How to live longer: Drinking this many cups of coffee can boost life longevity
HOW TO live longer: When it comes to living a longer and healthier life we are bombarded by information overload when it comes to all things we should avoid, from sugar, salt and certain fats, the list is endless. When it comes to what we can have, a certain hot beverage loved by many is recommended and the exact science suggests this many cups a day to increase life expectancy. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Valley health system gets name on Diamondbacks training facility
Banner Health, the state of Arizona's largest employer and health system, now has its name on one of the Arizona Diamondbacks ’ team facilities as part of an new partnership between the two organizations. As the Major League Baseball team's pitchers and catchers took the field for the first time in preparation for the 2020 season Wednesday, the Diamondbacks and Banner unveiled the newly named complex called the Banner S ports Medicine Performance Center. It is at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 13, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Brandon Brown Source Type: news

The Pacific Community launches the Pacific Healthy Recipe Contest
By External SourceFeb 12 2020 (IPS-Partners) The Pacific Community (SPC) is calling for contestants to join the Pacific Healthy Recipe Contest and showcase their cooking skills and creativity to promote healthy eating and prevention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Up to 75 per cent of deaths in Pacific countries are related to NCDs, such as diabetes and heart diseases, with unhealthy diets and lifestyles seen as important factors in their development. From observation, the Pacific diet has changed over time and consumption of local foods has transitioned into consumption of more imported processed foods that are high...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Asia-Pacific Food & Agriculture Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How to live longer: A handful of this tasty treats proven to increase life expectancy
HOW TO live longer: We are all well aware that a healthy diet equals a healthy life. Cutting down on saturated and trans fat, reducing salt intake, exercising regularly and drinking moderately will all create the healthy results we want. When it comes to mid meal snacking, one tasty treat has been proven to not only boost life longevity, but also ward off some of the most serious diseases. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Less advertising for high-calorie snacks on children's TV
(University of Bonn) The number of overweight children has increased significantly. Some food and beverage companies have signed a voluntary commitment at EU level to restrict advertising of foods high in fat, sugar and salt to children. A study by scientists at the University of Bonn shows: The number of corresponding commercials aimed at children decreased in Germany once this agreement had been put in place, but the companies also exploit loopholes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

EPA Says It Did Not Identify Any Human Health Risks From Glyphosate Exposure
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Jan. 22 issued an interim registration review decision for glyphosate and its various salt forms in which the agency said it did not identify any human health risks from exposure to glyphosate, although there is a "potential ecological risk" to mammals and birds. (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - February 5, 2020 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Cigarette Use Down, E-Cigarette Use Up Among Teens
MONDAY, Feb. 3, 2020 -- Cigarette use is dropping among teens, but electronic cigarette use is on the rise, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Pediatrics. Sunday Azagba, Ph.D., from University of Utah in Salt Lake City, and colleagues... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Our Message at Davos: Water & Sanitation Are a Critical Line of Defence Against Climate Change
Credit: WaterAid/ DRIK/ Habibul HaqueBy Tim WainwrightLONDON, Jan 31 2020 (IPS) There was only one topic on everyone’s lips at Davos this year – climate change. The headlines focused on the cold war between Greta Thunberg and Donald Trump, but there was much greater consensus among those gathered for the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF). The Forum itself updated its manifesto for responsible business – with climate right at its core. Among those calling for urgent action was WaterAid’s own president, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales. It’s more than 30 years since he last...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tim Wainwright Tags: Civil Society Climate Change Development & Aid Environment Featured Global Headlines Health Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

Dural Sealant Patch Made of of Bioresorbable Polymers Earns CE Mark
Liqoseal, a dural sealant patch made of bioresorbable polymers, has received the CE mark and is now commercially available in Europe. Developed by Polyganics, the patch could help reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after elective cranial surgery. CSF leakage is “a widely recognized complication of neurosurgical procedures that can result in increased morbidity, prolonged hospital stays, possible surgical revisions, and enhanced costs,” Rudy Mareel, Polyganics’s CEO, told MD+DI. “Incidence rates vary depending on age, indication, locat...
Source: MDDI - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Materials Source Type: news

Dural Sealant Patch Made of Bioresorbable Polymers Earns CE Mark
Liqoseal, a dural sealant patch made of bioresorbable polymers, has received the CE mark and is now commercially available in Europe. Developed by Polyganics, the patch could help reduce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after elective cranial surgery. CSF leakage is “a widely recognized complication of neurosurgical procedures that can result in increased morbidity, prolonged hospital stays, possible surgical revisions, and enhanced costs,” Rudy Mareel, Polyganics’s CEO, told MD+DI. “Incidence rates vary depending on age, indication, locat...
Source: MDDI - January 28, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Materials Source Type: news

