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By knowing how abusers like Kevin Spacey work, we can root them out | Deborah Orr
Predators hunt out their victims, like pigs sniffing out truffles. Knowing what narcissistic behaviour to look out for can preempt dangerTwenty people have now madeallegations of inappropriate behaviour against Kevin Spacey, the majority from his time as the Old Vic ’s artistic director. Fourteen of the allegations are so serious that complainants have been advised to go to the police.Managers at the Old Vic say they are sorry they did not create an environment in which people felt they could speak out if they were receiving unwanted attention. This failure has been put down to a “cult of personality” aro...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Deborah Orr Tags: Sexual harassment Kevin Spacey Culture Old Vic Theatre World news Psychology Science Source Type: news

UTSA researchers receive grant to help prevent contaminations in Edwards Aquifer
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Vikram Kapoor, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Drew Johnson, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio, have been awarded a $692,452 funding agreement through the City of San Antonio's Proposition 1 Edwards Aquifer Protection Program to design and implement a way to track fecal bacteria in the Edwards Aquifer so that major contamination can be stopped before it starts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 18, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nasa map of Earth's seasons over 20 years highlights climate change
The visualization shows spring coming earlier and the Arctic ice caps receding over timeNasa has captured 20 years of changing seasons in a striking new global map of planet Earth ​.The data visualization, released this week, shows Earth ’s fluctuations as seen from space.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Associated Press Tags: Nasa Environment Science Space Source Type: news

'It's a delicate place': Nasa captures 20 years of Earth's seasonal changes – video
A Nasa oceanographer explains how the US space agency successfully captured 20 years of changing seasons to form a striking new global map. The projection of the Earth and its biosphere is derived from two decades of satellite data from September 1997 to September 2017Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Nasa Space Science Climate change Oceans World news Environment Source Type: news

President Trump Says Ban on Elephant Remains Will Stay For Now
(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump said Friday he’s delaying a new policy allowing the body parts of African elephants shot for sport to be imported until he can review “all conservation facts.” The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Thursday that it will allow the importation of body parts from African elements shot for sport. The agency said encouraging wealthy big-game hunters to kill the threatened species would help raise money for conservation programs. Animal rights advocates and environmental groups criticized the decision. On Friday, the Republican chairman of the House Foreign Affairs ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime White House Source Type: news

Operator of Keystone Pipeline quietly cleaning up spill of 210,000 gallons of oil from largest-ever leak in South Dakota
(Natural News) As many environmentalists and local Native American tribes feared, a massive leak of some 210,000 gallons, or about 5,000 barrels, of oil has occurred along a section of the Keystone Pipeline in South Dakota, making it the largest-ever spill. The company quietly announced via a November 16 tweet that it is “currently responding... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Ranger: EPA, FDA building their own private armies with body armor and military weapons
(Natural News) Natural News founder/editor Mike Adams said in a recent podcast that two government agencies that shouldn’t be — the Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration —  are now arming up with military-style equipment such as body armor, spending tens of millions of dollars on such gear over the last few... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Nov. 17, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From Skyline Medical’s joint venture to Lensar receiving FDA clearance and CE Mark, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. Skyline Medical launches JV deal with Helomics Skyline Medical announced in a Nov. 15 press release that it has signed a joint venture agreement with Helomics. The agreement comes after a strategic collaboration between the companies that allows Skyline to reach more markets. The joint venture leverages the Helomics D-Chip platform to develop and market new approaches for personalized cancer diagnostics and care. 2.&...
Source: Mass Device - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: 510(k) Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) mHealth (Mobile Health) Neurological Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Research & Development Helomics InnerScope iReliev LensAR Inc. Source Type: news

Chester Zoo successfully breeds rare Catalan newt
Twelve Montseny newts – one of world’s rarest amphibians - hatched as part of joint breeding project with Catalan authoritiesConservationists at Chester Zoo have successfully bred one of the world ’s rarest amphibians – the Catalan newt – in an attempt to save it from extinction.The zoo is the first organisation outside Catalonia to become involved in the breeding project for the newt, the rarest amphibian in Europe.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Stacee Smith Tags: Amphibians Zoology Environment Catalonia Spain Europe World news Science Wildlife Biology Source Type: news

Medical Device Design Is Critical to Bringing Healthcare into the Home
Medical technology is going consumer. Both patients and care givers hold an increasing expectation that the devices they use to manage care will operate with the same ease and usability as the digital products they use every day to manage their lives. As healthcare moves to a home setting, patients require design elements that make the technology easier to use, more intuitive, and more accessible. Medical device companies are responding by focusing during design and development on those needs that are harder to tease out. To succeed in this potential consumer market, the biggest asset to any device is good design and ...
Source: MDDI - November 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Thielman Tags: Design Source Type: news

New Compendium Highlights Development of Clinical Decision Support to Enhance Worker Health
A new compilation of articles published in the November issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, describes an effort led by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to develop and evaluate clinical decision support (CDS) designed to assist primary care clinicians'with care of their working patients using CDS tools in electronic health records. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

California wildfires were caused by irresponsible development more than weather, according to expert
(Natural News) The wildfires that recently hit the famous Wine Country area of Northern California will go down in history as the most damaging wildfire event in the state. The fire that killed 42 people and destroyed 8,000 structures was attributed by many to environmental factors like strong winds, high temperatures, and abundant vegetation, but... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New life for pollution: Chemists are looking into using cigarette butts for hydrogen storage
(Natural News) There’s no question about it, smoking is bad for your health (and our environment). More than six trillion cigarettes are smoked each day, creating 800 metric tons of cigarette butt waste. These environmental eyesores are costing us our planet, and are making its way into waterways and bodies of water, poisoning humans and... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

School meals – tell us your story
Do you work in a school kitchen? If so, UNISON wants to hear from you. Following on from national school meals week, which ends today, and in the run-up to next Friday’s Stars in Our Schools Day, the union has put together an online survey to get the views of the people who matter when it comes to school meals – the staff. Please take part and let us know: what it’s like in your workplace? are you valued at work? what are the problems? what goes well? Take the survey now “School meals staff play a vital role in ensuring that pupils are well nourished at school, serving them healthy school meals,&r...
Source: UNISON Health care news - November 17, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: Article education services school meals school support staff schools stars in our schools Source Type: news

A moment that changed me: seeing my first moth fish | Fiona Gell
I was 22 and fascinated by fish behaviour. But when scientist Amanda Vincent showed me this strange creature I became convinced that my future lay in conservation — not in the labLike many of the most important occasions in my life, the moment that changed me involved fish. Holding the desiccated carcass of a sea moth while talking to my heroine, the fish biologist and conservationistDr Amanda Vincent, altered the course of my life.I was 22, and had just finished my biology degree. For my dissertation research I had spent a couple of months following butterflyfish in the Ras Mohammed national park in the Egyptian Red...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 17, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Fiona Gell Tags: Conservation fish Environment Marine life Wildlife Zoology Biology Science Endangered species Animals Endangered habitats UK news Source Type: news

eDNA tool detects invasive clams before they become a nuisance
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) When seeking a cure for a disease, early detection is often the key. The same is true for eliminating invasive species. Identifying their presence in a lake before they are abundant is vital. A recent University of Illinois study successfully used environmental DNA to detect invasive clams in California and Nevada lakes. Researchers believe this tool can help identify pests before they become a problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. Studies have shown that a mothers' reaction -- positive or negative -- to her child's negative emotions can predict whether her child develops the ability to effectively regulate his emotions and behavior. A new University of Illinois study explores potential predictors of mothers' supportive or non-supportive behavior during emotional challenges. (Source: EurekAlert...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A walk at the mall or the park? New study shows, for moms and daughters, a walk in the park is best
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) University of Illinois family studies researchers believed that if the attention restoration theory, which describes how interaction with natural environments can reduce mental fatigue and restore attention, worked for individuals it might also work for families to help facilitate more positive family interactions and family cohesion. They tested their theory by looking at sets of moms and daughters who were asked to take a walk together in nature and a walk in a mall. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Water flea evolution tells a cautionary tale of lake pollution
EU-funded researchers studied genomic changes in water fleas for signs of evolutionary adaptation linked to human activities, such as phosphorous contamination in lakes. The results shed light on how species respond to environmental changes, and could feed into measures to protect biodiversity and ecosystems. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 17, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Arecibo: Statement on NSF Record of Decision
On Nov. 15, 2017, the National Science Foundation (NSF) signed its Record of Decision for the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico. This important step concludes the agency's decision-making process with respect to the general path forward for facility operations in a budget-constrained environment and provides the basis for a future decision regarding a new collaborator. NSF issued its Record of ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243729&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Researchers aim to create touch-sensitive, nerve-connected robotic prosthetic hand
Researchers at two academic facilities are aiming to create a first-of-its-kind bioengineered robotic hand that can grow and adapt to its environment, equipped with a living pathway to translate the robots touch sensation to the user’s brain. Teams from both Florida Atlantic University and the University of Utah School of Medicine said they have received a four-year, $1.3 million grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of health for the project, according to a press release. Read the whole story on our sister site, The Robot Report The post Researchers aim...
Source: Mass Device - November 16, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Prosthetics Research & Development Robotics Source Type: news

Putting bandits into context: how function learning supports decision making - Schulz E, Konstantinidis E, Speekenbrink M.
The authors introduce the contextual multi-armed bandit task as a framework to investigate learning and decision making in uncertain environments. In this novel paradigm, participants repeatedly choose between multiple options in order to maximize their re... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Interactive map reveals pollutant levels across Europe
The map was created by the Copenhagen-based European Environment Agency. The map is marked with coloured dots, each  indicating that the level of at least one pollutant is 'very bad'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Navigating Graduate School with a Mental Illness
Psychologist Deborah Serani, Psy.D, was working with a young man who was struggling with a severe bout of social anxiety and chronic depression during his first trimester of grad school. Interacting with his classmates and giving presentations were excruciating. He considered dropping out. This is understandable. Grad school is hard enough. When you have a mental illness, it can feel impossible. Thankfully, it’s not. Below, three psychologists shared their suggestions for success. Learn about your mental illness. Working with a therapist can help you better understand your condition and yourself. What’s also he...
Source: Psych Central - November 16, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Disorders General Self-Help Stress Students grad students Graduate School Graduate Students Mental Health Mental Illness Self Care self-compassion success Source Type: news

Ashfield Meetings & Events welcome Matt Foreman as Head Of Exhibits
Matt will head up a dedicated global exhibit team that operates as an internal department, delivering a specialist service to the agency’s healthcare clients. Within his role, Matt will be responsible for driving exhibits strategy, working closely with the business development team to identify and develop new opportunities. In the last 12 months the team has delivered over 100 exhibits in Europe, North America and Asia-Pacific. Matt will report to Penny Callaghan (Director, Operations & Business Services) and will be responsible for a team of experienced exhibit professionals. Matt joins Ashfield Meetings & E...
Source: Ashfield Healthcare News - November 16, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ewan Jamieson Tags: Ashfield Source Type: news

Good to Know (Perhaps) That Food Is Being ‘Nuclearised’
Using nuclear sciences to feed the world. Credit: FAOBy Baher KamalROME, Nov 16 2017 (IPS)It might sound strange, very strange, but the news is that scientists and experts have been assuring, over and again, that using nuclear applications in agriculture –and thus in food production—are giving a major boost to food security. So how does this work? To start with, nuclear applications in agriculture rely on the use of isotopes and radiation techniques to combat pests and diseases, increase crop production, protect land and water resources, and ensure food safety and authenticity, as well as increase livestock pro...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Editors' Choice Environment Featured Food & Agriculture Global Headlines Health Natural Resources Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Water is Life: Native American Leaders at the Forefront of Environmental Health
November 20, 2017 3:00-5:00pm ET; Baltimore, MD. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Orcas vs great white sharks: in a battle of the apex predators who wins?
It ’s difficult to imagine the voracious and predatory great white shark as prey. Could orcas really be overpowering them and removing their livers?The great white shark,Carcharodon carcharias, is considered the most voracious apex predator in temperate marine ecosystems worldwide, playing a key role in controlling ecosystem dynamics.As a result, it is difficult to imagine a great white as prey. And yet, earlier this year the carcasses of five great whites washed ashore along South Africa ’s Western Cape province. Ranging in size from 2.7 metres (9ft) to 4.9 metres (16ft), the two females and three males all ha...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Lauren Smith Tags: Science Sharks Whales Animals Cetaceans Marine life Wildlife Environment Source Type: news

Growing for a better world: The 5 benefits of organic gardening
(Natural News) We can all do our part in helping regenerate the Earth. This can be as small as learning how to garden. Organic backyard farming, or simply gardening, is one of the best ways to start helping our communities and our environment. Commercial agriculture creates only a few jobs, since most commercial farms make use... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adolescent bystander behavior in the school and online environments and the implications for interventions targeting cyberbullying - Patterson LJ, Allan A, Cross D.
The aim of this study was to add to the emerging knowledge about the role of bystanders in cyberbullying. To differentiate online versus offline bystander behaviors, 292 Australian children (mean age = 15.2; female = 54.4%) reviewed hypothetical scenarios ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Assessing the present and future probability of Hurricane Harvey's rainfall - Emanuel K.
We estimate, for current and future climates, the annual probability of areally averaged hurricane rain of Hurricane Harvey's magnitude by downscaling large numbers of tropical cyclones from three climate reanalyses and six climate models. For the state of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Neural basis of exertional fatigue in the heat: a review of magnetic resonance imaging methods - Tan XR, Low ICC, Stephenson MC, Soong TW, Lee JKW.
The central nervous system, specifically the brain, is implicated in the development of exertional fatigue under a hot environment. Diverse neuroimaging techniques have been used to visualize the brain activity during or after exercise. Notably, the use of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Major trauma outside a trauma center: prehospital, emergency department, and retrieval considerations - Fedor PJ, Burns B, Lauria M, Richmond C.
Care of the critically injured begins well before the patient arrives at a large academic trauma center. It is important to understand the continuum of care from the point of injury in the prehospital environment, through the local hospital and retrieval, ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

The occupational therapist and the assessment of the elderly person's home - Schonheit C, Rousselle Q, Cara I, Curtis V, M ézière A.
The falls of elderly people in their home are frequently related to the environment. Plans and photographs of the home provided by the patient's relatives are useful and constitute relevant assessment tools. The home visit is even more effective as it help... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

NSF makes new awards to advance Science of Learning
(National Science Foundation) The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $8.2 million through its Science of Learning program to fund 24 new projects that will advance theoretical insights and fundamental knowledge of learning principles, processes, environments and constraints. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New method analyzes corn kernel characteristics
(University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences) An ear of corn averages about 800 kernels. A traditional field method to estimate the number of kernels on the ear is to manually count the number of rows and multiply by the number of kernels in one length of the ear. With the help of a new imaging machine developed at the University of Illinois breeders can learn the number of kernels per ear, plus a lot more information than can be manually observed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Hot and bothered
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Environmental economists predict climate change will bring big manufacturing losses to China by mid-21st century. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Environmental factors may trigger lupus onset and progression
(University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center) While genetics play a role in the development of Lupus, a systemic autoimmune disease, so do environmental triggers, such as particulates in air pollution and ultraviolet light, says a University of Cincinnati researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures
(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) A discovery might help designers of miniature 'lab-on-a-chip' technologies to grow three-dimensional colonies of cancer cells inside a chip's tiny chambers, rather than the merely two-dimensional colonies that they generally can culture now. Chips with 3-D cell arrays could furnish more realistic biological environments for drug testing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Spanking linked to increase in children's behavior problems
(Association for Psychological Science) Children who have been spanked by their parents by age 5 show an increase in behavior problems at age 6 and age 8 relative to children who have never been spanked, according to new findings in Psychological Science. The study, which uses a statistical technique to approximate random assignment, indicates that this increase in behavior problems cannot be attributed to various characteristics of the child, the parents, or the home environment - rather, it seems to be the specific result of spanking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Celebrating professor Tommy Koh
(World Scientific) Prof Koh is known internationally for helping to establish the international law of the seas and for chairing the UN Conference on the Environment and Development in Rio. The book testifies of Prof Koh's masterful ability to distil complex issues and interests into actionable decisions and plans; disarm opponents and direct the energies around the negotiating table towards achieving what is right, good and ultimately, to the mutual benefit of all parties concerned. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New sensors paint real-time picture of ocean health
EU-funded researchers have developed new marine sensors to meet the growing need for real-time data on the state of our oceans. Such timely and accurate information will help scientists and policymakers react quickly to ecological threats and ensure that environmental policies are properly implemented. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 16, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

Wastewater, an underexploited resource
Processing urban wastewater is typically limited to cleaning it up for release into the environment. This is a shame, because it contains compounds that could be put to good use - as could the water itself. EU-funded researchers have tested promising innovations to advance resource-efficient processing, recovery of substances, and re-use. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - November 16, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

NSF makes new awards to advance Science of Learning
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $8.2 million through its Science of Learning program to fund 24 new projects that will advance theoretical insights and fundamental knowledge of learning principles, processes, environments and constraints. "NSF has shown long-standing leadership in the Science of Learning through past investments in the Science of Learning Centers and Science of Learning Collaborative Networks," said Fay Lomax Cook, assistant director for NSF's ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243658&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News ite...
Source: NSF News - November 15, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Neha Misra Brings Light —and Power—into the Lives of Women around the World
November 15, 2017Neha Misra embodies the notion that unexpected combinations can create unexpected good —a theme that inspires our annual SwitchPoint conference. Meet Neha below and get your tickets to hear her speak atSwitchPoint 2018.Neha Misra is a social entrepreneur, poet, and visual folk artist with a deep belief in the power of human imagination and action to create new realities. She is the co-founder and chief collaboration officer of Solar Sister and a global champion for improving sustainable energy access by advancing women ’s leadership.In 2017, Misra was named a Presidential Leadership S...
Source: IntraHealth International - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: intrahealth Source Type: news

A Newly Discovered Planet Could Harbor Life – and It’s (Relatively) Close to Us
A newly discovered exoplanet could harbor life, scientists say. And it’s even (relatively) close to Earth – only 11 light-years away. Ross 128 b has some similar characteristics to Earth, astronomers said in a new study published in the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. It’s roughly the same size and may have a comparable surface temperature, an environment that could allow life to flourish. “The special properties of this system means that we are contributing our bit on the search of an Earth 2.0.” Nicola Astudillo-Defru, one of the study’s co-authors at the University of Geneva&rsquo...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aric Jenkins Tags: Uncategorized astronomy onetime space Source Type: news

There's more than one way to build a tree, 374m-year-old fossils reveal | Susannah Lydon
Fossils from China show that evolution found an alternative – and ultimately overly-complicated – way to increase the size of the earliest tree trunksIn the world ofknee-high land plants 400m years ago, the battle to grow tall was won by plants which found biomechanical solutions to fight gravity. Vascular plants had already evolved a plumbing system, allowing them to transport water, and the food produced by photosynthesis, around the plant. The water-conducting cells in the xylem – dead, hollow and stiffened by the polymer lignin – also afforded them some structural support. But there are limits t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Susannah Lydon Tags: Fossils Plants Science Biology Evolution Trees and forests Environment Source Type: news

Bigotry against indigenous people means we're missing a trick on climate change
Traditional farming strategies could protect humanity against global warming and prevent deadly wildfires. Yet scientists seem determined to ignore them Prejudice against indigenous people is visible and ingrained in cultures everywhere, from US football team names (the Washington Redskins for example) to Hindu folk tales where the forest peoples arerakshasas, or demons. But it ’s arguable that these prejudices also influence our science and policy. Take, for example, the specialised method of rotational farming used by many indigenous farmers all over the world but particularly in the global south. Farmers use seaso...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 15, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Prakash Kashwan Tags: Working in development Indigenous peoples Natural resources and development Climate change Environment Global development World news Biodiversity Conservation Wildlife Agriculture Science Source Type: news

How to Reduce the Burden of Iterative Design and Evaluation
Conclusions HFE is an integral part of the medical product development process, helping manufacturers develop safe, effective, and usable products. It has a much broader remit than just conducting usability testing such as a formative or validation study. It utilizes a number of complementary activities and techniques including Preliminary Analyses which has been the focus of this article. Preliminary Analyses—Identification of Known Use Problems, Task Analysis, and Use-related Risk Assessment—should be conducted at the outset of the design and development process of a medical product in order to iden...
Source: MDDI - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Suresh P. Gupta Tags: Design Source Type: news

Clarivate Analytics names the world ’s most impactful scientific researchers with the release of the 2017 Highly Cited Researchers List
Clarivate Analytics, the global leader in providing trusted insights and analytics to enable researchers to accelerate discovery, today released its publication of its annual Highly Cited Researchers list.  The citation analysis identifies the most frequently cited researchers as determined by the extent to which their papers have supported, influenced, inspired and challenged other researchers around the globe. It identifies authors who have consistently won peer approval from international researchers in the form of high citation counts. For more than two decades the Web of Science has served as the basis for regula...
Source: News from STM - November 15, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news