What can gorillas teach us?

All the gorillas were dying… Over 50 years of trying to breed gorillas in zoos and nothing was working. It didn’t matter where they tried — San Diego, Cincinnati, St. Louis — not even the best zoos in the country could get these gorillas to reproduce. They were facing extinction. And everyone simply accepted that it was impossible to breed gorillas in zoos. That was until one caretaker took a closer look at what the gorillas were eating. For decades, zoos fed the gorillas what they called gorilla biscuits. But, on top of being unable to reproduce, the gorillas were developing diseases like heart disease,1 diabetes,2 obesity3 and high blood pressure.4 In short, gorillas were not made to eat “biscuits.” It’s a bit scary to think how you and I find ourselves in a similar situation. I see it more and more in my clinic patients every year. People are getting sick. They’re struggling with weight, diabetes, heart disease… the list goes on and on. And the only answer they can get from mainstream doctors is that it’s genetic. Well I’m here to tell you, just like the gorillas, there is nothing wrong with you. You were made perfect. But the world you live in was not. And you are suffering from today’s abnormal environment. Mainstream medicine has failed you. They can’t see that every chronic disease is connected by this one common thread that I call Syndrome Zero. And the biggest culprit is the massive overl...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Natural Cures Nutrition carbs coconut oil diabetes gorillas heart disease high blood pressure insulin obesity Syndrome Zero triglycerides Source Type: news

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ConclusionsLower serum UA concentrations may be associatedwith lower BMD values and higher prevalence of clinical fractures independent of potential confounders except for BMD values at each site. These findings need to be confirmed by further prospective studies.
Source: Clinica Chimica Acta - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
This study aimed to evaluate the effects of lorcaserin on body weight, cardiovascular risk factors, and safety in obese patients in Taiwan.MethodsIn this double-blind, randomised controlled trial, 171 obese adults were assigned to receive lorcaserin at a dose of 10 mg, or placebo, twice a day for 24 weeks. Diet and exercise counselling were given to all patients through the treatment period. Primary outcomes were proportion of patients achieving at least 5% and 10% reduction in body weight and mean change in body weight. Safety and tolerability endpoints such as Beck Depression Inventory-II, blood biochemistry, v...
Source: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Preventive programs should be implemented for industrial workers, especially young workers, workers who smoke, overweight workers, and workers with psychosomatic disease. PMID: 30019636 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics - Category: Occupational Health Tags: Int J Occup Saf Ergon Source Type: research
The average adult eats about 3,400 milligrams (mg) of sodium per day — far more than the recommended daily goal of 2,300 mg. Here are the top 10 types of food that account for more than 40% of the sodium we eat each day, along with some ideas for simple swaps to help you eat less salt. 1. Breads and rolls This category tops the list not because bread is especially salty (a slice contains about 100 to 200 mg of sodium), but because we eat so much of it. Smart swaps: Instead of toast or a bagel for breakfast, have a bowl of oatmeal prepared with just a pinch of salt. Bypass the dinner breadbasket for a serving of whole...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 19 July 2018Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Curtis S. Bergquist, Elizabeth A. Jackson, Michael P. Thompson, Lourdes Cabrera, Gaetano Paone, Alphonse DeLucia, Chang He, Richard L. Prager, Donald S. Likosky, Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons Quality CollaborativeAbstractBackgroundPrior work identified a direct relationship between frailty and adverse outcomes in cardiac surgery, but assessment of the effect across patient subgroups has largely been ignored. We identified whether frailty’s (measured by gait speed) association with adverse outcome...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 July 2018Source: The Annals of Thoracic SurgeryAuthor(s): Leo Lopez, Lucile Houyel, Steven D. Colan, Robert H. Anderson, Marie J. Béland, Vera D. Aiello, Frederique Bailliard, Meryl S. Cohen, Jeffrey P. Jacobs, Hiromi Kurosawa, Stephen P. Sanders, Henry L. Walters, Paul M. Weinberg, Jeffrey R. Boris, Andrew C. Cook, Adrian Crucean, Allen D. Everett, J. William Gaynor, Jorge Giroud, Kristine J. GuleserianAbstractThe definition and classification of ventricular septal defects have been fraught with controversy. The International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenita...
Source: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Contemporary Neurosurgery - Category: Neurosurgery Tags: Article Source Type: research
In conclusion, documentation is important, a critical part of advocacy and the development process at the larger scale. It isn't just words, but rather a vital structural flow of information from one part of the larger community to another, necessary to sustain progress in any complex field. We would all do well to remember this - and to see that building this documentation is an activity in which we can all pitch in to help. Evidence Suggests that, at Least in Earlier Stages, Alzheimer's Disease Blocks Rather than Destroys Memories https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/07/evidence-suggests-that-at-least-in-ea...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
If the successes in technological development achieved over the past few hundred years is teaching us anything, perhaps it should be that individual members of a species that evolved in an environment of pervasive scarcity and intermittent famine are not well equipped for an environment of consistent plenty. Our biochemistry and our instincts lead us astray: eat too many calories and life expectancy and long-term health will suffer for it. This is not new. We are no different from our ancestors in this aspect of the human condition. The change lies in the fact that we now live in an age so wealthy and capable that consiste...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, spermidine inhibits lipid accumulation and necrotic core formation through stimulation of cholesterol efflux, albeit without changing plaque size or cellular composition. These effects, which are driven by autophagy in VSMCs, support the general idea that autophagy induction is potentially useful to prevent vascular disease. Intestinal Autophagy Important in Calorie Restriction and Longevity in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2016/08/intestinal-autophagy-important-in-calorie-restriction-and-longevity-in-nematodes/ Based on the evidence accumulated from many years of studies of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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