The Trump Administration ’s Deportation Regime Is Faltering
Alex NowrastehThe Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently released areport detailing deportations (henceforth “removals”) conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) during the fiscal year 2019. The DHS report divides removals into two categories based on the arresting agency: those removed from the interior of the United States and those removed from the border. Interior removals are those w ho are initially arrested by ICE and then subsequently removed.Border removals are individuals initially apprehended by a Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer while they attempted to illegally ente...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 12, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Immigrants Don ’t Litter More than Native-Born Americans: Evidence from American Cities
Alex Nowrasteh andAndrew C. ForresterThere are very few new arguments in the immigration debate. For generations, people have batted around similar versions of thesame argument in favor or against different immigration policies such as how immigrants affect wages, voting, crime, and terrorism. There are other fringe arguments that crop up now and again, but we  don’t usually address them because they are so rarely argued. However, the frequency of a formerly-fringe argument against immigration is rising: immigrants should be banned or their numbers significantly reduced because they litter a lot.At the recent Na...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, Andrew C. Forrester Source Type: blogs

Beyond the Stigma of Parenting with Anxiety
I find it inspiring to see other parents who have anxiety taking proactive steps to facilitate and create a life that includes trying to thrive despite anxiety. Parenting is not an easy task and when you factor in living with a mental illness, the challenges can be different. The stigma attached to mental illness often ignites the feelings of shame that makes parents reluctant to seek support and help for their anxiety. This can perpetuate the feelings of isolation that make parents feel like no one else is going through what they are going through every day. Guilt plagues the self-esteem of parents and can make them feel...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sue Morton Tags: Anxiety and Panic Parenting Stigma Guilt Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 11th December 2019
Discussion relating to one of these at least in the Guardian,Record number of over-45s giving birth in England, NICESurveillance report NICE guideline (NG126)Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial managementThis guideline will be updated:read this page to find out why.In the newsSinging the blues: how music can help ease postnatal depressionMelodies for Mums, an iniative that is part of a study being funded by the Wellcome.Maternity care failings in Shropshire (BMJ)OpinionBMJ editorialScreening for cytomegalovirus in pregnancy (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - December 11, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Gene Testing for Antidepressants & Psychotropics: Not There Yet
An increasingly common question I get asked is, “Will gene testing help my doctor know which antidepressant to prescribe?” Popular tests such as GeneSight suggests that they can “shorten your road to recovery” and how you, as an individual, will respond to specific antidepressant medications. Does drug-gene testing, also referred to as pharmacogenomics or pharmacogenetics, work? And if so, does it only work for certain types of medications? Let’s find out. The Promise of Gene Testing The idea of gene-drug testing is pretty simple. By testing your DNA, companies hope to be able to predict your...
Source: World of Psychology - December 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders General Medications Treatment drug-gene testing gene-drug gene-drug test pharmacogenetics pharmacogenomics Source Type: blogs

RSNA 2019 AI Round-Up
Shah Islam Hugh Harvey By HUGH HARVEY, MBBS and SHAH ISLAM, MBBS AI in medical imaging entered the consciousness of radiologists just a few years ago, notably peaking in 2016 when Geoffrey Hinton declared radiologists’ time was up, swiftly followed by the first AI startups booking exhibiting booths at RSNA. Three years on, the sheer number and scale of AI-focussed offerings has gathered significant pace, so much so that this year a decision was made by the RSNA organising committee to move the ever-growing AI showcase to a new space located in the lower level of the North Hall. In some ways it made sense to ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Start-Ups AI Hugh Harvey Radiology RSNA RSNA 2019 RSNA19 Shah Islam Source Type: blogs

Fannie and Freddie Need Fixing —Urgently: A Response to Joe Nocera
Diego ZuluagaYesterday, Joe Nocera penned an extraordinarycolumn expressing his bafflement at the Trump administration ’sdrive to release Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two firms that purchase and guarantee around half of single-family mortgages in the United States, from government conservatorship. Nocera argues against such a move, writing that “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it . . . Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac ain’t broke.”The piece is disconcerting from start to finish. Nocera writes that Fannie and Freddie make the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage, a product common only in the U.S., possible ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 10, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Diego Zuluaga Source Type: blogs