The five: factors that affect early greying
As researchers confirm that stress can turn you grey, we look at the other scientific factors that could salt-and-pepper your crowning gloryThis week, scientists from Harvard demonstrated that stress canaccelerate the greying of human hair. The researchers found that stress prompts the production of a hormone that affects the melanocyte cells involved in making hair pigments. The scientists hope that this discovery will add to the understanding of how the depletion of stem cells contributes to ageing in general.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Anna Cooper Tags: Ageing Genetics Biology Science Health Society Source Type: news

Study suggests Europa, Jupiter's Moon, contains table salt in its oceans just like the oceans on Earth
(Natural News) A study published in the journal Science Advances believes that subterranean oceans lurking underneath the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa may have a similar salt composition to oceans on Earth after the Hubble Space Telescope spotted sodium chloride, or salt, on the surface of the icy moon. Scientists now believe that other similarities may be discovered between the oceans of the two worlds.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Don't cut salt completely: Study discovers that high-salt diets inhibit tumor growth
(Natural News) Having too much salt in your diet is incredibly unhealthy. High-salt intake can exacerbate conditions like multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, when it comes to cancer, a team of researchers is now suggesting that increasing the amount of salt in your diet may have some beneficial effects, particularly when it comes to fighting... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The End Is Nigh: Doomsday Clock Reaches 100 Seconds to Midnight
Here’s the bad news: we’ve all got just 100 seconds to live. Here’s the good news: they’re metaphorical seconds, but the fact is we’ve got just 100 of them and when they tick down, it really could be the end of human life. That grim assessment comes from this morning’s update of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists‘ Doomsday Clock, announced at a press event in Washington, DC, during which the venerable nuclear watchdog group made its annual announcement of how close humanity is to destroying itself by the twin threats of nuclear weapons and climate change. The position of the clo...
Source: TIME: Science - January 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized climate change doomsday clock global politics Nuclear Weapons onetime Source Type: news

Social Media Helped Juul Dominate the Vaping Market. Now, Teens Are Using It to Help Each Other Quit
Juul Labs, the e-cigarette company so popular its name became a verb, wouldn’t be where it is without social media. In the company’s early years, a steady stream of posts from users and influencers helped turn Juul from a smoking alternative to a cultural phenomenon. So many Juul users—many of them teenagers—voluntarily posted about vaping that it hardly made a difference when the company in 2018 silenced its own accounts to help stem its popularity among underage users. Now, in the wake of a vaping-related lung disease outbreak that has sickened almost 2,700 and killed 60, teenagers and young adult...
Source: TIME: Health - January 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health vaping Source Type: news

Why the Coronavirus Should Worry Us All
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of MERS virus particles (yellow) both budding and attached to the surface of infected VERO E6 cells (blue). Credit: NIAIDBy Ifeanyi NsoforABUJA, Jan 21 2020 (IPS) The coronavirus outbreak — which began in Wuhan, China, and causes a pneumonia-like illness — is raging across Asia, infecting close to 300 people and killing four. It was initially known to be transmitted from animals to human, and was just confirmed to be transmitted from human to human. The rapid nature of its origin and speed in transmission reminds us that national security is threatened when ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Ifeanyi Nsofor Tags: Global Headlines Health Source Type: news

New study debunks notion that salt consumption contributes to weight loss
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that reducing sodium intake in adults with elevated blood pressure or hypertension decreased thirst, urine volume and blood pressure, but did not affect metabolic energy needs. These results support the traditional notion that decreasing sodium intake is critical to managing hypertension -- disputing recent studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Don't cut salt completely: Animal study discovers that high-salt diets can inhibit tumor growth
(Natural News) Having too much salt in your diet is incredibly unhealthy. High-salt intake can exacerbate conditions like multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel diseases. However, when it comes to cancer, a team of researchers is now suggesting that increasing the amount of salt in your diet may have some beneficial effects, particularly when it comes to fighting... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study suggests Europa, Jupiter's Moon, contains table salt in its oceans just like the oceans on Earth
(Natural News) A study published in the journal Science Advances believes that subterranean oceans lurking underneath the surface of Jupiter’s moon Europa may have a similar salt composition to oceans on Earth after the Hubble Space Telescope spotted sodium chloride, or salt, on the surface of the icy moon. Scientists now believe that other similarities may be discovered between the oceans of the two worlds.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Evolution of experiential learning opportunities for nursing students after natural disaster - Sickora C, Salt RJ, Page TS, Lee W, Cantu AG, Lee M, Schwab KW, Martinez ML, Byrd D.
BACKGROUND: Natural disasters, such as Hurricane Harvey, can provide unique hands-on learning experiences for nursing students. METHOD: The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing deployed teams of faculty and stu... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Researchers Find Salt Could Be Used To Treat Cancer
BOSTON (CBS) — There may be a new weapon to attack cancer cells with less harm to the patient, and it you can probably find it right on your kitchen table. It’s salt, which is also called sodium chloride. Researchers at the University of Georgia used sodium chloride nano-particles as a so-called “Trojan Horse” to deliver cancer-killing sodium and chloride ions into cancer cells. But they say the treatment isn’t toxic because when the nano-particles degrade, they just turn into salt. In fact, when they injected these salt nano-particles into tumors in mice, the sodium chloride nano-particles su...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Cancer Treatments Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Using salt to fight cancer
A recent study in mice finds that salt nanoparticles can kill cancer cells. The results also show that the dead cells act as a cancer vaccine. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Infugem (Gemcitabine in Sodium Chloride injection) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - January 15, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

