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Thyroid Nodule Location Linked to Malignancy Risk Thyroid Nodule Location Linked to Malignancy Risk
Thyroid nodules located in the upper pole of the gland were nearly five-times more likely to be malignant, suggesting possible anatomical or environmental influences.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

Minimizing exposure to common hormone-disrupting chemicals may reduce obesity rates
(European Society of Endocrinology) Everyday products carry environmental chemicals that may be making us fat by interfering with our hormones, according to research presented in Barcelona at the European Society of Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018. Following recommendations on how to avoid these chemicals could help minimize exposure and potentially reduce the risk of obesity and its complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Educational Videos: Protective Actions, Pharmaceutical Countermeasures, and Health Effects
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health. 04/26/2018 These 10 videos describe what protective actions to take in a radiation emergency, the possible health effects of radiation exposure and contamination, and medical treatments that may be available. Videos cover Where to Go in a Radiation Emergency; Get Inside, Stay Inside, Stay Tuned; Self-Decontamination in a Radiation Emergency; Food and Water Safety in a Radiation Emergency; Prussian Blue; KI (Potassium Iodide); Acute Radiation Syndrome; Biological Effects of Radiation Cutaneous Radiation Injury; and Prenatal Radiation Expos...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Prosecutors in Poland probe sewage dump into Baltic bay
Prosecutors on Poland's Baltic coast have opened a probe into potential damage to the environment of the Bay of Gdansk after the sewage system in this coast city malfunctioned and the refuse was dumped into the bay (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Behavioral patterns of children involved in bullying episodes - Santoyo CV, Mendoza BG.
This study applied a systematic observation strategy to identify coercive behavioral patterns in school environments. The aim was to describe stability and change in the behavioral patterns of children identified as victims of bullying. To this end, the fo... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Non-medical use of prescription drugs by young men: impact of potentially traumatic events and of social-environmental stressors - Rougemont-B ücking A, Grazioli VS, Marmet S, Daeppen JB, Lemoine M, Gmel G, Studer J.
This study investigated the effects of distinct forms of stress on NMUPD. Methods: Data from 5308 y... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Lessons learned from data collection as health screening in underserved farmworker communities - Flocks J, Tovar JA, Economos E, Thien Mac VV, Mutic A, Peterman K, McCauley L.
BACKGROUND: Girasoles is an academic-community partnership investigating heat-related illness (HRI) among farm-workers. An unexpected outcome is health screening and intervention for participants without access to health care. OBJECTIVES: We presen... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Assessing risk for future firearms violence in young people who present to ED -
A new clinical index tool designed specifically for the emergency environment predicts the risk for future firearms violence in young people 14-24 years of age. The approach employs a brief, 10-point instrument that can be administered in one to two minute... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Comparison of factors associated with fear of falling between older adults with and without a fall history - Lee S, Oh E, Hong GS.
Background: Although fear of falling (FOF) has been studied since FOF has negative consequences for the elderly, there is limited information about the risk factors of FOF, including the environment. The purpose of this study was to describe individ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Reducing the standard serving size of alcoholic beverages prompts reductions in alcohol consumption - Kersbergen I, Oldham M, Jones A, Field M, Angus C, Robinson E.
AIMS: To test whether reducing the standard serving size of alcoholic beverages would reduce voluntary alcohol consumption in a laboratory (study 1) and a real-world drinking environment (study 2). Additionally, we modelled the potential public health bene... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Some tropical trees are preppers: They store water for times of drought, researchers discover
(Natural News) Much like humans and animals, trees need water to survive. In harsh places where there is next to no water or moisture, some trees still manage to thrive. One study, published in Tree Physiology, aims to shed some light on how trees adapt to such environments. Scientists discovered that certain species of trees are able... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Strange inspiration: Researchers use tip from auto industry to make smoked foods tastier, more environment-friendly
(Natural News) If you love smoked foods, you’re probably aware that aside from the delicate flavors associated with it, this method of cooking and flavoring food is often linked to cancer-causing compounds. To address this concern, a group of researchers has turned to an unlikely source of inspiration: the automobile industry. Experts have tried running... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

EU sets a 70 percent recycling target for waste by 2020, starts by designing a modified bacteria that lives off plastic
(Natural News) Plastic pollution is a very serious problem in many different parts of the world. It has caused a great deal of harm to the environment and continues to affect many people’s lives every single day. Europe suffers from it just like any other place on Earth. Fortunately, the concept of plastic recycling exists.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How smaller drinks could reduce the UK ’s alcohol consumption
Cutting down drinking is difficult, but could smaller servings of alcohol help? Our study suggests it mightMany of us worry about our drinking and want to cut down, but finding the motivation and willpower to stick to it is hard. But what if we could change our environment so drinking less became the default? Making small changes to the environment to nudge people to behave a certain way (sometimes calledchoice architecture) can be effective, because a lot of our behaviour happens without conscious deliberations. In our research, we found thatreducing the standard serving size of alcohol could do exactly that.Portion sizes...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Inge Kersbergen Tags: Psychology Science Alcohol Society Source Type: news

Researchers operate lab-grown heart cells by remote control
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and their collaborators have developed a technique that allows them to speed up or slow down human heart cells growing in a dish on command -- simply by shining a light on them and varying its intensity. The cells are grown on a material called graphene, which converts light into electricity, providing a more realistic environment than standard plastic or glass laboratory dishes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Flow of cerebrospinal fluid regulates neural stem cell division
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Stem cells in the brain can divide and mature into neurons participating in various brain functions, including memory. In a paper published in the journal 'Cell Stem Cell', scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit ä t M ü nchen (LMU) have shown how this works. They found that ion channels play a key role in mediating force signals to the neural stem cells to activate them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Asian tiger mosquito on the move
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Scientists at the Goethe University and the Senckenberg Gesellschaft f ü r Naturforschung have compared the ecological niches of the Asian tiger mosquito and the yellow fever mosquito, both of which transmit infectious diseases, on various continents. The invasion time span plays an important role in their expansion and the Asian tiger mosquito has not yet arrived in all regions where it would find a suitable environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ammunition with risks and side effects
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Hunting with lead shot is highly restricted or entirely banned in many countries due to the danger of poisoning birds and environment. However, alternative ammunition is not without its own risks, as was discovered in a study conducted by a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Greening aluminium production
Aluminium is a vital material. Yet its production consumes vast amounts of raw materials and energy. An EU-funded project has developed waste-ore recycling processes and power-saving furnaces that could shrink the industry's environmental footprint while increasing its long-term competitiveness. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - May 18, 2018 Category: Research Source Type: news

4 Ways Medical Packaging Equipment is Changing
Conclusion Medical device manufacturers can benefit from the evolution of heat-sealing systems. Users should expect to see constant monitoring of the sealing process, built-in redundancy, efforts to reduce material waste, and enhancements such as UDI capabilities. To learn more, visit OK Sealer at Booth # 1646 the upcoming MD&M East 2018 expo in New York City June 12-14. [All images courtesy of OK SEALER] (Source: MDDI)
Source: MDDI - May 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Ann Marie Kellett Tags: MD & M East (New York) Packaging Source Type: news

Climate change on track to cause major insect wipeout, scientists warn
Insects are vital to ecosystems but will lose almost half their habitat under current climate projectionsGlobal warming is on track to cause a major wipeout of insects, compounding already severe losses, according to a new analysis.Insects are vital to most ecosystems and a widespread collapse would cause extremely far-reaching disruption to life on Earth, the scientists warn. Their research shows that, even with all the carbon cuts already pledged by nations so far, climate change would make almost half of insect habitat unsuitable by the end of the century, with pollinators like bees particularly affected.Continue readin...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Damian Carrington Environment editor Tags: Insects Climate change Conservation Wildlife Animals Environment World news Biology Science Source Type: news

ONCOS-102 Mesothelioma Trial Moves Forward
Oncologists in Spain are recruiting patients for the randomized phase of the pleural mesothelioma clinical trial involving ONCOS-102, the promising immunotherapy vaccine. Optimism surrounding the trial stems from encouraging results obtained recently in the six-patient safety cohort used as a precautionary lead-in. The trial involves the vaccine in combination with standard-of-care chemotherapy for patients with inoperable disease. ONCOS-102 is a scientifically engineered adenovirus that is designed to activate a patient’s immune system to selectively target cancer cells. It is being developed by Targovax, a Scandina...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 17, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Environmental Health & Toxicology Resources for the Public and Professionals
July 25, 2018 3:00-4:00pm ET. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wallace ’s enigma: how the island of Sulawesi continues to captivate biologists
After 150 years, biologists are untangling the history of the Indonesian island ’s unusual fauna“We now come to the Island of Celebes, in many respects the most remarkable and interesting in the whole region, or perhaps on the globe, since no other island seems to present so many curious problems for solution.” (Wallace 1876)Wedged in between the continental landmasses of south-east Asia and Australia lies the vast island realm of Wallacea. Named after Alfred Russel Wallace, the 19th-century explorer and naturalist who traversed this area, it hosts floras and faunas that are incredibly rich and often incl...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hanneke Meijer Tags: Biology Animals Science Fossils Evolution Wildlife Environment Source Type: news

Springer Nature charts rapid growth in open access articles by UK authors
A new report outlines how Springer Nature has been able to deliver rapid growth in gold open access (OA) articles in the UK. In the five years since the Finch report was produced in 2012, Springer Nature has published nearly 28,000 gold OA articles with a UK corresponding author, according to the report Gold open access in the UK: Springer Nature’s transition. In 2017, 77% of all Springer Nature publications with UK corresponding authors were published via gold OA, representing a 174% increase in gold OA articles from 2013 to 2017 for this group. The rapid growth in UK articles published via the gold OA route has bee...
Source: News from STM - May 17, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

What bacteria can teach us about combating atrazine contamination
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization of Australia, or CSIRO, are interested in harnessing the bacterial ability to degrade atrazine in order to remediate atrazine-polluted environments. In a new research paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, a team from CSIRO and Australian National University describe previously unknown proteins involved in atrazine degradation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Supercomputing the emergence of material behavior
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Chemists at the University of California, San Diego designed the first artificial protein assembly (C98RhuA) whose conformational dynamics can be chemically and mechanically toggled. The Maverick GPU-based supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center simulated the system through an allocation on NSF-funded XSEDE, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment. The research, published in April 2018 in Nature Chemistry, could help create new materials for renewable energy, medicine, water purification, and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A classifier of frog calls for fighting against climate change
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) The sounds of amphibians are altered by the increase in ambient temperature, a phenomenon that, in addition to interfering with reproductive behaviour, serves as an indicator of global warming. Researchers at the University of Seville have resorted to artificial intelligence to create an automatic classifier of the thousands of frog and toad sounds that can be recorded in a natural environment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Zealand's secret recipe for active school travel: The neighborhood built environment
(Elsevier) Increased rates of active travel (e.g., walking or cycling) to school in New Zealand children and youth were associated with shorter distances to school, and neighborhoods with more connected streets, less residential density, and lower socio-economic status, reveals a new systematic meta-analysis published in Journal of Transport and Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Securing the natural environment for future generations
(British Ecological Society) The British Ecological Society and the UK's statutory nature conservation agencies are holding a conference at Manchester Metropolitan University, bringing together policy officials, practitioners, natural and social scientists from across the UK and internationally to set a new direction of travel for nature conservation in the UK. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prospects for harnessing biocide resistance for bioremediation and detoxification
Prokaryotes in natural environments respond rapidly to high concentrations of chemicals and physical stresses. Exposure to anthropogenic toxic substances—such as oil, chlorinated solvents, or antibiotics—favors the evolution of resistant phenotypes, some of which can use contaminants as an exclusive carbon source or as electron donors and acceptors. Microorganisms similarly adapt to extreme pH, metal, or osmotic stress. The metabolic plasticity of prokaryotes can thus be harnessed for bioremediation and can be exploited in a variety of ways, ranging from stimulated natural attenuation to bioaugmentation and fro...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Atashgahi, S., Sanchez-Andrea, I., Heipieper, H. J., van der Meer, J. R., Stams, A. J. M., Smidt, H. Tags: special/review Source Type: news

Worldwide emergence of resistance to antifungal drugs challenges human health and food security
The recent rate of emergence of pathogenic fungi that are resistant to the limited number of commonly used antifungal agents is unprecedented. The azoles, for example, are used not only for human and animal health care and crop protection but also in antifouling coatings and timber preservation. The ubiquity and multiple uses of azoles have hastened the independent evolution of resistance in many environments. One consequence is an increasing risk in human health care from naturally occurring opportunistic fungal pathogens that have acquired resistance to this broad class of chemicals. To avoid a global collapse in our abi...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Fisher, M. C., Hawkins, N. J., Sanglard, D., Gurr, S. J. Tags: Botany, Medicine, Diseases special/review Source Type: news

State-owned chemical company in China found to be illegally dumping toxic chemical waste
(Natural News) If it is frustrating that many privately-owned chemical companies across the globe are damaging the environment and threatening our health, it’s even more distressing to find out there are state-owned businesses who are notoriously contributing to the aggravating case of pollution. Shanxi Sanwei Group Co. Ltd., is under hot waters for another environmental violation... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Do You Hear? Yanny Or Laurel?
BOSTON (CBS) – Remember this little gold and white dress?  Or was it blue and black?  Well, as Dr. Mallika Marshall reports, someone’s at it again, this time messing with our hearing. A four-second audio clip has got everybody talking and everybody picking sides.  What do you hear?  Yanny?  Or Laurel? “Our brain loves to categorize things,” says Kevin Franck, PhD, Director of Audiology at Mass. Eye and Ear.  “It wants to make meaning out of mess,” he adds. Dr. Franck says the way we hear speech has a lot to do with our childhood. “When we’re babi...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated Local CBS Boston Dr. Mallika Marshall Local TV WBZ TV Source Type: news

Emissions of a Banned Ozone-Eating Chemical Are Rising Again and Scientists Don ’t Know Why
(WASHINGTON) — Something strange is happening with a now-banned chemical that eats away at Earth’s protective ozone layer: Scientists say there’s more of it — not less — going into the atmosphere and they don’t know where it is coming from. When a hole in the ozone formed over Antarctica, countries around the world in 1987 agreed to phase out several types of ozone-depleting chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Production was banned, emissions fell and the hole slowly shrank. But starting in 2013, emissions of the second most common kind started rising, according to a study in We...
Source: TIME: Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Seth Borenstein / AP Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime Source Type: news

More Parents Smoking Marijuana Around Children, Study Says
NEW YORK (CBS Local) – As regulations crack down on the dangers of cigarette smoke, a new study is warning that many parents are undoing all of this progress by exposing their children to secondhand marijuana smoke. The Details: A study says more parents are smoking marijuana around their children Researchers point to the decriminalization of marijuana for the change The study warns that children are being exposed to more secondhand smoke because of higher marijuana use  According to researchers from Columbia University, the number of cigarette-smoking parents who said they used marijuana increased from 1...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV Marijuana talkers Source Type: news

Alabama ranks near last for nursing as a profession
A new report by WalletHub shows the nursing profession in Alabama is one of the worst states for nurses, ranking the fourth worst out of all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Some of the key issues analyzed by the study show an aging domestic population, the future of entitlement programs and the student-loan crisis are present in Alabama. The state ranked 42nd in the opportunity and competition metric category and 48th in the work environment category. The best stat e for nursing is Maine,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Tyler Patchen Source Type: news

This Will Change Your Mind About Psychedelic Drugs
For years, the field of mental health has been largely barren of meaningful treatment advances. But now, scientists have new hope in the least likely of places: psychedelic drugs. Recent research suggests that certain psychedelic substances can help relieve anxiety, depression, PTSD, addiction and the fear surrounding a terminal diagnosis. “The biggest misconception people have about psychedelics is that these are drugs that make you crazy,” says Michael Pollan, author of the new book How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Egypt:PM in Talks Over Medical Tourism, Projects in Petroleum
[Egypt Online] Prime Minister Sherif Ismail held on Wednesday 16/5/2018 four meetings with the petroleum and environment ministers, the South Sinai governor and the chairman of Federation of Egyptian Chambers of Commerce. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 16, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Environmental Assessment Training Series (EATS)
The skills needed to investigate outbreaks of foodborne illness are different from those needed to inspect restaurants, and the role of environmental health staff is critical. EATS addresses the role of environmental assessments within the broader context of outbreak investigations and the food safety system. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Environmental Justice Advisory Council Public Teleconference
May 31, 2018 3:30-5:30pm ET. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Special issue of Royal Society magazine highlights scale of oceanic change
The seas around the West Antarctic Peninsula have experienced some of the fastest global warming in recent decades, increasing the rate and richness of biological activity in the region. Innovative analytical techniques and collaborative research projects involving scientists from around the world are helping to improve our understanding of the causes and consequences of environmental change. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 16, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Publications, Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Earth Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Nigeria:'Failure of National Policy Responsible for Poor Sanitation'
[Daily Trust] The Registrar of Environmental Health Officers Registration Council of Nigeria (EHORECON), Dr Dominic Abonyi, has said that the failure of circulation and implementation of the 2005 National Environmental Sanitation Policy has led to the current situation where government establishments require sanitation services. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - May 16, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Exposure Analysis Services for the Environmental Influences on Child Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program (Admin Supp - Clinical Trial Not Allowed)
This funding opportunity announcement (FOA) encourages applications for administrative supplements from the Children's Health Exposure Analysis Resource (CHEAR) grantees in order to support the offering of CHEAR analytical services to meet the needs of the NIH Environmental influences on Children's Health Outcomes (ECHO) program. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White House Sends Budget Rescissions Proposal to Congress
The White House sent a $15.4 billion budget rescissions proposal to Congress on May 8, 2018, targeting spending cuts from ‘unobligated funds’ within several federal agencies and programs. The proposal does not propose any reductions from the fiscal year (FY) 2018 spending. The plan proposes to rescind $4.8 billion in unused funding from Department of Energy (DOE) loan programs that have not made any loans since 2011. These include the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing (ATVM) loan program, an Obama-era initiative to help domestic automakers, and another DOE innovative technology loan program for large...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

AIBS Urges EPA Administrator to Extend Comment Period for Proposed " Secret Science " Rule
The American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS) has sent a letter to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt requesting an extension on the deadline to submit comments on the proposed rule “Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science” by at least 60 days. The proposed rule, which was published in the Federal Register on April 30, 2018, would limit the use of scientific studies that have underlying data that are not publicly available when crafting regulations. AIBS expressed concerns that the 30-day comment period would not allow sufficient time for the scientific community t...
Source: Public Policy Reports - May 16, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Cross-Jurisdictional Considerations for Addressing Zika and Other Public Health Threats
National Indian Health Board. 04/26/2018 This 57-minute webinar discusses how valuable and important Tribal-State-Local partnerships are, especially for emerging public health issues like Zika that can require emergency response, as well as interdepartmental and cross-jurisdictional cooperation. Zika concerns multiple stakeholders within Tribal systems - along with other public health allies from state and local health departments - including emergency management, environmental health, and public health, as well as arenas within healthcare systems such as maternal child health, behavioral health, community health, and prim...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Climate-Resilient Water Safety Plans: Managing Health Risks Associated with Climate Variability and Change
World Health Organization. 08/2017 This 92-page document provides guidance on how climate considerations can be integrated into water safety planning to provide greater resilience to the current and predicted impacts of climate change and variability on water supplies. It is intended to help water suppliers and water safety plan (WSP) teams who have already committed to using the WSP approach and are developing and implementing plans to gain greater understanding of climate change and how it can be considered and addressed in the WSP process. The document will also be useful to other stakeholders, particularly health and e...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Company: Groundwater Ruling Should Not Be Reconsidered; Groups Lack Standing
TRENTON, N.J. - NL Industries Inc. on May 7 filed a supplemental brief in New Jersey federal court arguing that the court should deny environmental groups' motion for reconsideration of its prior ruling that they failed to produce sufficient evidence to show that NL and other companies violated the Clean Water Act (CWA) when they discharged pollutants in levels that exceeded federal permits and contaminated local groundwater (Raritan Baykeeper, et al. v. NL Industries Ind., et al., No. 09-4117, D. N.J.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Residents Sue Remediation Company For Falsifying Soil Samples From Superfund Site
SAN FRANCISCO - One hundred forty-nine residents who live near a Superfund site in San Francisco sued an environmental remediation company in California state court May 1, claiming that the company falsified soil samples during its alleged cleanup of the property and that its failure to fully complete the work it was paid $1.1 billion to do has led to higher rates of breast and cervical cancer and asthma (Bayview Hunters Point Residents, et al. v. Tetra Tech Inc., et al., No. CGC-18-566188, Calif. Super., San Francisco Co.). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news