Notice of Funding Opportunity: Bioethics and Disability
This report would examine developments at the state and federal-level, court cases, and current views from stakeholders. Policy Questions Which states have PAS laws and what do those laws provide? What protections against abuse of PAS?What have the Supreme Court and lower courts held regarding individuals’ rights under PAS laws? The laws themselves?Is there evidence that persons with disabilities are being denied treatment by insurance companies but offered PAS instead, as NCD predicted?How is PAS viewed by disability organizations? Has this evolved in the past 13 years? If so why? If not, why?Are persons with disabi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

HOW TO Improve Your Mental Health With Technology
Technology and mental well-being might seem as profoundly antagonistic expressions. However, there are excellent digital tools to reach mindfulness and to practice meditation. You can even use these smartphone apps, virtual reality solutions, digital devices as de-stressing and de-toxifying means for getting out of technology – as, after a while, you will be able to practice all types of anti-anxiety skills on your own. So, let The Medical Futurist show you how you can enhance your mental and emotional health with technology. The need for taking care of our emotional health “Just as we observe physical hygiene ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 8, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: From Chance to Choice Health Sensors & Trackers anxiety depression digital health emotional emotional health Innovation mental health mental wellbeing stress management technology Source Type: blogs

SmokeBeat Uses Fitness Bands and Smartwatches to Detect Smoking: Interview with CEO of Somatix
The tobacco epidemic is one of the biggest public health issues in history. There are more than one billion smokers worldwide and smoking kills more than seven million people annually. Although many smokers recognize how deadly their habit can be and express the desire to stop smoking, quitting remains very difficult. To help smokers kick their habit once and for all, Somatix, an Israeli company, developed SmokeBeat. SmokeBeat is an innovative smoking cessation tool that uses an individual’s personal smartwatch or smartband to detect smoking by tracking the user’s hand-to-mouth gestures. SmokeBeat is unique in ...
Source: Medgadget - May 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kenan Raddawi Tags: Exclusive Medicine Psychiatry Rehab Source Type: blogs

When philosophy and evidence collide: is an occupation-focused approach suitable in pain management?
I have often described myself as a renegade occupational therapist: I like statistics, I think experimental research is a good way to test hypotheses, I don’t make moccasins (though I occasionally wear them!), I’m happy reading research and figuring out how I can apply findings into my clinical practice. Occupational therapy is a profession that continues to evolve. The origins of occupational therapy lie back in the “moral” model of treatment for mental illness when advocates found that giving people things to do helped them become well (mind you, some of the reasons for admission to a “menta...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 6, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Chronic pain Clinical reasoning Coping Skills Occupational therapy Pain conditions Research Science in practice pain management Psychology rehabilitation research literature self management T Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 7th 2018
The objective here is a set of tests that (a) match up to the expected outcome based on human trials of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants, and (b) that anyone can run without the need to involve a physician, as that always adds significant time and expense. These tests are focused on the cardiovascular system, particularly measures influenced by vascular stiffness, and some consideration given to parameters relevant to oxidative stress and the development of atherosclerosis. A standard blood test, with inflammatory markers. An oxidized LDL cholesterol assessment. Resting heart rate and blood pressure. Heart r...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

3 Ways to Fight Laziness and Take Control of your Life
Conclusion Laziness can be absolutely destructive to our professional and personal lives. We might not know it, but we're missing out on so many things that life could've given us if we weren't lazy. So never let yourself fall in that rut. Know what what you hope to reach can be yours with just a little smart and efficient planning and a healthy dose of determination and hard work.   "Perseverance is a great element of success. If you only knock long enough and loud enough at the gate, you are sure to wake up somebody." Henry Wadsworth Longfellow     Jomy is a part-time writer and the founde...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - May 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jomy M Tags: featured motivation productivity tips self improvement laziness pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Higher Levels of Progerin are Found in Cardiomyopathy Patients
Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), or simply progeria, is a rare genetic condition that presents the superficial appearance of greatly accelerated aging. It isn't in fact accelerated aging, but rather one specific form of molecular damage run amok, causing severe and increasing dysfunction in near all cells. Normal aging is a collection of many varied forms of molecular damage that eventually cause severe and increasing dysfunction in near all cells. The consequences of a failure of any given population of cells or an organ to function correctly can appear superficially similar even if the causes are not the same...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

