RoosterBio Signs Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with...
RoosterBio will support biofabrication in austere environments for the U.S. military and expand 4DBio3 Ready to Print education and training initiatives.(PRWeb September 30, 2020)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/roosterbio_signs_cooperative_research_and_development_agreement_with_the_geneva_foundation_and_the_uniformed_services_university/prweb17434268.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - September 30, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

40% of world ’s plant species at risk of extinction
Race against time to save plants and fungi that underpin life on Earth, global data showsTwo in five of the world ’s plant species are at risk of extinction as a result of the destruction of the natural world, according to an international report.Plants and fungi underpin life on Earth, but the scientists said they were now in a race against time to find and identify species before they were lost.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Plants Biodiversity Conservation Environment Fungi Wildlife Biology Science Food security Farming Climate change Global development Society Source Type: news

Near-blind Ansell's mole-rats detect magnetic cues with eyes, study shows
Research shows Zambian species with surgically removed eyes change nest-building habits but other behaviours remain intactNear-blind, underground-burrowing, African Ansell ’s mole-rats can sense magnetic fields with their eyes, a study has found.Native to Zambia, the animals have eyes that span just 1.5mm in diameter, live in elaborate underground tunnel systems ofup to 1.7 miles (2.8km)long and feed on plant tubers and roots.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover Science correspondent Tags: Animals Science World news Zambia Wildlife Africa Environment Source Type: news

This Fall ’s College Reopenings Were a Mess—Here’s How to Avoid COVID-19 Outbreaks Next Semester
Despite dire warnings this summer from public health experts, over a third of U.S. colleges and universities went full steam ahead with reopening, saying they had no choice due to financial or political pressures. The results, in some instances, have been catastrophic. From August 26 to September 10, 2020, there were at least 62,000 new positive test results at U.S. colleges and universities. A recent preprint study reports that colleges that reopened for in-person instruction this fall probably contributed more than 3,000 cases daily to their counties. About half of the counties with colleges around the country reported t...
Source: TIME: Health - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gavin Yamey and Nahid Bhadelia Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

A dose of toxic synthetic chemicals: Researchers detect "forever chemicals" in California's drinking water
(Natural News) Drinking water sources serving 7.5 million Californians are contaminated with toxic synthetic chemicals, according to a study from the Environmental Working Group (EWG), a nonprofit organization specializing in environmental research. These chemicals, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS, are commonly called “forever chemicals,” as they are extremely resistant to degradation once they get released to the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cochrane is supporting a culture of evidence
Generating a culture of evidence means creating an environment in which evidence is always an important part of health-care decision making; it's valued, understood, and used.In a culture of evidence, Cochrane can and does have an impact beyond the world of research. We work closely with our partners to focus our work on the most   important questions for decision makers, involve external partners in creating evidence, disseminate evidence in formats decision makers can understand, and advocate for using evidence for informing policy and decision making. Learn more about what is a culture of evidence and how Coch...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 29, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Global poll of views on environment and science finds sharpest divide in US
Only one in five Americans with right-wing outlook said they had a lot of trust in scientistsPeople in the US are more sharply divided along political lines when it comes to science and environmental issues than in other parts of the world, new research shows.Globally, people who see themselves on the left side of politics are more likely to be concerned about the environment than those who see themselves as being on the right or in the centre ground.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Environment Science US news World news Climate change MMR Europe Australia news Canada Brazil South Korea Americas Asia Pacific Italy Sweden Poland Spain France UK news Source Type: news

How A Beloved Gemstone Became A Symbol Of Environmental Tragedy In Myanmar
Decades of mining for jade has left the landscape desolate. Local activists want to make a change — but can they stand up to the powerful companies that dominate the industry?(Image credit: Hkun Lat) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Fishbein Source Type: news

South Africa: Mkhize Hails Environmental Health Practitioners Amid Covid-19
[SAnews.gov.za] Health Minister, Dr Zweli Mkhize, has underscored the importance of environmental health practitioners as the world marks the 9th World Environmental Health Day amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 29, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

