Age-proofing a traffic saturated metropolis - evaluating the influences on walking behaviour in older adults in Ho Chi Minh City - Le TPL, Leung A, Kavalchuk I, Nguyen HN.
Walking is an essential mode of travel for older adults, offering significant health benefits. However walking as a travel mode in Vietnam is constrained by poor built environment quality and safety, which act as a psychological barrier to pedestrians in a... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Some impediments to child sexual abuse interventions and corresponding social work implications: reflections on the Zimbabwean Victim Friendly System - Muridzo NG, Chikadzi V.
Child sexual abuse is a multifaceted children's rights issue and a global problem of considerable extent. It has adverse effects for child survivors and their ecological environments. Using qualitative data from a multiple-case study research project, the ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Declining Sperm Count Tied to Chemicals in the Environment Declining Sperm Count Tied to Chemicals in the Environment
Chemicals that pervade our modern world are contributing to a decades-long decline in fertility and could pose health risks even into future generations, writes a New York epidemiologist in a new book.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Urology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Urology Headlines - April 9, 2021 Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Urology News Source Type: news

Perception of the built environment and walking in pericentral neighbourhoods in Santiago, Chile - Herrmann-Lunecke MG, Mora R, Vejares P.
Walking is important as a sustainable and healthy transport mode. Yet, walking is strongly influenced by the built environment and the socio-cultural characteristics of the walker. However, the impact of the built environment on walking and "walkers" has s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Rethinking the determinants of vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT) in an auto-dependent city: transport policies, socioeconomic factors and the built environment - Zhao P, Li P.
Past decades have seen a 'peak car' phenomenon which is indicated by a decline in vehicle kilometers traveled (VKT) in many countries. Although the determinants of VKT have been widely discussed, the theoretical arguments remain unresolved, particularly on... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Ketamine use in operation Enduring Freedom - Leslie E, Pittman E, Drew B, Walrath B.
INTRODUCTION: Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic increasingly used in the prehospital and battlefield environment. As an analgesic, it has been shown to have comparable effects to opioids. In 2012, the Defense Health Board advised the Joint Trauma Syste... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Who are the potential users of shared e-scooters? An examination of socio-demographic, attitudinal and environmental factors - Mitra R, Hess PM.
Shared e-scooter systems are operating across hundreds of cities worldwide. However, limited understanding of the user demand, as well as how this demand varies across individuals with various transportation preferences living in different urban contexts, ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Pedestrians and Bicycles Source Type: news

Stress from work and social interactions put women at higher coronary heart disease risk
(Drexel University) Psychosocial stress - typically resulting from difficulty coping with challenging environments - may work synergistically to put women at significantly higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, according to a study by researchers at Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health, recently published in the Journal of the American Heart Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

As the Climate Crisis Grows, a Movement Gathers to Make ‘Ecocide’ an International Crime Against the Environment
The Fifth Crime: First in a continuing series with NBC News about the campaign to make “ecocide” an international crime. In 1948, after... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Third of Antarctic ice shelves ‘will collapse amid 4C global heating’
Unimaginable amounts of water will flow into oceans if that temperature rise occurs and ice buffers vanish, warn UK scientistsMore than a third of the vast floating platforms of ice surrounding Antarctica could be at risk of collapsing and releasing “unimaginable amounts” of water into the sea if global temperatures reach 4C above pre-industrial levels, UK scientists say.Researchers from the University of Reading said that limiting the temperature rise to 2C could halve the area at risk and avoid a drastic rise in sea levels.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nilima Marshall, PA Tags: Antarctica Climate change Polar regions Paris climate agreement Oceans Flooding Cop26: Glasgow climate change conference 2021 Greenhouse gas emissions Environment Science World news Source Type: news

Risk to anaesthetists from chemical linked to Parkinson ’s disease | Letter
Trichloroethylene was used as a general anaesthetic agent, and chronic exposure over a career could have led to Parkinson ’sWe have received reports that anaesthetists exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) may develop Parkinson ’s disease (Rates of Parkinson ’s disease are exploding. A common chemical may be to blame, 7 April). TCE was used as a general anaesthetic agent from the 1940s to the early 80s (when it was known by its tradename Trilene). If so, the presumption is that it would be chronic exposure over the course of a career that would present the greatest risk, and there has been no suggestion that...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Parkinson's disease Health Medical research Science Society Doctors Neuroscience Source Type: news

Undercover footage shows ‘gratuitous cruelty’ at Spanish animal testing facility
Campaigners call for the closure of the Madrid research firm, after whistleblower video allegedly captures unacceptable treatmentUndercover footage of “gratuitous cruelty and abuse” allegedly taken in an animal testing facility in Spain – which has previously secured funding from the EU and Spanish authorities for projects – has been published, amid calls for the centre’s closure.Madrid-based contract research organisation Vivotecnia conducts experiments on a range of animals including monkeys, dogs, mini pigs, rats, mice and rabbits for the biopharmaceutical, chemical, cosmetic, tobacco and f...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Grover and Ashifa Kassam Tags: Animal experimentation Animal welfare Environment Spain European Union Science World news Animals Source Type: news

Sea-level rise is creating ‘ghost forests’ on an American coast | Emily Ury
In coastal North Carolina, evidence of forest die-off is everywhere. Nearly every roadside ditch I pass is lined with dead or dying treesTrekking out to my research sites near North Carolina ’sAlligator River national wildlife refuge, I slog through knee-deep water on a section of trail that is completely submerged. Permanent flooding has become commonplace on this low-lying peninsula, nestled behind North Carolina ’s Outer Banks. The trees growing in the water are small and stunted. Many are dead.Throughout coastal North Carolina, evidence of forest die-off is everywhere. Nearly every roadside ditch I pass whi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Emily Ury Tags: Climate change Environment Science Source Type: news

Overcoming COVID-19: World Leaders Must Finance a More Equal World to Beat Pandemics
High school graduation, Accra, Ghana, 2013. Credit: United NationsBy Winnie ByanyimaGENEVA, Apr 8 2021 (IPS) Leaders at this year’s World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings (April 5-11) will determine how best to recover from one of the biggest crises the institutions have faced since their founding in 1944—COVID-19’s impact and its economic aftermath. Given the need to fund treatment and vaccines, there is pressure to scale back funding for social provisions. But doing so would prove a catastrophic—and costly—mistake. Instead, leaders must boldly finance a more equal world. The issue isn’t just...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Winnie Byanyima Tags: Development & Aid Education Environment Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Suns best Jazz in chess match turned war for playoff-like atmosphere
As a new team that also lacks experience, the Suns will take every playoff-esque environment they can get before the real thing comes.... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Helping Youth Agribusiness Keep Pace with Fast Growing Africa
By Nteranya Sanginga, Aline Mugisho and Seyi MakindeIBADAN, Nigeria, Apr 8 2021 (IPS) From small towns to big cities, sub-Saharan Africa has the fastest urban growth rate in the world. The continent’s population is expected to double by 2050 with the youth representing 60% of the overall population. The UN Department of Global Communication, for example, projects that for the next 15 years urban growth is set to double for several African cities: Dar es Salaam will reach over 13 million inhabitants and Kampala will exceed seven million. Nteranya SangingaAlongside this explosion in urban areas, rural population growt...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Nteranya Sanginga - Aline Mugisho - Seyi Makinde Tags: Africa Development & Aid Economy & Trade Education Food & Agriculture Food Security and Nutrition Food Sustainability Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour TerraViva United Nations Agricultural Research International I Source Type: news

Children and Corona: More infections than reported cases during second wave in Germany
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) A study by Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen concludes that during the second Corona wave, three to four times more children in Bavaria, Germany were infected with the Corona virus than reported via PCR tests. In addition, the researchers found that about eight times more children had antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 at the end of the second wave in comparison to the end of the first wave. The results are relevant for decision-making on which measures to take to contain the pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study explains Mycobacterium tuberculosis high resistance to drugs and immunity
(Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)) A consortium of researchers from Russia, Belarus, Japan, Germany, and France led by a Skoltech scientist have uncovered the way in which Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives in iron-deficient conditions by utilizing rubredoxin B, a protein from a rubredoxin family that play an important role in adaptation to changing environmental conditions. The new study is part of an effort to study the role of M. tuberculosis enzymes in developing resistance to the human immune system and medication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New pig brain maps facilitate human neuroscience discoveries
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) For nearly a decade, scientists have relied on an MRI-based map, or atlas, of the pig brain - developed at the University of Illinois using 4-week-old pigs - to understand where and how nutrients and other interventions affect the developing brain. Now, Illinois scientists have updated that atlas, increasing its resolution by a factor of four, and they have also added a new atlas for adolescent 12-week-old pigs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacteria help plants grow better
(University of Bonn) A current study by scientists of the University of Bonn and Southwest University in China sheds light on an unusual interdependence: Maize can attract special soil bacteria that, in turn, help the plants to grow better. In the long term, the results could be used to breed new varieties that use less fertilizer and therefore have less impact on the environment. The study is published in the journal Nature Plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UBCO researchers find a new use for waste
(University of British Columbia Okanagan campus) Waste materials from the pulp and paper industry have long been seen as possible fillers for building products like cement, but for years these materials have ended up in the landfill. Now, researchers at UBC Okanagan are developing guidelines to use this waste for road construction in an environmentally friendly manner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Opposition Wins Greenland Election After Running Against Rare Earths Mine
Greenland’s left-wing environmentalist party promised to halt a mining project that could have made Greenland a major source of rare... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-throughput injection molding of transparent fused silica glass
We present a process for glassworks using high-throughput IM of an amorphous silicon dioxide nanocomposite that combines established process technologies and low-energy sintering. We produce highly transparent glass using classical IM and sintering, allowing for a potentially substantial reduction in energy consumption. Our strategy merges polymer and glass processing, with substantial implications for glass utilization. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Mader, M., Schlatter, O., Heck, B., Warmbold, A., Dorn, A., Zappe, H., Risch, P., Helmer, D., Kotz, F., Rapp, B. E. Tags: Engineering, Materials Science reports Source Type: news

NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR & NIH Stand Against Structural Racism NIDCR Director Rena D’Souza, DDS, MS, PhD, said in a statement that there is no place for structural racism in biomedical research, echoing remarks from NIH Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, in his announcement of a new NIH ...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 7, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

The Guardian view on dark skies: we need them
Light pollution is killing insects and birds – and an ancient human connection with the heavenly bodiesSevere light pollution in Britain appears to have fallen, according to the CPRE, the countryside charity. Across a week in February, the charity asked volunteers to look up and count the stars they could see. The results suggest that 51% of participants were experiencing severe light pollution, compared to 61% the previous year – an effect, the charity concluded, of darker town and city centres, owing to lockdown. Sadly, though, the overall trend is worrying: human illumination of the planet isgrowing by 2% a ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Astronomy Pollution Space Science Environment Source Type: news

Environmental DNA Can Be Pulled from the Air
A proof-of-concept study uses eDNA in the air to detect mammals, expanding the technique beyond aquatic sampling. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 7, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Creating learning environments free of violence in special education through the dialogic model of prevention and resolution of conflicts - Duque E, Carbonell S, de Botton L, Roca-Campos E.
Violence suffered by children is a violation of human rights and a global health problem. Children with disabilities are especially vulnerable to violence in the school environment, which has a negative impact on their well-being and health. Students with ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Association of environmental risk factors and personality traits with risky driving behaviors in a sample of young adults from Saudi Arabia - Beaver KM, Al-Ghamdi MS, Kobeisy AN.
Road traffic accidents represent a serious problem in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), with rates of such accidents far exceeding the rates in developed nations. Even so, there remains relatively little knowledge regarding the driving behaviors among Sau... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

Child labor in Tehran, Iran: abuses experienced in work environments - Jalili Moayad S, Mohaqeqi Kamal SH, Sajjadi H, Vameghi M, Ghaedamini Harouni G, Makki Alamdari S.
BACKGROUND: Child labor is exploitative and harmful and deprives children of opportunities for a healthy life. Nonetheless, child labor is prevalent worldwide. Abusive working conditions are common, especially in developing countries. OBJECTIVE: Th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

A Post-COVID-19 Recovery will not be Possible if Water, Sanitation & Hygiene are not High on the Agenda
Michael, 34, a nurse at Wurm CHPS, Ghana, washes his hands. Every healthcare centre in the world’s poorest countries could have taps and toilets for just half-an-hour’s worth of COVID-19 spending. Credit: WaterAid / Apagnawen AnnankraBy Helen HamiltonLONDON, Apr 7 2021 (IPS) This World Health Day, G20 finance ministers will meet in Rome, Italy, to discuss how they will build back from the pandemic. The global economy is and concerted effort, coordination and imagination is needed to enable not only a worldwide recovery but also to ensure that the world’s poorest people are not left behind. The World Hea...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Helen Hamilton Tags: Development & Aid Education Environment Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