War, what is it good for?
Some of my 2 1/2 long-time followers know that I maintained the Today in Iraq and Afghanistan blog for many years. I've set it aside for a while, out of a general feeling of despair. But now I do want to say something about theWaPos's publication of the report of the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction. SIGAR reports frequently featured in Today in Iraq and Afghanistan.IG Sopko has been speaking truth to power for many years, mostly exposing the utter failure of development projects. But now he has done a comprehensive assessment of the goals and accomplishments of the United States'longest war. The an...
Source: Stayin' Alive - December 10, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Why There Has Been No Great Reversal in U.S. Banking
Diego ZuluagaThomas Philippon ’sThe Great Reversal is an important book in which he warns of the decline of competition in many U.S. product markets. Not having studied antitrust issues for some time, I will leave criticism of his general thesis —that competition has indeed declined and that this is owing to lax antitrust enforcement—to my Cato colleagues writing about that issue. (You can starthere.)But I do want to take issue with Philippon ’s argument that finance is one of the industries in which competition has declined. Philippon devotes a whole chapter of the book to the financial services in...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 10, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Diego Zuluaga Source Type: blogs

Special Inspector General for Afghanistan: “The American People Have Constantly Been Lied To.”
John GlaserTheWashington Post has obtained a huge cache of internal government documents containing hundreds of interviews with U.S. officials on the war in Afghanistan. The documents reveal a broadly shared official view that America ’s longest war has been a failure, essentially from the start. Over the years, official assessments of the war were consistently positive, optimistic, hopeful, and confident in the progress being made on the ground. But behind closed doors, official assessments were starkly different.Post reporter Craig Whitlock writes:Several of those interviewed described explicit and sustained effort...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 9, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: John Glaser Source Type: blogs

Psychometric Network Analysis of the Hungarian WAIS
J. Intell. 2019, 7, 21; doi:10.3390/jintelligence7030021Christopher J. Schmank, Sara Anne Goring, Kristof Kovacs and Andrew R. A. ConwayReceived: 1 June 2019; Accepted: 24 August 2019; Published: 9 September 2019Abstract: The positive manifold —the finding that cognitive ability measures demonstrate positive correlations with one another—has led to models of intelligence that include a general cognitive ability or general intelligence (g). This view has been reinforced using factor analysis and reflective, higher-order latent variable models. However, a new theory of intelligence, Process Overlap Theory (POT), ...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - December 7, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Tags: g general intelligence network analysis POT process overlap theory WAIS Wechsler Source Type: blogs

Rebuilding Trust in our Doctors: An Option for our Broken System
By AMITA NATHWANI, MA This week’s impeachment hearings show what a crisis of trust we live in today.  69% of Americans believe the government withholds information from the public, according to recent findings by Pew Research Center.  Just 41 % of Americans trust news organizations.  We even distrust our own health care providers: Only 34% of Americans say they deeply trust their doctor. One important way doctors can regrow that trust is to become educated about the types of medicine their patients want, including alternative therapies.  People are seeking new ways to care for ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Physicians alternative medicine Amita Nathwani Ayurvedic Medicine holistic care Holistic Medicine naturopathic medicine The OpEd Project traditional chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 6th December 2019
Yesterday's post was the news and media from the last week and a bit.Here is the research, statistics and reports.ResearchPlanned earlier delivery for late pre-eclampsia may be better for mothers (NIHR Signals)Review of a study in the LancetInduction recommended for women still pregnant at 41 weeks (Guardian)Report of research from the SWEPIS study, published in theBMJ, .Health service programmesICON (Babies cry, you can cope) - programme launched in North Yorkshire to help parents manage normal infant crying and prevent abusive head injuries caused by shakingReportsBetter for women report (RCOG): improving the health and ...
Source: Browsing - December 6, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

What's the Matter with Significance?
Discussions about statistical significance are not usually found in newspapers, but the  Associated Press  recently hadsuch a discussion about the results of a clinical trial involving a heart drug. Statistical significance refers to whether a study finds a “real” effect or whether any differences measured are a result of chance. For example, in the case of the heart drug study, the authors attempt to measure whether the drug reduces patients’ mortality by comparing the mortality of patients on the drug to people not on the drug. The statistical significance reflects the authors’ confidenc...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Peter Van Doren, David Kemp Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence vs. Tuberculosis, Part 1
By SAURABH JHA, MD Slumdog TB No one knows who gave Rahul Roy tuberculosis. Roy’s charmed life as a successful trader involved traveling in his Mercedes C class between his apartment on the plush Nepean Sea Road in South Mumbai and offices in Bombay Stock Exchange. He cared little for Mumbai’s weather. He seldom rolled down his car windows – his ambient atmosphere, optimized for his comfort, rarely changed. Historically TB, or “consumption” as it was known, was a Bohemian malady; the chronic suffering produced a rhapsody which produced fine art. TB was fashionable in Victorian Britain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech Saurabh Jha TB tuberculosis Source Type: blogs