How Self-Compassion Can Fight Perfectionism
“Be kind to one another.”  You don’t need to be a die-hard Ellen DeGeneres fan to appreciate the value of that motto. And while we’re reminded how kindness goes a long way in our everyday interactions with others, we often forget to apply it to those who need it most: ourselves. Whether it’s setting a personal weight-loss goal, or believing that we can ace a final exam — all of us are familiar with the experience of setting high standards. We’re even more familiar with the inevitable let-down that comes from not living up to those very standards. Enter, the life of a perfecti...
Source: World of Psychology - May 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nick Hobson, PhD Tags: Celebrities Depression General Inspiration & Hope LifeHelper Mindfulness Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Research Self-Esteem Self-Help approval seeking Kindness maladaptive perfectionism Self Care self-compassion Source Type: blogs

Fitbit Versa: Medgadget Reviews One of The Best Fitness Wearables
Conclusion: The Versa is the best fitness tracker Fitbit has ever made. It’s chock full of neat features and a comprehensive set of tracking tools, and with the future inclusion of female health and SpO2 tracking, it’ll be interesting to see what direction Fitbit might take its platform as a bona fide health wearable. Though it may lack some features of its smartwatch competitors, it blows their fitness platforms out of the water, and at $199, is a compelling reason to go with something other than Apple or Samsung. Product page: Fitbit Versa… More information and link to buy: Fitbit Versa (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - May 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Scott Jung Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Medicine Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

How Many Years of Additional Life Expectancy Does a Healthy Lifestyle Provide?
What does a healthy lifestyle achieve for life expectancy? It is surprisingly hard to answer that question for humans. Researchers can't construct carefully cultivated lifestyle choice groups and follow them from birth to death. Instead, messy and imperfect vaults of epidemiological data must be fed into complicated statistical machinery, using strategies that are, at the end of the day, guided by a healthy dose of intuition and common sense. Different groups can and do produce widely different answers to questions regarding additional years added by diet, exercise, or other factors. One has to survey the field in aggregat...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Bridging the gap: medical training in the digital age
Like most medical trainees my age, I step into the hospital with the entire knowledge base of the world in my pocket. I have apps on my phone to look up disease symptoms and diagnoses, reference drug doses and side effects, estimate the 10-year risk of having a heart attack, determine the correct timing and type of vaccine administration and screening tests, and even display the risks, benefits, and statistics of various types of contraception. Importantly, this incredible ability to access and share information quickly has changed not only how we practice medicine, but also how we teach and learn it. The difference that t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nathaniel-fleming" rel="tag" > Nathaniel Fleming < /a > Tags: Education Medical school Source Type: blogs

Do You Have The Guts To Be Healthy? – The Thryve Microbiome Test Review
Few people know how important microorganisms living in our bodies are. They not only keep us company but influence our weight, our behaviors, even our mood. The revolution in genetic testing also brought the era of microbiome testing upon us, which could help improve our digestive system as well as our overall health. There are already several companies, which offer you a microbiome test, Thryve is one of them. Let’s see how their test performed! We are never alone – microbiome is our friend There is a joke that you’re never lonely just think of the many organisms with whom you share your own body. While ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 2, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Genomics future Genetic testing genetics Health microbiome Personalized medicine probiotics review Source Type: blogs

The opioid crisis: Doctors cannot lose hope
While our elected officials in Washington spin political rhetoric and quote scary statistics around the opioid epidemic, New Jersey was one of the first states to take actual action. In February of this year,  New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal declared its plan of combat: a 24-hour response team, improvements to the prescription monitoring program, and over a million dollars in federal grants. In fact, the Office of the New Jersey Coordinator for Addiction Response and Enforcement Strategies was created to oversee the task. Other states have yet to step up to the plate. But will it have any impact? T...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/linda-girgis" rel="tag" > Linda Girgis, MD < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

What Can be Achieved if the Epigenetic Clock is an Accurate Reflection of Aging?
The difference between having and not having an accurate, rapid, low-cost measure of biological age is night and day. If such a thing did exist, then it is immediately the case that a good few dozen interventions could be rapidly tested in humans, taking a month or two between before and after measurements. The cost is low enough that volunteer groups and philanthropy could manage it. Look at what Betterhumans is doing in trials of cheap senolytic compounds, for example, and then add a robust assessment to that in order to definitively say whether or not rejuvenation occurred. I expect that only a few of the obvious candid...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 30, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Sometimes Factories Move Abroad. That's OK.
Writing in the  New York Times recently, Louis Uchitelle calls for labor unions to be strengthened in order to prevent American firms from closing factories in the United States and shifting production abroad. Implicit in his argument is the notion that factories and the employment they provide are inherently  desirable and the more the merrier.Before addressing this point, however, let ’s first acknowledge that the decline in the number of factories and factory workers in the United States is overwhelmingly a story about automation and improved use of information technology rather than trade or outsou...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 30, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Colin Grabow Source Type: blogs

