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Coronary heart disease: DMP could be extended by two topics
(Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care) Almost all health care aspects need to be updated. The already third search update for guidelines shows that their number and quality have increased notably in 10 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tooth loss in middle age linked to heart disease
(Reuters Health) - Losing two or more natural teeth in middle age may signal an increased risk for coronary heart disease, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Sugary Drinks, but Not Foods, Linked to Increased Mortality Sugary Drinks, but Not Foods, Linked to Increased Mortality
In the REGARDS study of nearly 18,000 middle-aged people, high consumption of sugary beverages was associated with twice the risk for death from coronary heart disease.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Exercise Could Lower Your Chances of Getting Heart Disease Even if You ’re Genetically at Risk
About one in four deaths in the United States are due to heart disease. But a new study suggests that even if you have a genetic risk for heart disease, there’s a simple way to combat it: Exercise. In the study, researchers looked at data from nearly 500,000 people from England, Scotland and Wales who were participating in a trial called the U.K. Biobank Study. At the start of the trial, the men and women allowed researchers to assess their genetic predispositions for heart disease. They also self-reported their exercise, wore accelerometers to subjectively measure their daily physical activity, wore hand dynamometer...
Source: TIME: Health - April 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Exercise family history of heart disease genetic risk for heart disease onetime Source Type: news

All That Overtime Could Be Killing You
Researchers said they found that working 61 to 70 hours a week increased the risk of coronary heart disease by 42 percent, and working 71 to 80 hours increased it by 63 percent. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tips for balancing diet with potassium for people with kidney disease
(Natural News) Healthcare professionals usually suggest a sufficient potassium intake to lower an individual’s blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular damage, coronary heart disease, and stroke. But according to a review, for patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and those with end stage renal disease (ESRD), potassium intake must be carefully controlled to prevent... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

H. Pylori Linked to Atherosclerosis in Healthy People (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Infected individuals with no history of coronary heart disease had significant subclinical atherosclerosis (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - March 31, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart Disease, Stroke Less Prevalent Among Foreign-Born
WEDNESDAY, March 28, 2018 -- Foreign-born adults living in the United States have a lower prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke than adults born in the United States, according to a study published online March 28 in the Journal of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 28, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Heart disease, stroke less widespread among foreign-born vs. US-born adults
(American Heart Association) Foreign-born adults living in the United States had a lower prevalence of coronary heart disease and stroke than US-born adults in nationally representative data spanning 2006-2014, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People Aren't as Safe From Lead as Thought: Study
The findings revealed a link between low-level exposure and increased risk of premature death. Lead exposure has been associated with hardened arteries, high blood pressure and coronary heart disease, according to the researchers. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More than quarter of British adults living with 2 health conditions
High blood pressure, diabetes, coronary heart disease, depression and cancer are among the most common of the 36 illnesses said to be fuelling Britain's ill-health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For Heart Disease Patients, Think Exercise, Not Weight Loss
In patients with coronary heart disease, exercise lowered the risk of dying, while weight loss did not. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Weight Exercise Heart Deaths (Fatalities) Source Type: news

Internet search trends mirror heart disease patterns
(American College of Cardiology) Search engine queries related to common heart disease symptoms track closely with geographic and seasonal trends for coronary heart disease hospitalizations, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: FDA review finds additional data supports the potential for increased long-term risks with antibiotic clarithromycin (Biaxin) in patients with heart disease
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is advising caution before prescribing the antibiotic clarithromycin (Biaxin) to patients with heart disease because of a potential increased risk of heart problems or death that can occur years later. Our recommendation is based on our review of the results of a 10-year follow-up study1 of patients with coronary heart disease from a large clinical trial2 that first observed this safety issue. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - February 22, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

How to beat heart disease with diet and lifestyle
(Natural News) You can prevent heart disease — eating a healthy diet, such as a plant-based diet, and making healthy lifestyle changes are just some of the steps you can make. Cholesterol is the greatest risk factor for coronary heart disease. It increases in levels because of poor diets. Most people who were raised on a conventional... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Heart disease: 'Just one cigarette daily' raises risk
Just one cigarette per day raises the risk of coronary heart disease to around half that of smoking 20, according to a new review of published evidence. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Smoking / Quit Smoking Source Type: news

Even one cigarette a day greatly raises cardiovascular risk, experts warn
Impact of one daily cigarette on risk of heart disease and stroke greater than previously thoughtSmoking just one cigarette a day is more dangerous than commonly thought, say researchers who have found it still raises the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke to about half the risk from smoking 20 a day.The team behind the study say that the findings emphasise that cutting out cigarettes, rather than just cutting down, is necessary to dramatically reduce the chance of cardiovascular problems – akey cause of premature death among smokers.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Smoking Heart disease Society Health Stroke Medical research Science Source Type: news

Heart disease risk - Seven ways to lower your risk of life-threatening condition
CORONARY heart disease is a type of cardiovascular disease - the leading cause of early death across the world. You can lower your risk of the deadly condition by eating right, and by changing your lifestyle. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rheumatoid Arthritis May Confer Higher Cardiac and Infection Risks Rheumatoid Arthritis May Confer Higher Cardiac and Infection Risks
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of serious infections, myocardial infarction (MI), and coronary heart disease (CHD), an analysis of Medicare claims data suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - January 17, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Rheumatology News Source Type: news

Skinny pigs? Low-fat craze gone too far
Let’s face it. You and I both know most Americans are struggling with their weight. I see it in my practice every day. There’s not one study that will tell you otherwise. What’s more, there’s been an explosion of not only obesity, but of related diseases like diabetes, hypertension and heart disease. But did you realize that the rates of obesity and disease in America began rising at the exact same time the health authorities told us to eat a low-fat diet? It started in 1977 when George McGovern led a Senate Committee that released its “Dietary Goals for the United States.” According to ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - January 17, 2018 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Nutrition clogged arteries fat heart healthy low-fat polyunsaturated fats skinny Weight Loss Source Type: news

Research proves having a hysterectomy before 35, long thought of as “risk free,” QUADRUPLES a woman's risk of heart failure and increases risk of obesity
(Natural News) Studies reveal that a hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the woman’s uterus, increased the risk of congestive heart failure by four times and doubles the likelihood of coronary heart disease. The procedure to excise the uterus is considered a standard procedure for treating certain conditions in the regions such as fibroids and endometriosis. However, there is little research... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Christmas dinner could trigger a heart attack
Overeating is risky for those with coronary heart disease or are at risk for it, said Professor Marvin Lipman from New York Medical College. A single act of overeating could quadruple a heart attack patient's chance. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart disease: Wine could protect against heart conditions this Christmas
DRINKING wine this Christmas time could lower the risk of dying from coronary heart disease, and could help to protect the heart, nutritionists have claimed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lower your risk for heart disease when you make peanuts and tree nuts a regular part of your diet
(Natural News) Consuming most kinds of nuts may result in a decrease in risk of cardiovascular disease and coronary heart disease. According to a study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there is a lowered risk of developing such diseases in people who consume fresh nuts regularly, as compared to people... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Heart disease symptoms: Having a DOG could reduce your risk of DEATH by this much
CARDIOVASCULAR disease risk, including coronary heart disease and strokes, could be lowered by getting a dog, a study has revealed, as Battersea Dogs& Cats Home said the pets could reduce stress and prevent loneliness. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cardiorespiratory fitness is essential to reduce risk of coronary heart disease
(Elsevier) Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a leading cause of death for men in the US. Both cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and the blood triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein ratio (TG:HDL ratio) are strong predictors of death from CHD. In the current issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, two new studies highlight the importance of CRF on subsequent CVD and mortality risk. These articles contribute substantive evidence on the importance of achieving moderate to high levels of CRF in both adults and children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

World Diabetes Day 2017 supports women ’s rights to a healthy future
Today, 14 November, is World Diabetes Day. The theme for this year’s campaign is “Women and diabetes ‒ our right to a healthy future”. The campaign aims to promote the importance of affordable and equitable access for all women at risk of or living with diabetes to the essential diabetes medicines and technologies, self-management education and information they require to achieve optimal diabetes outcomes and to prevent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a menacing pandemic as it remains hidden throughout most of the world – with up to half of all people with diabetes globally remaining undiagnosed. Di...
Source: WHO EMRO News - November 14, 2017 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

What can gorillas teach us?
All the gorillas were dying… Over 50 years of trying to breed gorillas in zoos and nothing was working. It didn’t matter where they tried — San Diego, Cincinnati, St. Louis — not even the best zoos in the country could get these gorillas to reproduce. They were facing extinction. And everyone simply accepted that it was impossible to breed gorillas in zoos. That was until one caretaker took a closer look at what the gorillas were eating. For decades, zoos fed the gorillas what they called gorilla biscuits. But, on top of being unable to reproduce, the gorillas were developing diseases like heart di...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - November 7, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Natural Cures Nutrition carbs coconut oil diabetes gorillas heart disease high blood pressure insulin obesity Syndrome Zero triglycerides Source Type: news

Fragmented Ambulance Services in Sri Lanka Evolve into A Modern System
Fragmented ambulance services evolve into a modern system Situated in the Indian Ocean, separated from India by the Palk Strait, Sri Lanka is the 25th largest island in the world (See Figure 1). Its complex geographical features-peaks, plateaus, valleys, rivers and tropical forests-are subject to a variety of natural hazards, including floods, landslides, cyclones and tsunamis.1 With ancient cultural roots going back to the 6th century B.C., Sri Lanka's modern colonial history began with Portuguese, Dutch and British settlements in the 16th century. By 1815, Britain was the sole colonial power. In 1948, Sri Lanka became an...
Source: JEMS Operations - November 2, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nuwan Chamara Ekanayaka, EMT-I Tags: International Operations Source Type: news

Coronary heart disease: Eight AVOIDABLE factors increasing your risk of DEADLY condition
CORONARY heart disease is a leading cause of death in the UK. Here are the eight lifestyle risk factors to try and avoid. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Six - Month Tai Chi Program Improves Physical Activity in CHD
Improvements in activity, weight, QoL for patients with coronary heart disease refusing cardiac rehab (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - October 12, 2017 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Pulmonology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

Study will Explore Air Pollution ’s Impact on the Developing Fetus
New research will seek to understand the biological mechanisms that are triggered by exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and lead to lower birth weight in newborns, placing them at greater risk for chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease and hypertension later in life. The research will be conducted in Beijing by an international team of researchers. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - October 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Biomarker-Based Risk Models to Risk Stratify Stable CHD Biomarker-Based Risk Models to Risk Stratify Stable CHD
In this commentary, the author examines the utility of a new risk model for coronary heart disease based on circulating biomarkers as well as other clinical variables: the ABC-CHD risk model.Journal of the American College of Cardiology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

Analytics 4 Life lands $25m for AI-backed cardiac imaging tech
Analytics 4 Life said today that it landed $25 million in a Series B financing round. A group of investors, including doctors and medical device experts, contributed to the round. The digital health company’s cardiac imaging tech is designed to help physicians assess the presence of coronary artery disease using signals from the body – without the use of radiation or contrast agents. The company’s first application of its technology is CorVista, a non-invasive diagnostic test that uses an array of sensors to scan signals naturally given from the body. When the sensors are finished collecting data, the sig...
Source: Mass Device - September 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Diagnostics Funding Roundup Imaging analytics4life Source Type: news

IntraHealth International and Novartis Foundation Team Up to Thwart Hypertension in Senegal
Photo by Nana Kofi Acquah courtesy of the Novartis FoundationSeptember 26, 2017IntraHealth International is partnering with the Novartis Foundation, the Senegal Ministry of Health and Social Action, PATH, local health officials, community-based organizations, and other local stakeholders to address hypertension and improve cardiac health among the population of Dakar.Through the new initiative, Better Hearts Better Cities – Dakar, the ministry will test evidence-based, scalable approaches in Dakar that have the potential to thwart the rise of hypertension and othernoncommunicable diseases (NCDs) throughoutSenegal and...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

Education and Coronary Heart Disease Education and Coronary Heart Disease
This study investigates the possible connection.The BMJ (formerly known as the British Medical Journal) (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology Journal Article Source Type: news

South Asians with family history of heart disease at greater risk
(UT Southwestern Medical Center) New research by UT Southwestern cardiologists shows that people of South Asian descent with a family history of coronary heart disease are significantly more likely to have high levels of calcium buildup in their arteries - an indicator of higher risk for heart attacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statins cut heart deaths in men by 28% finds study
Conclusion This new analysis found that men without cardiovascular disease who were prescribed a statin were less likely to go on to develop heart disease or have a major cardiovascular event. These findings from the five-year randomised controlled trial are useful – there's been a lot of debate about whether giving statins to people without any cardiovascular disease is helpful. But it's harder to draw conclusions from the longer term results, as these were from a non-randomised observational period. Potential confounding factors – such as the men's attitude to medicine, risk and health – may have influe...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Statins cut coronary heart disease deaths by 28% in men with high cholesterol
Daily statins reduce deaths from coronary heart disease by 28% in men with very high LDL cholesterol, according to the 'longest ever' study measuring use of the treatment. (Source: GP Online News)
Source: GP Online News - September 7, 2017 Category: Primary Care Tags: 15.1 Cardiovascular Problems Source Type: news

Cardiovascular disease warning - charity said this could explain RISE in hospital cases
CARDIOVASCULAR disease - an umbrella term for diseases including coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack, heart rhythm problems, inherited heart disease, aneurysms, peripheral vascular disease and stroke. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Going to university may cut your risk of heart disease
Conclusion This study indicates there may be some genetic support for the idea that spending longer in education contributes to lowering the risk of CHD. The researchers also demonstrate that this may be because people who spend longer in education have a lower BMI and are less likely to smoke. However, there are some limitations to this research that need to be considered: The genetic variations identified as being associated with education may not be markers for education at all, but more basic biological pathways. The authors do not account for the fact that differences in education might be due to brain function, w...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Study: Fat but fit still face higher heart disease risk
Researchers found a higher rate of coronary heart disease among people who are overweight but otherwise healthy. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Coronary artery disease in patients undergoing coronary angiography
(Bentham Science Publishers) Historically, from the 1930s to the 1950s, the rate of cardiovascular disease in high-income countries was high. Since the mid-1970s, the rate of cardiovascular disease has declined in high income countries, possibly due to socioeconomic inequalities and better management of risk factors for coronary heart disease among the wealthy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For post-menopausal women, vaginal estrogens do not raise risk of cancer, other diseases
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

'Fat but fit' people may still be at risk of heart disease
Conclusion This large, valuable study confirms that – as has long been thought – an increased BMI is linked with an increased risk of heart disease. It shows that people with an obese BMI had a higher risk of heart disease, even if they didn't have other risk factors like high cholesterol and high blood pressure, proving that body fat is an independent risk factor. That said, this study does have some limitations. For example, definitions of being metabolically unhealthy aren't entirely consistent with other definitions of metabolic syndrome. This was also only assessed at the start of the study, and risk fac...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Metabolically healthy obese' at twice the risk of heart disease
Being both obese and healthy might be a myth, researchers say, pointing out that all overweight people are at an increased risk of coronary heart disease. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news

'Fat but fit' are at increased risk of heart disease
Being overweight increases risk of coronary heart disease by up to 28% Related items fromOnMedica Managing obesity in primary care - Part 2 Managing obesity in primary care - Part 1 Stigmatising overweight people is counterproductive Real food and brisk daily walk best for heart health Nutrition more important than calories, say experts (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Cardiovascular disease cure? One session of THIS could help treat condition
CARDIOVASCULAR disease includes all the diseases of the heart and circulation including coronary heart disease, angina, heart attack, congenital heart disease and stroke. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is angina? THESE symptoms could mean you are suffering with coronary heart disease
ANGINA is an uncomfortable feeling of tightness in the chest, which can often be painful. The symptoms can be easily mistaken for a heart attack, experts warn. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stroke risk: Eating a handful of THIS every day can reduce cholesterol
STROKES happen to more than 100,000 people every year in the UK, and up to 30 per cent of sufferers die within a month. However, adding almonds to your diet could prevent one, as well as reducing your risk of heart attack and coronary heart disease, by lowering your cholesterol. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news