How to make it easier to turn plant waste into biofuels
(Rutgers University) Researchers have developed a new process that could make it much cheaper to produce biofuels such as ethanol from plant waste and reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Their approach, featuring an ammonia-salt based solvent that rapidly turns plant fibers into sugars needed to make ethanol, works well at close to room temperature, unlike conventional processes, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Green Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

You May Be Surprised by How Much Salt You're Eating
FDA is encouraging industry to gradually reduce the amount of sodium in foods. Consumers have the opportunity to comment. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FDA Source Type: news

You May Be Surprised by How Much Salt You're Eating
FDA is encouraging industry to gradually reduce the amount of sodium in foods. Consumers have the opportunity to comment. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - January 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Addressing hypertension, reducing sodium intake and avoiding trans fat could improve the heart health of 94 million people – study
This study, published in the journal Circulation, is estimating that these three interventions could significantly reduce the number of people dying from cardiovascular... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tesla vehicles are now committing homicide on the streets of America. Why isn't the corporation being held responsible?
(Natural News) A few days into the new year it was reported that yet another Tesla car had gotten into a serious accident, smashing into a moving vehicle at a “high rate of speed” before its highly flammable battery suddenly burst into flames. The incident took place in Salt Lake City, and while some news... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rare salt formations in Utah could offer clues about life on Mars
Tiny crystals found on edge of Great Salt Lake may offer insight about similar structures on the red planet, scientists sayRare salt formations have been documented for the first time on the shores of the Great Salt Lake, and they could yield insights about salt structures found onMars before they disappear for good.They ’re showing up now in part because water levels at the largest natural lake west of the Mississippi have been lowered by drought and water diversion, exposing more shoreline. It’s a story that’s playing out throughout the American west as a growing population puts more demand on scarce wa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Utah Space Environment Mars Science US news Source Type: news

Forget What You Think You Know About Blue Light and Sleep
It’s become a virtually unchallenged piece of conventional wisdom that exposure to blue light—the type emitted by electronic device screens—is bad for sleep. That thinking has spurred a mini-industry of innovations meant to stop those effects, like warm-toned “night mode” settings on gadgets and glasses that claim to block blue light. But in December, a group of researchers at the University of Manchester in the U.K. published a paper in Current Biology challenging that notion. After exposing mice to lights that were different in hue but equal brightness and assessing their subsequent activity...
Source: TIME: Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized sleep Wellness Source Type: news

Two bacon rashers can contain more salt than TWELVE packets of ready salted crisps
A review of 171 bacon products in British supermarkets also revealed nine out of 10 were saltier than seawater. Marks and Spencer's middle bacon was the worst culprit. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Upside-down molecules on a salt surface
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Suleymanov, Y. Tags: Chemistry twis Source Type: news

Flipping carbon monoxide on a salt surface
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 9, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wu, S. Tags: Chemistry perspective Source Type: news

