Here ’s what the evidence shows about the links between creativity and depression
By Alex Fradera There’s a stereotype that mental distress is an almost inevitable part of being highly creative. But is there any substance to this idea, or have we been misled – by biographers drawn to artists with colourful and chaotic lives, and the conceits of cultural movements like the romantics? Scientific attempts to resolve this question, which have mainly focused on disorders of mood, have so far struggled to reach a definitive answer. However, in a new review in Perspectives on Psychological Science, Christa Taylor of Albany State University has applied surgical precision to open up the existing...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Creativity Mental health Source Type: blogs

High-Quality Early Childhood Programs Can Change Lives
The most comprehensive look to date at the benefits of early childhood education found that 102 of 115 programs improved at least one outcome for children beyond a statistical doubt. And the economic and social benefits continue to pay dividends, sometimes well into adulthood. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - January 3, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

Lesion-Symptom Mapping: A one day online workshop organized by C-STAR
The Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR; https://cstar.sc.edu/) is organizing a one day online workshop on Lesion-Symptom-Mapping methods, Thursday January 25th, between 10am and 4pm Eastern Daylight Time (US East coast). Please join us online that day, for an exciting line-up of speakers!This focus of this workshop will be on the pressing issues in the methods of Lesion Symptom Mapping, rather than on new neurocognitive findings. To make this workshop as interactive as possible, invited speakers will present for up to 30 minutes, followed by 20 minutes for question time and discussion...
Source: Talking Brains - January 3, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

The Link Between DOACs and Cancer
​A middle-aged woman was started on a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) for an upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis two weeks before presenting to the emergency department. She reported that she had coughed up some blood. She had never had blood clots before and had no other testing.​The whole thing was strange and concerning.Only about 10 percent of DVTs are in the upper extremity. (Circulation 2012;126[6]:768.) One can divide them into primary (or provoked), secondary, or idiopathic. Primary ones are usually related to effort, particularly those who are performing repetitive overhead movement or have thoracic outlet...
Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - January 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Relative risk reduction is a troublesome way to convey the benefits of treatments
How excited would you be about a medication that lowered your risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke by 1.5%? Excited enough to spend a few thousand dollars a year on the drug? I expect not. What if, instead, the drug reduced those same terrible outcomes by 20%? That’s probably enough benefit to interest some in the drug. Well, those statistics come from the same clinical trial, evaluating the same drug. In fact, they present the exact same results, but they simply do it in different ways. The 1.5% number refers to the absolute reduction in the risk of those outcomes — the drug reduced the two-yea...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 1, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Health Care System in 2018: Combat Zones to Watch
By PAUL KECKLEY Entering the home stretch on 2017, the stage is set for some classic duels next year: they’re about money and control and they’re playing out already across the industry. Here’s the five combat zones to watch: Hospitals vs. insurers: This is the quintessential struggle between two conflicting roles in our system. Hospitals see themselves as the protector for a community’s delivery system, bearing risks for clinical programs, technologies and facilities that require capital to remain competitive. Insurers see themselves as the referee for health costs, calling balls and strikes on the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Paul Keckley Source Type: blogs

Telomere Length as Presently Measured is Not a Useful Biomarker of Aging
Average telomere length is currently usually measured in leukocytes obtained from a blood sample. When considering the statistics of a sizable population, average telomere length tends to trend downwards over a lifetime. Telomeres form a part of the complex mechanism that limits somatic cell replication: they shorten with each cell division, and cells with very short telomeres self-destruct or become senescent, ceasing to replicate in either case. Stem cells deliver a supply of new somatic cells with long telomeres to make up the numbers. So average telomere length is a blurred measure of stem cell activity and pace of cel...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 29, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Lack of sleep can lead to Alzheimer ’s and dementia
This study is the clearest demonstration in humans that sleep disruption leads to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease through an amyloid beta mechanism,” said senior author Randall Bateman, MD, the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Distinguished Professor of Neurology. “The study showed that it was due to overproduction of amyloid beta during sleep deprivation.”More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer ’s, a disease characterized by gradual memory loss and cognitive decline.What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaThis study indicatesthat sleeping poorly...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - December 28, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: health lack of sleep alzheimer's lack of sleep dementia poor sleep linked to alzheimer Source Type: blogs