KCIC Report: Mesothelioma Lawsuits on the Rise in US
While the incidence of malignant mesothelioma in the United States continued its gradual decline, the tendency to sue for damages drastically increased in recent years, according to a KCIC study. Lawsuits filed by those stricken with the deadly asbestos-related cancer increased 65.7% from 2007 to 2017. Meanwhile, the overall incidence rate of mesothelioma dropped 16.2% during the same period. KCIC, a well-regarded consulting firm in Washington, D.C., that manages asbestos product liabilities, published the study of mesothelioma and asbestos litigation last week. Study author Megan Shockley, senior manager at KCIC, was unav...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 29, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Endocrine Environmental Compounds After Bariatric Surgery Endocrine Environmental Compounds After Bariatric Surgery
In what ways might concentrations of these compounds change after bariatric surgery?Clinical Endocrinology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news

Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
(Oregon State University) The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Achieving clean air for all is possible
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year. A new study however shows that it is possible to achieve clean air worldwide with fundamental transformations of today's practices in many sectors, supported by strong political will. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Are China's pollution remediation efforts making the planet warmer?
(Carnegie Institution for Science) A 10-year effort by China to improve air quality and reduce pollution-related health risks has caused warming in areas across the northern hemisphere, according to new work published in Environmental Research Letters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

OU-led study aims to use microbial information to inform global climate change models
(University of Oklahoma) A study led by researchers from the OU Institute of Environmental Genomics tackles a problem that has challenged scientists for more than a decade. The findings from which may have important implications for understanding and predicting the ecological consequences of climate warming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Redefining drought in the US corn belt
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought. But are scientists and producers focusing on the right metric when measuring crop-relevant drought? Not exactly, according to new research from University of Illinois scientists, who urge the scientific community to redefine the term. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statement on Ketamine Sedation and Law Enforcement from the American...
As physicians with expertise in pharmacology and toxicology, we support the appropriate use of ketamine by supervised paramedical professionals for dangerous agitation in the prehospital environment....(PRWeb September 29, 2020)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/statement_on_ketamine_sedation_and_law_enforcement_from_the_american_college_of_medical_toxicology/prweb17430581.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - September 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

High-resolution structures of the SARS-CoV-2 2'-O-methyltransferase reveal strategies for structure-based inhibitor design
There are currently no antiviral therapies specific for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the global pandemic disease COVID-19. To facilitate structure-based drug design, we conducted an x-ray crystallographic study of the SARS-CoV-2 nsp16-nsp10 2'-O-methyltransferase complex, which methylates Cap-0 viral mRNAs to improve viral protein translation and to avoid host immune detection. We determined the structures for nsp16-nsp10 heterodimers bound to the methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the reaction product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), or the SAH analog sinefungin (SFG). We also solved structures for nsp16-nsp10...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rosas-Lemus, M., Minasov, G., Shuvalova, L., Inniss, N. L., Kiryukhina, O., Brunzelle, J., Satchell, K. J. F. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

The purinergic receptor P2Y11 choreographs the polarization, mitochondrial metabolism, and migration of T lymphocytes
T cells must migrate to encounter antigen-presenting cells and perform their roles in host defense. Here, we found that autocrine stimulation of the purinergic receptor P2Y11 regulates the migration of human CD4 T cells. P2Y11 receptors redistributed from the front to the back of polarized cells where they triggered intracellular cAMP/PKA signals that attenuated mitochondrial metabolism at the back. The absence of P2Y11 receptors at the front of cells resulted in hotspots of mitochondrial metabolism and localized ATP production that stimulated P2X4 receptors, Ca2+ influx, and pseudopod protrusion at the front. This regulat...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ledderose, C., Bromberger, S., Slubowski, C. J., Sueyoshi, K., Aytan, D., Shen, Y., Junger, W. G. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Microbial metabolite protects against infection
Commensal-derived d-lactate promotes pathogen capture and clearance by Kupffer cells in the liver. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: VanHook, A. M. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

NASEM: Biological Collections Need National Strategy, Increased Investment
According to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), biological collections - living and natural history specimens, biological materials, and data in museums, stock centers, research centers, and universities - are in need of long-term financial sustainability, digitization, recruitment and support of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades. The report, Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century, which was sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), argues that biological collections are an “invaluable, and ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

