SHANK3: the good, the bad and the hopeful
(Baylor College of Medicine) New approach brings a better understanding of Phelan-McDermid syndrome and SHANK3. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unveiling disease-causing genetic changes in chromosome 17
(Baylor College of Medicine) Extensive single Watson-Crick base pair mutations can occur in addition to duplication or deletion of an entire group of genes on chromosomal region 17p11.2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research shows human trafficking screening tool effective in identifying victims
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) A screening tool designed specifically to assess for human trafficking was more likely to identify sexual and labor exploitation of youth, as well as the risk factors, than a commonly used psychosocial assessment, reported researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and Baylor College of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two independent mechanisms are involved in tuberous sclerosis
(Baylor College of Medicine) The development of the rare condition called tuberous sclerosis involves mTORC1-dependent and -independent mechanisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Always Feel Sicker at Night
Whether you’re dealing with the common cold, the flu or a stomach bug, you’ve probably noticed that your symptoms feel worse at night. You’re not imagining things. Research suggests that your body’s circadian rhythms—as well as some other factors—can exacerbate your symptoms after sundown. Along with regulating your sleep, your body’s circadian clocks help manage your immune system, says Michael Smolensky, a biological rhythm researcher and adjunct professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Texas. “When the immune system is activated”—like when you&r...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Researchers uncover intracellular longevity pathway
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers discovered an intracellular pathway that promotes health and longevity in the worm C. elegans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WATCH: Officials urge vaccinations as measles cases rise in Northwest
Baylor College of Medicine's Dr. Peter Hotez says that measles is "one of the most contagious and infectious diseases known to humans." (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Stand Up To Cancer dream team tackles t-cell lymphoma, focused on CAR-based strategies
(Stand Up To Cancer) A new $8 million SU2C Dream Team is focused on therapies for T-cell lymphoma using CARs to trigger the immune system to attack and destroy cancerous cells led by Helen Heslop, M.D., Baylor College of Medicine, co-led by Gianpietro Dotti, M.D., UNC Chapel Hill: seeking to develop " off the shelf " CAR cells improving availability& lowering cost; identifying biomarkers to track therapy effectiveness; evaluating a novel small molecule which shows potential as a cytoreductive regimen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Making 'sense' of the 'cart before the horse' in mammalian cells.
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers show that antisense RNA can mediated the formation of fusion genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mechanism explains breast cancer cell plasticity
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have discovered that breast cancer stem cells can shift between cell surface molecules CD44s and CD44v via alternative splicing and consequently alter their ability to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Making 'sense' of the 'cart before the horse' in mammalian cells
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers show that antisense RNA can mediated the formation of fusion genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unexpected link found between feeding and memory brain areas
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers reveal an unexpected connection between the lateral hypothalamus and the hippocampus, the respective feeding and the memory centers of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research confirms nerve cells made from skin cells are a valid lab model for studying disease
(Salk Institute) Researchers from the Salk Institute, along with collaborators at Stanford University and Baylor College of Medicine, have shown that cells from mice that have been induced to grow into nerve cells using a previously published method have molecular signatures matching neurons that developed naturally in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

TGF-beta pathway protects against uterine cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) Two new mouse models of uterine cancer reveal that the TGF-beta signaling pathway in uterine cells protects against the disease by suppressing the overgrowth and oncogenesis of the endometrium, the membrane lining the inside of the uterus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 14, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bacteria help discover human cancer-causing proteins
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers applied an unconventional approach that used bacteria to discover human proteins that can lead to DNA damage and promote cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 10, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Symposium Brings Specialists and Survivors Together
Some of the nation’s top mesothelioma specialists are scheduled to share their expertise at the 2019 International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma. The event, organized by the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, will be held March 24-27 in Bethesda, Maryland. The three-day symposium consists of two days of conference sessions and an advocacy day March 27. Mesothelioma patients, caregivers, family members and the bereaved community are invited to attend and learn about the latest treatment options for this rare cancer. “The symposium is a unique event for mesothelioma patients, their families and careg...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 9, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

The gut's link to Alzheimer's: Scientists discover common human gut yeast CAN enter the brain
The study by Baylor College of Medicine in Texas is the latest to suggest gut bacteria plays a role in brain diseases, and offers a clear target for researchers to examine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fungi cause brain infection and impair memory in mice
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers report that the fungus Candida albicans can cross the blood-brain barrier and trigger an inflammatory response that results in the formation of granuloma-type structures and temporary mild memory impairments in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Top 10 Mesothelioma and Asbestos News Stories of 2018
The death of renowned thoracic surgeon Dr. David Sugarbaker stunned the mesothelioma community, while asbestos awareness reached new heights in 2018. The loss of Sugarbaker, who pioneered mesothelioma treatment advances through three decades, was devastating to so many that he touched. On the other side, companies that continue to ignore the dangers of toxic asbestos were exposed — in the courtroom and in news coverage — about the problems they caused. Toxic asbestos was found in cosmetics, crayons and on the hands of executives at Johnson & Johnson, which is already paying the price. Here are the 10 most c...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 20, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Baylor College of Medicine faculty elected National Academy of Inventors fellows
(Baylor College of Medicine) Drs. Mary K. Estes, Bert O'Malley and Huda Zoghbi of Baylor College of Medicine were three of the 148 renowned academic inventors named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors this week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 13, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Novel mechanisms of dengue and Zika virus infections and link to microcephaly
(Baylor College of Medicine) New insights into how dengue and Zika viruses cause disease reveal strategies the viruses use to successfully infect their host and a link to microcephaly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 13, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

An integrated approach to finding new treatments for breast cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) An integrated, multipronged approach aiming at identifying therapeutic targets in cancer has uncovered gene DPYSL3 as a potential contributor to a specific subset of triple-negative breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Peter Hotez: ‘What happens when the anti-vaccine movement moves into India?’
The American scientist, whose new book explains why vaccines didn ’t cause his daughter’s autism, on why conspiracy theorists need to be challengedPeter Hotez is dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He has worked on developing vaccines for hookworm andschistosomiasis, and is a vocal opponent of the anti-vaccine movement. His daughter Rachel is autistic and he has written a book,Vaccines Did Not Cause Rachel ’s Autism, in which he describes her illness and tackles the newly resurgent anti-vaccine movement.Why did you decide to write this book thr...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Vaccines and immunisation Science Autism Andrew Wakefield Source Type: news

Full-time post-doctoral research position available at Baylor College of Medicine
Applications are open for a full-time Postdoctoral Associate position available immediately in theMitsiades lab at Baylor College of Medicine to study the role of steroid receptors in prostate and breast cancer. Deadline for applications is1 March 2019.Interested candidates should submit their CV, a cover letter explaining their relevant work experience, and 3 names of references toNicholas Mitsiades. (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - December 6, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Without Dna2, genes can jump into DNA breaks
(Baylor College of Medicine) When Dna2 is absent, small DNA fragments jump from all over the genome into chromosome breaks. This novel mechanism may explain similar events commonly seen in cancer or during antibody diversification. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel approach improves understanding of the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, the Texas Heart Institute and Texas Children's Hospital has developed a powerful new approach to understand the formation of new neurons in the mammalian adult brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rotavirus outsources cellular protein CK1 & #945; to assemble virus factories
(Baylor College of Medicine) Rotavirus outsources cellular protein CK1α to assemble virus factories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sugars and microbiome in mother's milk influence neonatal rotavirus infection
(Baylor College of Medicine) An international team of researchers reveals that complex interactions between sugars and the microbiome in human milk influence neonatal rotavirus infection and identifies maternal components that could improve the performance of live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 27, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Repurposing FDA-approved drugs can help fight back breast cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) Screening Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved compounds for their ability to stop cancer growth in the lab led to the finding that the drug flunarizine can slow down the growth of triple-negative breast cancer in an animal model of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Making moves and memories, are they connected?
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers report the first direct evidence that the cerebellum does more than just control muscle activity. It also plays a role in cognitive functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The anti-vaxxer maps of America: Where the trend is taking hold
Peter Hotez, Dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine, at Baylor College of Medicine, reveals the 18 US states that allow nonmedical vaccine exemptions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Solving the mystery of NPM1 in acute myeloid leukemia
(Baylor College of Medicine) Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells expressing the NPM1 mutant gene are highly dependent on continued export of protein NPM1c to proliferate. This finding provides a rationale for testing nuclear export inhibitor therapeutics in NPM1-mutated AML. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A novel strategy to potentially reduce breast cancer bone metastasis
(Baylor College of Medicine) Uncovering a novel mechanism that promotes growth of breast cancer bone metastasis has revealed a potential Achilles' heel for these cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tracking down microRNA candidates that can contribute to disease
(Baylor College of Medicine) A novel computational tool called ADmiRE extensively annotates human microRNA variants to determine which ones are likely to contribute to or cause diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene PPM1D gives stem cells a 'winning boost' after chemotherapy
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers show that gene PPM1D, whose function in blood production was unknown, can confer blood cells exposed to the chemotherapy agent cisplatin a survival advantage that might favor the development of leukemia years later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing sudden cardiac death with genome editing
(Baylor College of Medicine) Gene editing successfully prevented sudden cardiac death in a mouse model of inherited cardiac arrhythmia disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A partnership to tackle cancer health disparities
(University of Houston) With a $2.17 million grant from the National Cancer Institute, The University of Houston and Baylor College of Medicine join together to tackle cancer health disparities, developing a joint cancer drug discovery, development and research education program to focus on cancers that have increased risk of incidence and/or mortality among underserved communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Second Sight raises $4m
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it raised approximately $4 million in a private placement deal with entities owned by board chair Gregg Williams. The Sylmar, Calif.-based company said that it floated approximately 2.5 million shares of stock at $1.62 per share, which was the last reported sale price of its stock on the effective date. “This investment in Second Sight reflects my commitment to advancing the Orion technology and my confidence in our ability to develop this groundbreaking technology into a marketed product. Orion offers hope to millions of blind individuals worldwide who currently ...
Source: Mass Device - October 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Optical/Ophthalmic Wall Street Beat Second Sight Source Type: news

Src regulates mTOR, a major player in cancer growth
This study shows that Src is necessary and sufficient to activate mTORC1 and offers the possibility to develop novel approaches to control cancer growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s How to Tell if You Have a Cold or the Flu
Your nose is dripping like a leaky faucet, your throat is sore and you can’t stop sneezing. You don’t have a fever, but you feel wiped out—like you could curl up on the floor and fall asleep. Do you have a cold or the flu? If you guessed cold, you’re probably right. But experts say that differentiating the common cold (an upper respiratory infection) from the flu (influenza) can be trickier than most people assume. “There is huge overlap among non-influenza viruses and the symptoms produced by influenza and other bugs,” says Dr. Bruce Barrett, a professor of family medicine and community...
Source: TIME: Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Sample size matters in multisensory integration studies
(Baylor College of Medicine) Sample size (the number of individuals examined for a study) is the most important factor determining the accuracy of the study results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mathematics meets biology to uncover unexpected biorhythms
(Baylor College of Medicine) A novel mathematical approach has uncovered that some animal cells have robust 12-hour cycles of genetic activity, in addition to circadian or 24-hour cycles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dr. R. Taylor Ripley Leads Mesothelioma Center at Baylor
Thoracic surgeon Dr. R. Taylor Ripley comes to the Mesothelioma Treatment Center at Baylor College of Medicine with the highest possible endorsement. Dr. David Sugarbaker, the world’s most prominent mesothelioma specialist and director of the prestigious Baylor Lung Institute, recruited Ripley. It was like being anointed by the king. Ripley spent the previous four years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he built a sterling reputation for surgical, clinical and investigational research excellence. “Dr. Sugarbaker wanted someone to help grow his program. He recruited me to do tha...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Ripley Named New Director of Mesothelioma Center at Baylor
Thoracic surgeon Dr. R. Taylor Ripley comes to the Mesothelioma Treatment Center at Baylor College of Medicine with the highest possible endorsement. Dr. David Sugarbaker, the world’s most prominent mesothelioma specialist and former director of the prestigious Baylor Lung Institute, recruited Ripley. It was like being anointed by the king. Ripley spent the previous four years at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, where he built a sterling reputation for surgical, clinical and investigational research excellence. “Dr. Sugarbaker wanted someone to help grow his program. He recruited me to...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 12, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

How to 'jumpstart' rhythmic breathing at birth
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers reveal neuronal pathways that 'jumpstart' breathing at birth and may explain breathing abnormalities seen in premature babies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A 'homing system' targets therapeutic T-cells to brain cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) A multi-institution international team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a new strategy to overcome one of the main obstacles in the treatment of brain cancer -- access to the tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Clinical trial testing topical cream plus influenza vaccine in progress
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A Phase 1 clinical trial examining whether a topical cream can enhance the immune response conferred by a 'pre-pandemic' influenza vaccine is underway at Baylor College of Medicine, a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) funded by NIAID. Investigators are evaluating whether imiquimod cream, commonly used to treat genital warts and certain skin cancers, can boost the body's immune response to an H5N1 influenza vaccine. The trial is enrolling 50 healthy adults ages 18-50 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New clues found to understanding relapse in breast cancer
(Washington University School of Medicine) A large genomic analysis has linked certain DNA mutations to a high risk of relapse in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, while other mutations were associated with better outcomes, according to researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Baylor College of Medicine and the University of British Columbia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Dr. David Sugarbaker, Mesothelioma Treatment Pioneer, Dies at 65
Thoracic surgeon Dr. David Sugarbaker, a world leader in advancing the treatment of pleural mesothelioma for nearly 30 years, has died. He was 65. Sugarbaker was director of the Lung Institute at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Raja Flores, thoracic surgeon and mesothelioma specialist at Mount Sinai Cancer Center, expressed his respect for the famed surgeon. “He was a giant in the field. He not only took care of the mesothelioma patients, he trained a whole generation of doctors who will continue taking care of those patients,” said Flores, who trained under Sugarbaker. “It’s a sad...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 29, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Pay attention to the 'noise' in your brain
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers find that the 'noise' in the brain can be attributed to fluctuations in internally generated signals such as attention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news