Moving Palliative Care Upstream - Can we ever be TOO early?
By Christian Sinclair (@ctsinclair)The growth of palliative care in the community and outpatient settings has been one of the more popular stories in our field in the past few years. No longer is palliative care only available to serve in the intensive care units, but the demand for person-centered, family-oriented, symptom-based care with an emphasis on communication and decision-making is being heard in the earlier stages of illness. Serving patients and families in clinics and in their home is unleashing the true potential of palliative care. Even in my own work leading our outpatient efforts in an academic cancer cente...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - December 27, 2017 Category: Palliative Care Tags: cancer clinic denmark europe hpmchat outpatient research sinclair tweetchat Source Type: blogs

An Illustration of the Cost of Aging on Individual Health and Survival
The field of aging research could do with more of its scientists choosing to write for laypeople; the more outreach the better. This short column by researcher Steven Austad illustrates one way of looking at aging - that it is all about the mortality rate at a given age, and the inexorable rise of that mortality rate over time, caused by the accumulation of cell and tissue damage. By this metric an individual at age 40 or 50 is already significantly impacted by the processes of aging in comparison with an individual at age 20, manifesting as an increased mortality rate. Given this, there is every chance that a half-way dec...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 25, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Amygdala Stimulation in the Absence of Emotional Experience Enhances Memory for Neutral Objects
Theamygdala is a small structure located within the medial temporal lobes (MTL), consisting of a discrete set of nuclei. It has a reputation as the “fear center” or “emotion center” of the brain, although it performsmultiple functions. One well-known activity of the amygdala, via its connections with otherMTL areas, involves an enhancement of memories that are emotional in nature (compared to neutral). Humans and rodents with damaged or inactivated amygdalae fail to show this emotion-related enhancement, although memory for neutral items is relatively preserved (Adolphs et al., 1997;Phelps& Ande...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 23, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

PR segment depression and PR-ST dissociation
PR segment depression can occur in pericarditis and atrial infarction. Dissociation between PR and ST segments (PR-ST dissociation) can occur in pericarditis. In inferior wall infarction with which atrial infarction is usually associated, there can be ST elevation and PR depression in inferior leads. Jim MH et evaluated the prognostic implication of PR segment depression in inferior leads in acute inferior wall infarction [1]. They noted profound PR segment depression (1.2 mm or more) in 9 of 463 consecutive patients presenting with inferior wall myocardial infarction. They noted that patients with atrial ischemia as ind...
Source: Cardiophile MD - December 22, 2017 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: ECG / Electrophysiology Source Type: blogs

New Report on Illegal Immigrant Criminality Reveals Little & Admits Its Own Shortcomings
This report does not include data on the foreign-born or alien populations in state prisons and local jails because state and local facilities do not routinely provide DHS or DOJ with comprehensive information about their inmates and detainees.   This limitation is noteworthy because state and local facilities account for approximately 90 percent of the total U.S. incarcerated population.The federal prison population is not representative of incarcerated populations on the state and local level,  so excluding them from the report means that it sheds little light on nationwide incarcerations by nativity, legal sta...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 21, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Bill Niskanen: Monetary Policy Radical
Several days ago a colleague of mine, having been sent a copy ofthe Niskanen Center ’s recent conspectus, wondered whetherBill Niskanen, the former Chairman of the Cato Institute after whom the Niskanen Center is named, would have agreed with a claim it made. The claim was that promoting sound monetary policy was basically a matter of encouraging “policymakers to support the Federal Reserve’s dual-mandate” and of getting “pro-growth” candidates appointed to the Board of Governors.My short answer to the question was, “No.” But it occurs to me that that answer is worth fleshing...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 21, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Was There Fraud in Honduras' Election?
There is a lot of circumstantial evidence pointing to electoral fraud in Honduras ’ presidential election. Yet neither the opposition nor international electoral observers have conclusively demonstrated that such has occurred. In other words, there is a lot of gun smoke in the room, but no smoking gun.Perhapsthe most damning piece of circumstantial evidence so far is a statistical analysis by Georgetown professor Irfan Noorudin at the request of the Organization of American States (OAS). It demonstrates that:The Honduran national election of 2017 experienced a dramatic vote swing away from the opposition alliance and...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 20, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Juan Carlos Hidalgo Source Type: blogs