Mental health statistics for England: prevalence, services and funding
House of Commons Library - This briefing outlines the key statistics and data on the mental health of the population in England and mental health services.BriefingSummary (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 30, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

When Do You Discuss Mental Illness During Dating?
Dating is tough. It’s hard to find someone you click with, but it is even harder when you have an illness. A mental illness. And online dating? Well, that brings up its own set of difficulties because when you meet someone online you aren’t really talking to them. They are not able to see you or your personality. And I am not my illness. It is a part of me, but there is a whole lot more to me as a person. So, how and when do you talk about your mental illness: before the first date or after your second? Perhaps you even wait for a third? It depends. But me? I tend to bring it up in the first conversation. I don...
Source: World of Psychology - April 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Mental Health America Personal Publishers Relationships Dating Mental Illness Online Dating Source Type: blogs

Do not underestimate the power of touch
Many months have passed since the spring day when I was hit with the news from my yearly mammogram, but those typewritten words are forever etched in my memory: “The density appears greater in left breast.” My doctor comforted me with statistics showing that mammograms aren’t 100 percent accurate — but she also lost no time in sending me to a surgeon named Dr. Prewitt. Upon meeting him, I immediately felt sure that I would be in good hands. He explained the procedure he’d use and answered my questions with clarity and a very welcome gentleness. He expressed doubt about the diagnosis, but said,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/betsy-willis" rel="tag" > Betsy Willis < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Patients Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The tyranny of metrics – a book review
From the Amazon web site: How the obsession with quantifying human performance threatens our schools, medical care, businesses, and government Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we’ve gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself. The result is a tyranny of metrics that threatens the quality of our lives and most important institutions. In this timely and powerful book, Jer...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 27, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Mirror, Mirror: To Improve Your Confidence, Change How You See Yourself
You're reading Mirror, Mirror: To Improve Your Confidence, Change How You See Yourself, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In mid-2016, Dove published their third Global Beauty and Confidence Report, after interviewing 10,500 females across 13 countries. The results were rather worrying. They found that only 4% of women around the world considered themselves beautiful, but 72% felt pressure to look a certain way. 9 out of 10 girls wished they could change at least one aspect of their physical appearances. Ev...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: evelynmarinoff Tags: confidence featured happiness psychology self improvement personal growth pickthebrain positivity self image Source Type: blogs

A Troubling Nomination to the U.S. Sentencing Commission
One of the jobs of a think tanker is to synthesize information from other sources and put it in the context of his or her particular field. Hard data are particularly important to our work because data are measurable outcomes from policy and practice in the real world. No one cares what anyone at Cato “feels.” Feelings have their place, of course. Measuring the feelings of a particular group or groups of people can be useful in the aggregate because people will act in accordance with those feelings, but those feelings make up just another metric on which we collect data to explain the world. Reliable data ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jonathan Blanks Source Type: blogs

Update: Study finds continued birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) well into our 70s
___ Time for SharpBrains eNewsletter, bringing you the latest in in brain health and mental health research, tools and thinking. Also, a quick heads-up for those based in the UK: the Imperial College Centre for Neurotechnology will host a keynote by Alvaro Fernandez in London on Wednesday, May 30th, titled Why the Future of Brain Enhancement & Mental Health is Digital & Pervasive (free; requires registration). Other upcoming events here. New research: Study finds continued birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) well into our 70s The more hours you sit per day, the smaller ...
Source: SharpBrains - April 25, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology app brain Brain-health brain-scans brain-stimulation Brainnovations Cognitive-Training meditation Mental-Health Neurogenesis Neurotechnology smartphone Source Type: blogs

Towards a Better Epigenetic Clock
Researchers here report on an improved version of the epigenetic clock. A few carefully defined patterns of DNA methylation, including the original epigenetic clock, correlate quite closely with age. The current commercial implementation of the epigenetic clock, MyDNAge, has a margin of error of two years or so. While the consensus is that the clock reflects biological age, it is still the case that we might ask what exactly is being measured. The answer to that question remains to be established. It is plausible that DNA methylation changes with age are a reaction to all of the forms of cell and tissue damage that drive a...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 24, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