American Society of Human Genetics Denounces Unethical Use of False Genetic " Theories "
The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has issued a statement reinforcing facts about human genetics and expressing strong opposition to efforts that bend genetics knowledge for social or political ends. The statement reads, in part: “Genetics demonstrates that humans cannot be divided into biologically distinct subcategories or races, and any efforts to claim the superiority of humans based on any genetic ancestry have no scientific evidence. Moreover, it is inaccurate to claim genetics as the determinative factor in human strengths or outcomes when education, environment, wealth, and health care access are ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Climate Science Critic to be Appointed as NOAA Chief Scientist
The White House will appoint Dr. Ryan Maue, a meteorologist and former researcher at the Cato Institute, to serve as the new Chief Scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), according to The Washington Post. Maue currently serves as the developer of weathermodels.com, a website that offers weather related information, maps, and tools. He previously worked as an adjunct scholar at the Cato Institute, a Libertarian think tank involved in efforts to challenge the scientific consensus on climate change. Maue acknowledges that humans contribute to climate change but has challenged connections bet...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Global Biodiversity Goals Not Being Met, Says UN Report
A new report from the United Nations (UN) concludes that the world has not met any of the targets set 10 years ago by the Convention on Biological Diversity for protecting nature. The Global Biodiversity Outlook 5, published by the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) on September 15, 2020, serves as a final report card on progress on the 20 global biodiversity targets, known as the Aichi biodiversity targets, established in 2010 with a ten year deadline. The report found that despite some progress, natural habitats have continued to shrink, large numbers of species remain threatened by extinction from human activi...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Self-harm in adolescents, depression and anxiety: a comprehensive study - Tardivo LSLPC, Rosa HR, Ferreira LS, Chaves G, Pinto J únior AA.
There is a considerable increase in self-harm behavior in the school population, and there are few studies with psychological instruments that study the situation in our environment, especially in younger adolescents, who often keep it secret. The objectiv... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Protocol for comparing two training approaches for primary care professionals implementing the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model - Dubowitz H, Saldana L, Magder LA, Palinkas LA, Landsverk JA, Belanger RL, Nwosu US.
BACKGROUND: Child maltreatment (CM) is a major public health problem, affecting many lives, in the short and long term, and costing individuals, families, and society dearly. There is a need for broad implementation of evidence-based preventive interventio... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Support UK farmers to meet climate targets, ministers told
Green campaigners call for clarity on tree-planting and on interim subsidy systemFarmers need more support from the government to plant the trees necessary to meet the UK ’s climate targets, ministers have been told, as they considerwide-ranging changes to farming paymentsafter Brexit.Tree-planting is expensive, difficult and requires patience as the trees take years or even decades to yield commercial returns. Farmers and green campaigners are concerned that they will be left out of government plans to bring in a new interim subsidy system – called thesustainable farming incentive– to tide farmers over b...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 28, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Harvey Environment correspondent Tags: Trees and forests Farming Environment Politics Agriculture Science UK news Source Type: news

Green solutions to lower urban air pollution
Air pollution is a major risk factor for health in Europe. EU-funded research is helping to find innovative, inexpensive and green solutions for improving air quality, particularly in urban environments. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - September 28, 2020 Category: Research Source Type: news

UK risks losing contract for new climate research centre because of Brexit
Proposed centre with up to 250 jobs is linked to EU Copernicus satellite programmeThe UK is at risk of losing the contract for the expansion of a flagship European weather research centre based in Reading because of Brexit.The European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) has been based in Berkshire for the last 45 years but its future EU-funded activities are now the subject of an international battle.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Lisa O'Carroll Brexit correspondent Tags: Brexit Meteorology Climate change Science funding crisis Satellites Air pollution UK weather European Union Foreign policy Politics UK news World news Environment Source Type: news