Are you aware of gender bias in peer review?
Last month, Dina Balabanova, (Associate Professor in Health Systems Policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM); Section Editor for BMC Health Services Research) and Jamie Lundine (Research Fellow at LSHTM), hosted a workshop at LSHTM to discuss gender equality in peer review. The specific aim was to discuss ways to address women’s equal participation in the peer review process as authors, peer reviewers and editors in health journals. The workshop was attended by a diverse group of people with a range of backgrounds and experience including PhD students, researchers, editors, publishers and ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - December 19, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Elizabeth Moylan & Elisa de Ranieri Tags: Publishing Equity Gender bias peer review Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 18th 2017
In this study, we asked people in an open-ended way about their desire for longer life: Would you like to have more time? What age would you like to become? This was something more specific than asking about a preference for survival without reference to any length of time; about one's plans for the future; or whether people see the future as open or limited, as in studies of future time perspective. Our attempt was to discover whether there were preferred temporal spans with which older adults framed their futures and plans. The two-question series about extra years and desired age ("How old would you like to ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 17, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Sport participation in England
House of Commons Library - This briefing provides statistics about participation in sport in England by intensity, type and socioeconomic characteristics in England. It finds that more men than women participate in sport and that the highest level of participation occurred among the highest social classes.BriefingSummary (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 15, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Chronic Disease in Rural America
Rural areas face higher rates of chronic disease and higher related mortality rates. In some rural regions of the country and for some rural population groups, the disparity is even worse. The Rural Health Information Hub announces a new guide which discusses the impact of chronic disease on rural America, how providers and communities can help patients with chronic diseases, and where to look for funding to establish programs to address chronic conditions. The guide provides an overview of chronic disease generally as well as specific conditions, including heart disease and stroke, cancer, diabetes, chronic...
Source: BHIC - December 14, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Patricia Devine Tags: Chronic Disease Rural Source Type: blogs

Explaining Commerce to the Commerce Secretary
As college students across the country begin their final exams, we are reminded of the unfortunate reality that much of what we learn in school or other parts of life willeventually be forgotten. Usually, this is more of a nuisance than a problem. A failure to recall the finer points of Shakespearean literature is unlikely to trouble most accountants, nor is a marketing specialist apt to lose sleep over lost the ability to define the Pythagorean Theorem. It ’s a bigger problem, however, when the Secretary of Commerce forgets some basic lessons of international trade.Appearing atan Atlantic Council event earlier this ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 14, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Inu Manak, Colin Grabow Source Type: blogs

“Strongest evidence yet” for ego depletion – the idea that self control is a limited resource
By Christian Jarrett For years, “ego depletion” has been a dominant theory in the study of self control. This is the intuitive idea that self control or willpower is a limited resource, such that the more you use up in one situation, the less you have left over to deploy in another. It makes sense of the everyday experience of when you come home after a hard day at the office, abandon all constructive plans, and instead binge on snacks in front of the TV. The trouble is, the theory has taken some hard knocks lately, including a failed joint replication attempt by 23 separate labs. Critics have pointed out that ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 14, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Emotion Source Type: blogs

BMJ study: Patients treated by older physicians (60 and older) had higher mortality vs. younger physicians (39 and younger)
FromBMJ:The researchers evaluated a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries aged 65 and older admitted to hospital with a medical condition in 2011-14 and treated by hospitalist physicians.Main outcome measures 30 day mortality and readmissions and costs of care.The study included 700,000 admissions managed by 18,800 hospitalist physicians (median age 41).Patients ’ adjusted 30 day mortality rates were:- 10.8% for physicians younger than 40- 11.1% for physicians aged 40-49- 11.3% for physicians aged 50-59- 12.1% for physicians aged 60 and olderSee the figure here:http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/357...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - December 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Age Geriatrics Physician Source Type: blogs

