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Schistosoma vaccine to enter phase Ib clinical trial
(George Washington University) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, in collaboration with a team of researchers at the George Washington University and the Rene Rachou Institute, have received funding from the National Institutes of Health for a Phase Ib clinical trial for a Schistosomiasis vaccine in an endemic area of Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Identical twins can share more than identical genes
(Baylor College of Medicine) Independent of their identical genes, identical twins share an additional level of molecular similarity that influences their biological characteristics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sugar additive in cakes has fueled rise of superbug
The study by Baylor College of Medicine in Houston shows that the sugar - known as trehalose - is metabolized by the potentially deadly bacterium Clostridium difficile. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary sugar linked to increasing bacterial epidemics
(Baylor College of Medicine) The increasing frequency and severity of healthcare-associated outbreaks caused by bacterium Clostridium difficile have been linked to the widely used food additive trehalose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NeuroRx Signs Agreement With U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs and Baylor College of Medicine for Clinical Trial of First Drug Regimen Targeting Severe Bipolar Depression in Patients With Acute Suicidal Ideation and Behavior (ASIB)
Third clinical research site for NRX-100 / NRX-101 phase 2B/3 clinical study WILMINGTON, Del., Dec. 27, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- NeuroRx, a clinical stage biopharma company developing the first drug regimen to treat severe bipo... Biopharmaceuticals, Neurology NeuroRx, bipolar depression, ASIB (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - December 27, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

G-quadruplex regulates breast cancer-associated gene
(Baylor College of Medicine) For breast cancer, carrying protein CD44s, instead of CD44v, has a survival advantage. Researchers have now discovered a mechanism by which cells can regulate switching between the two proteins, opening options for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cancer growth in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pediatric immunologist Jordan S. Orange recognized for healing through research
(The Academy of Medicine, Engineering& Science of Texas) Jordan Scott Orange, M.D., Ph.D.,   of Baylor College of Medicine is the recipient of the 2018 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Medicine from The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Atoh1, a potential Achilles' heel of Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma
(Baylor College of Medicine) Tyrosine 78 in Atoh1 is phosphorylated exclusively in 'tumor-initiating cells' in sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma and reducing the levels of Atoh1 promotes tumor regression in mice and provides a potential future strategy for treating this type of tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Presurgical imaging may predict whether epilepsy surgery will work
(Rice University) A statistical approach to combining presurgical PET scans and functional MRI of the brain may help predict which patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are most likely to benefit from surgery. The method was developed by researchers at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of California at Irvine and UCLA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can a High-Tech Chip Conquer Global Health Challenges?
An Austin, TX-based molecular data company is out to prove that big things can come in small packages. Nano Global is developing a chip in partnership with Arm, a leading semiconductor IP company. According to Nano, the technology will help redefine how global health challenges such as superbugs, infectious diseases, and cancer are conquered. The system-on-chip (SoC) will yield secure molecular data that can be used in the recognition and analysis of health threats caused by pathogens and other living organisms. Combined with the company's scientific technology platform, the chip leverages advances in nanotechnology, optic...
Source: MDDI - December 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Software Electronics Source Type: news

How having too much or too little of CHRNA7 can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders
(Baylor College of Medicine) Using new pluripotent stem cell technology, researchers have discovered unexpected effects on calcium flux on neurons from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders carrying either fewer or extra copies of the CHRNA7 gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor researchers recognized with prestigious AAAS honor
(Baylor College of Medicine) Two Baylor College of Medicine researchers have been named 2017 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson opens Center for Device Innovation at TMC
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said today that its J&J Medical Device Companies business opened the doors on the Center for Device Innovation at the Texas Medical Center, which aims to support breakthrough medical device tech development. The project, a joint between Johnson & Johnson Innovation and the Texas Medical Center, is a 26,000-square-foot- facility designed to host JJMDC R&D staff to work on internal projects and “strategically aligned external ventures of JJMDC,” according to a press release. “CDI @ TMC represents unprecedented collaboration between the scientists, busin...
Source: Mass Device - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Could a blood test in middle age predict dementia risk?
Conclusion Inflammation in the body is a response to injury or disease. But if the body is constantly in an inflammatory state, it can harm blood vessels and lead to heart disease. This study suggests high levels of inflammation over the long term might also damage the brain. That's not surprising – what's good for the heart is usually good for the brain, and we already know exercising, avoiding high blood pressure and eating healthily may help protect the brain. Studies like this will help researchers work out more precisely what's happening in the brain when people experience memory loss or dementia. But this study...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Second Sight wins full FDA clearance for Orion cortical prosthesis feasibility trial
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it won FDA approval to launch a feasibility clinical study of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system. With the approval, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company is cleared to enroll up to 5 patients total at the University of California at Los Angeles and Houston’s Baylor College of Medicine. The company said it has also completed device testing and addressed outstanding questions the FDA requested upon receiving prior conditional approval in August. “We are grateful for the rapid and thorough review by the FDA and are pleased to be able to commence the Orion feasi...
Source: Mass Device - November 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news

Cancer Risk Elevated in Men With Peyronie's Disease Cancer Risk Elevated in Men With Peyronie's Disease
Men with Peyronie's disease (PD) are at increased risk of malignancy including cancer of the stomach and testis, suggesting they may need additional surveillance after diagnosis and treatment for PD, say researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

Chromosome organization emerges from 1-D patterns
(Rice University) Researchers at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have developed a method to predict how a human chromosome folds based solely on the epigenetic marks that decorate chromatin inside cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Healing Edge: To Mend a Birth Defect, Surgeons Operate on the Patient Within the Patient
In a startling experimental procedure, doctors lift the uterus from a pregnant woman and operate on a fetus with miniature instruments. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Birth Defects Spina Bifida Disabilities Surgery and Surgeons Baylor College of Medicine Texas Children's Hospital Source Type: news

2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium to be held Dec. 5-9
(American Association for Cancer Research) The UT Health San Antonio Cancer Center, the American Association for Cancer Research, and Baylor College of Medicine will be hosting the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Dec. 5-9, at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mechanism explains how seizures may lead to memory loss
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers reveals a mechanism that can explain how even relatively infrequent seizures can lead to long-lasting cognitive deficits in animal models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breakdown of metabolic collaboration of brain cells tied to Alzheimer's
Baylor College of Medicine researchers have discovered that impairing a vital collaboration between brain cells leads to neurodegeneration. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Wristbands track toxic exposure after Harvey
Flood victims in the Houston area will help scientists track their exposure to dangerous substances as they rebuild from Hurricane Harvey by wearing a porous silicone wristband that absorbs organic chemicals. Baylor College of Medicine is funding the study and is working with the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas A&M University and Oregon State University on the effort. The wristbands can detect volatile and semi-volatile chemicals directly… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 28, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Meditation May Help Against Heart Disease, Says American Heart Association
For the first time, the American Heart Association (AHA) is issuing a statement on the effects of meditation on the heart. AHA experts reviewed dozens studies analyzing eight different types of meditation and their effects on various heart disease risk factors and outcomes, from heart attack to blood pressure, stress, atherosclerosis and smoking cessation. Overall, the studies are encouraging, says Dr. Glenn Levine, chair of the AHA and American College of Cardiology task force on clinical practice guidelines. But the data isn’t conclusive enough to justify a recommendation for or against meditation in reducing heart...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized American Heart Association does meditation lower heart disease risk health benefits of meditation heart disease risk factors how to relieve stress and anxiety meditation and heart disease mindfulness meditation risk factors f Source Type: news

Breakdown of brain cells' metabolic collaboration linked to Alzheimer's disease
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have discovered that impairing a critical partnership between brain cells can lead to neurodegeneration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ensuring Pediatric Readiness for All Emergency Departments: National Pediatric Readiness Project
Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine Emergency Medical Services for Children Innovation and Improvement Center. 07/2017 This nine-page report describes the history of the National Pediatric Readiness Project (NPRP), the progress made to date, and the need for continued efforts to improve pediatric health care services within the nation's emergency departments. The project aims to establish a composite baseline of the nation's capacity to provide care to children in the emergency department, and create a foundation for emergency departments to engage in an ongoing quality improvement process. (PDF) (Sour...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

DNA looping architecture may lead to opportunities to treat brain tumors
(Baylor College of Medicine) The discovery of a mechanism by which normal brain cells regulate the expression of the NFIA gene, which is important for both normal brain development and brain tumor growth, might one day help improve therapies to treat brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heparin stimulates food intake and body weight gain in mice
(Baylor College of Medicine) Research shows that heparin, which is well known for its role as an anticoagulant, can also promote food intake and body weight increase in animal models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Method speeds up time to analyze complex microscopic images
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers who typically required a week of effort to dissect cryo-electron tomography images of the 3-D structure of a single cell will now be able to do it in about an hour thanks to a new automated method developed by a team of scientists at Baylor College of Medicine and the National University of Singapore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anti-inflammatory drug may help prevent heart attacks
Conclusion This well-conducted study shows promising signs that canakinumab may reduce the risk of future heart attacks and other cardiovascular events in people who've had them in the past. But before any changes are made to the current licensing of this drug, further research is needed to confirm the beneficial effects and the optimal dose. Most importantly, researchers will need to focus on the observation that the drug lowered white blood cell counts and increased the risk of fatal infection. They estimated around 1 in every 300 people taking canakinumab would die of a fatal infection. This number, while low, is sti...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

FDA clears Second Sight IDE trial of next-gen Orion cortical visual prosthesis
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it won FDA investigational device exemption to initiate a feasibility clinical study of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system. The conditional approval gives the Sylmar, Calif.-based company clearance to enroll up to 5 patients at 2 US sites, but requires that the company conduct additional device testing and “address outstanding questions” within 45 days, it said. “This is an exciting milestone for the company given the potential of Orion to provide useful vision to millions of blind individuals worldwide who have no other option today. We are deligh...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Prosthetics second-sight-medical Source Type: news

Research reveals how estrogen regulates gene expression
(Baylor College of Medicine) The sequential recruitment of coactivators to the estrogen receptor complex results in dynamic specific structural and functional changes that are necessary for effective regulation of gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Test reveals potential treatments for disorders involving MeCP2
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers has developed a strategy that allows them to identify potential treatments that would restore altered levels of MeCP2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BREAKTHROUGH as certain probiotics are found to produce powerful antibiotics that kill superbugs
(Natural News) Scientists at the Baylor College of Medicine are saying that next-generation probiotics can reduce the risk of becoming infected with the bacterium Clostridium difficile, also known a C. difficile or C. diff. This is a common bacterial infection which causes gastrointestinal issues such as bowel discomfort and diarrhea. Treatment for the condition usually... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Female mouse embryos actively remove male reproductive systems
(NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences) A protein called COUP-TFII determines whether a mouse embryo develops a male reproductive tract, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. The discovery, which appeared online August 17 in the journal Science, changes the long-standing belief that an embryo will automatically become female unless androgens, or male hormones, in the embryo make it male. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Change in protein production essential to muscle function
(Baylor College of Medicine) A group of genes involved in calcium handling undergoes a highly-regulated process called alternative splicing that changes the type of protein the genes produce as muscles transition from newborn to adult. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Gata4 helps mend a broken heart
(Baylor College of Medicine) Gata4 alone is able to reduce post-heart attack fibrosis and improve cardiac function in a rat model of heart attack. In rat fibroblasts in the lab, the molecular mechanism involves reduced expression of Snail, the master gene of fibrosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research opens possibility of reducing risk of gut bacterial infections with next-generation probiotic
(Baylor College of Medicine) In laboratory-grown bacterial communities, the co-administration of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri and glycerol selectively killed C. difficile. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ready-to-use cells are safe, effective at treating viral infections
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have developed a way to use virus-specific cells to protect patients against severe, drug-resistant viral infections. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial shows ready-to-use cells are safe and effective to treat viral infections
(Baylor College of Medicine) A phase II clinical trial shows that patients who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant and developed a viral infection could be helped by receiving immune cells specialized in eliminating that particular virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new HER2 mutation, a clinical trial and a promising diagnostic tool for metastatic breast cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) A phase II clinical trial of neratinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer carrying a HER2 mutation produces encouraging results in that about 30 percent of patients and a promising diagnostic tool for metastatic breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genome sequencing shows spiders, scorpions share ancestor
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have discovered a whole genome duplication during the evolution of spiders and scorpions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Iowa Uni: women who take drugs 'lose maternal instinct'
Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Iowa warn the finding is particularly concerning in light of America's drug addiction epidemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women who take drugs 'lose their maternal instinct'
Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Iowa warn the finding is particularly concerning in light of America's drug addiction epidemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bayer ’ s Drug Failed to Improve Mesothelioma Survival
Drug manufacturers announced disappointing ends recently to two different clinical trials involving pleural mesothelioma, dampening earlier enthusiasm over the promise of immunotherapy. Anetumab ravtansine, manufactured by Bayer, and tremelimumab, from drugmaker AstraZeneca, failed an effectiveness test as a stand-alone, second-line treatment for mesothelioma, according to both manufacturers. “Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a very difficult-to-treat tumor, and we had hoped for a better outcome for patients,” said Robert LaCaze, an executive vice president at Bayer. Although trial officials have not released ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 27, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Tags: anetumab ravtansine astrazeneca cancer drug bayer cancer drug bayer mesothelioma drug mesothelioma clinical trials tremelimumab Source Type: news

New Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention Manual Developed
Manual was created through partnership between AAFP, Baylor College of Medicine; supported by CDC (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - July 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Psychiatry, Institutional, Source Type: news

AAFP, Baylor Partner to Create Alcohol Screening Practice Manual
The AAFP has partnered with Baylor College of Medicine to create a new alcohol screening and brief intervention manual family physicians can use in their practices. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - July 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Lunatic fringe gene plays key role in the renewable brain
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have developed a novel mouse model that for the first time selectively identifies neural stem cells, the progenitors of new adult brain cells. In these mice, researchers have found a novel mechanism by which descendants of neural stem cells can send feedback signals to alter the division and the fate of the mother cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How CD44s gives brain cancer a survival advantage
(Baylor College of Medicine) In the case of glioblastoma multiforme, the deadliest type of brain cancer, researchers have discovered that the molecule CD44s seems to give cancer cells a survival advantage. In the lab, eliminating this advantage by reducing the amount of CD44s resulted in cancer cells being more sensitive to the deadly effects of the drug erlotinib. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news