbug may have spread outside of health care facilities. The superbug is known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, a family of bacteria that are difficult to treat because they are resistant to powerful antibiotics. So far, nearly all cases of CRE infections have been seen in people who stay health care facilities, or who have been treated with certain medical procedures or devices, according to the Cen...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

America's Home Care Agencies: Leading the Way in Promoting Public Health
When Marie Desil, a home care nurse with my agency, Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), recently took on the case of Doris*, an elderly woman with heart failure, she immediately set to work explaining to Doris and her family how to take her medications properly and manage her symptoms--advice that included limiting Doris' sodium and fluid intake and reporting any sudden weight gain. But Marie's nursing care didn't stop there. "After discussing with Doris and her family the importance of an annual flu shot, I got the okay from her doctor to administer the vaccine on my next visit," she says. "And I'll...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - December 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pneumonia Incidence Before and After PPI Prescription Pneumonia Incidence Before and After PPI Prescription
Do proton pump inhibitors increase the risk of community acquired pneumonia, as some studies have suggested?The BMJ (formerly known as the British Medical Journal) (Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines)
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - December 16, 2016 Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Pulmonary Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

UCLA researchers combat antimicrobial resistance using smartphones
A team of UCLA researchers has developed an automated diagnostic test reader for antimicrobial resistance using a smartphone. The technology could lead to routine testing for antimicrobial susceptibility in areas with limited resources.Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are posing a severe threat to global public health. In particular, they are becoming more common in bacterial pathogens responsible for high-mortality diseases such as pneumonia, diarrhea and sepsis.Part of the challenge in combatting the spread of these organisms has been the limited ability to conduct antimicrobial susceptibility testing in regions that do ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 15, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UC researchers examine potential drug pathway to combat pneumocystis
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) A study led by University of Cincinnati researchers is offering new insight in how the fungus Pneumocystis, thrives in the lungs of immune-compromised individuals, where it can cause a fatal pneumonia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 14, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Grandmother who went to hospital with broken arm died from pneumonia and sepsis
Patricia Fowler, 75, was not assigned to a doctor at Blackpool Victoria Hospital, Lancashire, because she was overlooked by a secretary who mistook her for another patient. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Benefits of a novel concept of home-based exercise with the aim of preventing aspiration pneumonia and falls in frail older women: a pragmatic controlled trial - Takatori K, Matsumoto D, Nishida M, Matsushita S, Noda T, Imamura T.
AIM: To investigate whether home-based exercise with the aim of preventing aspiration pneumonia and accidental falls improves swallowing-related and physical functions in community-dwelling frail older women. METHODS: Participants were 266 communit... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 8, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Lung cancer symptoms even nonsmokers need to know
Ashley Rivas was 26 when she noticed she was getting tired earlier than usual on her runs. Over the next few years, the X-ray technician from Albuquerque, New Mexico, developed a persistent cough and wheezing, which her doctors attributed to exercise-induced asthma. She had other symptoms, too: weight loss, fever, and several bouts of pneumonia. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - December 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds no evidence cleaner cookstoves reduce pneumonia in children
The Cooking and Pneumonia Study (CAPS), funded by the MRC, Wellcome and DFID through the Joint Global Health Trials Scheme, finds no evidence that cleaner burning biomass fuelled cookstoves reduce the risk of pneumonia in young children in rural Malawi. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - December 7, 2016 Category: Research Source Type: news

With a $30 million carrot dangling, Phase 3 trials underway in Japan for Cempra's pneumonia drug
Phase 3 trials are underway for Cempra ’s pneumonia drug solithromycin in Japan. The trials are being completed by Toyama Chemical Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation. To date, the Chapel Hill-based drug developer has received $40 million upfront and in milestone payments from Toyama, which completed a Phase 2 stu dy for solithromycin in Japan earlier this year, according to a release issued by Cempra. The company also said it stands to reap $30 million more in milestone payments… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 6, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

With a $30 million carrot dangling, Phase 3 trials underway in Japan for Cempra's pneumonia drug
Phase 3 trials are underway for Cempra ’s pneumonia drug solithromycin in Japan. The trials are being completed by Toyama Chemical Co., Ltd., a subsidiary of FUJIFILM Holdings Corporation. To date, the Chapel Hill-based drug developer has received $40 million upfront and in milestone payments from Toyama, which completed a Phase 2 stu dy for solithromycin in Japan earlier this year, according to a release issued by Cempra. The company also said it stands to reap $30 million more in milestone payments… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 6, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jennifer Henderson Source Type: news

Lung Ultrasound to Monitor VAP in Critically Ill Patients Lung Ultrasound to Monitor VAP in Critically Ill Patients
Lung ultrasound may be an effective tool for assessing for the presence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in the ICU.Critical Care (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Critical Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Avian influenza outbreak: Human symptoms of potentially fatal virus ‘bird flu’ revealed
AVIAN flu, also known as bird flu is a virus can affect humans - causing symptoms ranging from mild conjunctivitis to to severe pneumonia and even death. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 5, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa: To Stop Pneumonia, Start with Vaccines
[Gates Foundation] Early in my career, I visited a remote village in West Africa where I saw a small girl in the local clinic who was struggling to breathe. I was told she probably wouldn't survive - not because we didn't have a cure for the disease she was suffering from, but because her parents couldn't afford antibiotics. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 1, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

On World AIDS Day, Let's Confront The Challenging Problem Of HIV/AIDS In The Black Gay Community With Renewed Honesty And Action
In the spring of 1986, I found myself in the intensive care unit at Boston's Tufts New England Medical Center. I was the only person visiting a friend who just five days prior had been diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia. At the time, this type of pneumonia was known as a difficult to treat, opportunistic infection. It was also an indicator that my friend had AIDS. I listened to the respirator that helped him breath, and watched helplessly as his life ebbed away. I had no idea that this was not to be just one heartbreaking loss, but rather the beginning of a period of intense grief that would last for years, as countless...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIAID-funded clinical trial to evaluate shorter-duration antibiotics in children
Five medical centres in the US are planning to conduct the SCOUT-CAP clinical trial to determine the efficacy of shorter course of antibiotics in treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children who show improvement after the first few days of … (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - November 30, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NIAID-sponsored study to assess shorter-duration antibiotics in children
Trial will examine antibiotic use for community-acquired pneumonia. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 28, 2016 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Bacterial infection: illustrated
Presentations of infections including an infected sebaceous cyst, tonsillitis, a dental abscess, mycoplasma pneumonia and mastitis. (Source: GP Online Education)
Source: GP Online Education - November 28, 2016 Category: Primary Care Tags: Infections and infestations Source Type: news

NIAID-sponsored study to assess shorter-duration antibiotics in children
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Physicians at five US medical centers are planning to enroll up to 400 children in a clinical trial to evaluate whether a shorter course of antibiotics -- five days instead of 10 -- is effective at treating community-acquired pneumonia in children who show improvement after the first few days of taking antibiotics. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of NIH, is sponsoring the clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 28, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Trends in Pneumonia Mortality, Hospitalizations by Organism Trends in Pneumonia Mortality, Hospitalizations by Organism
What do we know about the hospitalization and mortality rates among pneumonia patients, and how do they differ by organism? Find out what the trends are telling us.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Among antidementia drugs, memantine is associated with the highest risk of pneumonia
A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that among users of antidementia drugs, persons using memantine have the highest risk of pneumonia. The use of rivastigmine patches is associated with an increased risk as well. The study found that persons using donepezil or galantamine had the lowest risk of pneumonia. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 25, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Assessing Fever in Returning Travelers: Part II
  Zika continues to be the virus of the day for returning travelers, but there are several other diseases that we need to consider in these patients when they present to us in the emergency department. Chikungunya is epidemic in many of the same countries as Zika and can be even more devastating. And Avian and MERS-CoV is still present in many countries. Unlike patients infected with Zika virus, these patients do require isolation to protect our health care staff from infection. Chikungunya Chikungunya, which means “to walk bent over,” was likely endemic but unrecognized in the United States before the mos...
Source: EPMonthly.com - November 25, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matt McGahen Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Goodbye SGR, Hello MACRA
How will CMS’s new physician payment policy impact emergency physicians? For nearly twenty years the debate in Washington surrounding physician payment policy revolved around the SGR, or the Sustainable Growth Rate. That all changed last year when Congress passed the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act, commonly referred to as “MACRA” in and around the beltway. Many refer to MACRA as the “SGR-fix,” but in reality the legislation has much broader implications. It will not only change reimbursement rates but the entire payment formula and incentives for virtually every physician in the ...
Source: EPMonthly.com - November 25, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matt McGahen Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Nigeria: Govt, GSK Freeze Price of Pneumonia Vaccines for Next 10 Years
[This Day] Abuja -The federal government in conjunction with a leading pharmaceutical company, GSK, has pledged not to increase the price of pneumonia vaccines for the next 10 years but to rather freeze the price for improved vaccination. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 23, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nigeria: Pneumonia Replaces Malaria As Number One Child Killer Disease in Nigeria - Report
[Premium Times] Pneumonia has overtaken malaria as the number one killer disease among children under the age of five in Nigeria. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 22, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Among antidementia drugs, memantine is associated with the highest risk of pneumonia
Among users of antidementia drugs, persons using memantine have the highest risk of pneumonia, new research shows. The use of rivastigmine patches is associated with an increased risk as well, say researchers. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 21, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

No Drop in VAP Rates, Study Contends No Drop in VAP Rates, Study Contends
Ventilator-associated pneumonia rates have remained steady at about 10%, data from the Medicare Patient Safety Monitoring System showed. The results contradict trends reported previously by the CDC.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

