When Faith Alone Can ’ t Heal Depression
There is no question that religion and spirituality can help pull us out of darkness and provide the hope and inspiration that is needed to persevere through despair. Several studies over the last decade have confirmed the positive role of faith in recovery from depression. How Faith Helps Depression A 2016 study from the University of Utah School of Medicine demonstrated how religious and spiritual experiences activate the brain reward circuits. In the study 19 young-adult Mormon church members performed four tasks in response to content meant to evoke spiritual feelings. Based on the brain imaging scans (fMRI), rese...
Source: World of Psychology - March 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression General Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Research Spirituality Stigma Emotional Resilience Faith Source Type: blogs

A New Study Supports Evolutionary Psychology ’s Explanation For Why Men And Women Want Different Attributes In Partners
By Jesse Singal When it comes to the heated subject of differences between how men and women behave, debate in psychology has centered on mate preferences and general interests. The available research shows that when it comes to (heterosexual) mating preferences, men are relatively more interested in physical beauty, while women are relatively more interested in earning capacity. As for general interests, men are more interested in physical things, while women are more interested in people. Even the staunchest evolutionary psychologists would acknowledge these are partially overlapping bell curves: There are plenty o...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Dating evolutionary psych Sex Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 13th March 2019
Some things you may need to know about …NICE GuidanceNG121 – Intrapartum care for women with existing medical conditions or obstetric complications and their babies, published March 2019Health Education EnglandMaternity Workforce Strategy – Transforming the maternity workforceCase studiesAtlas of Shared Learning Implementing the Mum and BabyApp across North-West LondonReducing perineal tears duringchildbirth at Bedford Hospital NHS TrustOther case studiesHumber, Coast and Vale Health and Care Partnership - Work to improve access tospecialist community perinatal mental health services Film revie...
Source: Browsing - March 13, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Keeping the art of medical satire alive
Sequels generally disappoint. Jason couldn ’t match the fear he generated in the original Friday the 13th. The sequel to the “Parachute,” a satirical piece canvassing PubMed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parachutes to placebo, matched its brilliance — and even exceeded it, though the margin can’t be confirmed wi th statistical significance. The “Parachute,” published […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/dr-saurabh-jha" rel="tag" > Dr. Saurabh Jha < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Cardiology Source Type: blogs

The Imperfect Count of Hate Crimes
Laws on hate crimes raise  longstanding questions of fairness both in theory and application, including (when enacted at the federal level) dangers of overextension of federal criminal law and inroads on the prohibition against double jeopardy. The role of hate crimes as culture war rallying points can make things worse. In the Jussie Smollett episode, journalists came under fire for raising questions about unlikely elements of the actor’s sto ry — Smollett had been “doubly victimized as the subject of speculation by the media industry and broader culture,” said the hea...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 12, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Walter Olson Source Type: blogs

Psychologists Love To Report “Marginally Significant” Results, According To A New Analysis 
  Figure 3 from Olsson-Collentine et al, 2019: “Percentage of p values (.05
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Source Type: blogs

Have Specific Genetic Examples of Antagonistic Pleiotropy Been Identified in Humans?
This study provides a possible reason why genes carrying health risks have persisted in human populations. The second found evidence for multiple variants in genes related to ageing that exhibited antagonistic pleiotropic effects. They found higher risk allele frequencies with large effect sizes for late-onset diseases (relative to early-onset diseases) and an excess of variants with antagonistic effects expressed through early and late life diseases. There also exists other recent tangible evidence of antagonistic pleiotropy in specific human genes. The SPATA31 gene has been found under strong positive genomic sele...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 11, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Talking Suicide with a Bipolar and a Schizophrenic
 Suicide is something that most people think they understand, but there are many misconceptions about it. We say it’s a serious problem, yet will mention it casually and insensitively in certain settings. In this episode, our hosts openly discuss suicide and their personal stories with trying to end their own lives.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “I thought about suicide every day for as far back as I can remember.” – Gabe Howard   Highlights From ‘Suicide’ Episode [1:00] Frankly discussing suicide. [3:00] Don’t belittle a person’s suicide attempt. [7:00] Why...
Source: World of Psychology - March 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Depression Schizophrenia Suicide Source Type: blogs