New cross-cultural analysis suggests that g or “general intelligence” is a human universal
By Alex Fradera Intelligence is a concept that some people have a hard time buying. It’s too multifaceted, too context-dependent, too Western. The US psychologist Edwin Boring encapsulated this scepticism when he said “measurable intelligence is simply what the tests of intelligence test.” Yet the scientific credentials of the concept are undimmed, partly because intelligence is strongly associated with so many important outcomes in life. Now Utah Valley University researchers Russell Warne and Cassidy Burningham have released evidence that further strengthens the case for intelligence being a valid ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cross-cultural Intelligence Source Type: blogs

Study combines MRI brain scans with statistics to better predict cognitive problems after stroke
Conclusions: The brain health index is a new image analysis approach that may usefully capture combined visible brain damage in large-scale studies of ageing, neurovascular and neurodegenerative disease. The Study in Context: Next: Brain scans to identify children at high risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) before symptoms appear 25 Key Resources to Improve Brain Health and Mental Health Five reasons the future of brain enhancement is digital, pervasive and (hopefully) bright 10 neurotechnologies about to transform brain enhancement and brain health What are cognitive abilities and how to boost them? Solving ...
Source: SharpBrains - April 23, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology atrophy brain health index Brain-health brain-injury cerebral small vessel diseases cognition computer-assisted image processing magnetic resonance imaging stroke Source Type: blogs

Insights into Loneliness
This article also notes that research by Sarah Pressman at the University of California, Irvine demonstrates that loneliness reduces longevity by a whopping 70%). Given these startling statistics, it’s important to recognize if one’s feelings of ongoing loneliness are due to work burnout. And if that’s the case, then it may be time to challenge priorities and find a healthier life balance. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - April 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Family Friends Habits Happiness Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Alienation Friendship Isolation Loneliness social media social support socializing Technology Source Type: blogs

Does Pruitt Have a Point about Science?
Scott Pruitt, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is loathed by most researchers and environmentalists, but he may yet emerge as science ’s unlikely redeemer.Pruitt is one of the least popular people in America. Before coming to DC, he was the attorney general of Oklahoma, where he described himself as “a leading advocate against the EPA’s activist agenda,”— a claim he made good by suing the Agency no fewer than 14 times.But Pruitt — who in public appears reasonable, quietly-spoken and polite — denies having declared war on the environment, only on ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Terence Kealey, Patrick J. Michaels Source Type: blogs

The $1/Day Standard & Other Problems with DHS ’s Public Charge Rule
ConclusionThe rule would not prevent legal immigrants from accessing welfare if the law allows them to obtain it, setting up a strange dichotomy between our rules at entry and our rules after entry. Under current law, the administration generally cannot prevent immigrants from using welfare in such cases, so no matter how the administration ends up reforming the public charge determinations, Congress should amend the law tolimit government benefits only to citizens. The private sector can —and already is—aiding immigrants when they fall on hard times or need help to get ahead, and the evidenceindicates that sim...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Lowering nicotine in cigarettes
Follow me on Twitter @mallikamarshall When I was about 10 years old, my mother had me take a puff on an unfiltered Camel cigarette in an effort to discourage me from smoking in the future. Well, needless to say, it worked. After coughing and sputtering for what seemed like hours, I have never touched another cigarette. While I am in no way suggesting that parents follow in my mother’s footsteps (in fact I would strongly discourage it), as a pediatrician and parent myself I want to ensure that children and teens never take that first puff. But in fact, the majority of smokers in the US begin smoking in their youth. Ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mallika Marshall, MD Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs

The Flynn Effect and IQ Disparities Among Races, Ethnicities, and Nations: Are There Common Links? | Psychology Today
@media print { body { margin: 2mm 9mm; } .original-url { display: none; } #article .float.left { float: left !important; } #article .float.right { float: right !important; } #article .float { margin-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important; } }The Flynn Effect and IQ Disparities Among Races, Ethnicities, and Nations: Are There Common Links? | Psychology Todayhttps://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/beautiful-minds/201008/the-flynn-effect-and-iq-disparities-among-races-ethnicities-and-nationsThe Flynn Effect and IQ Disparities Among Races, Ethnicities, and Nations...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - April 19, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Study of 20,000 finds an income advantage for those judged to be very unattractive
By Alex Fradera Do chiselled features garner better pay? Researchers have previously found that income is associated with attractiveness, leading to the idea of both a beauty premium and an ugliness penalty. A common explanation is discrimination: employers seek out beautiful people and reject or ignore those harder on the eye. But in the Journal of Business Psychology, Satoshi Kanazawa and Mary Still have published research aiming to upset this. The biggest takeaway is that being perceived as very unattractive may not incur an income penalty at all. The researchers drew on a longitudinal study of 20,000 young Americ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Occupational Social Source Type: blogs