The effects of microplastics on organisms in coastal areas
(Wiley) Microplastics (plastic particles under 5 mm) are an abundant type of debris found in salt and freshwater environments. In a Limnology& Oceanography Letters study, researchers demonstrated the transfer of microplastics through the food chain between microscopic prey and larval fish that live in coastal ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is beetroot ketchup really a healthier option? New condiments that claim to be better for you
Mayonnaise, ketchup and other condiments can add a good hit of salt and sugar - and unwanted calories - to our food. But manufacturers are now offering sauces with added health benefits. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Better Choices for a Fast, Healthy Lunch
MONDAY, Dec. 30, 2019 -- Rushed for lunch? Yes, that nearby fast-food chain is convenient, but by tweaking your choices you can cut unwanted salt, fat and calories. When the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) updates its food guidelines, it... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 30, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Ocular injuries associated with air-powered salt guns - Thayer J, Johnson DA.
This report discusses the potential ocular injuries associated with an air-powered salt gun, a new product that may appeal to children. The authors hope to inform both providers and patients of the potential risks and treatment considerations if an injury ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Lannett To Commence Marketing Generic Adderall(R) XR
PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 12, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Lannett Company, Inc. (NYSE: LCI) today announced that it expects to commence marketing in the coming months a generic version of Adderall XR®, an extended-release mixed salt of ... Biopharmaceuticals, Generics, Product Launch Lannett Company, Shire Plc, Adderall, amphetamine (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - December 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Attorney Fees Awarded To Disability Claimant Based On Success On Merits
SALT LAKE CITY - A Utah federal judge on Nov. 21 awarded a disability claimant attorney fees after determining that the claimant's success on the merits of a long-term disability (LTD) benefits claim warrants the award of attorney fees (Don Foust v. Lincoln National Life Insurance Co., No. 17-1208, D. Utah, 2019 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 202915). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Disability Insurance Legal News - December 11, 2019 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Road salt pollutes lake in one of the largest US protected areas, new study shows
(Taylor& Francis Group) New research shows road salt runoff into Mirror Lake in Adirondack Park prevents natural water turnover and therefore poses a risk to the balance of its ecology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Two patients die after eating absorbent gel granules in hospital
NHS hospitals in England have been warned to stop using absorbing gel granules because confused and vulnerable patients have died after trying to eat them like salt or sugar. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Beset by neural tube defects, Ethiopia may fortify salt
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 5, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wadman, M. Tags: Epidemiology, Medicine, Diseases In Depth Source Type: news

Tel Aviv University's Prof. Carmit Levy receives Young Investigator Award from SMR
(American Friends of Tel Aviv University) Tel Aviv University's Prof. Carmit Levy received the prestigious Young Investigator Award at the 16th International Congress of the Society for Melanoma Research, held Nov. 20-23 in Salt Lake City, Utah, for her 'contributions to melanoma research that significantly exceeded the average for this career stage.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

It ’s Not Just Flooding in Venice. Here’s How Climate Change Threatens World Heritage Sites Everywhere
Venice is reeling from the worst flooding the city has experienced in 50 years, the city is “on its knees,” Venetian Mayor Luigi Brugnaro tweeted as water submerged much of the the famous historical city. The floods penetrated Saint Mark’s Basilica, a 1,000 year old church that is considered to be one of the finest examples of Byzantine architecture in the world and one of the city’s most famous landmarks. While floods are a normal part of life in Venice, which is famously built on a lagoon at the edge of the Adriatic Sea, they have never happened with such frequency before. Experts say that climate...
Source: TIME: Science - November 23, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized climate change onetime Science Source Type: news

Infection Likely Cause of One in Eight Stillbirths
WEDNESDAY, Nov. 20, 2019 -- Most cases of infection-related stillbirth may be due to bacterial pathogens, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Obstetrics& Gynecology. Jessica M. Page, M.D., from the University of Utah in Salt Lake... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - November 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Winning the ‘No Food Loss’ Battle: The Case of Japan
Veena S. Kulkarni, PhD is Associate Professor, Department of Criminology, Sociology and Geography, Arkansas State University, USABy Veena S. KulkarniARKANSAS, Nov 20 2019 (IPS) Humankind since almost the time that there is recorded history has grappled with the question of ‘how many is too many?’ The response is expectedly complex as it varies across time and space. The pace of population growth was slow till about approximately 250 years or so. It is only since the middle of the eighteenth century that there has been a palpable acceleration in population growth. Veena S. KulkarniThe intervals in which we have...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Veena Kulkarni Tags: Aid Economy & Trade Education Environment Food & Agriculture Food Sustainability Global Headlines Health Natural Resources Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Barilla Center for Food and Nutrit Source Type: news

Milestone reached in new leukemia drug
(Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory) Using a chemical compound called YKL-05-099, a team of cancer researchers from CSHL and the Dana Farber Institute was able to target the Salt-Inducible Kinase 3 (SIK3) pathway and extend survival in mice with MLL leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-salt diet triggers changes in mouse brains
Mice fed a very high-salt diet showed accumulation of a protein in the brain linked with Alzheimer ’s disease and other dementias. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - November 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Hold the salt,' says Mayo, as winter approaches
Mayo Clinic's giant Rochester campus includes 15 miles of sidewalks and 120 acres of parking lots and roads. That kind of property requires plenty of plowing in winter — but not as much road salt as it used to. Minnesota Public Radio reports on how Mayo's ground maintenance crews have cut back on heavy, frequent use of salt, citing the impact on water sources from runoff. The clinic, of course, also has to keep in mind patient safety, meaning icy sidewalks are also a bad outcome. The Minnesota… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 18, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news

15-year study finds treatment gaps exist for patients with peripheral arterial disease
(Intermountain Medical Center) In a new 15-year study, researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that patients with eripheral arterial disease may not be prescribed life-saving medications at the same rate as for other heart conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news