This is not normal(ised)
“Sydney stations where commuters fall through gaps, get stuck in lifts” blares the headline. The story tells us that: Central Station, the city’s busiest, topped the list last year with about 54 people falling through gaps Wow! Wait a minute… Central Station, the city’s busiest Some poking around in the NSW Transport Open Data portal reveals how many people enter every Sydney train station on a “typical” day in 2016, 2017 and 2018. We could manipulate those numbers in various ways to estimate total, unique passengers for FY 2017-18 but I’m going to argue that the value as-is...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - March 11, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: australian news statistics smh trains transport Source Type: blogs

Better the Balance, Better the World, Better the Science
The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is #BalanceforBetter, which encourages a more gender-balanced world to drive change and progress. This extends to science and research, statistics from WISE stated that since 2011, there has been a year on year increase in the number of women in core STEM occupations. We need to continue this good work, and head for a future where women feel more empowered and supported to enter a career in science.  To mark the day,  we spoke to Rupshi Mitra, Assistant Professor at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and author of a paper published on F...
Source: Naturally Selected - March 8, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Rupshi Mitra Tags: F1000 Source Type: blogs

These Violent Delights Don ’t Have Violent Ends: Study Finds No link Between Violent Video Games And Teen Aggression
By Matthew Warren Claims that violent video games lead to aggression have been around since the days of Space Invaders. When young people are exposed to violent media, the theory goes, their aggressive thoughts become more prominent, leading them to commit acts of violence. But while several studies have found results that seem to back up this idea, the evidence is far from unequivocal. Now a study published in Royal Society Open Science has failed to find any association between the time spent playing violent video games and aggressive behaviour, adding to a growing body of literature that suggests that such a link has be...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Developmental Forensic Media Technology Source Type: blogs

Fear, Measles, and Protecting our Kids
This study followed 657,461 children born in Denmark from 1999 through 31 December 2010, with follow-up from 1 year of age and through 31 August 2013. Another team of researchers completed an exhaustive review of all scientific studies of the MMR and its potential problems in 2001. The results are published in the September 2001 issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood. Those authors concluded, “While the final decision rests with the parents, the evidence of the safety and efficacy of MMR  vaccine is so overwhelmingly conclusive that health professionals should have no hesitation recommending its use....
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - March 5, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Immunizations Source Type: blogs

Using parameters in Rmarkdown
Nothing new or original here, just something that I learned about quite recently that may be useful for others. One of my more “popular” code repositories, judging by Twitter, is – well, Twitter. It mostly contains Rmarkdown reports which summarise meetings and conferences by analysing usage of their associated Twitter hashtags. The reports follow a common template where the major difference is simply the hashtag. So one way to create these reports is to use the previous one, edit to find/replace the old hashtag with the new one, and save a new file. That works…but what if we could define the hasht...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - March 4, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: programming statistics automation reports rmarkdown Source Type: blogs

Your Romantic Partner Is Probably Less Intelligent Than You Think, Suggests New Study
By guest blogger David Robson It’s now well known that many of us over-estimate our own brainpower. In one study, more than 90 per cent of US college professors famously claimed to be better than average at teaching, for instance – which would be highly unlikely. Our egos blind us to our own flaws. But do we have an even more inflated view of our nearest and dearest? It seems we do – that’s the conclusion of a new paper published in Intelligence journal, which has shown that we consistently view our romantic partners as being much smarter than they really are.  The researchers, Gille...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Dating Intelligence Source Type: blogs