FDA Issues Guidance on Real-World Evidence for Medical Devices
Earlier this year, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized guidance on the use of real world evidence to support regulatory decision-making for medical devices. The final guidance follows a July 2016 draft guidance on the topic in which the FDA discussed potential uses of real world data and the various factors evaluated to determine whether that data can support a regulatory decision. The FDA believes that this guidance is a “cornerstone” of its strategic priority to build a national evaluation system for health technology. The final guidance includes clarity as to what it means for com...
Source: Policy and Medicine - December 13, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Muslim Ban? Fewer Muslim Refugees, Immigrants, and Travelers Enter U.S. in 2017
During his campaign, President Trumppromised to ban all Muslims outright until he could figure out “what is going on.” Helater explained that this idea had developed into several policies that would have the same effect. Since his inauguration, Trump has begun to implement them —they includeslashing the refugee program,banning all immigration and travelers from several majority Muslim countries, andimposing new burdens on all visa applicants as part of “extreme vetting” initiatives. So far, these policies appear to have “worked,” strongly reducing Muslim immigration and travel to t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 13, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Pending FDA review and approval, research findings pave way for Akili ’s EVO to become first brain training platform prescribed for ADHD
Akili Achieves Primary Efficacy Endpoint in ADHD Trial (MD magazine): “Boston-based Akili Interactive has announced top-line results from the STARS-ADHD pivotal study of its investigational digital therapeutic medicine AKL-T01, in treatment of pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)…The digital medicine, AKL-T01, is a video game for patients to play on tablet devices. It uses the same storytelling and reward mechanisms as standard videogames; however, it features mechanisms to act on neural systems and algorithms that dial the level of stimulus up or down, meeting the needs of the patient. In...
Source: SharpBrains - December 12, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Akili Akili Interactive Brain-Training depression digital medicine digital therapeutic digital therapies FDA impulsivity memory neural systems STARS-A Source Type: blogs

Asking the Right Question: Do You Want to Live Longer, if Good Health is Guaranteed?
In this study, we asked people in an open-ended way about their desire for longer life: Would you like to have more time? What age would you like to become? This was something more specific than asking about a preference for survival without reference to any length of time; about one's plans for the future; or whether people see the future as open or limited, as in studies of future time perspective. Our attempt was to discover whether there were preferred temporal spans with which older adults framed their futures and plans. The two-question series about extra years and desired age ("How old would you like to ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 12, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: The Road to Recovery
Persistent neglect in childhood can lead you to believe that you don’t deserve to be loved or cared for. This idea begins to define you: you are a person who ought to be treated badly. When we think of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a specific list comes to mind: soldiers returning from combat zones and police officers connected to terrible incidents in the line of duty; victims of sexual trauma and women who were beaten by their partners; the families who stood on the roofs of their houses in the aftermath of Katrina and those who managed to walk away from the horrific South Asian tsunami in 2004...
Source: World of Psychology - December 12, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Disorders Personal PTSD Publishers The Fix abuse acute C-PTSD chronic Fear Pain Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Source Type: blogs

Conference Review: 2017 End Well Symposium – Design for the End of Life Experience
By Lizzy Miles (@LizzyMiles_MSW)End Well advertised itself as“a first of its kind gathering of design, tech, health care and activist communities with the goal of generating human-centered, interdisciplinary innovation for the end of life experience.”  I feel privileged to have been able to attend. The Symposium was capped at 400 attendees and sold out early. There was a serendipitous momentary technology glitch that allowed me and two friends to register after it was sold out. Fortunately, the organizers graciously agreed to squeeze us in since we had paid.The single-day event took place at the Interconti...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - December 11, 2017 Category: Palliative Care Tags: end of life End Well miles Source Type: blogs

Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer ’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical disease
Discussion: Because large numbers of persons are living with preclinical AD, our results underscore the need for secondary preventions for persons with existing AD brain pathology who are likely to develop clinical disease during their lifetimes as well as primary preventions for persons without preclinical disease. The Study in Context Bill Gates announces $50 million investment to fight Alzheimer’s Disease From Anti-Alzheimer’s ‘Magic Bullets’ to True Brain Health Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging 10 million people develop dementia every year Report: 35% of...
Source: SharpBrains - December 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimers-disease amyloidosis biomarkers Forecast Intervention neurodegeneration prediction Prevalence prevention Statistics Source Type: blogs

Senate Tax Bill Increases Progressivity
AWall Street Journal op-ed last week by liberal billionaire Tom Steyer complained that the proposed Republican tax cut “overwhelming helps the wealthy.” He said that the American people will be furious “if they see a bill passed that hands out filet mignon to the wealthy while leaving them struggling over scraps.”Steyer ’s op-ed had more rhetoric than data, but he did cite aTax Policy Center (TPC) analysis of the Senate bill. So let ’s look at the TPC data. The table below summarizes the Senate tax cuts for 2019 and compares them to current-law taxes.Looking at the block on the right, TP...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 11, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

In Your Career, Effort is Rewarded by Outcome
In a 21st-century nursing job market where competition is tough, effort is rewarded by outcome. For those nurses and healthcare professionals who sit on their laurels and don't do the work, career growth can be stunted. But for those willing to put in the sweat equity, the potential return on investment is high.Doing the WorkCareer development isn't rocket science, but it's also not a walk in the park. Your career can just happen to you if you're not paying attention, but if you dig deep and do your due diligence, you can create the nursing career you really want.The work of nursing career-building and career management is...
Source: Digital Doorway - December 11, 2017 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare healthcare careers nurse nurse career nurse careers nurses nursing Source Type: blogs