Plasma Proteins Used to Monitor Health Status; Emerging Science for Lab Testing
A recent article proposed a new way of analyzing patient serum as a means to broadly assess health status (see:Plasma protein patterns as comprehensive indicators of health). Below is an excerpt from the abstract:Proteins are effector molecules that mediate the functions of genes and modulate comorbidities, behaviors and drug treatments.They represent an enormous potential resource for personalized, systemic and data-driven diagnosis, prevention, monitoring and treatment. However, the concept of using plasma proteins for individualized health assessment across many health conditions simultaneously has not been tested. Here...
Source: Lab Soft News - December 4, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: AI Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Diagnostics Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Medical Ethics Population Health Preventive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Stopping the staff we need? Migration choices in the 2019 general election
Nuffield Trust -This briefing looks back at how migrants and migration policy have shaped the care workforce across the UK in recent decades, drawing on new figures obtained from the Office for National Statistics. It assesses the risks different parties ’ policies pose and how these could be addressed to ensure that we do not stop the staff we need.BriefingNuffield Trust - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Brexit Workforce and employment Source Type: blogs

Am I An Alcoholic?
Am I an Alcoholic? Alcoholism (also known as Alcohol Use Disorder, or AUD) is a chronic, relapsing disease affecting millions of individuals in the United States. According to the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 51 percent of the population aged 12 and older reported binge drinking in the past month. More than 14 million individuals aged 12 and older were suffering from alcoholism. And each year, more than 2,200 individuals die due to alcohol poisoning. Many may come to wonder, “Am I an alcoholic?” What Causes Alcoholism? Some individuals are more prone to alcoholism than others. Alcoholism...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 3, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility alcoholic alcoholic behavior alcoholics Source Type: blogs

Insurance Coverage Parity for Mental Health Concerns Is Getting Worse
As a testament to the ineffectiveness of laws when not rigorously enforced (hello, speed limit, I’m looking at you!), the lack of enforcement on mental health parity has been devastating. Mental health parity means that insurance companies are required, by law, to offer the same coverage and benefits for mental disorders as they do for physical conditions. When an American seeks treatment for a mental health or substance abuse problem, chances are they are going to face some pretty steep hurdles. And those hurdles are only getting worse before they get better, according to a new study examining insurance claim data f...
Source: World of Psychology - December 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Psychotherapy Treatment mental health equality Mental Health Parity parity act treatment in America Source Type: blogs

Maternal Mortality – Separating Signal from Noise
By AMEYA KULKARNI, MD When Samuel Morse left his New Haven home to paint a portrait of the Maquis du Lafayette in Washington DC, it was the last time he would see his pregnant wife. Shortly after his arrival in Washington, his wife developed complications during childbirth. A messenger took several days on horseback to relay the message to Mr Morse. Because the trip back to New Haven took several more, his wife had died by the time he arrived at their home.  So moved was he by the tragedy of lost time that he dedicated the majority of the rest of his life to make sure that this would never happen to anyone again. H...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 3, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Medical Practice Ameya Kulkarni Global Health Maternal mortality public health Source Type: blogs

The Psychological Impacts Of Poverty, Digested
This study, of 4,758 11-year-olds living in urban areas of England, found that children who lived in greener neighbourhoods performed better on tests of spatial working memory (an effect that held for both deprived and non-deprived neighbourhoods). “Our findings suggest a positive role of greenspace in cognitive functioning,” commented researcher Eirini Flouri at University College London. What might this role be? Perhaps because it’s restful for the brain, and restores the ability to concentrate. Interventions that focus on the families of kids growing up in poverty should also help. The team that observ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Feature Mental health Money Source Type: blogs

