Baylor College of Medicine neuroscientist and geneticist recognized for re
(The Academy of Medicine, Engineering& Science of Texas) HOUSTON - Baylor College of Medicine Neuroscientist and Geneticist Benjamin Arenkiel, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 2021 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Medicine from TAMEST (The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas). He was chosen for his breakthrough identification of the brain's neural pathways that are connected to eating disorders, addiction and other neuropsychiatric disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Should I Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If I ’ve Had the Virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus? Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it’s their turn. “It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.” After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away. “Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Should I Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If I ’ve Had the Virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus? Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it’s their turn. “It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.” After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away. “Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Should I Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If I ’ ve Had the Virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus? Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it’s their turn. “It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.” After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away. “Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Should I Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If I ’ve Had the Virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus? Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it’s their turn. “It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.” After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away. “Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Should I Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If I ’ve Had the Virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus? Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it’s their turn. “It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.” After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away. “Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Should I Get a COVID-19 Vaccine If I ’ve Had the Virus?
Should I get a COVID-19 vaccine if I’ve had the virus? Yes. Regardless of previous infection, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people should plan on getting vaccinated when it’s their turn. “It’s a pretty straightforward question,” said Johns Hopkins infectious disease specialist Dr. Amesh Adalja. “Yes, you need to get vaccinated.” After someone recovers, their immune system should keep them from getting sick again right away. “Your immune system is able to identify the virus, and protect itself,” said Dr. Saskia Popescu, an...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Simple bioreactor makes 'gut check' more practical
(Rice University) Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers develop lab tool to mimic conditions in intestines, giving them a mechanical model for the real-time growth of bacterial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Proteogenomics offers insight to treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
(Baylor College of Medicine) A new study identifies three molecular subtypes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that could be used to better determine appropriate treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why There Is Limited Support For Anti-Addiction Vaccines Despite The Epidemic Of Opioid Overdoses
In a recent paper published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry, Thomas R. Kosten, from the Department of Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, delved into the six factors that have led to very limited support for antiaddiction vaccines. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 31, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anuradha Varanasi, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Source Type: news

Changing the perspective on the 'Cinderella of the cytoskeleton'
(Baylor College of Medicine) SETD2, known for its involvement on gene expression, also can affect functions controlled by the cytoskeleton, such as movement, metastasis and migration, which are very important for cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 23, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New mammal reference genome helps ID genetic variants for human health
(Baylor College of Medicine) A new reference genome assembly identified more than 85 million genetic variants in the rhesus macaque, the largest database of genetic variation for any one nonhuman primate species to date. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Too much of a good thing - persistent IFN & #947; depletes progenitor blood cells via BST2
(Baylor College of Medicine) Long-term exposure to IFNγ stimulates the production of protein BST2 on blood stem cells, which resulted in their emergence from the quiescent state, persistent proliferation and finally exhaustion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Light flips genetic switch in bacteria inside transparent worms
(Rice University) Researchers from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have shown that colored light can both activate and deactivate genes of gut bacteria in the intestines of worms. The research shows how optogenetic technology can be used to investigate the health impacts of gut bacteria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

India's Biological E. to start vaccine late-stage trials in April: Executive
The privately held company said in November it had started early-stage and mid-stage human trials of its vaccine candidate, being developed in collaboration with Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and U.S.-based Dynavax Technologies Corp, and expects results by February. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - December 18, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Optogenetic method can reveal how gut microbes affect longevity
(Baylor College of Medicine) Optogenetics offers a direct way to manipulate gut bacterial metabolism in a temporally, quantitatively and spatially controlled manner and enhance host fitness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Maternal diet during lactation shapes functional abilities of milk bacteria
(Baylor College of Medicine) The mother's diet while breastfeeding can shape the profile of human milk oligosaccharides (HMO), a type of complex carbohydrate in the mother's milk. Changing the HMOs, which are food and fodder for healthy microbes, in turn modifies the functional abilities of the milk microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel gene variants that modify the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease discovered
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have identified 216 new genetic modifiers of late-onset Alzheimer's disease. The newly-identified biomarkers could potentially be used in the future to refine risk assessment, patient prognosis and act as therapeutic targets for this untreatable condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A role for the slow oscillations of the neocortex in epileptic spasm generation
(Baylor College of Medicine) Epileptic spasms are a type of brief seizures that are the hallmark of catastrophic seizure disorders and characterized by severe cognitive and motor deficits. Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have found the source and mechanism to explain how cortical neurons generate spasms. This is also the first study to reveal a hitherto unknown relationship between a normal brain state, like sleep, and spasms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The tree of cortical cell types describes the diversity of neurons in the brain
(Baylor College of Medicine) The tree of cortical cell types provides one of the most detailed and complete characterizations of the diversity of neural types in the brain so far. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The future of health care: Experts discuss health care, real estate in a post-COVID world (live webinar recap)
On Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, HBJ President and Publisher Bob Charlet sat down, virtually, with our panel of experts to address how the current public health crisis is changing our outlook on business, medicine and the economy and how health systems and companies across the country are reassessing their real estate portfolios as they prepare for a post-COVID-19 environment. Panelist: Dr. Doug Lawson, CEO, St. Luke’s Health; Dr. Paul Klotman, president and CEO, Baylor College of Medicine; Becky… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 1, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Source Type: news

Gloria Echeverria Investigates an Insidious Form of Breast Cancer
The newly minted Baylor College of Medicine faculty member is working to crack the mystery of triple negative breast cancer. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 1, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Scientist to Watch Source Type: news

Treatment shows reduction in heart failure after myocardial infarction
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine identified potential preventative therapies for heart failure after a significant heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BICRA gene provides answers to patients, doctors and scientists
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers identified the BICRA gene as a new disease gene involved in a neurodevelopmental disorder and found evidence that BICRA functions in neural development in humans and flies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predicting preterm births
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers studied how family history can predict preterm birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How rotavirus causes severe gastrointestinal disease
(Baylor College of Medicine) Using intercellular calcium waves, rotavirus amplifies its ability to cause disease beyond the cells it directly infects. This is the first virus identified to activate ADP-mediated intercellular calcium waves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Maraxilibat reduces debilitating itching in children with Alagille syndrome
(Baylor College of Medicine) On behalf of Childhood Liver Disease Research Network (ChiLDReN), Texas Children's Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine researchers report that prolonged treatment with Maraxilibat resulted in clinically meaningful improvements in debilitating itching (pruritus) and related quality of life outcomes in children with Alagille syndrome. The novel pharmacological approach addresses a major unfulfilled therapeutic need to control severe and relentless itching in pediatric patients with Alagille syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Proteogenomics enhances the identification of therapeutic vulnerabilities in breast cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) Applying powerful proteogenomics approaches to breast cancer, researchers propose more precise diagnostics, identify new tumor susceptibilities for translation into treatments and implicate new mechanisms involved in breast cancer treatment resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Revealing the unexpected structure of iron-exporter ferroportin
(Baylor College of Medicine) The 3D structure of a mammalian ferroportin reveals unexpected characteristics and a mode of action that could lead to innovative therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Biological E gets DGCA nod to begin the next phase of trials for its COVID-19 vaccine
This vaccine candidate includes an antigen that was in-licensed from BCM Ventures, which is an integrated commercialisation team of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and an advanced adjuvant from the US-based vaccine focused pharmaceutical firm Dynavax Technologies Corporation. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - November 17, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What EEGs tell us about COVID-19 and the brain
(Baylor College of Medicine) A systematic review of hundreds of cases of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 helps painting a broader picture of how COVID-19 affects the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New approach to diagnosing genetic diseases using RNA sequencing increases yield
(Baylor College of Medicine) A new study from Baylor College of Medicine finds that starting genetic analysis with RNA sequencing can increase diagnostic yield and confidence in diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Highly effective tumor detection strategy for common childhood brain tumors
(Texas A&M University) A team of scientists at Texas A&M University, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital have developed a way to more accurately both detect and monitor a common type of pediatric brain cancer, setting the stage for giving clinicians a real-time view into how the cancer responds to treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The road to uncovering a novel mechanism for disposing of misfolded proteins
(Baylor College of Medicine) The discovery of the cause of a rare liver disease in babies led to uncovering a novel cellular mechanism for disposing of misfolded proteins that has implications for neurodegenerative conditions of older age (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Glutathione precursor GlyNAC reverses premature aging in people with HIV
(Baylor College of Medicine) Supplementation of precursors of glutathione, a major antioxidant produced by the body, improves multiple deficits associated with premature aging in people with HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CAR NKT cells offer a promising novel immunotherapy for solid tumors
(Baylor College of Medicine) Natural killer T (NKT) cells, a type of immune cells known for their potent anti-cancer properties in murine tumor models, have been developed into a novel form of immunotherapy to treat patients with cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 12, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Web resources bring new insight into COVID-19
Researchers around the world are a step closer to a better understanding of the intricacies of COVID-19 thanks to two new web resources developed by investigators at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of California San Diego. The resources are freely available through the Signaling Pathways Project (Baylor) and the Network Data Exchange (UCSD). (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 22, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Web resources bring new insight into COVID-19
(Baylor College of Medicine) Two new web resources put at researchers' fingertips information about cellular genes whose expression is affected by coronavirus infection and place these data points in the context of the complex network of host molecular signaling pathways. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to the body's first line of defense
(Baylor College of Medicine) Human norovirus strains differ in sensitivity to interferon, one of the body's first line of defense. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

US-based BCM ties up with India's BE for COVID-19 vaccine production
In the race to find a cure for the coronavirus infection, Texas-based Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) has entered into a licensing agreement with Indian pharmaceutical company Biological E Limited (BE) for the development of a safe, effective and affordable vaccine. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - August 27, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For $5 and in 15 Minutes You Can Learn If You Have COVID-19
On Aug. 26, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave an emergency use authorization (EUA) for a rapid COVID-19 test that can produce results in just 15 minutes, which could not only increase the number of people tested in the U.S., but also identify those who are positive sooner, so they can self-isolate and limit spread of the disease. The testing device, made by Abbott Laboratories and called BinaxNOW Ag Card, is about the size of a credit card and can be easily used anywhere people need to be tested. It analyzes samples from a nasal swab and comes with an app that people can download to receive their results&mda...
Source: TIME: Health - August 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Novel PROTAC enhances its intracellular accumulation and protein knockdown
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine developed an improved type of PROTAC that has enhanced intracellular accumulation and functions, not only as a degrader, but also as an inhibitor of the target protein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 26, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

To be or not to be in the ER, that is the question
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers discovered a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins that may help better understand human NGLY1 deficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fighting cancer with rejection-resistant, 'off-the-shelf' therapeutic T cells
(Baylor College of Medicine) Baylor College of Medicine researchers develop improved cancer-fighting CAR T cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart attack damage reduced by shielded stem cells
(Rice University) Bioengineers and surgeons from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have shown in rodents that a four-week shielded stem cell treatment can reduce damage caused by a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor College of Medicine and Biological E sign licensing pact to develop Covid-19 vaccine
BE in a statement on Thursday said it will leverage its experience to develop and commercialise the vaccine candidate, which currently is produced using a proven yeast-based expression technology. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - August 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

PolyA-miner assesses the effect of alternative polyadenylation on gene expression
(Baylor College of Medicine) Meet PolyA-miner, a new computational tool that enables scientists to evaluate the contribution of alternative polyadenylation to gene regulation in health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 23, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

More Mesothelioma Cancer Centers Using Tumor Treating Fields
Tumor Treating Fields is one of the newest treatments on the market for pleural mesothelioma cancer patients with metastatic disease. The device is also available to patients with locally advanced cancer who are not candidates for mesothelioma surgery. Clinical trials of the treatment, previously known as NovoTTF-100L, extended the survival of mesothelioma patients by more than six months compared to those receiving only chemotherapy. The device is now called Optune Lua and has been available outside of clinical trials for over a year. More physicians and treatment centers are becoming certified to prescribe the treatmen...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 21, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Combating drug resistance in age-related macular degeneration
(Baylor College of Medicine) An international team of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine and Houston Methodist has discovered a strategy that can potentially address a major challenge to the current treatment for age-related macular degeneration, (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immunotherapy with CAR T cells results in exceptional patient recovery
(Baylor College of Medicine) In a clinical trial, a child with rhabdomyosarcoma, a form of muscle cancer, that had spread to the bone marrow, showed no detectable cancer following treatment with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that were engineered to target the HER2 protein on the surface of the cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 15, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news