Africa: Social, Environmental Factors Seen Behind Africa's Low Covid-19 Cases
[Africa Renewal] COVID-19 transmission in Africa has been marked by relatively fewer infections, which have been on the decline over the past two months, owing to a variety of socio-ecological factors as well as early and strong public health measures taken by governments across the region. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 26, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Gas explosion-induced acute blast lung injury assessment and biomarker identification by a LC-MS-based serum metabolomics analysis - Dong X, Yao S, Wu W, Cao J, Sun L, Li H, Ren H, Ren W.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effect of gas explosion on rats, and to explore the metabolic alterations associated with gas explosion-induced acute blast lung injury (ABLI) in real roadway environment using metabolomics ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Promising observational instruments of parent-child (0-12 years) interaction within the child protection system: a systematic review - Ca ñas M, Ibabe I, de Paúl J.
BACKGROUND: Parent-child interaction (PCI) is considered a critical environmental factor that affects child development. In the field of child and family intervention, assessment of caregiver-child interaction has great relevance for decision-making. O... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

UK scientists begin study of how long Covid can survive in the air
Researchers will test length of time virus stays infectious in different climatic conditionsCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageIt is the question scientists around the world are trying to answer: how long can the coronavirus survive in the tiny aerosol particles we exhale? In a high-security lab near Bristol, entered through a series of airlock doors, scientists may be weeks from finding out.On Monday, they will start launching tiny droplets of live Sars-CoV-2 and levitating them between two electric rings to test how long the airborne virus remains infectious under different environmental co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Coronavirus outbreak Science Infectious diseases Medical research UK news World news Source Type: news

Blasts from the past: how ice age ponds are coming back to life
Once watering holes for mammoth and elk, Herefordshire ’s neglected ancient ponds are being restoredEcologistWill Watson is hunting for Britain ’s largest blood-sucking leech in a 14,000-year-old pond in Herefordshire. The elusive medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis), grows up to 20cm long and has only officially been recorded three times in the county in the past two decades. In the ice age pond in Moccas Park national nature reserve it was last found in 2000.Watson shakes his net in the water. Most creatures shy away from such disturbance but this leech – the only one in Britain that sucks human blood &...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Phoebe Weston Tags: Environment Animals Wildlife Plants Biology Science Conservation UK news Source Type: news

How to be healthy and happy
What does being healthy and happy mean to you? Perhaps you feel it’s got something to do with your outer appearance, or maybe you’d like to be less sad or anxious. Whatever your interpretation of those two words, healthy and happy, I’ll guarantee the answer isn’t as simple as you think it might be. Life doesn’t work like that because if it did, as soon as the ‘gift’ you wished for had arrived you’d no longer be looking for the next thing to make whatever ails you better. Let’s face it happiness isn’t delivered by Santa or by the latest gadget or must-have look. S...
Source: The Hysterectomy Association - September 25, 2020 Category: OBGYN Authors: Linda Parkinson-Hardman Tags: Health happy healthy Source Type: news

Nigeria: Success - a Possibility After Repeated IVF Failures (II)
[This Day] There is a high and similarly equal chance of success on the first three attempts at In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) but if not successful, then a fourth attempt will offer little success unless there has been a major change in protocol, or the "environment" that the embryos are placed into is changed. (Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth)
Source: AllAfrica News: Pregnancy and Childbirth - September 25, 2020 Category: OBGYN Source Type: news

EPA: Pesticide Registration Review; Draft Human Health and/or Ecological Risk Assessments for Chlorpyrifos; Notice of Availability
Notice from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of a revised human health risk assessment and ecological risk assessment for the registration review of chlorpyrifos. The revised assessment is part of the EPA's periodic review of pesticide registrations to ensure that the pesticide can perform its intended function without unreasonable adverse effects on human health or the environment. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - September 25, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Nerve cells let others " listen in "
(University of Bonn) How many " listeners " a nerve cell has in the brain is strictly regulated. This is shown by an international study led by the University College London and the universities of Bonn, Bordeaux and Milton Keynes (England). In the environment of learning neurons, certain processes are set in motion that make signal transmission less exclusive. The results have now been published in the journal Neuron. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

" Stretching rack " for cells
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) The behavior of cells is controlled by their environment, physical factors such as pressure or tension have an effect. Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the University of Heidelberg are using a 3D printing process to produce micro-frames on whose four pillars a cell rests. If a hydrogel inside the framework swells and pushes the pillars apart, the cell must " stretch " . The researchers report in Science Advances (DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.abc2648). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reusing tableware can reduce waste from online food deliveries
(University of Groningen) In China, approximately 10 billion online food orders were served to over 400 million customers in 2018. All of these orders came in single-use plastic packaging, with single-use plastic tableware. Together with colleagues from China and the UK, Yuli Shan, an environmental scientist at the University of Groningen, found that reusable tableware can substantially reduce packaging waste and life cycle environmental emissions. The analysis was published in the journal Nature Food on 15 September. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

FSU researchers help develop sustainable polymers
(Florida State University) Researchers at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering have made new discoveries on the effects of temperature on sustainable polymers. Their findings may help the industry to produce plastics that are better for the environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Wells Fargo CEO forced to apologize for stating the obvious
(Natural News) No matter how far they bend over and kneel, corporations will never be able to placate the demands of today’s racially-motivated social justice warriors. Corporations are currently being forced to meet “diversity goals” to purge their organization of white people and to build a more inclusive environment that hires equally among each race.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus Cluster Discovered At Brigham And Women ’ s Hospital
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Brigham and Women’s Hospital Coronavirus Source Type: news

Second-Generation Immigrants With Diabetes Fare Worse Than Natives Second-Generation Immigrants With Diabetes Fare Worse Than Natives
Adapting to a Westernized environment appears to have adverse cardiometabolic effects in the long run, and in particular, among children of immigrants from non-Western nations, a Swedish study shows.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines)
Source: Medscape Diabetes Headlines - September 24, 2020 Category: Endocrinology Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Lending color to dead cells -- A novel natural dye for screening cell viability
(Tokyo University of Science) Synthetic dyes are commonly used to assess the toxicity of chemical compounds in cell cultures. However, these dyes damage cells, rendering the cultures useless for long-term experiments. Recently, scientists from Japan discovered that a natural food pigment can replace synthetic dyes in cell viability assays for three widely varied types of cells--and performs better. Their approach is also environment-friendly and inexpensive, and opens up possibilities in a range of fields including drug discovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Job security, finances strongly related to increased anxiety during pandemic
(University of Connecticut) For people still employed during the COVID-19 pandemic, job insecurity and financial concern are associated with greater symptoms of depression and anxiety, according to findings from the UConn School of Nursing published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, or JOEM. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Waste generation by hospital emergency departments is highlighted for first time
(Massachusetts General Hospital) Emergency departments of hospitals generate significant amounts of environmentally harmful waste which could be reduced through basic changes to disposal policies and practices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists develop 'tiny wind turbine' to scavenge energy from gentle breeze – video report
Scientists have developed a 'tiny wind turbine' that can take energy from a gentle breeze, such as that made as you walk.The device comprises two plastic strips in a tube that flutter or clap together in the presence of airflow. That energy, powered by the contact and separation of two materials, can be bottled up and stored for use, according to researchers.Scientists in China hope the device can generate sustainable power in a low-cost, efficient manner while 'overcoming the issues that the traditional wind turbines can ’t solve'Full story: 'Tiny wind turbine' can collect energy from a walker's swinging a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 23, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Renewable energy Environment Science Source Type: news

E.P.A. Rejects Its Own Findings That a Pesticide Harms Children ’s Brains
The agency ’s new assessment directly contradicts federal scientists’ conclusions five years ago that chlorpyrifos can stunt brain development in young children. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Friedman Tags: Environment Hazardous and Toxic Substances Pesticides United States Politics and Government Regulation and Deregulation of Industry Environmental Protection Agency chlorpyrifos Children and Childhood Babies and Infants Trump, Donald J Source Type: news

Guts and brains: How microbes in a mother ’s intestines affect fetal neurodevelopment
During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother ’s intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development,UCLA biologists report Sept. 23 in the journal Nature.While the maternal gut microbiota has been associated with abnormalities in the brain function and behavior of offspring — often in response to factors like infection, a high-fat diet or stress during pregnancy — scientists had not known until now whether it influenced brain development during critical prenatal periods and in the absence of such environ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news