School Choice Reduces Crime and Paternity Suits
One of the original arguments for a government-run education system is thatpublic schools are necessary for stable democratic society. After all, self-interested families might send their children to private schools that specialize in maximizing earnings rather than citizenship skills. But new evidence suggests that private schools are actually more conducive to maintaining social order than public schools. Here ’s why.Thenew study - coauthored by Dr. Patrick J. Wolf and me - used student-level data from the longitudinal evaluation of the longest-running private school voucher program in the United States. We found t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Corey A. DeAngelis Source Type: blogs

This Diary Study Just Happened To Be Taking Place When Disaster Struck, Providing A Rare Insight Into Vicarious Experience Of Traumatic Events
By Matthew Warren Major disasters clearly take a toll on the survivors who had the misfortune to go through them. But there is another group of people who can suffer mental and physical distress from disasters: those who experience them second-hand, through media coverage and conversation. After 9/11, for example, researchers found an increase in symptoms of depression and stress among Americans who hadn’t directly experienced the terrorist attacks.  But there have always been doubts about studies purporting to show evidence of vicarious distress. Because disasters occur randomly researchers are usually unable t...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs

A More Serious Trial Failure for Gensight's Allotopic Expression Implementation
Gensight Biologics uses allotopic expression of a mitochondrial gene, ND4, to attempt to treat the inherited blindness condition Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, in which this gene is mutated and dysfunctional. An altered copy of ND4 is introduced into the cell nucleus, and the protein produced is delivered back to the mitochondria where it is needed for correct function. A fairly standard gene therapy is used to deliver this payload into the retina. Unfortunately, after promising results from earlier trials and technology demonstrations, their late stage trials are failing. It remains to be seen as to why this is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

BIOTRONIK ’s Orsiro Ultrathin Coronary Stent Approved in U.S.
BIOTRONIK won FDA approval for its Orsiro drug-eluting coronary stent, an ultrathin device that’s already been approved in Europe for eight years and has been implanted in more than a million patients worldwide. The Orsiro is a cobalt chromium metal stent that releases sirolimus, which helps to prevent restenosis. This is performed by BIOTRONIK’s proprietary BIOlute bioabsorbable polymer coating, which is infused with the drug and releases it as it breaks down. The stent is available as narrow as 2.25 mm up to 4.0 mm in diameter and lengths up to 40 mm, which is the longest available in the U.S. for this kind o...
Source: Medgadget - February 25, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 25th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Yet Again An Insightful Comment Lays The Disingenuous ADHA Exposed To Ridicule. They Really Need To Start Behaving Like Mature, Truthful Adults!
Again an anon. reader has called out the fraudulent ADHA. Quote from the comment in italics “The measure of ADHA success is clear in the national strategy (or the let’s rationale our overblown budgets).Extract from online versionAlmost five million Australians now have a record (20% of the population)[7] and, with opt-out participation arrangements due to be implemented from 2018, an e stimated 98% of the population will then have a My Health Record. In 2018, Australia will have the highest participation rate in a national health record system in the world. For the first time, members of healthcare teams will h...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - February 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

When The Best You Can Get Is Zero – The BACtrack Mobile Breathalyzer Review
All drivers get into situations when they have to say no to alcohol, or have to count how much time they’ll need until sobering up completely when they have that last drink. But breathalyzers could also be parents’ good friend when dealing with teenage drinking, people who try to regulate their alcohol consumption, and nurses or doctors, who could also easily assess whether an incoming patient is under the influence of booze. A digitalized, smartphone-connected, truly 21st-century breathalyzer, the BACtrack Mobile promises to monitor blood alcohol concentration straight from your pocket – and we decided t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 23, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients alcohol alcohol consumption breathalyzer device digital gadget gadgets review smartphone smartphone apps technology zero Source Type: blogs

Application, Review, Funding, and Demographic Trends for Maximizing Investigators ’ Research Awards (MIRA): FY 2016-2018
NIGMS has made MIRA awards to Established Investigators (EI) and Early-Stage Investigators (ESI) for three full Fiscal Years (FY). In this Feedback Loop post, we provide an analysis of application, review, funding, and demographic trends for the MIRA program. For the first two rounds of EI MIRAs, eligibility was limited to well-funded NIGMS investigators: PIs with two or more NIGMS R01-equivalent awards or one NIGMS R01-equivalent award for>$400,000 in direct costs. For the FY 2018 EI competition and beyond, eligibility was expanded to include any investigator with a single PD/PI NIGMS R01-equivalent that is up for ...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - February 22, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Dr. Jake Basson and Travis Dorsey Tags: Funding Trends Funding Outcomes Funding Policies MIRA NIGMS Strategic Plan R01 Source Type: blogs

Health care organizations have to take better care of their employees
Anybody who has even a passing interest in health and wellness knows the sobering fact that a large number of medical problems that plague society today are the result of unhealthy living habits. Conditions such as heart disease and diabetes, which are reaching epidemic proportions, are directly linked to poor eating and inactivity. Official statistics […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - February 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/suneel-dhand" rel="tag" > Suneel Dhand, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

Spravato: New Ketamine Treatment to be Approved by FDA
Last week a committee of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommended in a 14-2 vote that the agency approve the use of a nasal spray form of esketamine (a specific type of ketamine) for the treatment of treatment-resistant depression and certain other types of depression. Treatment-resistant depression is when clinical depression fails to respond to multiple (at least two) attempts to treat it with at least two different types of medications or psychotherapy over the course of a year or longer. If the FDA ends up approving the drug — and we believe they will — it will offer new hope for people with ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders General Medications Treatment esketamine ketamine for depression Spravato Suicide TRD Treatment Resistant Depression Treatment-resistant Source Type: blogs

Different Kinds Of Loneliness – Having Poor Quality Relationships Is Associated With Greater Distress Than Having Too Few
By Emma Young Loneliness not only feels bad, experts have characterised it as a disease that increases the risk of a range of physical and psychological disorders. Some national prevalence estimates for loneliness are alarming. Although they can be as low as 4.4 per cent (in Azerbaijan), in other countries (such as Denmark) as many as 20 per cent of adults report being either moderately or severely lonely.  However, there’s no established way of identifying loneliness. Most diagnostic methods treat it as a one-dimensional construct: though it can vary in degrees, someone is either “lonely”, or they&r...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Social Source Type: blogs

Twitter, Trump and Fat Space
Over the weekend, after days of jabs and complaints  on Twitter about the news that was released following President. Trump’s recent physical, Jon Cooper, Chairman of the Democratic Coalition, called his 239,000 followers to tweet using the hashtag #MarALardass. By Monday morning the hashtag was at the top of the trending list on Twitter. Cooper’ s followers enthusiastically embraced the hashtag and there followed more fat shaming, crude anti-fat humor than I could count. I and a number of others began to post responses to the worst of the fat bashing, only to be met with a chorus of justifications because...
Source: Jung At Heart - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: blogs

“Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience
Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 million in annual revenues in 2009 to more than a $1 billion in 2012 and is projected to reach ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior Neuromyths Brain Training Concentration Memory Skills Neuroscience problem solving speed of thinking visual-spatial recognition Source Type: blogs

Neuromyth: “Brain Training” Is Supported by Neuroscience
Online computer games promise to improve “memory, problem solving, concentration, speed of thinking, language, and visual-spatial recognition.” They further promise that they “work your social skills, social awareness, self-awareness, and self-control” while you’re having fun. These are tempting offers, and this is a very lucrative and growing business in the United States as people age and many older adults seek out ways to maintain cognitive functioning. “Brain training” grew from $600 million in annual revenues in 2009 to more than a $1 billion in 2012 and is projected to reach ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior Neuromyths Brain Training Concentration Memory Skills Neuroscience problem solving speed of thinking visual-spatial recognition Source Type: blogs

