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DNA looping architecture may lead to opportunities to treat brain tumors
(Baylor College of Medicine) The discovery of a mechanism by which normal brain cells regulate the expression of the NFIA gene, which is important for both normal brain development and brain tumor growth, might one day help improve therapies to treat brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heparin stimulates food intake and body weight gain in mice
(Baylor College of Medicine) Research shows that heparin, which is well known for its role as an anticoagulant, can also promote food intake and body weight increase in animal models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Method speeds up time to analyze complex microscopic images
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers who typically required a week of effort to dissect cryo-electron tomography images of the 3-D structure of a single cell will now be able to do it in about an hour thanks to a new automated method developed by a team of scientists at Baylor College of Medicine and the National University of Singapore. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Anti-inflammatory drug may help prevent heart attacks
Conclusion This well-conducted study shows promising signs that canakinumab may reduce the risk of future heart attacks and other cardiovascular events in people who've had them in the past. But before any changes are made to the current licensing of this drug, further research is needed to confirm the beneficial effects and the optimal dose. Most importantly, researchers will need to focus on the observation that the drug lowered white blood cell counts and increased the risk of fatal infection. They estimated around 1 in every 300 people taking canakinumab would die of a fatal infection. This number, while low, is sti...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

FDA clears Second Sight IDE trial of next-gen Orion cortical visual prosthesis
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) said today it won FDA investigational device exemption to initiate a feasibility clinical study of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system. The conditional approval gives the Sylmar, Calif.-based company clearance to enroll up to 5 patients at 2 US sites, but requires that the company conduct additional device testing and “address outstanding questions” within 45 days, it said. “This is an exciting milestone for the company given the potential of Orion to provide useful vision to millions of blind individuals worldwide who have no other option today. We are deligh...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Prosthetics second-sight-medical Source Type: news

Research reveals how estrogen regulates gene expression
(Baylor College of Medicine) The sequential recruitment of coactivators to the estrogen receptor complex results in dynamic specific structural and functional changes that are necessary for effective regulation of gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 24, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Test reveals potential treatments for disorders involving MeCP2
(Baylor College of Medicine) A team of researchers has developed a strategy that allows them to identify potential treatments that would restore altered levels of MeCP2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BREAKTHROUGH as certain probiotics are found to produce powerful antibiotics that kill superbugs
(Natural News) Scientists at the Baylor College of Medicine are saying that next-generation probiotics can reduce the risk of becoming infected with the bacterium Clostridium difficile, also known a C. difficile or C. diff. This is a common bacterial infection which causes gastrointestinal issues such as bowel discomfort and diarrhea. Treatment for the condition usually... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Female mouse embryos actively remove male reproductive systems
(NIH/National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences) A protein called COUP-TFII determines whether a mouse embryo develops a male reproductive tract, according to researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston. The discovery, which appeared online August 17 in the journal Science, changes the long-standing belief that an embryo will automatically become female unless androgens, or male hormones, in the embryo make it male. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Change in protein production essential to muscle function
(Baylor College of Medicine) A group of genes involved in calcium handling undergoes a highly-regulated process called alternative splicing that changes the type of protein the genes produce as muscles transition from newborn to adult. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How Gata4 helps mend a broken heart
(Baylor College of Medicine) Gata4 alone is able to reduce post-heart attack fibrosis and improve cardiac function in a rat model of heart attack. In rat fibroblasts in the lab, the molecular mechanism involves reduced expression of Snail, the master gene of fibrosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research opens possibility of reducing risk of gut bacterial infections with next-generation probiotic
(Baylor College of Medicine) In laboratory-grown bacterial communities, the co-administration of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri and glycerol selectively killed C. difficile. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ready-to-use cells are safe, effective at treating viral infections
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have developed a way to use virus-specific cells to protect patients against severe, drug-resistant viral infections. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial shows ready-to-use cells are safe and effective to treat viral infections
(Baylor College of Medicine) A phase II clinical trial shows that patients who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant and developed a viral infection could be helped by receiving immune cells specialized in eliminating that particular virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new HER2 mutation, a clinical trial and a promising diagnostic tool for metastatic breast cancer
(Baylor College of Medicine) A phase II clinical trial of neratinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer carrying a HER2 mutation produces encouraging results in that about 30 percent of patients and a promising diagnostic tool for metastatic breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Genome sequencing shows spiders, scorpions share ancestor
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have discovered a whole genome duplication during the evolution of spiders and scorpions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Iowa Uni: women who take drugs 'lose maternal instinct'
Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Iowa warn the finding is particularly concerning in light of America's drug addiction epidemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women who take drugs 'lose their maternal instinct'
Researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Iowa warn the finding is particularly concerning in light of America's drug addiction epidemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bayer ’ s Drug Failed to Improve Mesothelioma Survival
Drug manufacturers announced disappointing ends recently to two different clinical trials involving pleural mesothelioma, dampening earlier enthusiasm over the promise of immunotherapy. Anetumab ravtansine, manufactured by Bayer, and tremelimumab, from drugmaker AstraZeneca, failed an effectiveness test as a stand-alone, second-line treatment for mesothelioma, according to both manufacturers. “Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a very difficult-to-treat tumor, and we had hoped for a better outcome for patients,” said Robert LaCaze, an executive vice president at Bayer. Although trial officials have not released ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 27, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Tags: anetumab ravtansine astrazeneca cancer drug bayer cancer drug bayer mesothelioma drug mesothelioma clinical trials tremelimumab Source Type: news

New Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention Manual Developed
Manual was created through partnership between AAFP, Baylor College of Medicine; supported by CDC (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Psychiatry - July 27, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Psychiatry, Institutional, Source Type: news

AAFP, Baylor Partner to Create Alcohol Screening Practice Manual
The AAFP has partnered with Baylor College of Medicine to create a new alcohol screening and brief intervention manual family physicians can use in their practices. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - July 20, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Lunatic fringe gene plays key role in the renewable brain
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have developed a novel mouse model that for the first time selectively identifies neural stem cells, the progenitors of new adult brain cells. In these mice, researchers have found a novel mechanism by which descendants of neural stem cells can send feedback signals to alter the division and the fate of the mother cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How CD44s gives brain cancer a survival advantage
(Baylor College of Medicine) In the case of glioblastoma multiforme, the deadliest type of brain cancer, researchers have discovered that the molecule CD44s seems to give cancer cells a survival advantage. In the lab, eliminating this advantage by reducing the amount of CD44s resulted in cancer cells being more sensitive to the deadly effects of the drug erlotinib. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study finds potentially safer substitutes for BPA
A group of potentially safer substitutes for the chemical compound bisphenol A, or BPA, has been identified by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers identify potentially safer substitutes for BPA
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have identified a group of potential substitutes for bisphenol A (BPA) that lack the adverse effects typically associated with BPA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists develop imaging method for measuring glutathione in real time
(Baylor College of Medicine) Scientists have developed a fluorescent probe -- they call it RealThiol -- that can measure real-time changes of glutathione concentration in living cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 13, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ASHG honors Arthur Beaudet with Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award
(American Society of Human Genetics) ASHG has named Arthur L. Beaudet, MD, of the Baylor College of Medicine, as the 2017 recipient of the annual Victor A. McKusick Leadership Award. This award recognizes individuals whose professional achievements have fostered and enriched the development of human genetics as well as its assimilation into the broader context of science, medicine, and health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Houston team one step closer to growing capillaries
(Rice University) In their work toward 3-D printing transplantable tissues and organs, bioengineers and scientists from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have demonstrated a key step on the path to generate implantable tissues with functioning capillaries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Seattle Cancer Center Opens Latest Mesothelioma Clinical Trial
The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance has opened a phase II clinical trial involving durvalumab, the promising immunotherapy drug, in combination with chemotherapy for the first-line treatment of unresectable pleural mesothelioma. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already granted accelerated approval to durvalumab in May for the treatment of bladder cancer. Researchers have also lauded the drug for its effectiveness in earlier lung cancer clinical trials. “We have every reason to believe it will be effective with mesothelioma, too,” Dr. Bernardo Goulart, chief trial investigator and medical oncologist at t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 27, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Tags: cancer in seattle doctor Bernardo Goulart mesothelioma clinical trials mesothelioma in seattle mesothelioma treatment seattle cancer care alliance Source Type: news

Patient-inspired research uncovers new link to rare disorder
(Baylor College of Medicine) Peroxisomal biogenesis disorder, which has been linked only to lipid metabolism, is also associated with sugar metabolism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA names winner of Switzer Prize for research excellence
Dr. Huda Zoghbi, a neurologist whose work has revealed the molecular basis of neurological disorders, is the recipient of the 2017 Switzer Prize awarded by theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for excellence in biological and biomedical sciences research.Zoghbi ’s lab at the Baylor College of Medicine identified a gene mutation that causes Rett syndrome, a severe genetic disorder that mostly affects girls. After a short period of apparently normal development, the disorder causes them to lose language and motor skills, typically by 18 months of age. The discovery paved the way for a genetic test to diagnose the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

CU Anschutz and Baylor researchers to study Zika virus impact on children
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the Baylor College of Medicine will join with Guatemalan investigators in a major study examining the clinical outcomes of children infected with the Zika virus after being born, focusing on long-term brain development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gut bacteria could lead to anti aging treatments
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas Health Science Center identified bacterial genes and compounds that extend the life of C.elegans worms. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Newly discovered cellular pathway may lead to cancer therapies
(Baylor College of Medicine) Scientists have discovered a new cellular pathway that can promote and support the growth of cancer cells. In a mouse model of melanoma, blocking this pathway resulted in reduction of tumor growth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 15, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Simple tasks don't test brain's true complexity
(Rice University) New research strategies are needed to find out how information flows through the brain's neural networks, according to neuroscientists at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine. In a new article in Neuron, the researchers suggest using complex experiments to test the most important properties of these networks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A 12-hour biological clock coordinates essential bodily functions
(Baylor College of Medicine) In addition to 24-hour clocks, mammals and other organisms have 12-hour clocks that are autonomous, work independently from 24-hour clocks and can be modified by external factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insight into the heart's lack of self-repair may lead to better disease treatment
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have uncovered new insights into what causes heart muscle to not be able to repair itself. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research reveals new insights into why the heart does not repair itself
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have discovered a previously unknown connection between processes that keep the heart from repairing itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 5, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Follistatin is a key player in embryo implantation
(Baylor College of Medicine) Follistatin plays a key role in establishing receptivity of the uterus to embryo implantation in an animal model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mice will help reveal the roles of human brown fat
(Baylor College of Medicine) Scientists have discovered that mice have metabolically active brown fat deposits similar to the largest depot found in people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor College of Medicine, CHI St. Luke's continue buildout of McNair Campus
Once completed, the new McNair campus will feature 650 hospital beds and will cost $1.1 billion to complete. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 30, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Joe Martin Source Type: news

Baylor College of Medicine, CHI St. Luke's continue buildout of McNair Campus
Once completed, the new McNair campus will feature 650 hospital beds and will cost $1.1 billion to complete. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 30, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Joe Martin Source Type: news

CRKL in 22q11.2; a key gene that contributes to common birth defects
(Baylor College of Medicine) The research findings imply that patients with genitourinary birth defects due to 22q11.2 changes in gene dosage should also be evaluated for other potential birth defects seen in patients with DiGeorge syndrome that would affect the patient's future health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Comprehensive cancer study assesses potential targets for personalized medicine and finds new ones
(Baylor College of Medicine) A comprehensive approach confirmed molecular changes in cancer cells most likely involved in the development of the disease and discovered others that had not been typically linked to cancer before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Shift work ruins men's sex lives and sperm quality
Researchers from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston also linked lack of sleep with urinary problems and erectile dysfunction. One in eight people in the UK work nights. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Compiling Big Data in a Human-Centric Way
When a group of researchers in the Undiagnosed Disease Network at Baylor College of Medicine realized they were spending days combing through databases searching for information regarding gene variants, they decided to do something about it. By creating MARRVEL (Model organism Aggregated Resources for Rare Variant ExpLoration) they are now able to help not only their own lab but also researchers everywhere search databases all at once and in a matter of minutes. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - May 12, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Noisy knee joints 'may be a sign of osteoarthritis'
This study suggests that if these people have noisy knees, they are at higher risk for developingpain within the next year, compared with the people who do not have noisy knees. "Future studies that target people who have X-ray signs of osteoarthritis, who do not complain of pain but do report noisy knees hold the promise of identifying interventions that can prevent knee pain." Arthritis Research UK's view Natalie Carter, head of research liaison and evaluation at Arthritis Research UK, said:"Osteoarthritis of the knee affects more than four million people in the UK and can cause daily pain and fatigue....
Source: Arthritis Research UK - May 7, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Study shows association between gut microbes and brain structure in people with irritable bowel syndrome
FINDINGSA new study by researchers at UCLA has revealed two key findings for people with irritable bowel syndrome about the relationship between the microorganisms that live in the gut and the brain.For people with IBS research shows for the first time that there is an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies. The results suggest that signals generated by the brain can influence the composition of microbes residing in the intestine and that the chemicals in the gut can shape the human brain ’s structure.Additionally, the researche...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 5, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study: Alterations to circadian clock change the body's response to diet
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have found that changing the circadian clock in mice can alter how the body responds to diet. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Circadian clock changes can alter body's response to diet
(Baylor College of Medicine) Changing the circadian clock in mouse liver can alter how the body responds to diet and also change the microbes living in the digestive track. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 4, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news