Many digital health solutions lack evidence: How physicians can help
Technology makes this an exciting time for health care. Not only are technological advances making health care better, they’re also making it more affordable. To get a taste of the potential of where health and technology are going, you only need to look as far the recent Fortune article titled, “Prepare for a Digital Health Revolution,” or to search through the more than 300,000 health apps available today. But is all this excitement just hype? Opinions differ. Last year the CEO of the American Medical Association (AMA), the nation’s largest association of physicians, described many of the current ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 11, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/bronwyn-harris" rel="tag" > Bronwyn Harris, MD < /a > Tags: Tech Cardiology Mobile health Pulmonology Source Type: blogs

Brief Guide to the CTE Brains in the News. Part 2: Fred McNeill
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is the neurodegenerative disease of the moment, made famous by the violent and untimely deaths of many retired professional athletes. Repeated blows to the head sustained in contact sports such asboxing and American football can result in abnormal accumulations oftau protein (usually many years later). The autopsied brains from two of these individuals are shown below.Left: courtesy of Dr. Ann McKee inNYT. Right: courtesy of Dr. Bennett Omalu inCNN. These are coronal sections1 from the autopsied brains of: (L) Aaron Hernandez, aged 27; and(R) Fred McNeill, aged 63.Part 1 of this ...
Source: The Neurocritic - December 11, 2017 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Hey Watson, Can I Sue You?
By JAYSON CHUNG & AMANDA ZINK Currently, three South Korean medical institutions – Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Pusan National University Hospital and Konyang University Hospital – have implemented IBM’s Watson for Oncology artificial intelligence (AI) system. As IBM touts the Watson for Oncology AI’s to “[i]dentify, evaluate and compare treatment options” by understanding the longitudinal medical record and applying its training to each unique patient, questions regarding the status and liability of these AI machines have arisen. Given its ability to interpret data and ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare: Lessons from Finance
By AJAY KOHLI, MD “We built it and we just let it run. We’re a few dudes in an office and our goal is to keep it running. It does everything we could do, except it’s significantly more powerful and it has completely automated how our work is being done,” casually said the hedge fund manager as he described the process by which nearly $1billion was being managed within his fund. The ‘it’ is an artificial intelligence (AI) based algorithm that uses complex statistics to analyze variables that went into successful decisions and uses advanced computer programs to keep replicating those decis...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fewer than Half of Employment-Based Green Cards are for Workers
The United States ’ immigration system favors family reunification, even in the so-called employment-based categories.  The family members of immigrant workers must use employment-based green cardsdespite the text of the actual  statute and other evidence that strongly suggests that this was not Congress’ intent.   Instead of a separate green card category for spouses and children, they get a green card that would otherwise go to a worker. In 2015, 56 percent of all supposed employment-based green cards went to the family members of workers (Chart 1).   The other 44 percent went to the ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 8, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Replication failure: No evidence that big smilers in vintage baseball photos lived longer
By Emma Young What’s in a smile? According to a widely reported 2010 study of US major league baseball players, which we covered here at BPS Research Digest, one important answer is: an indication of how long the smiler will live. By analysing official individual photos of players from the 1952 baseball season, and then looking at subsequent death records, Ernest Abel and Michael Kruger at Wayne State University, Detroit, concluded that players who’d smiled like they meant it – with full “Duchenne smiles“, which involve muscles around the eyes as well as the mouth – lived on average seve...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Health Replications Source Type: blogs

Replication failure: No evidence that big smilers live longer
By Emma Young What’s in a smile? According to a widely reported 2010 study of US major league baseball players, which we covered here at BPS Research Digest, one important answer is: an indication of how long the smiler will live. By analysing official individual photos of players from the 1952 baseball season, and then looking at subsequent death records, Ernest Abel and Michael Kruger at Wayne State University, Detroit, concluded that players who’d smiled like they meant it – with full “Duchenne smiles“, which involve muscles around the eyes as well as the mouth – lived on average seve...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 8, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Health Replications Source Type: blogs