John W. Campbell, Editor of Astounding Science Fiction, Described Actuarial Escape Velocity in 1949
Some of the voices of the past can appear entirely contemporary, because they saw further and with greater clarity than most of their peers. John W. Campbell, editor of Astounding Science-Fiction Magazine, died of heart disease at age 61 in 1971. In 1949 he wrote an editorial on the future of medicine, aging, and longevity that wouldn't seem out of place today. He anticipated what we presently call actuarial escape velocity, or longevity escape velocity, the idea that gains in life span through progress in medical technology allow greater time to benefit from further gains - and eventually, we are repaired more rapidly tha...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Some thoughts on my recent Twitter break
Various people have suggested that taking a break from social networks – Twitter in particular – can be A Good Thing™. So I tried it, for a couple of weeks. Here’s what I learned. 1. Why a break? The reasons that everyone else cites, I guess. A sense that my stream has swung away from essential information towards noise and distraction, despite attempts to curate it carefully by following “good people”. A realisation that I was habitually reaching for it without thinking, or knowing why. The empty serotonin hit of checking for likes. For me, a growing sense of people existing in bubbles...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - February 19, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: networking health productivity social networking twitter Source Type: blogs

China Is Building The Ultimate Technological Health Paradise. Or Is It?
How could a country keep around 1.4 billion people healthy when the system struggles with corruption, lack of resources and an aging population? China, the emerging giant with a strong central leadership fostering technology and innovation, places its bets on artificial intelligence, telemedicine, cloud-based hospitals, and WeChat. While that could sound like an ultimate technological paradise, the question is, what are they going to do with the vast amount of data or to what interests are they going to leverage their state of the art A.I. systems? Generally, how will we speak about digital health in China: a healthcare dy...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 19, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Bioethics Future of Medicine Medical Professionals Patients Policy Makers AI chatbot china digital digital health Healthcare Innovation smartphone technology telehealth telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Roger McNamee ’s Facebook Critique
In a recentTimemagazine article,Roger McNamee offers an agitated criticism of Facebook, adapted from his bookZucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.  Facebook “has a huge impact on politics and social welfare,” he claims, and “has done things that are truly horrible.”  Facebook, he says, is “terrible for America. ”McNamee suggests his “history with the company made me a credible voice.” From 2005 to 2015, McNamee was one of a half dozen managing directors of Elevation Partners, an $1.9 billion private equity firm that bought and sold  shares in eight com...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 18th 2019
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Marie Kondo And Digital Health
The Japanese art of decluttering and tidying up could show medical professionals what they could get rid of in healthcare so the surroundings of patients and care processes could become agreeable. Here, the aim is not to “spark joy” but to make all the activities in healthcare invisible and inevitable – no waiting times, no (necessary) medical visits, less administration – to cause as little concern to patients as possible. Let’s see how digital health could help make medicine neat! A fragile Japanese woman and the art of tidying up After Netflix introduced its latest reality show about...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 16, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design administration chatbot chatbots decluttering digital health marie kondo patient management smart smart healthcare technology telemedicine tidying up waiting waiting time Source Type: blogs

Trends in Human Mortality in Very Late Life May be Illusions Resulting from Bad Data
To my mind far too much effort is expended on trying to figure out the epidemiology of the tiny fraction of humans who manage to live a fair way past one hundred years of age. For one, there just aren't enough of them to generate truly robust data from which conclusions can be drawn. People are still arguing over the legitimacy of many of the cases, including Jeanne Calment. Gathering and vetting data on the age of very old people is inherently challenging in its own ways. As the authors of today's paper point out, we should be more suspicious than we are of claims of extreme longevity. You might compare their position wit...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

There Is No National Emergency on the Border, Mr. President
ConclusionThere will be a long legal battle over the President ’s declaration of a national emergency along the border to build some of his border fence.  Regardless of the outcome, there is no good reason to declare the border a national emergency.  (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 15, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

The Vicious Cycles of Aging
This study showed that potential vicious cycles underlying ARDs are quite diverse and unique, triggered by diverse and unique factors that do not usually progress with age, thus casting doubts on the possibility of discovering the single molecular cause of aging and developing the single anti-aging pill. Rather, each disease appears to require an individual approach. However, it still cannot be excluded that some or all of these cycles are triggered by fundamental processes of aging, such as chronic inflammation or accumulation of senescent cells. Nevertheless, experimental data showing clear cause and effect relationships...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Try Something New Together – Research Shows Engaging In “Self-Expanding Activities” Rekindles The Sexual Desire Of Long-Term Couples
By Christian Jarrett People have a basic drive to learn and develop and to see themselves and the world in new ways. That’s according to the psychologists Arthur Aron and Elaine Aron, who refer to this as our need for “self-expansion”. It follows from their theory that any chance to self-expand should be rewarding, and that if you can self-expand while doing things with your romantic partner then your relationship will benefit. Previous research has hinted that this is the case, finding that when couples engaged in self-expanding activities together – anything that felt new, exciting, interesting an...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Sex Source Type: blogs

El Paso Homicides Spiked After Border Fence Was Completed; The Fence Didn't Cause It
At a recent rally in El Paso, Texas, President Trump again claimed that that city had a high crime rate before a fence was built between it and Mexico in 2008 and 2009.  Many peoplehave pointed out that El Paso has long been a more peaceful city than others, before and after the border fence was built.   This post adds just a few more visuals to hammer home the point made by others and an odd anomaly in homicides.I constructed the figures using local police department crime data from the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) database, focusing on departments that policed populations of between 500,000 to 1 million.   ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 13, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Goodbye to Compounded Analgesic Creams
This study is one of the largest and best-designed study I'm aware of of these creams, and the findings are pretty clear: such creams benefit patients via placebo mechanisms, aka they don't work.Note that there is a separate body of research on some other topicals which should not be confused with this study. Eg, the 5% lidocaine patch for post-herpetic neuralgia, topical capsaicin for a variety of neuropathies, and at least some topical NSAIDs for osteoarthritis, and topical opioids. I'm not broadly endorsing those either - it's complicated - however they weren't tested here and the take home point is we should stop makin...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - February 11, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Source Type: blogs

Efficient " Central Bank Digital Currency " Is a Fantasy
In January I had the pleasure of participating on a panel on “The New Financial System: Decentralized?” at the Blockchain Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. (Video of the panel ishere.) The panel was preceded by a talk by Prof. Nouriel Roubini of the NYU Stern School of Business (videohere; all quotes below are my own transcriptions). In his talk Roubini made remarkable claims for what he called a “central bank digital currency.”A terminological clarification is immediately needed: the “central bank digital currency” that Roubini and other economists advocate is not in fact acurrency....
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

People Who Are Most Fearful Of Genetically Modified Foods Think They Know The Most About Them, But Actually Know The Least
via Fernbach et al, 2019 By Jesse Singal There are few subjects where a larger gap exists between public opinion and expert opinion than people’s opinions on foods, like corn or wheat, that have been genetically manipulated to, for example, increase crop yields or bolster pest-resistance. Experts generally view so-called GM foods as totally safe to consume, while the public is suspicious of them — and this divide is massive. One Pew Research Center survey found that just 37 per cent of the American public believed GM foods are safe to eat, compared with 88 per cent of members of the American Association fo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Decision making Educational Political Source Type: blogs

Success stories - V.A. Wait Times Now Shorter Than for Private Doctors
From New York Times on 01/22/19Wait times for an appointment at Veterans Affairs hospitals have decreased since 2014 and are now, on average, shorter than those in the private sector, a new study shows.Researchers used V.A. data to calculate wait times for about 17 million appointments. The public sector data came from a survey conducted by a physicians ’ search firm in nearly 2,000 medical offices in 30 major and midsize metropolitan areas.The study, in JAMA Network Open, covered four specialties: primary care, cardiology, dermatology and orthopedics.In 2014 the average wait time in V.A. hospitals was 22.5 days...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - February 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

AF, Ablation, Stents and Five Nuances
Joan has left an excellent comment on my recent 2019 AF ablation update. She brings up many important issues. Let’s dissect it. Q: Joan asks if it is common to see patients who think they are cured after AF ablation but are still in AF?  A: The scenario I described in my previous post is not common, but it is not rare. Since AF ablation entails much instrumentation and many burns, it can affect how the heart feels things. The heart has its own nervous system; yes, the heart feels. Also, the bigger the procedure, the bigger the placebo effect.  Q: If ablation doesn’t work, then I sure k...
Source: Dr John M - February 10, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Today's microbial diversity reading: A census-based estimate of Earth's bacterial and archaeal diversity
Looking at this today:A census-based estimate of Earth's bacterial and archaeal diversityLouca S, Mazel F, Doebeli M, Parfrey LW (2019) A census-based estimate of Earth's bacterial and archaeal diversity. PLoS Biol 17(2): e3000106. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.3000106Definitely worth a look:AbstractThe global diversity of Bacteria and Archaea, the most ancient and most widespread forms of life on Earth, is a subject of intense controversy. This controversy stems largely from the fact that existing estimates are entirely based on theoretical models or extrapolations from small and biased data sets. Here, in an attem...
Source: The Tree of Life - February 9, 2019 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Early Results From Canada's Recreational Cannabis Legalization
Statistics Canada released the  National Cannabis Survey results for the fourth quarter of 2018 yesterday. Despite comedic predictions that Canada will become “the stoner living in America ’s attic” after it legalized cannabis for recreational use, the early results suggest nothing much has changed. The survey found: “About 4.6 million or 15% of Canadians aged 15 and older reported using cannabis in the last three months. That was a similar percentage to what was reported before legalization. In addition, nearly one in five Canadians think they will use cannab...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 8, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Obama Tripled Migrant Processing at Legal Ports —Trump Halved It
ConclusionCongress needs to demand answers on why the Trump administration is processing half as many asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants at ports of entry than the Obama administration did in October 2018. The administration ’s normal responses simply don’t explain it. The processing is far below what it was two years ago, but given that CBP has been turning back migrants since at least May 2016, it needs to explain how it has not found solutions to this problem in the meantime. The agency cannot simply suspend U.S. immigration law for years on end.The anecdotal evidence and the statistics point in a si...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 8, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Remote Patient Monitoring and Self-Responsibility
At HIMSS next week, I'll be doing 5 presentations about the future of healthcare IT, focusing on patient directed data exchange, internet of things, and telemedicine.   Remote patient monitoring,  which combines all three, will be increasingly important.Remote patient monitoring can take numerous forms,  and the evidence supporting these tools is mixed. Here ’s another excerpt from our new book—The Transformative Power of Mobile Medicine—co-authored by Paul Cerrato that dives into the issues.  For those interested in reading the entire book, the publisher is offering a deep d...
Source: Life as a Healthcare CIO - February 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: blogs

Study: Brief sleep intervention provides enduring benefits to children with ADHD
___ Sleep problems are common in children with ADHD, are more persistent than in the general population, and often exacerbate difficulties associated with ADHD. For example, poor sleep can enhance difficulties with attention and concentration that most youth with ADHD experience. Research has shown that brief sleep interventions can improve sleep in youth without ADHD who experience sleep difficulties. However, until recently, there have been no randomized controlled trials on the impact of brief sleep interventions in youth with both ADHD and sleep difficulties. The Study: A study published in the British Medical Journal&...
Source: SharpBrains - February 7, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD randomized controlled trials sleep sleep intervention sleep problems Source Type: blogs

An absolute beginner ’ s guide to creating data frames for a Stack Overflow [r] question
For better or worse I spend some time each day at Stack Overflow [r], reading and answering questions. If you do the same, you probably notice certain features in questions that recur frequently. It’s as though everyone is copying from one source – perhaps the one at the top of the search results. And it seems highest-ranked is not always best. Nowhere is this more apparent to me than in the way many users create data frames. So here is my introductory guide “how not to create data frames”, aimed at beginners writing their first questions. 1. No need for vectors There is no need to create vectors f...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - February 7, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: R statistics data frame rstats stack overflow Source Type: blogs