Health care needs new presentation techniques
“So, if you look at this table, you can see that group X had a small but statistically significant increase in mortality over group Y. What does that tell us? It suggests that maybe there is some signal that intervention A is better than intervention B.” The slide has some table from some journa l, and […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - December 1, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/stephen-p-wood" rel="tag" > Stephen P. Wood, ACNP-BC < /a > < /span > Tags: Tech Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Abstaining From Social Media Doesn ’t Improve Well-Being, Experimental Study Finds
By Matthew Warren From digital detoxes to the recent Silicon Valley fad of “dopamine fasting”, it seems more fashionable than ever to attempt to abstain from consuming digital media. Underlying all of these trends is the assumption that using digital devices — and being on social media in particular — is somehow unhealthy, and that if we abstain, we might become happier, more fulfilled people. But is there any truth to this belief? When it comes to social media, at least, a new paper in Media Psychology suggests not.  In one of the few experimental studies in the field, researchers have fo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Facebook Twitter Source Type: blogs

Thanking a lot of people - all the Acknowledgement sections from all my papers
This article was written using the Authorea scientific writing platform.The authors would like to thank the Coronado Pop Warner Islanders for initial collection of the sample and participation in Project MERCCURI, as well as Kris Tracy who assisted in the etymology of the proposed species name.The 16S rRNA sequence analysis was performed under the MiSeq Com- petition MkIIm by New Zealand Genome Limited and with the assistance of Patrick Biggs (NZGL) for MiSeq sequence processing. We thank Alex- ander Forrest for the loan of the Brancker CTD. We are grateful to three anonymous reviewers for their comments and suggestions. W...
Source: The Tree of Life - November 28, 2019 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Not Stayin' Alive
This is not new news, but it's strong confirmation of earlier observations that have been somewhat controversial, and also bad news that the trend is continuing.That trend is declining life expectancy in the U.S. I'm not linking to the full report in JAMA because it's incredibly wonky and behind a paywall anyway, but rather to the associated editorial, which tells you what you need to know.Before we get into the substance of this, let me explain the concept of life expectancy. I'll try to put this simply, but some people find it confusing. It's really a fictitious, though useful, construct. It isn't really a prediction of ...
Source: Stayin' Alive - November 27, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Evaluating the Relation Between CHC Cognitive Factors and Selected Components of Executive Functioning | SpringerLink
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40817-019-00073-3Executive functioning remains an elusive paradigm in regard to their underlying constructs. The Cattell-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory of cognitive functions is the predominant theory of the measurement of human intelligence in psychology in regard to test construction and interpretation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between components of the Tower Test and Color-Word Interference Test from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System (D-KEFS) and CHC theory, as measured by the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities&nb...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - November 26, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Criminal Apprehensions Fell Precipitously Along the Border in 2019
Alex NowrastehCustoms and Border Protection apprehended1,148,024 people during Fiscal Year 2019. Border Patrol apprehended 75 percent of them while CBP officers apprehended the remaining quarter. The number of people CBP apprehended was up 68 percent over 2018, but the number of criminals arrested in 2019 was only up about 15 percent over the previous year. As a result, criminal apprehensions in 2019 comprised the smallest share of all apprehensions since 2015, when publicly available data were first published online (Figure 1). We only have data for the first month of the 2020 fiscal year, so those numbers are included ev...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 25, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Three Pathways for Upward Mobility in HR Career
You're reading Three Pathways for Upward Mobility in HR Career, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. You are doing what again? Human Resource is a career, not many people outside this field, quite understand. Whenever these professionals talk of their job, they often get confused glances by their family and friends. It gets as hard for HR professionals to evolve in their careers and prove their worth for promotion and new management roles.  Hiring, grooming and retaining a business’s cadre o...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: sharmaniti437 Tags: career global HR certifications HR Careers Source Type: blogs

Alcohol Abuse by Teenagers
Alcohol is the drug of choice for most teenagers and can lead to severe consequences. Alcohol abuse by teenagers not only affects the young people who are drinking, but also impacts the safety of the people they encounter. Luckily, there are signs to look out for, ways to prevent alcohol abuse by teenagers and ways to get help. Stats on Alcohol Abuse by Teenagers Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused drug among youth in the United States, making it a very large problem. Here are some statistics on alcohol abuse by teenagers, provided by the CDC. Excessive drinking is responsible for more than 4,300 deaths among un...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - November 22, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Alcohol Drinking Teenagers alcohol abuse alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcoholism teens Source Type: blogs

What Is The Opioid Crisis?
The opioid crisis is known as the health crisis surrounding prescription, and nonprescription, opioid drugs. The overdose and death rates of opioids are climbing exponentially and the use of the drug is more rampant now than ever. How Did the Opioid Crisis Begin? In the late 1990s, pharmaceutical companies reassured the medical community that patients would not become addicted to prescription opioid pain relievers, and healthcare providers began to prescribe them at greater rates. Before long, this lead to the medications becoming misused and it became apparent that these medications were indeed highly addictive. However,...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - November 22, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Heroin Addiction Recovery opioid opioid crisis opioids pharmaceutical addiction pharmaceutical drug abuse treatment pharmacists Source Type: blogs

Opioid Overdose: What Happens and What to Do
The largest risks that come with using opioids are addiction and overdose. An overdose occurs when the body has received too much of a substance or a combination of substances. An opioid overdose can be fatal, which makes it important for all individuals to know the signs of one and what to do if it happens. What Happens During an Opioid Overdose? Opioid overdose can occur at any time, even if the opioids are being used as directed and as prescribed. Doctors can accidentally over-prescribe medications or the body can have a reaction that wasn’t expected. Opioids are a depressant, meaning they slow down the central n...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - November 21, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Heroin Painkiller Substance Abuse drug overdose heroin addiction heroin users opiates opioid opioids prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription medication Source Type: blogs

Mandated Queries of the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program: A Three-Month Experience from a Cancer Center-Based Outpatient Palliative Medicine Clinic
This article represents the findings from the queries over the first three months ’ queries and brings further clarity to our initial findings.Methods This quality improvement (QI) project was reviewed and approved by the Orlando Health/UFHealth Cancer Center Joint Oncology Committee for 2018-19. We began recording results of all E-FORSCE queries occurring after the law ’s implementation of July 1, 2018 through September 30, 2018. We informed each patient that the PDMP query had become mandatory in Florida, and we discussed the results of each query with each patient. Each query examined the last 12 months of t...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - November 18, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: kollas opioid pain quality improvement statte Source Type: blogs

What is the Definition of “Opioid”?
What is the Definition of “Opioid”? The definition of opioid is as follows: Opioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin, synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, and pain relievers available legally by prescription, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, and many others. Opioids work by interacting with the opioid receptors on nerve cells in the body and brain. By interacting with these receptors, opioids medications are able to cut off communication between the pain point on the body to the brain. This chemical interaction gives it’s users pain relief that is too great for ov...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - November 15, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction to Pharmaceuticals fentanyl heroin heroin addiction opiate opiate abuse opiate addiction opiates opioid opioids Source Type: blogs

Applying Smarter, Part 1: Breaking Down the AAMC ’ s Apply Smart Campaign
By BRYAN CARMODY, MD “YOUR LIKELIHOOD OF SECURING RESIDENCY TRAINING DEPENDS ON MANY FACTORS – INCLUDING THE NUMBER OF RESIDENCY PROGRAMS YOU APPLY TO.” So begins the introduction to Apply Smart: Data to Consider When Applying to Residency – a informational campaign from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) designed to help medical students “anchor [their] initial thinking about the optimal number of applications.” In the era of Application Fever – where the mean number of applications submitted by graduating U.S. medical students is now ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Education Medical Practice Physicians AAMC Bryan Carmody Medical Students Residency Source Type: blogs

Applying Smarter, Part 1: Breaking Down the AAMC ’ s Apply Smart Campaign
By BRYAN CARMODY “YOUR LIKELIHOOD OF SECURING RESIDENCY TRAINING DEPENDS ON MANY FACTORS – INCLUDING THE NUMBER OF RESIDENCY PROGRAMS YOU APPLY TO.” So begins the introduction to Apply Smart: Data to Consider When Applying to Residency – a informational campaign from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) designed to help medical students “anchor [their] initial thinking about the optimal number of applications.” In the era of Application Fever – where the mean number of applications submitted by graduating U.S. medical students is now up t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Education Medical Practice Physicians AAMC Bryan Carmody Medical Students Residency Source Type: blogs

How the Hustle Brag Phenomenon Is Hurting Your Mental Health
How many times has a coworker or friend complained about how many hours they worked that week, how many meetings they sat in that day, or how tired they were? It starts to feel like maybe they get a level of satisfaction out of bragging about how tired and busy they are.  A century ago, Americans worked 100 hours a week. Since then, the government has limited the workweek to 40 hours. But if you’re in a startup or in a client-oriented industry, sometimes 40 hours isn’t enough to get the work done. And once you hit that overtime, so begins the bragging.  Entrepreneurs need to know that more work doesn...
Source: World of Psychology - November 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Sarah Daren Tags: Industrial and Workplace Stress Success & Achievement hustle Overworked professional Workaholic Source Type: blogs

More and More Pills for 25-30% Better Odds of This, That and The Other – Some Patients Want That, and Some Will Run the Other Way
By HANS DUVEFELT, MD I scribbled my signature on a pharmaceutical rep’s iPad today for some samples of Jardiance, a diabetes drug that now has expanded indications according to the Food and Drug Administration. This drug lowers blood sugar (reduces HbA1c by less than 1 point) but also reduces diabetes related kidney damage, heart attacks, strokes and now also admission rates for heart failure (from 4.1% to 2.7% if I remember correctly – a significant relative risk reduction but not a big absolute one; the Number Needed to Treat is about 70, so 69 out of 70 patients would take it in vain for the heart failure...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Patients Physicians Primary Care Hans Duvefelt Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 13th November 2019
Some recent things...StatisticsBreastfeeding at 6-8 weeks after birth (Public Health England)Reproductive health: 2019 update (Official Statistics)Update of profile indicators, which include birth outcomesNHS Maternity Statistics 2018-19 (NHS Digital)Statistics on maternity activity in English hospitals, including method of onset of delivery, delivery method, place of delivery, baby's first feed type, maternal alcohol intake, and folic acid intake.Summary from the Embed Health Consortium Health Bulletin:Use of analgesics or anaesthetics before or during delivery has dropped;The number of all deliveries is at its lowest lev...
Source: Browsing - November 13, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Homeschooling, Choice, and Innovation: A Response
Kerry McDonaldHomeschooling continues to be a popular option for many U.S. families as they seek alternatives to conventional mass schooling. In my Septemberbriefing paper for Cato, I argued that homeschoolers should generally support the expansion of education choice programs, whether or not they personally benefit from such programs, because an environment of education choice empowers parents to consider a variety of options for their children, including homeschooling.I spotlighted four states, Ohio, Florida, Wisconsin, and North Carolina, that have some of the most robust education choice programs in the country, and th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Kerry McDonald Source Type: blogs

High-Sensitivity Troponin is not a Myth, and “Myth-busting” is often another Myth to be Busted
Conclusion: Early rule out protocol is effective and safe.We refer interested readers to the following excellent reviews of high-sensitivity troponin implementation:Twerenbold, R. et al.JACC70 (8): 996 –1012.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2017.07.718.Yader S. et al. 2016. Am J Med 129 (4): 354 –65.https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2015.12.005.Response to the 2nd “Myth-busting” articleInterestingly, on Nov 5, Dr. Spiegel publishedanother “Myths in EM” piece in EM News: “Is hs-cTnT Worth the Downstream Testing?. The piece assesses a new randomized trial of the Roche hs -cTnT...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - November 10, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Immigration and Homicide Rates in New York City: 1850-2017
Alex NowrastehResearchfrom 1994 to 2014 has generally found that there is a negative relationship between immigration and crime in the United States. According to those andother findings, all immigrants have a lower criminal incarceration rate and there are lower crime rates in the neighborhoods where they live.Evenrecentresearchonillegalimmigrationandcrimehasfoundanegative relationship.All of those studies research the relationship between crime and immigration in recent years and decades – which is most relevant for setting public policy today. However, I recently came across historicalhomicide data for New York Ci...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 6, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 6th November 2019
Some recent things....NHS ImprovementMaternity and Neonatal Safety Improvement ProgrammeThe programme aims to improve the safety and outcomes of maternal and neonatal care, and contribute to the national ambition, set out in Better Births of reducing the rates of maternal and neonatal deaths, stillbirths, and brain injuries that occur during or soon after birth by 50% by 2025StatisticsCompendium: infant mortality (NHS Digital)Maternity statistics - monthly statistics, July 2019 (NHS Digital)Maternity statistics, England, 2018-19 (NHS Digital)NewsRevealed: 47 pregnant women in prisons in England and Wales (Guardian)We are t...
Source: Browsing - November 6, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Do Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders Really Care About Wealth Inequality?
Ryan BourneSenator Bernie Sanders has called levels of U.S. wealth inequality“outrageous,” “grotesque” and “immoral.” Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is pushing for a wealth tax to curb what she describes as “runaway wealth concentration.” Yet despite their rhetoric, it’s not clear, deep down, whether either really cares about wealth inequality per se or believes that reducing it should be an overriding public policy goal.To see why, consider this. Every year,Credit Suisse calculates a wealth “Gini coefficient” for major countries, in...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Five Ways To Boost Resilience In Children
By Emma Young While some of us crumble in the face of adversity, and struggle to recover, others quickly bounce back from even serious trauma. Psychological resilience is undeniably important in all kinds of areas of life, so understanding what underpins it, and how to train it – particularly in children — is of intense interest to psychologists. 1. Watch your language According to Carol Dweck of growth mindset fame, to drive success in our children we should “praise the effort that led to the outcome or learning progress; tie the praise to it,” as opposed to praising effort more broadly, or ac...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Developmental Feature Source Type: blogs