On World Health Day, a Call for Equity, Justice & the End of Paternalism
Family planning counselor and nurse speaks to group at clinic in Nakuru, Kenya. Credit: Sala LewisBy Joyce Banda and Nabeeha Kazi Hutchins*WASHINGTON DC, Apr 7 2021 (IPS) The past year has forced many of us to address difficult truths about how we treat and take care of each other — among them is a reckoning with racism and injustice. In the global health and development sector, this reckoning is not new. Black, Brown and Indigenous women have been at the forefront of driving efforts to end inequity, racism and paternalism for decades, but the threats remain. As women and leaders in global health and development fro...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joyce Banda and Nabeeha Kazi Hutchins Tags: Development & Aid Education Environment Global Health Humanitarian Emergencies Inequity Poverty & SDGs Sustainability TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Terrawatch: cities that change the shape of the planet
The weight of buildings in dense urban areas can lead to subsidence, with effects particularly marked by the coastIt ’s well known that ice sheets are heavy enough to bend the underlying rocks, but what about cities? Are some cities capable of reshaping the bit of planet they sit on?By 2050 around 70% of Earth ’s population are projected to live in cities. This set Tom Parsons, a geophysicist with the United States Geological Survey, to wondering if the associated redistribution of mass into concentrated urban areas is capable of causing subsidence. Using the San Francisco Bay region (7.75 million peopl e) as a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Kate Ravilious Tags: Environment Science Geology Source Type: news

The opportunities and risks of digitalization for sustainable development
(Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies e.V. (IASS)) Digitalization can support transitions towards a more sustainable society if technologies and processes are designed in line with suitable criteria. This requires a systemic focus on risks and benefits of digital technologies across the dimensions of sustainable development: environment, society, and economy. This is the conclusion of a study prepared by a team of researchers at the IASS in Potsdam. Applying this precautionary approach to digitalization requires the active involvement of developers, users, and regulators. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Getting to Better than Normal in a Post-COVID-19 World
Delegates at an online conference organised by APDA and AFPPD looked at ways to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on women and girls. By Cecilia RussellJOHANNESBURG, South Africa, Apr 6 2021 (IPS) Girls in Asia don’t want to go back to normal – they want to go “back to better than normal”, says Zara Rapoport, a delegate during an online seminar on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on gender. The seminar, held this week, was organised by the Asian Forum for Parliamentarians on Population and Development (AFPPD) and the Asian Population and Development Association (APDA). It focused on the impact of ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Cecilia Russell Tags: Asia-Pacific Climate Change Environment Gender Gender Violence Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies TerraViva United Nations Asian Population and Development Association (APDA) Source Type: news

New Real-World Observational Analysis of UPTRAVI ® (selexipag) Underscores the Importance of Risk Assessment for Treating Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) Patients
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA – April 6, 2021 – Findings from an analysis of the first 500 patients enrolled in the SPHERE registry (SelexiPag: tHe usErs dRug rEgistry) found more than three-quarters (76%) of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients treated with UPTRAVI® (selexipag) either maintained (56%) or reduced (20%) their one-year mortality risk score. The SPHERE results were published in the April issue of the Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation (JHLT). SPHERE is an ongoing real-world, observational, user registry using two different risk assessment methods that describes the clinical characte...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Branching out – UNISON ’ s branches look to the future
UNISON’s branches are vital in supporting our members. Together with our regions and the national union, branches work tirelessly to improve the working conditions for members, wherever they are, whatever their role.  But what branches do is expanding. Not only do they recruit members and represent them, but after 10 years of austerity there has been a reduction of employers in national bargaining arrangements and a significant fragmentation of the workforce. UNISON needs every branch active and thriving. In 2019, the national delegate conference decided that an examination of all branch resources be conducted t...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - April 6, 2021 Category: Food Science Authors: Martin Cullen Tags: Article News branch resources review Source Type: news

World Health Day 2021: Together we can reach a fairer and healthier world
April 2021, Cairo – On 7 April 2021, World Health Day will be commemorated globally, under the theme “Together for a fairer, healthier world”. On this occasion, the World Health Organization (WHO) calls for urgent action to eliminate health inequities and mobilize action to attain better health for all and leave no one behind. Inequities have always existed. Despite improvements in health outcomes globally and in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, these gains have not been shared equally across different countries or communities. The COVID-19 pandemic has had grave consequences for people already experien...
Source: WHO EMRO News - April 6, 2021 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

IMF, World Bank Must Support Developing Countries ’ Recovery
By Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Apr 6 2021 (IPS) The COVID-19 pandemic continues to take an unprecedented human and economic toll, wiping away years of modest and uneven progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Developing countries now need much more support as progress towards the SDGs was ‘not on track’ even before the pandemic. Anis ChowdhuryBy end-2022, average incomes are expected to be 18% below pre-crisis levels in low-income countries (LICs) and 22% less in emerging and developing countries excluding China – compared to 13% lower for developed e...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Financial Crisis Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Jomo Kwame Sundaram & Anis Chowdhury Source Type: news

Built environment design and people with autism spectrum disorder: a scoping review - Tola G, Talu V, Congiu T, Bain P, Lindert J.
Built environment design can be considered as an influential factor in the quality of life of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This scoping review provides an overview of the current available literature on the relationship between people with A... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Contributions of hypoxia-awareness training to the familiarization of personal symptoms for occupational safety in the flight environment - Chiang KT, Tu MY, Cheng CC, Chen HH, Huang WW, Chiu YL, Wang YY, Lai CY.
Hypoxia remains a flight-safety issue in terms of aviation medicine. Hypoxia-awareness training has been used to help aircrew members recognize personal hypoxia symptoms. There is still no study, as yet, to establish the association of within-subject data ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Association of infrastructure and route environment factors with cycling injury risk at intersection and non-intersection locations: a case-crossover study of Britain - Aldred R, Kapousizis G, Goodman A.
OBJECTIVE: This paper examines infrastructural and route environment correlates of cycling injury risk in Britain for commuters riding in the morning peak. METHODS: The study uses a case-crossover design which controls for exposure. Control sites f... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Association of nursing work environment, relationship with the head nurse, and resilience with post-traumatic growth in emergency department nurses - Jung SY, Park JH.
This study aimed to examine the relationship between nursing work environment, relationship with the head nurse, resilience, and ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Eco-house prototype constructed with alkali-activated blocks: material production, characterization, design, construction, and environmental impact - Robayo-Salazar RA, Valencia-Saavedra W, Ram írez-Benavides S, Mejía de Gutiérrez R, Orobio A.
This article pres... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Correction: Wachs, s., et al. Associations between witnessing and perpetrating online hate in eight countries: the buffering effects of problem-focused coping. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3992 - Wachs S, Wright MF, Sittichai R, Singh R, Biswal R, Kim EM, Yang S, G ámez-Guadix M, Almendros C, Flora K, Daskalou V, Maziridou E.
The authors wish to add the following corrections to their paper published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. In the second paragraph of Section 3.3, "toxic online disinhibition" should be replaced with "assertive... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

An analysis on the performance of a mobile platform with gas sensors for real time victim localization - Anyfantis A, Blionas S.
This work concerns the performance analysis of the sensors contained in a victim detection system. The system is a mobile platform with gas sensors utilized for real time victim localization in urban environments after a disaster has caused the entrapment ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

Associations between children's risky play and ECEC outdoor play spaces and materials - Sandseter EBH, Sando OJ, Kleppe R.
Children spend a large amount of time each day in early childhood education and care (ECEC) institutions, and the ECEC play environments are important for children's play opportunities. This includes children's opportunities to engage in risky play. This s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

UK star count shows drop in light pollution under lockdown
Highest proportion of participants since 2013 saw 30 or more stars in Orion constellationThe number of stars visible in the skies above Britain increased in this year ’s annual count, indicating a lessening of light pollution in lockdown.CPRE, the countryside charity, said 51% of people taking part in itscitizen science count in February noted 10 or fewer stars in theOrion constellation, indicating severe light pollution. During the same period in 2020, before the first lockdown, 61% of counts registered 10 or fewer stars.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Environment Astronomy Science UK news Source Type: news

Why has the African elephant been split into two species? – podcast
Recently, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) assessed the African elephant astwo separate species– the forest elephant and savannah elephant. The move has increased these animals’ ‘red list’ categorisation to endangered for savannah elephants and critically endangered for forest elephants. In anAge of Extinction extra for Science Weekly, Patrick Greenfield asks why it has taken so long for these two species to be officially recognised as such, and what the reclassification could mean for their conservationContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Patrick Greenfield and produced by Tiffany Cassidy and Madeleine Finlay Tags: Science Environment Biodiversity Conservation Wildlife Taxonomy Biology Source Type: news

Curbing coronavirus spread in enclosed spaces means better masks, adequate ventilation
(American Institute of Physics) With research increasingly showing the COVID-19 virus is transmissible via smaller droplets suspended in air, there is growing concern current guidelines of mask wearing and social distancing are insufficient in indoor environments where people tend to be in close quarters. In AIP Advances, researchers show social distancing is equally as important as mask wearing when people indoors are just breathing or participating in normal conversation, even when there is no risk of coughing or sneezing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 6, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Great tits change their traditions for the better
(University of Konstanz) Researchers at the University of Konstanz and Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior in Germany have found that birds are able to change their culture to become more efficient. Published today as open access in the journal Current Biology, this research reveals immigration as a powerful driver of cultural change in animal groups that could help them to adapt to rapidly changing environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news