Pandemrix Vax for 2009 H1N1 Pandemic Tied to More Adverse Events
(MedPage Today) -- But not enough information to establish causation (Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary)
Source: MedPage Today Pulmonary - September 21, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: news

GPs should 'dust off' pandemic plans this flu season, warns leading medic
Dr Andrew Green, clinical and prescribing lead for the General Practice Committee in the UK, urged doctors to step up their preparations ahead of the flu outbreak this winter. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Listening to a pandemic
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Battles, H. T. Tags: books Source Type: news

Botswana:Tackle NCDs Head-On, Vigorously - Mogae
[Botswana Daily News] Gaborone -Nations have been urged to act quickly and tackle Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) head-on with the same vigour exerted on fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 18, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:Cholera - Dirty Pandemic, Dirtier Politics
[The Herald] A pall has been cast over Zimbabwe as the cholera pandemic has ravaged Harare's suburbs with the grim prospects that the outbreak could spread, claiming more lives. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 17, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:Cholera Death Toll Hits 30
[The Herald] The number of people who have died of cholera has risen from 28 to 30 as Government, Harare City Council, the police and other stakeholders continue to make concerted efforts to curb the spread of the disease amid calls to declare the pandemic a state of disaster. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 17, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

This flu vaccine could come via mail
Scientists are one step closer to a pandemic flu vaccine that can be formulated and delivered quickly via mail in the case of an outbreak. Canadian company Medicago has developed a manufacturing platform capable of delivering vaccine doses 19 days after a new strain is identified, rather than the typical three to four weeks it takes to develop a traditional flu vaccine, the company reported in Science Advances.  The company was abl e to produce 30 million doses in 30 days, the report says.  The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - September 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

A Needle-Free Flu Vaccine in the Mail?Could Be
Researchers are testing an injection-free vaccine that looks like a Band-Aid you place on your arm. Their initial hope is to create such a vaccine that would allow for a rapid public health response in case of a pandemic flu. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - September 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A prototype of how to fight the next pandemic: A vaccine without the shot
Developing a vaccine for the next pandemic flu is the first problem. Getting it to people without increasing the spread of the virus is the next. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carolyn Johnson Source Type: news

New Influenza Surveillance Tool Supports Communities
LAKEVILLE, MINN. [September 12, 2018] - ImageTrend announces influenza tracking using Continuum® software in preparation for the upcoming flu season.1 As each incident report is posted by EMS care providers, Continuum automatically begins to monitor the aggregate data for developing trends or surges in influenza-like symptoms. Sudden spikes or increased concentration of incidents can trigger Continuum’s alerting function. Utilizing Continuum to track Influenza can help emergency response and public health personnel understand where and when outbreaks are occurring, as well as aid in the decision process...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ImageTrend Tags: Industry News Operations Press Releases Source Type: news

New Influenza Surveillance Tool Supports Communities
LAKEVILLE, MINN. [September 12, 2018] - ImageTrend announces influenza tracking using Continuum® software in preparation for the upcoming flu season.1 As each incident report is posted by EMS care providers, Continuum automatically begins to monitor the aggregate data for developing trends or surges in influenza-like symptoms. Sudden spikes or increased concentration of incidents can trigger Continuum’s alerting function. Utilizing Continuum to track Influenza can help emergency response and public health personnel understand where and when outbreaks are occurring, as well as aid in the decision process...
Source: JEMS Operations - September 12, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ImageTrend Tags: Industry News Operations Press Releases Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:Viral Load Monitoring - Next Step in Ending Aids
[The Herald] In Zimbabwe, there are over one million people living with HIV who are receiving life-saving antiretroviral treatment (ART). This is one of the most exciting milestones for the nation in addressing the HIV pandemic. The next frontier is HIV viral load monitoring to assess the amount of HIV present in the blood of people living with HIV. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - September 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Spanish flu: the killer that still stalks us, 100 years on
The pandemic wiped out up to 100 million lives, but scientists still struggle to explain what caused it. The answers could ensure that it never strikes againOne hundred years ago this month, just as the first world war was drawing to a fitful close,an influenza virus unlike any before or since swept across the British Isles, felling soldiers and civilians alike. One of the first casualties was the British prime minister and war leader, David Lloyd George.On 11 September 1918, Lloyd George, riding high on news of recent Allied successes, arrived in Manchester to be presented with the keys to the city. Female munitions worke...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 9, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Flu pandemic First world war Health Epidemics Death and dying Society World news UK news Science Medical research Immunology Source Type: news

Topical cream tested as way to enhance bird flu vaccine
A clinical trial is underway to determine the effectiveness of a topical cream to enhance the immune response to a " pre-pandemic " influenza vaccine. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clinical trial testing topical cream plus influenza vaccine in progress
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) A Phase 1 clinical trial examining whether a topical cream can enhance the immune response conferred by a 'pre-pandemic' influenza vaccine is underway at Baylor College of Medicine, a Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Unit (VTEU) funded by NIAID. Investigators are evaluating whether imiquimod cream, commonly used to treat genital warts and certain skin cancers, can boost the body's immune response to an H5N1 influenza vaccine. The trial is enrolling 50 healthy adults ages 18-50 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'Pandemic' of inactivity increases disease risk worldwide, WHO study says
(Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Best Time to Get the Flu Shot Is Earlier Than You Think
It’s technically still summer, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says it’s already time to think about flu season 2018-2019. All adults and children older than six months should get a flu vaccine by the end of October 2018, the CDC says. (The American Academy of Pediatrics recently made a similar recommendation.) While the shot is still effective for those who get it later in the fall or winter, getting vaccinated before flu season is in full swing offers the best protection, the CDC says. While the flu shot is not perfect — during last year’s brutal flu season, it was only ab...
Source: TIME: Health - September 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Human infection with avian influenza A(H7N9) virus in China – update
Since March 2013, when the avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection was first detected in humans, a total of 1567 laboratory-confirmed human cases, including at least 615 deaths1, have been reported to WHO (Figure 1) in accordance with the International Health Regulations (2005). In the latest wave (the 6th wave since Oct 2017), only three human cases have been detected; meanwhile there have been generally fewer A(H7N9) virus detections in poultry and environment samples, according to various reports from mainland China and China, Hong Kong SAR. WHO has been monitoring the situation, and conducting risk assessments2 through...
Source: WHO Avian Influenza - September 3, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: avian influenza [subject], bird flu, avian flu, fowl plague, influenza in birds, avian bird flu, h5n1, disease outbreaks [subject], outbreak, outbreaks, epidemics, pandemic, disease control, influenza [subject], flu, seasonal influenza, pandemic influenza Source Type: news

Severe human infection with a novel avian-origin influenza A(H7N4) virus
(Science China Press) Avian influenza virus (AIV) is always the threat to human due to its pandemic potential. Herein, a novel reassortant AIV, influenza A(H7N4) virus, has been identified. The virus originated from wild bird AIVs, infected backyard chickens and ducks, and cause a severe human infection. Researchers firstly conducted a comprehensive investigation on this case, confirming the viral infection and the transmission route. Early identification and response interrupted the spread of this novel virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ebola outbreak in the DRC has ‘the potential to be the worst ever seen’
The International Rescue Committee, an agency that responds to humanitarian crises fears it will trump the pandemic of 2014, which killed 11,000 and decimated West Africa. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deadly bird flu could spread because China is refusing to share samples of the virus
Health authorities in China have ignored a request from the UK Government for a sample of the H7N9 bird flu virus which has already killed over 600 people, and experts warn it could cause a pandemic. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zimbabwe:First Lady Vows to Fight HIV, Aids
[The Herald] First Lady Auxillia Mnangagwa yesterday vowed to work tirelessly in the fight against HIV and Aids, and to champion national and international advocacy efforts to end the pandemic in the country. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - August 30, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Three reasons the US is not ready for the next pandemic
Christine Crudo Blackburn, Andrew Natsios and Gerald W Parker all work in public health at  Texas A&M University. They explain how three main factors are making the US more vulnerable to flu. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Readiness for Responding to a Severe Pandemic 100 Years After 1918
Article assesses public health and health care readiness for the 1918 influenza outbreak and looks at developments in the last 100 years that have improved readiness for a pandemic. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HIV and a tale of a few cities
(University of California - San Diego) In a pair of new modeling studies, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with international colleagues, examined how policy reform in terms of drug decriminalization (in Mexico) and access to drug treatment (in Russia) might affect two regions hard hit by the HIV pandemic: Tijuana, Mexico and the Russian cities of Omsk and Ekaterinburg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 17, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The US Domestic Influenza Virologic Surveillance Landscape The US Domestic Influenza Virologic Surveillance Landscape
The development of a process map characterizing the landscape of US influenza virologic surveillance may help improve pandemic planning and response efforts.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Flu season 2018: How will the UK prepare for a pandemic?
SUMMER in the UK could soon be coming to an end as the scorching heatwave gives way to damp grounds and grey skies and with it comes flu season. With a number of diseases such as Ebola gripping the world right now, how will the UK deal with a pandemic? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Superbug genes are floating around in the air of 19 global cities, warn scientists ... the next global pandemic is already in the making
(Natural News) For many cities, air quality is a major public health concern — and new research has shown that it’s not just exhaust fumes people need to be worried about. For at least 19 global cities, genes from antibiotic resistant bacteria present a unique threat: The airborne antibiotic resistant genes (ARGs) could lead the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The next global pandemic could wipe out nearly a billion people, computer simulation finds
(Natural News) Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security designed a frighteningly realistic scenario to see how prepared the government is for a global pandemic, and the exercise showed how woefully unprepared we are for such a situation. The researchers came up with a scenario that included a disease that could realistically exist... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Deadly virus pandemic could kill 900m people if it started today
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Center for Global Health Security in Baltimore, Maryland, saw 150 million people die within 20 months in a made-up global disease outbreak scenario. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Quantifying Contact Rates and Mixing Patterns in Workers in Non-healthcare Work Settings in the United States to Support the Development of Prevention and Control Strategies for Reducing or Slowing the Transmission of Pandemic Influenza
The purpose of this project is to conduct research that describes individual social contact and mixing patterns in workers in non-healthcare work settings in the United States. The goal is to have a better estimate of social contacts in work places to support the development of prevention and control strategies for reducing or slowing the transmission of pandemic influenza. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - July 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Africa:The HIV Pandemic - Time to Recalibrate and Target the Weak Spots
[The Conversation Africa] University of Cape Town -HIV remains a global challenge. Between 36.7 million and 38.8 million people live with the disease worldwide. And more than 35 million have died of AIDS related causes since the start of the epidemic in the mid-1980s. Two years ago the International Aids Society and The Lancet put together a commission made up of a panel of experts to take stock and identify what the future response to HIV should be. The report is being released to coincide with the 22nd International Aids Conference in Amsterdam. The Conv (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using fasting blood sugar levels to measure diabetes? You may not be getting the real picture
(Natural News) Diabetes is a pandemic that has been sweeping across the globe, but there are still a lot of things that people don’t understand about the condition. In particular, blood tests (as well as their interpretation) continue to be a source of confusion for most patients with diabetes. In his video, DeWayne McCulley of Death... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tanzania:Editorial - HIV Is Still a Major Threat - Lets Not Lower Our Guard
[Citizen] There has been talk in recent weeks of a potential breakthrough in the search for a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine 35 years after the virus was first identified. The pandemic has caused much misery globally, but especially in developing countries, including Tanzania. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - July 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FT Health: Drug resistance, pandemics and the vaccination gap
New report reveals that fewer than 100 countries have a plan in place to stop overuse of antibiotics (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - July 20, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

'Dangerous complacency' to global HIV epidemic risks resurgence
The response to the global HIV pandemic is risking a resurgence of the disease, experts warn. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - July 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Smart City Active Mobile Phone Intervention (SCAMPI) study to promote physical activity through active transportation in healthy adults: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial - Ek A, Alexandrou C, Delisle Nystr öm C, Direito A, Eriksson U, Hammar U, Henriksson P, Maddison R, Trolle Lagerros Y, Löf M.
BACKGROUND: The global pandemic of physical inactivity represents a considerable public health challenge. Active transportation (i.e., walking or cycling for transport) can contribute to greater total physical activity levels. Mobile phone-based programs c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Media, Marketing, and Internet Issues Source Type: news

‘Prevention crisis’ is hampering global HIV response, warns head of UNAIDS
Complacency over HIV and AIDS has created a “prevention crisis” that risks destabilizing efforts to reach the key 2020 target of fewer than 500,000 new HIV infections per year, the head of the UN agency in charge of fighting the pandemic warned on Wednesday. (Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security)
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fatty liver disease pandemic needs 'gold standard' human-relevant research
(Humane Society International) New study calls for human-based tools to unravel the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The contribution of in silico, in vitro and pathways-based systems biology approaches to unraveling the pathogenesis of this disease are described, and how this human-relevant research can be used for anti-NASH drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From Ebola to Nipah: are we ready for the next epidemic? – Science Weekly podcast
The 2014 Ebola outbreak killed over 10,000 people before it was eventually brought under control. As new infectious diseases appear around the world, what can we learn from past outbreaks to better prepare ourselves?Subscribe and review onAcast,Apple Podcasts,Soundcloud,Audioboom andMixcloud. Join the discussion onFacebook andTwitterSomewhere in the world there ’s a bat, a monkey or a pig with a virus that could jump into humans and become the next major epidemic, or even pandemic. This is what happened with Ebola, a disease first detected in humans in the 1970s. When the 2014 west Africa outbreak finally ended in 20...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - July 13, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Presented by Ian Sample and produced by Graihagh Jackson Tags: Science Health Ebola Epidemics Society World news Source Type: news

NIAID dcientists create 3D structure of 1918 influenza virus-like particles
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Virus-like particles (VLPs) are protein-based structures that mimic viruses and bind to antibodies. Because VLPs aren't infectious, they show promise as vaccine platforms for many viral diseases, including influenza. Since details about influenza VLPs are scant, a team of researchers developed a 3D model based on the 1918 H1 pandemic influenza virus. The research, conducted by NIAID scientists, could benefit VLP vaccine projects, targeting a range of viruses from HIV to Ebola and SARS coronavirus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

At Yale ’s first HIV/AIDS symposium, memories of a mysterious epidemic
At the symposium, clinicians, basic science researchers, and public health workers came together to track their progress fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - July 9, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Change health messaging to focus on potential impact to help stop the next pandemic
(City University London) Changing public health messaging to focus on the impact of our actions -- for example the potentially harmful impact of infecting a colleague with a cold, rather than whether we will infect them if we go into work in the first place -- could have significant implications for how we deal with global threats, according to a new study from City University of London, the Oxford Martin School (University of Oxford), and Yale University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Did the 2009 flu vaccine give some people narcolepsy?
Following the 2009 H1N1 or swine flu pandemic, scientists saw an increase in narcolepsy cases in countries where an immune system booster was use in shots. Now, the US stockpiles it. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New & Resurgent Infectious Diseases Can Have Far-reaching Economic Repercussions
DAVID E. BLOOM is the Clarence James Gamble Professor of Economics and Demography, DANIEL CADARETTE is a research assistant, and JP SEVILLA is a research associate, all at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health.By David E. Bloom, Daniel Cadarette and JP SevillaWASHINGTON DC, Jul 3 2018 (IPS)Infectious diseases and associated mortality have abated, but they remain a significant threat throughout the world.We continue to fight both old pathogens, such as the plague, that have troubled humanity for millennia and new pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), that have mutated or spilled over ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David E. Bloom and JP Sevilla Tags: Active Citizens Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Tanzania:Premier Saluted Over Anti-Aids Envoy Role
[Daily News] Geita Gold Mine has saluted the government for its efforts in fighting the HIV/AIDS, and thanked Prime Minister Kassim Majaliwa for accepting the role of the country's Ambassador in the war against the pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 2, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Malawi:NGO Trains Ntchisi Youth As Peer Educators On HIV, Aids
[Malawi News Agency] Ntchisi -About 30 youths in Ntchisi have become trainer of trainers after undergoing a three-day training aimed at equipping them with knowledge on HIV and Aids so that they should reach out to their peers in the district with messages about the pandemic. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - June 29, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Human Vaccines Project and Seqirus partner to advance universal flu vaccine research
(Human Vaccines Project) The Human Vaccines Project, a nonprofit public-private partnership focused on decoding the immune system to improve human health, announced today that Seqirus, a global leader in the prevention of influenza, is joining the Project's Universal Influenza Vaccine Initiative (UIVI). Seqirus, owned by CSL Limited, has been on the front line of influenza vaccine development and pandemic preparedness for more than a century, pioneering new technologies for rapidly producing influenza vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 28, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Microbiologists and plant scientists find secret to tackling cholera
(Michigan State University) While cholera rages across many regions of the world, a team of microbiologists and plant scientists has pinpointed a genetic weakness in the pandemic's armor, which could lead to future treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists aim to stop the devastation of Zika-like pandemics
Killer viruses can ravage countries, but now a new project hopes to spot diseases likely to jump from animals to humansFor several months, health workers have been battling to contain anEbola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A total of 60 cases, 28 of them fatal, have been reported around the town of Mbandaka, though authorities say the outbreak is now under control.Politicians, nevertheless, remain nervous. Thousands died in theWest African Ebola outbreak of 2014 after the virus – which probably spread from infected animals, such as fruit bats – triggered widespread cases of severe, sometimes ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science editor Tags: Infectious diseases Medical research Microbiology Ebola Zika virus Sars Science Health Society World news Africa China Source Type: news