Fruit flies: 'Living test tubes' to rapidly screen potential disease-causing human gene
This study provides a blueprint of how fruit flies can be used as a rapid screening tool to identify potentially pathogenic human genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than a living syringe: Mosquito saliva alone triggers unexpected immune response
(Baylor College of Medicine) Mosquito saliva alone can trigger an unexpected variety of immune responses in an animal model of the human immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Florida and Minnesota immunotherapy cos. to merge, move HQ to Houston
TapImmune Inc. (Nasdaq: TPIV), a Jacksonville, Florida-based developer of cancer fighting immunotherapies, is merging with Marker Therapeutics Inc., a Minnesota-based developer of similar T-cell therapies. The newly formed company will be based in Houston, due to a strategic alliance with Baylor College of Medicine. TapImmune and Marker will each own half of the company, though the deal is still subject to the approval of TapImmune's stockholders. Marker is privately held. The combined company will… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 15, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Will Robinson Source Type: news

Merger takes Jacksonville immunotherapy company to Houston
TapImmune Inc. (Nasdaq: TPIV), the Jacksonville-based developer of cancer fighting immunotherapies, is merging with Marker Therapeutics Inc., a Minnesota-based developer of similar T-cell therapies. The newly formed company will be based in Houston, due to a strategic alliance with the Baylor College of Medicine. TapImmune and Marker will each own half of the company, though the deal is still subject to the approval of TapImmune's stockholders. Marker is privately held. The combined company will… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 15, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Will Robinson Source Type: news

Marmoset monkey model of Zika virus infection offers new insights into the human condition
(Baylor College of Medicine) A novel marmoset model of human Zika virus infection offers new opportunities for better understanding of how the virus causes congenital disease in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Formate prevents most folic acid-resistant neural tube defects in mice
(Baylor College of Medicine) A multi-institutional research team has developed a novel folic acid-resistant neural tube defect mouse model of the human condition by silencing the Slc25a32 gene, and, in most of the mutant mice, neural tube defects can be prevented by formate supplementation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fruit fly study identifies new gene linked to aortic aneurysms
(Baylor College of Medicine) An interdisciplinary team of researchers has identified a new gene linked to human aortic aneurysms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 24, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hippo pathway found essential to orchestrate the development of the heart
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers has discovered that during development, when progenitor heart cells progressively differentiate into various cell types, the Hippo pathway is essential to coordinate the progress of these cell types into a working heart (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why is it harder for females to gain weight?
(Baylor College of Medicine) Why is it harder for females to gain weight? A new study proposes that part of the answer may be in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor CM graduate starts Speratum CR to bring his own discovery to cancer patients
(Baylor College of Medicine) Dr. Christian Mar í n-Muller ’ s grandmother died of cancer before he was born. It saddens him that he never had the chance to meet her, but thanks to her he knew from an early age what he wanted to be when he grew up. He would become a scientist and find a way to fight cancer so nobody else would have to lose a grandma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Two is better than one to improve brain function in Alzheimer's disease mouse model
(Baylor College of Medicine) Using two complementary approaches to reduce the deposits of amyloid-beta in the brain rather than either approach alone improved spatial navigation and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SightLife Surgical rebrands as CorneaGen
SightLife Surgical said today it is rebranding under the moniker CorneaGen, with plans to launch several new products under the new brand. Products set to launch under the new name include tissue storage media with antifungal Ampho B, Geuder preloaded glass cannula for DMEK and Intacs corneal implants for keratoconus, which join the company’s recent acquisition of the AcuFocus Kamra inlay. “Corneal implants are a natural fit with CorneaGen’s growing family of innovative  corneal products and services. The Kamra Inlay acquisition makes sense because of CorneaGen’s long-standing relationship...
Source: Mass Device - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Optical/Ophthalmic sightlife Source Type: news

You Asked: What Is Inflammation, And Why Should I Care About It?
Your body can heal itself, which is pretty miraculous when you sit back and think about it. If you suffer a cut or infection—or if a disease, allergen or virus finds its way into you—your immune system reacts by sending specialized white blood cells to the affected area. These white blood cells can repair damage, stop the spread of infection or illness and in some cases eradicate the intruder. This whole response is called inflammation. “Inflammation is an activation of cells and cell-derived components that have the job of fighting invasions, and in some cases just sponging up or clearing out damaged cel...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine Source Type: news

The humble fruit fly continues to boost biomedical discovery
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have developed and made available a large versatile library of fruit flies that can be used to perform efficient and elegant in vivo gene-specific manipulations using the new protocol and gene-specific integration vector CRIMIC (CRISPR-Mediated Integrated Cassette). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Opens with Optimism in South Florida
Dr. Chukwuemeka Ikpeazu at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center has brought hope — where once there was none — to patients in South Florida with unresectable pleural mesothelioma. Ikpeazu is the principal investigator in the multicenter phase II clinical trial involving the much-anticipated immunotherapy drug durvalumab. Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca manufactures the drug under the brand name Imfinzi. “I am optimistic, very, very optimistic that this drug will be effective for these patients,” Ikpeazu told Asbestos.com. “All the data, all the earlier studies, are encouraging.” He...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 4, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Answers to 100-year-old mystery point to potential breast cancer therapies
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers at has identified a long sought after connection between how cancer cells use the sugar glucose to generate energy -- the Warburg pathway -- and cancer growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Put Your Best Feet Forward, Despite Diabetes
SUNDAY, April 1, 2018 -- If you have diabetes, it's time to think about your feet. " Diabetes is a multisystem disease, " Dr. Ronald Lepow explained in a news release from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. " Circulation in the feet and legs... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Research uncovers a potential new strategy to fight ovarian cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers discovered a potential novel way to regulate ovarian cancer growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What the first American astronauts taught us about living in space
(Baylor College of Medicine) Project Mercury proved that humans could live and work in space, paving the way for all future human exploration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Longtime Houston businessman, health care leader dies
A prominent Houston businessman who helped establish Baylor College of Medicine, the Harris County Hospital District and the city's public transportation system has died. Daniel C. Arnold died March 19, according to multiple reports. He had just turned 88 years old. The Houston Chronicle reports that he died from kidney cancer and was surrounded by family at his Houston home.  The native Houstonian was a graduate of the Kinkaid School and attended classes at Rice University and Princeton University… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - March 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jen Para Source Type: news

Longtime Houston businessman, health care leader dies
A prominent Houston businessman who helped establish Baylor College of Medicine, the Harris County Hospital District and the city's public transportation system has died. Daniel C. Arnold died March 19, according to multiple reports. He had just turned 88 years old. The Houston Chronicle reports that he died from kidney cancer and was surrounded by family at his Houston home.  The native Houstonian was a graduate of the Kinkaid School and attended classes at Rice University and Princeton University… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 21, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Jen Para Source Type: news

Brain implant for some blind people shows benefits of FDA ’s Breakthrough Device Program
Malvina Eydelman, M.D., Director of the Division of Ophthalmic, and Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices, Office of Device Evaluation Malvina Eydelman, M.D., Director of the Division of Ophthalmic, and Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices, Office of Device Evaluation FDA’s Breakthrough Devices Program is beginning to show important results for patients since it was established in late 2016 under the 21st Century Cures Act to help patients gain timely access to breakthrough technologies. Consider Second Sight Medical Products Inc.’s Orion Cortical Visual Prosthesis System, which recently qualified for the FDA’...
Source: Mass Device - March 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Blog FDA Voice Source Type: news

Research reveals a mechanism that drives ataxia type 1
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have learned that polyQ-ATAXIN1 and capicua form a complex that is sufficient to trigger spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scorpion venom component can reduce severity of rheumatoid arthritis
(Baylor College of Medicine) A group of researchers led by Dr. Christine Beeton at Baylor College of Medicine has found that one of the hundreds of components in scorpion venom can reduce the severity of rheumatoid arthritis in animal models, without inducing side effects associated with similar treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Geffen School Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA presents award for excellence in basic science research
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a Baylor College of Medicine professor whose work holds promise for treating a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, received an annual award for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research from theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.The medical school ’s dean, Dr. Kelsey Martin, presented Zoghbi with the 2017Switzer Prize during a Feb. 16 ceremony. Zoghbi received a $25,000 honorarium and a statuette.“Her story is a beautiful illustration of the connection between medicine and science, and a lesson in the value of maintaining curiosity and open-mindedness,&rdq...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Novel classification can lead to new ways to diagnose and treat cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) A novel approach to studying cancer has enabled researchers to group about 10,000 human cancers of 32 different types into 10 classes based on the molecular pathways that drive tumor growth. A better understanding of these pathways can potentially lead to novel ways to diagnose and treat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Second Sight touts 1st-in-human Orion cortical implant
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) today announced the first trial implantation of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system and updated on implantations of its Argus device and enrollment in an upcoming study. The first implantation procedure was performed late last month by Dr. Nader Pouratian at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company said, as part of an FDA-cleared feasibility trial it won approval to launch last November. The Orion cortical visual prosthesis system is designed to convert images captured by a miniature video camera, mounted on a patient’s glasses, into a ...
Source: Mass Device - February 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news

Researchers identify gene largely accounting for 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have identified in a mouse model OTUD7A as the gene within the deleted region that accounts for many characteristics of 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers gain new insight into how the intestine repairs itself
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers propose that, contrary to the current thinking, how the intestine repairs itself seems to depend on the type of damage, and they found that triggers that were previously thought to be unimportant are actually essential for repairing rotavirus-caused injury. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schistosoma vaccine to enter phase Ib clinical trial
(George Washington University) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, in collaboration with a team of researchers at the George Washington University and the Rene Rachou Institute, have received funding from the National Institutes of Health for a Phase Ib clinical trial for a Schistosomiasis vaccine in an endemic area of Brazil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Identical twins can share more than identical genes
(Baylor College of Medicine) Independent of their identical genes, identical twins share an additional level of molecular similarity that influences their biological characteristics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sugar additive in cakes has fueled rise of superbug
The study by Baylor College of Medicine in Houston shows that the sugar - known as trehalose - is metabolized by the potentially deadly bacterium Clostridium difficile. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dietary sugar linked to increasing bacterial epidemics
(Baylor College of Medicine) The increasing frequency and severity of healthcare-associated outbreaks caused by bacterium Clostridium difficile have been linked to the widely used food additive trehalose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NeuroRx Signs Agreement With U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs and Baylor College of Medicine for Clinical Trial of First Drug Regimen Targeting Severe Bipolar Depression in Patients With Acute Suicidal Ideation and Behavior (ASIB)
Third clinical research site for NRX-100 / NRX-101 phase 2B/3 clinical study WILMINGTON, Del., Dec. 27, 2017 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- NeuroRx, a clinical stage biopharma company developing the first drug regimen to treat severe bipo... Biopharmaceuticals, Neurology NeuroRx, bipolar depression, ASIB (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - December 27, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

G-quadruplex regulates breast cancer-associated gene
(Baylor College of Medicine) For breast cancer, carrying protein CD44s, instead of CD44v, has a survival advantage. Researchers have now discovered a mechanism by which cells can regulate switching between the two proteins, opening options for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to control cancer growth in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Pediatric immunologist Jordan S. Orange recognized for healing through research
(The Academy of Medicine, Engineering& Science of Texas) Jordan Scott Orange, M.D., Ph.D.,   of Baylor College of Medicine is the recipient of the 2018 Edith and Peter O'Donnell Award in Medicine from The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 12, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Atoh1, a potential Achilles' heel of Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma
(Baylor College of Medicine) Tyrosine 78 in Atoh1 is phosphorylated exclusively in 'tumor-initiating cells' in sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma and reducing the levels of Atoh1 promotes tumor regression in mice and provides a potential future strategy for treating this type of tumor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Presurgical imaging may predict whether epilepsy surgery will work
(Rice University) A statistical approach to combining presurgical PET scans and functional MRI of the brain may help predict which patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are most likely to benefit from surgery. The method was developed by researchers at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of California at Irvine and UCLA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can a High-Tech Chip Conquer Global Health Challenges?
An Austin, TX-based molecular data company is out to prove that big things can come in small packages. Nano Global is developing a chip in partnership with Arm, a leading semiconductor IP company. According to Nano, the technology will help redefine how global health challenges such as superbugs, infectious diseases, and cancer are conquered. The system-on-chip (SoC) will yield secure molecular data that can be used in the recognition and analysis of health threats caused by pathogens and other living organisms. Combined with the company's scientific technology platform, the chip leverages advances in nanotechnology, optic...
Source: MDDI - December 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Software Electronics Source Type: news

How having too much or too little of CHRNA7 can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders
(Baylor College of Medicine) Using new pluripotent stem cell technology, researchers have discovered unexpected effects on calcium flux on neurons from patients with neuropsychiatric disorders carrying either fewer or extra copies of the CHRNA7 gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor researchers recognized with prestigious AAAS honor
(Baylor College of Medicine) Two Baylor College of Medicine researchers have been named 2017 Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is the First Bioprinted Heart Just Around the Corner?
A Chicago bioprinting startup that seeks to 3-D print human hearts for transplantation has added to its scientific advisory board of heavy hitters. But its CEO won’t say how close the company is to producing its first viable heart. Biolife4D just announced it has added regenerative biomaterials expert Adam  Feinberg, PhD to lead its scientific advisory team. Feinberg is associate professor of materials science & engineering and biomedical engineering at Carnegie Mellon University and principal investigator of the regenerative biomaterials and therapeutics group. Feinberg uses materials-based engine...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Cardiovascular Implants Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson opens Center for Device Innovation at TMC
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said today that its J&J Medical Device Companies business opened the doors on the Center for Device Innovation at the Texas Medical Center, which aims to support breakthrough medical device tech development. The project, a joint between Johnson & Johnson Innovation and the Texas Medical Center, is a 26,000-square-foot- facility designed to host JJMDC R&D staff to work on internal projects and “strategically aligned external ventures of JJMDC,” according to a press release. “CDI @ TMC represents unprecedented collaboration between the scientists, busin...
Source: Mass Device - November 9, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Could a blood test in middle age predict dementia risk?
Conclusion Inflammation in the body is a response to injury or disease. But if the body is constantly in an inflammatory state, it can harm blood vessels and lead to heart disease. This study suggests high levels of inflammation over the long term might also damage the brain. That's not surprising – what's good for the heart is usually good for the brain, and we already know exercising, avoiding high blood pressure and eating healthily may help protect the brain. Studies like this will help researchers work out more precisely what's happening in the brain when people experience memory loss or dementia. But this study...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Second Sight wins full FDA clearance for Orion cortical prosthesis feasibility trial
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it won FDA approval to launch a feasibility clinical study of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system. With the approval, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company is cleared to enroll up to 5 patients total at the University of California at Los Angeles and Houston’s Baylor College of Medicine. The company said it has also completed device testing and addressed outstanding questions the FDA requested upon receiving prior conditional approval in August. “We are grateful for the rapid and thorough review by the FDA and are pleased to be able to commence the Orion feasi...
Source: Mass Device - November 2, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news

Cancer Risk Elevated in Men With Peyronie's Disease Cancer Risk Elevated in Men With Peyronie's Disease
Men with Peyronie's disease (PD) are at increased risk of malignancy including cancer of the stomach and testis, suggesting they may need additional surveillance after diagnosis and treatment for PD, say researchers from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

Chromosome organization emerges from 1-D patterns
(Rice University) Researchers at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have developed a method to predict how a human chromosome folds based solely on the epigenetic marks that decorate chromatin inside cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Healing Edge: To Mend a Birth Defect, Surgeons Operate on the Patient Within the Patient
In a startling experimental procedure, doctors lift the uterus from a pregnant woman and operate on a fetus with miniature instruments. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Birth Defects Spina Bifida Disabilities Surgery and Surgeons Baylor College of Medicine Texas Children's Hospital Source Type: news

2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium to be held Dec. 5-9
(American Association for Cancer Research) The UT Health San Antonio Cancer Center, the American Association for Cancer Research, and Baylor College of Medicine will be hosting the 2017 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, Dec. 5-9, at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news