Fat-free mass index predicts survival in patients with Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
(Wiley) Researchers have found that fat-free mass index, but not body mass index, was a significant predictor of survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a debilitating form of pneumonia. Unlike body mass index, fat-free mass index takes into account the amount of muscle mass a person is carrying. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Resistance to ‘last-line’ antibiotics is increasing, warn experts
People are becoming increasingly resistant to “last-line” antibiotics used to treat serious pneumonia and bloodstream infectionsHide related content:  Show related contentread more (Source: Nursing in Practice)
Source: Nursing in Practice - November 18, 2016 Category: Nursing Authors: carolynwickware Tags: Infections Professional Editor ' s pick Latest News Source Type: news

Does vitamin D cut lung infection risk in older adults?
Conclusion This randomised controlled trial assessed high dose supplementation with vitamin D for a period of 12 months as a way of preventing acute respiratory infections in older adults in long term care. This study was well designed and reduced risk of bias where possible. However, there are some important limitations which affect the reliability of the findings: The study has a small sample size and the authors state they did not manage to reach their target recruitment level; this means the study did not have the statistical power required for certainty in the findings. There were some differences in the character...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 18, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Older people Source Type: news

Experts raise alarm over declining effect of last-line antibiotics
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control says resistance of some strains of bacteria is growingLast-line antibiotics against serious pneumonia and bloodstream infections are under real threat in Europe as resistant strains of bacteria emerge, experts are warning.A new report from theEuropean Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) reveals that resistance has continued to increase across Europe in spite of attempts to raise global awareness of the danger to the fundamentally important antibiotic class of drugs. Without them, some infectious diseases could become untreatable and some forms of major surgery...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 18, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Health editor Tags: Antibiotics Society Drug resistance Drugs Health Science World news Europe Source Type: news

Nigeria: Nigeria Marks World Prematurity, Pneumonia Day
[Leadership] The Federal Ministry of Health yesterday 17th November marked this year's World Prematurity and Pneumonia day in Abuja. In marking the day, the Ministry organised a special health educative session tagged: Innovation To End Pneumonia And Complications of Prematurity. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 18, 2016 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Kids Can Beat 'Complex' Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: Study
Title: Kids Can Beat 'Complex' Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: StudyCategory: Health NewsCreated: 11/17/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/18/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Lungs General)
Source: MedicineNet Lungs General - November 18, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

Kids can beat 'complex' pneumonia without IV antibiotics: Study
HealthDay News Antibiotics taken orally are as effective as intravenous antibiotics for children recovering at home from complex pneumonia, a new study finds. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kids Can Beat ‘ Complex ’ Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: Study
Drugs taken by mouth were just as effective for children after hospital discharge (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - November 17, 2016 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Infections, Nursing, Pediatrics, Pulmonology, News, Source Type: news

Kids Can Beat'Complex' Pneumonia without IV Antibiotics
Drugs taken by mouth were just as effective for children after hospital discharge Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Antibiotics, Children's Health, Pneumonia (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 17, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pneumonia: Children Should Get Oral Antibiotics at Discharge Pneumonia: Children Should Get Oral Antibiotics at Discharge
Most children with complicated pneumonia should receive postdischarge antibiotics orally, rather than by PICC, a new study has found.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - November 17, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Study: Oral Antibiotics Best for Kids' Pneumonia (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Treatment failure rates not significantly different than with PICC (Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease)
Source: MedPage Today Infectious Disease - November 17, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Good news for kids recovering from complex pneumonia
In some good news for families of children recovering from complex pneumonia, doctors recommend that it ’s better to send kids home from the hospital with oral instead of intravenous antibiotics. The retrospective study of 2,123 children at 36 hospitals found oral antibiotics are as effective as intravenous in managing residual disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 17, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Kids Can Beat'Complex' Pneumonia Without IV Antibiotics: Study
THURSDAY, Nov. 17, 2016 -- Antibiotics taken orally are as effective -- and doubtless much more welcome -- than intravenous antibiotics for children recovering at home from complex pneumonia, a new study finds. Youngsters with complex pneumonia... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 17, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

PPIs Not Linked to Risk for Community-Acquired Pneumonia (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by Susan Sadoughi, MD, and Richard Saitz, MD, MPH, FACP, FASAM Use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) is not associated with increased risk for community-acquired pneumonia after accounting for patients'underlying risk, suggests a study in The BMJ.Using a … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - November 17, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Postdischarge IV No Better Than Oral Antibiotics for Complicated Pediatric Pneumonia (FREE)
By Deborah Lehman, MD Dr. Lehman is an associate editor with NEJM Journal Watch Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, from which this story was adapted. Full coverage is available to subscribers at the link below.For children discharged from the hospital … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - November 17, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news