U.S. Poverty Has Plunged
Chris EdwardsThe governmentsays that America ’s poverty rate is 11.8 percent. Italso says that the poverty rate has hovered around 11 to 15 percent since 1970 suggesting little or no progress against poverty in decades.But the Census Bureau ’s official poverty rate is biased upwards and kind of meaningless. In terms of material well-being, families near the bottom are much better off today than in past decades because of general economic growth and larger government hand-outs.In aCato study, John Early recalculated the U.S. poverty rate using more complete data and found that it fell from 19.5 percent in 1963 t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 4, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

The Unique Vulnerability of Dating While Sober
  I am acutely aware of how careful I am to minimize my recovery journey when I first start dating someone. A few months ago, a male friend and I were talking about the frustrations and disappointments of dating. I mentioned how lonely it can be navigating this world on my own, without a traveling companion, a long-term lover, or a hiking partner, without someone with whom to Netflix and chill on a rainy Sunday. He said, “Dating is complicated for everyone, but for you, with your history? I can only imagine. Maybe guys are afraid of you, afraid of your intelligence and strength.” He hesitated and then con...
Source: World of Psychology - November 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Bipolar Disorders Publishers Recovery The Fix alcohol use disorder Alcoholism sober Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, November 4th 2019
In this study, we hypothesized that moderately and chronically reducing ACh could attenuate the deleterious effects of aging on NMJs and skeletal muscles. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed NMJs and muscle fibers from heterozygous transgenic mice with reduced expression of the vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT), VKDHet mice, which present with approximately 30% less synaptic ACh compared to control mice. Because ACh is constitutively decreased in VKDHet, we first analyzed developing NMJs and muscle fibers. We found no obvious morphological or molecular differences between NMJs and muscle fibers of VKDHet and contro...
Source: Fight Aging! - November 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Replication Crisis Lowers The Public ’s Trust In Psychology — But Can That Trust Be Built Back Up?
By Matthew Warren Often when we discuss the replication crisis in psychology, the main focus is on what it means for the research community — how do research practices need to change, for instance, or which sub-disciplines are most affected? These are all important questions, of course. But there’s another that perhaps receives less attention: what do the general public think about the field of psychology when they hear that supposedly key findings are not reproducible? So a new paper in Social Psychological and Personality Science should make for concerning reading. Across a series of studies involving a ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 31st October 2019
Some recent things, a day late.StatisticsNewborn hearing screening: standards data report for April 2017 - March 2018Global healthUSAID Maternal and Child Survival ProgramThis comes to an end this year and there is a webinar to look at its achievements.Book a ticket.Research newsPost-term pregnancy research cancelled after six babies die (Guardian)Grateful acknowledgement to the Embed Health Consortium Health Bulletin (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - October 31, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Ruminations and Worrying Ruining Your Day?
Do you ever find yourself dwelling on something inconsequential that happened a long time ago?  Are you still thinking about how badly you embarrassed yourself in front of Sally Sue in the second grade?  Today’s guest has a method to help you stop! Sometimes reviewing past failures or setbacks can be healthy, a way to avoid making the mistake again. But when processing turns into ruminating, it is time to make a change.  If you find yourself continually revisiting negative thoughts that just won’t go away, listen in as Dr. Tara Sanderson gives us some tips on how to stop ruminating once and for ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Anxiety and Panic Brain and Behavior Depression LifeHelper Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness OCD Podcast Psychiatry Psychology Self-Help The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs