Treatment with antidepressant results in lower rate of mental stress-induced cardiac ischemia
(The JAMA Network Journals) Among patients with stable coronary heart disease and mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI), 6 weeks of treatment with the antidepressant escitalopram, compared with placebo, resulted in a lower rate of MSIMI, according to a study in the May 22/29 issue of JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Antidepressant reduces stress-induced heart condition
(Duke University Medical Center) A drug commonly used to treat depression and anxiety may improve a stress-related heart condition in people with stable coronary heart disease, according to researchers at Duke Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Insomnia and sleep duration interact to increase heart disease risk
Long sleep duration and insomnia increase the risk for coronary heart disease among postmenopausal women and may interact to almost double the risk, study findings from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) show. (Source: MedWire News - Cardiology)
Source: MedWire News - Cardiology - May 20, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Patients' Perceptions of Depression and Heart DiseasePatients' Perceptions of Depression and Heart Disease
The prevalence of depression in people with coronary heart disease is high. How do patients perceive the link between their physical condition and mental health? BMC Family Practice (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - May 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Job stress may raise our 'bad cholesterol' levels
Conclusion This study has found an association between job stress and abnormal lipid levels in the blood. Its strengths include the large number of workers assessed (more than 40,000) and the use of the same methods to assess all of the participants. However, the fact that both job stress and lipid levels were assessed at the same time means it is not possible to say for certain whether job stress might have directly caused changes in blood lipid levels. There are also other limitations and points to note: The study did not assess diet. People with job stress may have less healthy diets, which could account for the dif...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Genetic screening could reveal hidden high risk for coronary heart disease
(University of Helsinki) Researchers of the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, and Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare have shown that genetic marker information can improve risk evaluation of coronary heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Seeking An Early Biomarker To Fight Atherosclerosis
The Journal of the American Heart Association has published the conclusive results from a study directed by Dr. Eric Thorin of the Montreal Heart Institute (MHI), which suggests for the first time that a blood protein contributes to the early development of atherosclerosis. Dr. Thorin, his team and his collaborators discovered that the blood levels of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (angptl2) are six times higher in subjects with coronary heart disease than in healthy subjects of the same age... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 15, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

A Woman's Risk Of Heart Disease May Be Increased By Insomnia And Disrupted Sleep During Menopause
Insomnia and other sleep disturbances are common among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and may increase their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence that a combination of altered sleep duration and insomnia among women ages 50-79 doubled their risk of both CHD and CVD over a period of more than 10 years is presented in an article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available on the Journal of Women's Health website... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Detailed Coding, EHR Analysis Superior in ID’ing CHD, Heart Failure
“A recent peer-reviewed article in Preventing Chronic Disease, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found that an EHR-analyzing algorithm that went beyond parsing four-digit ICD-9 data was markedly superior to analysis based solely on those entries. The study was designed to identify and accurately categorize acute coronary heart disease and heart failure events [...] (Source: ICMCC: The International Council on Medical and Care Compunetics)
Source: ICMCC: The International Council on Medical and Care Compunetics - May 3, 2013 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lodewijk Tags: News Algorithms Chronic Heart Failure Coding ICD-10 Source Type: news

The Unexpected Benefits of Compassion for Business
Despite what many may think, research is showing that compassionate workplaces are good both for employees and the corporate bottom line. read more (Source: Psychology Today Anxiety Center)
Source: Psychology Today Anxiety Center - April 22, 2013 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emma M. Seppala, Ph.D. Tags: Anxiety Happiness Stress Work compassion coronary heart disease coworkers customer service employees elevation employee health employee well-being ethic friendship generosity health care expenditures heart rate high health Source Type: news

Association Between Demanding Physical Work And Increased Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease
Two studies presented at this year's EuroPRevent 2013 congress suggest that demanding physical work has a detrimental effect on an individual's risk of coronary heart disease. The first was a case-control study described by Dr Demosthenes Panagiotakos, Associate Professor of Biostatistics-Epidemiology at Harokopio University, Athens, which evaluated occupation in 250 consecutive patients with a first stroke, 250 with a first acute coronary event and 500 equally matched controls... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

PURE: Few People With CVD Worldwide Follow Healthy HabitsPURE: Few People With CVD Worldwide Follow Healthy Habits
In a new analysis from the global PURE study, just 4% of people with known coronary heart disease or past stroke ate well, had quit smoking or never smoked, and exercised regularly. Heartwire (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Very few people with established CVD adhere to healthy habits: PURE
In a new analysis from the global PURE study, just 4% of people with known coronary heart disease or past stroke ate well, had quit smoking or never smoked, and exercised regularly. (Source: theHeart.org)
Source: theHeart.org - April 18, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Demanding physical work associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease
(European Society of Cardiology) Two studies presented at this year's EuroPRevent 2013 congress suggest that demanding physical work has a detrimental effect on an individual's risk of coronary heart disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Demanding physical work associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease
Additional physical activity during leisure time in those who are already physically exhausted from their daily occupation does not induce a 'training' effect but rather an overloading effect on the cardiovascular system. Two studies presented suggest that demanding physical work has a detrimental effect on an individual's risk of coronary heart disease.  Read more  Topics: Cardiovascular Disease Prevention - Risk Assessment and Management (Source: ESC News and Press)
Source: ESC News and Press - April 18, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

In Countries Of Varying Income Levels, Adoption Of Healthy Lifestyle Low By Individuals With Cardiovascular Disease
Among patients with a coronary heart disease or stroke event from countries with varying income levels, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors (such as regular physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking) was low, with even lower levels in poorer countries, according to a study in the April 17 issue of JAMA. "Observational data indicate that following an acute coronary syndrome, those who adhere to a healthier lifestyle have a lower risk of recurrent events... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 17, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiovascular / Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart Patients Slow to Make Healthy Choices (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Roughly one in seven patients do not adopt healthy lifestyle changes after suffering a stroke or developing coronary heart disease, researchers found. (Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular)
Source: MedPage Today Cardiovascular - April 17, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Hard times in Cuba linked to better national health
Conclusion This is an interesting study that appears to show that modest weight loss within a relatively short period across the whole population is associated with a downward trend in diabetes and reductions in death rates from both diabetes and heart disease. Similarly, weight regain was associated with an increase in diabetes incidence, prevalence and mortality as well as a slowing down in the decline of cardiovascular deaths. This type of study draws on many different data sources and, as such, there is a possibility of error. Also, as the authors point out, data was missing on diabetes incidence during the crisis year...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Diabetes Source Type: news

Well: Risks: Balding and Heart Disease
Male pattern baldness, the kind that starts at the top or back of the head, may indicate an increased risk for coronary heart disease, according to a new analysis. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: By NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Baldness Heart Body Featured Source Type: news

VIDEO: Male baldness 'indicates heart risk'
Men who are bald have a much higher chance of developing coronary heart disease, according to researchers in Japan. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baldness Linked To Higher Risk Of Coronary Heart Disease
Male pattern baldness is linked to a higher risk of coronary heart disease, but only if it is on the top/crown of a man's head. The finding came from a new study published in the journal BMJ Open which also showed that a receding hairline is not associated with an elevated risk of the disease. The investigators searched the Medline and Cochrane Library databases for studies published on male pattern baldness and coronary heart disease. The experts found 850 potential reports that were published between 1950 and 2012... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Male-pattern baldness linked with coronary heart disease
The severity of male-pattern baldness increased the risk of coronary disease, even in younger subjects, report investigators. A receding hairline, on the other hand, was not associated with an increased risk of heart disease. (Source: theHeart.org)
Source: theHeart.org - April 4, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Body Mass Index (BMI) And Coronary Heart Disease
Coronary heart disease (CHD) increases with BMI, as well as with age, finds an article published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine. The research from the Million Women Study indicates that increased weight increases risk of CHD equivalent to that caused by getting older. Researchers from the University of Oxford followed the health of 1.2 million women from England and Scotland for (on average) almost a decade... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Risk For Coronary Heart Disease Increases With BMI
Coronary heart disease (CHD) increases with BMI, as well as with age, finds an article published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine. The research from the Million Women Study indicates that increased weight increases risk of CHD equivalent to that caused by getting older. Researchers from the University of Oxford followed the health of 1.2 million women from England and Scotland for (on average) almost a decade... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

Body Mass Index and coronary heart disease
(BioMed Central) Coronary heart disease increases with BMI, as well as with age, finds an article published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine. The research from the Million Women Study indicates that increased weight increases risk of CHD equivalent to that caused by getting older. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 1, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Park perks: Teenagers who live close to a park are more physically active
California teenagers who live close to a park or open space are more likely to get exercise than those who live in areas without parks nearby, a new policy brief from the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research shows.While the findings might not be surprising, they are important in park-starved areas of California. Across the state, only 25 percent of adolescents live near a park or open space. But those who do seem to benefit, according to the study, which linked 2009 California Health Interview Survey data to park locations provided by the Trust for Public Land.Nearly 45 percent of California teens who live near a pa...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 27, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The UK National Health Service: delivering equitable treatment across the spectrum of coronary disease
Source: Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Area: Evidence> Medicines Management> References Background: Social gradients in cardiovascular mortality across the United Kingdom may reflect differences in incidence, disease severity or treatment.  It is unknown whether a universal healthcare system delivers equitable lifesaving medical therapy for coronary heart disease.  We therefore examined secular trends in the use of key medical therapies stratified by socioeconomic circumstances across a broad spectrum of coronary disease presentations, including acute coronary syndromes, secondary preven...
Source: NeLM - Cardiovascular Medicine - March 26, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Can we treat a 'new' coronary heart disease risk factor?
(Columbia University Medical Center) Heart attack survivors with depression have a markedly increased risk of death or another heart attack. New findings from Columbia's Dr. Karina Davidson report a new cost-effective, patient-centered model of treating heart attack survivors for depression -- ultimately reducing their medical risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 21, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Burnout Independently Linked To Coronary Heart Disease
If your job burns you out, it looks like your heart health can suffer as well as your mental health, according to a study by researchers from Tel Aviv University (TAU) in Israel reported in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine. In their study of nearly 9,000 male and female workers, researchers from the Faculty of Management and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine at TAU, found a link between job burnout and coronary heart disease that was independent of other known risk factors... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 14, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Anxiety / Stress Source Type: news

Study: Job Burnout Associated With a 79% Increased Risk of Heart Disease
Over an average of only three and a half years of follow-up, those with burnout were 1.4 times more likely to develop coronary heart disease. For the 20 percent of patients who most identified with the symptoms of burnout, that risk was increased by 79 percent. (Source: RWJF News Digest - Public Health)
Source: RWJF News Digest - Public Health - March 13, 2013 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Job burnout can severely compromise heart health
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Dr. Sharon Toker of Tel Aviv University has found a link between job burnout and coronary heart disease (CHD), the buildup of plaque in the coronary arteries that leads to angina and heart attacks. She says that her findings were more extreme than she expected and make burnout a stronger predictor of CHD than many other risk factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 12, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Global Study Suggests Dental Health Could Someday Be A Useful Risk Marker For Heart Disease
Poor dental health, especially tooth loss, is associated with several established cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, smoking, blood pressure, obesity and other novel risk factors, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session. Although several studies have proposed a link between periodontal disease and coronary heart disease, knowledge about periodontal disease in patients with established heart disease is lacking... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

TV Advertising Of Statins May Have Side Effects
Television advertising may drive over-diagnosis of high cholesterol and over-treatment with statins, according to a new study¹ by Dr. Jeff Niederdeppe from Cornell University in the US and colleagues. It appears that a trip to the doctor enquiring about statins advertised on TV often leads to a prescription. The work appears online in the Journal of General Internal Medicine², published by Springer. Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US, and high levels of LDL-cholesterol, or 'bad' cholesterol, are a major contributor... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Statins Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet 'cuts strokes and heart attacks in at-risk groups'
Research shows diet can reduce risk for people who smoke, have type 2 diabetes or exhibit other unhealthy characteristicsFollowing a Mediterranean diet rich in either extra-virgin olive oil or nuts reduces the risk of people at risk of a heart attack or stroke suffering either event or dying of a heart condition by 30%, new research reveals.The findings, published online by the New England Journal of Medicine, offer hope to those in danger of a heart attack or stroke because they smoke, have type 2 diabetes or exhibit other unhealthy characteristics. They also confirm that the diet common in southern European countries, wh...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 25, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Denis Campbell Tags: Heart attack The Guardian Diets and dieting Health Medical research & wellbeing Food drink Society Life and style Editorial Science Source Type: news

Tanzania: New Cath Lab to Cut Cardiovascular Treatment Costs
[Daily News]TREATMENT for cardiovascular diseases, including coronary heart disease and stroke will be made easy and available locally at affordable costs thanks to plans to open up a catheterization lab at Aga Khan Hospital, next year. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 25, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Coronary Heart Disease And History Of Stroke A Fatal Combination
The cardiology service team at the Hopital Bichat and the Mixed INSERM Unit 698 (AP-HP, Universite Paris Diderot), in collaboration with international teams of researchers, studied a cohort of patients suffering from coronary disease. The study showed that those patients with a history of stroke or transient ischæmic attack (TIA) are not only at higher risk of cardio-vascular episodes but also of haemorrhagic events, stressing the therapeutic challenge involved in treating such patients. The research is published online in Circulation... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Stroke Source Type: news

Which Fats Really Are Good For Your Heart?
WebMD Medical News By Kathleen Doheny Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD Feb. 6, 2013 — The standard advice about which fats are best for heart health is under debate again. Triggering it is new research, just published in BMJ, finding that a form of omega-6 fatty acid found in vegetable oils may actually boost heart disease risk. Omega-6 fatty acids are a type of polyunsatured fat, which has generally been considered heart healthy. The new findings could significantly alter the advice about which type of fats to eat, some experts say. The new research warrants another look at the current recommendations, says a spoke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 20, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: mreal197 Tags: WebMD News Source Type: news

New Therapeutic Target Identified For Coronary Heart Disease
Scientists investigating how certain genes affect an individual's risk of developing coronary heart disease have identified a new therapeutic target, according to research published in The American Journal of Human Genetics. They have discovered that an enzyme known as ADAMTS7 plays a crucial role in the build-up of cells in the coronary arteries which lead to coronary heart disease. Coronary heart disease (also known as coronary artery disease) is the nation's biggest killer, with around 94,000 deaths in the UK each year*... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news

History of stroke and coronary heart disease -- a fatal combination
(INSERM (Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale)) The cardiology service team at the Hôpital Bichat and the Mixed INSERM Unit 698 (AP-HP, Université Paris Diderot), in collaboration with international teams of researchers, studied a cohort of patients suffering from coronary disease. The study showed that those patients with a history of stroke or transient ischæmic attack are not only at higher risk of cardio-vascular episodes but also of haemorrhagic events, stressing the therapeutic challenge involved in treating such patients. The research is published online in Circu...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 18, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scientists identify new therapeutic target for coronary heart disease
(Queen Mary, University of London) Scientists investigating how certain genes affect an individual's risk of developing coronary heart disease have identified a new therapeutic target, according to research published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Michigan's Obesity Straining More Than Waistlines
Now ranked fifth in the nation in obesity, state residents are on track to rack up 1.4 million new cases of type 2 diabetes, 2.9 million cases of coronary heart disease and 2.6 million cases of high blood pressure over the next 20 years, a national study found… That prognosis only underscores the stakes for Michigan's health-care network, given the fact it already leads the nation in the number of people dropped from employer-based health care in the past decade. Editor’s Note: The report predicting rates of obesity and obesity-related disease over the next 20 years was produced by Trust for America’s H...
Source: RWJF News Digest - Childhood Obesity - February 14, 2013 Category: Eating Disorders and Weight Management Source Type: news

Spread the news: butter may not be a yellow peril after all
New research shows that men who had had a heart attack were more likely to die from coronary heart disease when they replaced saturated fats with polyunsaturated fat in margarine, says Angela Dowden (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - February 13, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cardiovascular Risk Management in Coronary Heart DiseaseCardiovascular Risk Management in Coronary Heart Disease
This study examined various quality indicators associated with cardiovascular risk management in patients with coronary heart disease treated in primary care. Does practice size have an impact? BMC Family Practice (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Journal Article Source Type: news

Longer life through sexbots? Dream on!
Futurists as well as celebrity medic Dr. Oz claim that more and better sex will extend one's life expectancy. These claims extrapolate wildly beyond current scientific knowledge. read more (Source: Psychology Today Sex Center)
Source: Psychology Today Sex Center - February 8, 2013 Category: Sexual Medicine Authors: Scott A. McGreal, MSc. Tags: Health Personality Sex coronary heart disease dr mehmet oz dr oz frankel frequent orgasms having sex human lifespan human longevity life expectancy men s health mortality rate relationship status robots sex celebrity sex Source Type: news

Stress at work unlikely to trigger common cancers, say researchers
Study published by BMJ found no evidence of link between job strain and risk of colorectal, lung, breast or prostate cancers Stress at work is highly unlikely to be a cause of the four most common types of cancer, according to a large international review of previous research.Breast, prostate, colorectal and lung cancers are probably not triggered by job-related stress, say the researchers, even though many people assume there is a link. But data from 12 well-conducted trials in six countries between 1985 and 2008, pooled in a meta-analysis which allows scientists to be more certain of their conclusions, shows no increase ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 8, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Sarah Boseley Tags: The Guardian World news Health Medical research Society Cancer Science Source Type: news

Diagnostic Confidence Key for Prompt Treatment for Women with Heart Symptoms
08/29/2012, Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Doctors who believe that women have "atypical" coronary heart disease symptoms are less certain when diagnosing heart disease in women. As a result, women are less likely than men to receive treatments for an urgent cardiac event, finds a new study in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. (Source: Health Behavior News Service)
Source: Health Behavior News Service - February 6, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could 'healthy' margarine fats be bad for you?
Conclusion Contrary to received wisdom, this research suggests that not all polyunsaturated fatty acids are good for the heart (the so-called "cardioprotective effect"). This study has several strengths. It was a randomised controlled trial, using just one type of oil to increase consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids. However, the study also has its limitations. The dietary data collected during the original trial does not contain enough information to rule out the possibility that changes in other nutrients could have been caused the effect seen. In this trial, participants were ad...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eating tomatoes cuts heart disease risk by a quarter... but doesn't protect against strokes
Eating tomatoes over 11-year period reduced the risk of coronary heart disease by 26 per cent but had no effect on the chances of a stroke, according to a study from Tufts University in Boston. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does a veggie diet lead to a healthier heart?
Conclusion This large and impressive prospective cohort study suggests that a vegetarian diet may benefit your heart, reducing the risk of IHD. However, there are important limitations to the study that should be considered before assuming the results apply broadly to the whole of the UK. First, this study specifically and actively recruited vegetarians and vegans. In addition to GP practice-based recruitment, the researchers “aimed to recruit health-conscious people living throughout the UK”. People who take the effort to get involved in research involving diet and health tend to be more health conscious tha...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 31, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Loneliness corrodes health
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Jan. 22 (UPI) -- Loneliness boosts inflammation, which is linked to coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease, U.S. researchers suggest. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 22, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news