Novel Transforming Glue Treats Emergency Battlefield Eye Injuries
According to statistics, war-related eye injuries have steadily increased from a fraction of a percent to as high as 10 to 15 percent in the past few decades. Many of these injuries lead to permanent vision loss due to a lack of nearby medical facilities or the proper tools to treat them. Researchers at the University of Southern California have developed an advanced material that medics can rapidly deploy and that is customized for numerous types of ocular trauma. Like superglue for the eyes. Originally developed as an adhesive for USC’s famed retinal implants, the glue, a hydrogel called PNIPAM, poly(N-is...
Source: Medgadget - December 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Materials Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Those Living with Alzheimer's Will More Than Double by 2060
47 million Americans already demonstrate some evidence of susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.ByAlzheimer's Reading RoomAbout 15 million Americans will have either Alzheimer ’s dementia or mild cognitive impairment by 2060, up from approximately 6.08 million this year, according to study by researchers at theUCLA Fielding School of Public Health.“There are about 47 million people in the U.S. today who have some evidence of preclinical Alzheimer’s, which means they have either a build-up of protein fragments called beta-amyloid or neurodegeneration of the brain but don’t yet have symptoms.Many of t...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - December 7, 2017 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer prevalence Alzheimer's statistics alzheimer's study alzheimer's trends connect alzheimer's dementia health news Source Type: blogs

A Few PIRLS of Wisdom on New Reading Results
The latest international academic assessment results are out —this time focused on 4th grade reading —and the news isn’t great for the United States. But how bad is it? I offer a few thoughts—maybe not that wise, but I needed a super-clever title—that might be worth contemplating.The exam is theProgress in International Reading Literacy Study—PIRLS—which was administered to roughly representative samples of children in their fourth year of formal schooling in 58 education systems. The systems are mainly national, but also some sub-national levels such as Hong Kong and the Flemish-s...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 7, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Hayek on the Creation of Moral Hazard by Central Banks
Some years ago I published a paper on the banking theory and policy views of the important twentieth-century economist Friedrich A. Hayek, entitled “Why Didn ’t Hayek Favor Laissez Faire in Banking?”[1] Very recently, working on a new paper on Hayek ’s changing views of the gold standard, I discovered an important but previously overlooked passage on banking policy in a 1925 article by Hayek entitled “Monetary Policy in the United States After the Recovery from the Crisis of 1920.” I missed the passage earlier because the full text of Hay ek’s article became available in English tr...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 7, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

More Information Won ’t Resolve Management Problems at Border Patrol Checkpoints
ConclusionThe best information in the world cannot compensate for poor incentives and can make government management less efficient by providing cover for any choice. Government agents are not usually malevolent,or at least any more so than the rest of us, but they have incentives to satisfy political demands. Private firms that behave in these ways often fail or earn lower profits unless they are bailed out by the government, which is usually the source of these poor incentives in the first place. More metrics can even worsen efficiency. We should look to deeper structural reforms of government agencies rather than contin...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 6, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Trump Administration Expands Interior Immigration Enforcement
Today, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released areport detailing deportations (henceforth “removals”) conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) during the fiscal year of 2017.  This post presents data on removals in historical context combined with information fromPew and theCenter for Migration Studies.  ICE deported 81,603 illegal immigrants from the  interior of the United States in 2017, up from 65,332 in 2016.  Removals from the interior peaked during the Obama administration in 2011 at 237,941 (Figure 1).  ICE also removed large numbers of people appre...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Brain scan study provides new clues as to how electroconvulsive “shock” therapy helps alleviate depression
  Pre-treatment, functional connectivity (FC) between fusiform face area and amygdala was reduced in depressed patients compared with healthy controls (HC), but increased after electroconvulsive therapy (from Wang et al 2017) By Christian Jarrett In the UK, thousands of people with depression continue to undergo electroconvulsive “shock” therapy (ECT) each year, usually if their symptoms have not improved following talking therapy or anti-depressants, and especially if they are considered to be at high risk of suicide, and the numbers may be rising. The technique, which involves using an electric shock to ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Mental health Source Type: blogs

FDA Offers Draft Guidance on E-Submissions of REMS Documents
The FDA recently released draft guidance describing how FDA plans to implement the requirements for the electronic submission of Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) documents in certain submissions under new drug applications, abbreviated new drug applications and biologics license applications. FDA Comments on Stakeholder Feedback In the guidance, FDA describes three years of engagement and analysis of stakeholder feedback regarding REMS standardization. The agency’s findings were published as a report: “Standardizing and Evaluating Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS).” As the...
Source: Policy and Medicine - December 5, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs