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South Asians with family history of heart disease at greater risk
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) New research by UT Southwestern cardiologists shows that people of South Asian descent with a family history of coronary heart disease are significantly more likely to have high levels of calcium buildup in their arteries - an indicator of higher risk for heart attacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statins cut heart deaths in men by 28% finds study
Conclusion This new analysis found that men without cardiovascular disease who were prescribed a statin were less likely to go on to develop heart disease or have a major cardiovascular event. These findings from the five-year randomised controlled trial are useful – there's been a lot of debate about whether giving statins to people without any cardiovascular disease is helpful. But it's harder to draw conclusions from the longer term results, as these were from a non-randomised observational period. Potential confounding factors – such as the men's attitude to medicine, risk and health – may have influe...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Statins cut coronary heart disease deaths by 28% in men with high cholesterol
Daily statins reduce deaths from coronary heart disease by 28% in men with very high LDL cholesterol, according to the 'longest ever' study measuring use of the treatment. (Source: GP Online News)
Source: GP Online News - September 7, 2017 Category: Primary Care Tags: 15.1 Cardiovascular Problems Source Type: news

Cardiovascular disease warning - charity said this could explain RISE in hospital cases
CARDIOVASCULAR disease - an umbrella term for diseases including coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack, heart rhythm problems, inherited heart disease, aneurysms, peripheral vascular disease and stroke. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Going to university may cut your risk of heart disease
Conclusion This study indicates there may be some genetic support for the idea that spending longer in education contributes to lowering the risk of CHD. The researchers also demonstrate that this may be because people who spend longer in education have a lower BMI and are less likely to smoke. However, there are some limitations to this research that need to be considered: The genetic variations identified as being associated with education may not be markers for education at all, but more basic biological pathways. The authors do not account for the fact that differences in education might be due to brain function, w...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Study: Fat but fit still face higher heart disease risk
Researchers found a higher rate of coronary heart disease among people who are overweight but otherwise healthy. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography
(Bentham Science Publishers) Historically, from the 1930s to the 1950s, the rate of cardiovascular disease in high-income countries was high. Since the mid-1970s, the rate of cardiovascular disease has declined in high income countries, possibly due to socioeconomic inequalities and better management of risk factors for coronary heart disease among the wealthy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For post-menopausal women, vaginal estrogens do not raise risk of cancer, other diseases
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

'Fat but fit' people may still be at risk of heart disease
Conclusion This large, valuable study confirms that – as has long been thought – an increased BMI is linked with an increased risk of heart disease. It shows that people with an obese BMI had a higher risk of heart disease, even if they didn't have other risk factors like high cholesterol and high blood pressure, proving that body fat is an independent risk factor. That said, this study does have some limitations. For example, definitions of being metabolically unhealthy aren't entirely consistent with other definitions of metabolic syndrome. This was also only assessed at the start of the study, and risk fac...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Metabolically healthy obese' at twice the risk of heart disease
Being both obese and healthy might be a myth, researchers say, pointing out that all overweight people are at an increased risk of coronary heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

'Fat but fit' are at increased risk of heart disease
Being overweight increases risk of coronary heart disease by up to 28% Related items fromOnMedica Managing obesity in primary care - Part 2 Managing obesity in primary care - Part 1 Stigmatising overweight people is counterproductive Real food and brisk daily walk best for heart health Nutrition more important than calories, say experts (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Cardiovascular disease cure? One session of THIS could help treat condition
CARDIOVASCULAR disease includes all the diseases of the heart and circulation including coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack, congenital heart disease and stroke. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is angina? THESE symptoms could mean you are suffering with coronary heart disease
ANGINA is an uncomfortable feeling of tightness in the chest, which can often be painful. The symptoms can be easily mistaken for a heart attack, experts warn. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stroke risk: Eating a handful of THIS every day can reduce cholesterol
STROKES happen to more than 100,000 people every year in the UK, and up to 30 per cent of sufferers die within a month. However, adding almonds to your diet could prevent one, as well as reducing your risk of heart attack and coronary heart disease, by lowering your cholesterol. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In assessing risk of hormone therapy for menopause, dose — not form — matters
FINDINGSWhen it comes to assessing the risk of estrogen therapy for menopause, how the therapy is delivered — taking a pill versus wearing a patch on one’s skin — doesn’t affect risk or benefit, researchers at UCLA and elsewhere have found. But with the commonly used conjugated equine estrogen, plus progestogen, the dosage does. Higher doses, especially over time, are associated with greater risk of problems, including heart disease and some types of cancer, especially among obese women.BACKGROUNDThe Women ’s Health Initiative established the potential of estrogen therapy to increase or decrea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Socioeconomic factors and severity of coronary artery disease
(Bentham Science Publishers) Historically, from the 1930's to the 1950's, the rate of cardiovascular disease in high-income countries was high. Since the mid-1970's, the rate of cardiovascular disease has declined in high income countries, possibly due to socioeconomic inequalities and better management of risk factors for coronary heart disease among the wealthy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart disease symptoms: Would YOU know how to spot these five DEADLY types?
HEART disease is the second biggest killer in the UK, but would you be able to spot the signs of types including heart attack, heart failure and coronary heart disease? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Some types of vegetarian diet can raise heart disease risk
Conclusion This large pooled cohort study seems to demonstrate an association between a healthy plant-based diet and reduced risk of coronary heart disease, and an increased risk of heart disease with an unhealthy plant-based diet. This adds to the evidence base supporting the possible benefits of healthy plant-based diets in protecting against certain illnesses. However there are some limitations to the research: The cohort included only health professionals from the US so might not be representative of wider populations in the UK or elsewhere. The study can't provide information on the benefits or otherwise of this d...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Healthy, Plant-Based Diet Linked to Lower Risk for Coronary Heart Disease (FREE)
By Kelly Young Edited by David G. Fairchild, MD, MPH Eating a diet heavy in plants is associated with reduced coronary heart disease risk, provided they're the right plants, suggests a study in the Journal of the American College of … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - July 18, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Heart attack - low levels of THIS vital mineral could be putting you at risk
HEART attacks are one of the main symptoms of coronary heart disease - a major cause of death in the UK. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Higher BMI linked with increased risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, type 2 diabetes
(The JAMA Network Journals) Results of a new study add to the evidence of an association between higher body mass index (BMI) and increased risk of cardiometabolic diseases such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adolescent obesity linked to early mortality from cardiovascular diseases
(The Endocrine Society) While there is solid evidence that adolescent overweight and obesity are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, less is known about the association between body mass index (BMI) and rarer cardiovascular diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changes in Peripheral Blood Cells Linked to Increased CHD Changes in Peripheral Blood Cells Linked to Increased CHD
Genetic changes in peripheral blood cells previously linked to blood cancers are now associated with increased coronary heart disease in humans and accelerated atherosclerosis in mice.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Merck's cholesterol drug clears main goal in late-stage study
(Reuters) - Merck& Co Inc said on Tuesday its cholesterol drug met its main goal of reducing coronary heart diseases in a late-stage study. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Clonal Hematopoiesis Linked to Coronary Heart Disease
CHIP linked to coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction in humans; atherosclerosis in mice (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - June 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Pathology, Geriatrics, Journal, Source Type: news

No gender difference in stress as risk for heart disease
Researchers at UCLA found no difference between men and women when it comes to stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds no gender difference in stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease
This study was supported by the National Institutes of Health. The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - June 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study finds no gender difference in stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Researchers found that although women had higher average levels of urine stress hormones than men, the association between stress and having asymptomatic coronary heart disease as measured by coronary calcium was similar in both genders. In particular, urinary cortisol was a strong independent predictor of asymptomatic coronary heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beta-blockers 'useless' for many heart attack patients, study reports
Conclusion This study aimed to see whether beta blockers reduce mortality in people who've had a heart attack but who don't have heart failure or systolic dysfunction. It found no difference between those who were and those who were not given beta-blockers on discharge from hospital. The authors say this adds to the evidence that routine prescription of beta blockers might not be needed for patients without heart failure following a heart attack. Current UK guidelines recommend all people who have had a heart attack take beta blockers for at least one year to reduce risk of recurrent events. Only people with heart failure ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Source Type: news

Heart attack symptoms - how the shape of your EARS could predict risk
HEART attacks are a symptom of coronary heart disease - a health condition which can be caused by smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart attack symptoms - how your EARS could predict risk of disease
HEART attacks are a symptom of coronary heart disease - a health condition which can be caused by smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When You're Tapped Before Age 30: 5 Behaviors That Burn Us Out
A version of this article was originally published on Forbes. Sign up for Caroline’s newsletter to get her writing sent straight to your inbox. In all likelihood, you know what burnout feels like: Exhaustion, disinterest, poor performance, irritability, lack of empathy. The media often claims it’s caused by bad work environments; bad coworkers; bad bosses. This is partially true: Employees with large caseloads experience burnout more often. And individuals whose jobs revolve around people—such as social workers, customer service representatives, teachers, nurses and police officers—are particularl...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gluten Consumption in Non-Celiac Adults and Risk of CHD Gluten Consumption in Non-Celiac Adults and Risk of CHD
This study looked at the possible risks and benefits of a gluten-free diet as it relates to coronary heart disease.The BMJ (formerly known as the British Medical Journal) (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

'Fat but fit' still at higher risk of heart disease
Conclusion The question of whether someone can be "fat but fit" has been much debated. If you're obese but exercise, eat well and don't have metabolic risk factors, the theory goes, you could be just as healthy as someone of recommended weight. This study suggests that may not be true. It is definitely worth adopting a healthy lifestyle, whatever your weight. The study found that, the more metabolic risk factors people had, the more likely they were to develop heart disease, cardiovascular disease and so on. Metabolic risk factors do make a difference. But in this large study, on average, people who wer...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Obesity Source Type: news

Segregated Neighborhoods May Influence Blood Pressure
(Reuters Health) - African-Americans who move from segregated neighborhoods to more racially diverse communities might experience improvements in their blood pressure, a U.S. study suggests. When researchers looked at the “top number” known as systolic blood pressure - the pressure blood exerts against artery walls when the heart beats - they found moving away from segregated neighborhoods mattered. Relocating to less segregated communities was associated with average decreases of 1.2 to 1.3 mmHG (millimeters of mercury) in systolic blood pressure. “At the population level, a reduction of this magnitude i...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Review finds no link between dairy and heart attack or stroke risk
Conclusion This large meta-analysis of cohort studies demonstrated no increased risk to cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or all-cause death from eating dairy products. The review has strengths in its large size and the fact it was able to analyse different types of dairy product, such as high and low-fat and everyday products such as cheese and yoghurt. However, there are a number of factors to consider: The results of a systematic review are only as good as the quality of the underlying studies. These are all observational studies and it's possible that unadjusted health and lifestyle factors are having an...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news

Eating Full-Fat Cheese Won ’ t Raise Chance Of Heart Attack, Study Finds
CBS Local —  Pass the cheese, please. While it may not be the healthiest thing in the world, a new study claims that full-fat dairy products are not as bad as once thought. Eating full-fat cheese, milk or yogurt does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to a study published in European Journal of Epidemiology, via Guardian, The study was an in-depth analysis of 29 prior studies that looked at the link between dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease or heart problems. Their findings were such that these dairy products have a “neutral” effect on those ar...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cheese study finds Source Type: news

Low-gluten diet linked to heart attack risk
Conclusion This study has found that while overall gluten consumption in people without coeliac disease may not be related to heart disease risk, avoiding whole grains (wheat, barley and rye) in order to avoid gluten may be associated with increased heart disease risk. This study has several strengths, including its large size, the fact that data was collected prospectively and diet assessed at several time-points, the long period of follow up, and that it took into account a wide range of potential confounders. As with all studies of this type, it is possible that other factors may affect the results. However, the researc...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Do not avoid gluten unless you have celiac disease, researchers say
A new study looks at the link between long-term gluten consumption and coronary heart disease among people who do not have celiac disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Scientists find a likely genetic driver of smoking-related heart disease
Cigarette smoking accounts for about one fifth of cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but precisely how smoking leads to CHD has long been unclear. Now, a team has uncovered a molecule that may at least partly explain the smoking-CHD connection. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 2, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Quality of care for peripheral artery disease is low
This study is a “call to action” to identify and implement effective physician-targeted and patient-targeted strategies aimed at improving quality of care. These strategies should take advantage of recent advances in behavior change, including leveraging an individual’s social support network to help them mak e lifestyle changes, and providing physicians with feedback about the quality of care they provide to patients with peripheral artery disease.AUTHORSJoseph Ladapo of UCLA and Jeffrey Berger of New York University.JOURNALThe studyis published online by the Journal of the American College of Cardi...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 1, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Scientists find a likely genetic driver of smoking-related heart disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Cigarette smoking accounts for about one fifth of cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but precisely how smoking leads to CHD has long been unclear. Now, a team co-led by researchers Penn and Columbia has uncovered a molecule that may at least partly explain the smoking-CHD connection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Air Pollution Gets Into The Bloodstream And Damages The Heart
Inhaled nanoparticles like those pumped out in vehicle exhausts can work their way through the lungs and into the bloodstream where they can raise the risk of heart attack and stroke, scientists said on Wednesday. In experiments using harmless ultra-fine particles of gold, the scientists were able for the first time to track how such nanoparticles are breathed in, pass through the lungs and then gain access to the blood. Most worryingly, the researchers said at a briefing in London, the nanoparticles tend to build up in damaged blood vessels of people who already suffer from coronary heart disease – the condition tha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Artery-clogging saturated fat myth debunked
Contrary to popular belief among doctors and the public, saturated fat does not clog up the arteries and cause coronary heart disease, say researchers. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Trial investigates use of asthma drug for patients with heart conditions
(NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at Guy ’ s and St Thomas ’ and King ’ s College London) Researchers at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust have launched an innovative new trial which aims to improve the recovery of patients with serious heart conditions. The CXCR2 inhibition and coronary heart disease (CICADA) study will test if a drug, known as AZD5069, originally developed to treat patients with respiratory conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), can improve recovery from severe angina or heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Q & A: saturated fat, your health and what the experts say
The key points in a debate between cardiology experts over the link between fat, cholesterol and coronary diseaseWhat ’s the fuss about?A furore has blown up over whether eating saturated fat increases the risk of coronary heart disease after three cardiologists said that “the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong”. They also dismissed the drive for foods with lower cholesterol and the use of medications as “misguided”.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 25, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Nutrition Medical research Health & wellbeing Obesity Diets and dieting Heart attack Diabetes Stroke Smoking Doctors Science Source Type: news

CHD and Very Low BP Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Events CHD and Very Low BP Increase Risk of Cardiovascular Events
Results of the CLARIFY study reinforce the assertion that patients with coronary heart disease and very low BP--as well as those with high BP--are at increased risk of CVD events.Evidence-Based Medicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

‘They’re Out There—If We Can Find Them’
Explores the impact of social isolation and loneliness on health, a particular concern in rural areas and for elderly people. Isolation has been linked with higher blood pressure and increased risk for stroke and coronary heart disease. Details these concerns as well as efforts to address them in rural Maine. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - April 12, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

‘They’re Out There — If We Can Find Them’
Explores the impact of social isolation and loneliness on health, a particular concern in rural areas and for elderly people. Isolation has been linked with higher blood pressure and increased risk for stroke and coronary heart disease. Details these concerns as well as efforts to address them in rural Maine. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - April 12, 2017 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: More gray hair linked to higher risk of heart disease
A new observational study finds a correlation between the amount of gray hair in adult men and their risk of coronary heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news