Retrospective review of use of mesh or tape for urogynaecological surgery
This report has been produced to investigate activity, summarised within Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, for the NHS, in England, of patients who have had a urogynaecological procedure for the treatment of urogynaecological prolapse or stress urinary incontinence, including those where mesh, tape or their equivalents have been used. It has been undertaken to assist the NHS and others in establishing a clearer national picture of patients who have had such procedures. These statistics are classified as experimental and should be used with caution. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evalua...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 18, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: NHS measurement and performance Source Type: blogs

Could ride-hailing platforms solve the problems of transportation in healthcare?
Patients living in rural, suburban or urban areas with poor infrastructure often don’t have the proper means to get to the doctor’s appointment on time. In extreme cases, they could even wait for emergency situations so they can call an ambulance and receive care in a hospital. In the last months, both giant ridesharing companies, Uber and Lyft announced non-emergency medical transportation services, while start-ups, such as Circulation also promise to deal with the issue. Could smartphones and networked services solve transportation in healthcare? Why is getting to the doctor such a hassle? There is a little v...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Hospital lyft medical transportation patient ride-hailing startup uber Source Type: blogs

Ride-Hailing Platforms Could Solve The Problems of Transportation in Healthcare
Patients living in rural, suburban or urban areas with poor infrastructure often don’t have the proper means to get to the doctor’s appointment on time. In extreme cases, they could even wait for emergency situations so they can call an ambulance and receive care in a hospital. In the last months, both giant ridesharing companies, Uber and Lyft announced non-emergency medical transportation services, while start-ups, such as Circulation also promise to deal with the issue. Could smartphones and networked services solve transportation in healthcare? Why is getting to the doctor such a hassle? There is a little v...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Hospital lyft medical transportation patient ride-hailing startup uber Source Type: blogs

Who Can Benefit from Virtual Reality CBT?
I have previously written about the possible benefits of using virtual reality (VR) in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Now it seems that virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has more wide-reaching benefits and can help reduce momentary paranoia and anxiety, as well as improve social cognition in individuals with psychotic disorders. In a February 2018 study published in The Lancet (Psychiatry), researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of personalized virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy in 116 patients with a DSM IV-diagnosed psychotic disorder and paranoid...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Antipsychotic Anxiety and Panic Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Technology Treatment CBT Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Paranoia Psychosis Psychotic Disorder virtual reality Source Type: blogs

Giving Voice to Teachers on World Voice Day —or Any Day
Today is World Voice Day! Occurring annually on April 16, World Voice Day is a great time to spread the word about the marvel of the human voice and the importance of taking care of it. Events held in celebration of the day include concerts, performances, educational workshops and vocal screenings. Why limit this event to just one day? As a speech-language pathologists, we can take advantage of this event to raise awareness and help prevent vocal disorders in a highly at-risk group—classroom teachers. Classroom teachers use their voices an average of 49 hours per week to perform their jobs. Add poor room ac...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Sue Hume Tags: Audiology Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Voice Disorders Source Type: blogs

Sexual assault in the emergency department: What can you do?
It has been documented that 1 in 3 women will experience rape in her lifetime, and this is most common in women under the age of 25.  Over 95 percent of victims of sexual assault are women worldwide, while in North America estimates place that at 85 percent.  These are the assaults we know about — generous estimates say that, at most, 10 percent of rapes are reported to police or other authorities/health care providers.  2004 CDC statistics indicated there were 57,000 visits to U.S. emergency departments for a presenting complaint of sexual assault — which is still a high number despite flawed me...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kari-sampsel" rel="tag" > Kari Sampsel, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Apr 12, Alan Kent Malyon: Today in the History of Psychology (12th April 1941)
Alan Kent Malyon was born. A highly respected clinical psychologist, Malyon was a founding figure within the field of lesbian and gay psychology. In 1986 he served as chair of the American Psychological Association Committee on Lesbian and Gay Concerns during which time he set in place enduring initiatives to ensure that gay and lesbian issues were addressed within mainstream psychology. Of all Malyon's many accomplishments arguably his greatest was his successful campaign to have 'egodystonic homosexuality' removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; a watershed moment in challenging misinforma...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Are Shootings More Likely to Occur in Public Schools?
The Parkland shooting, even almost  two months later, remains a very painful topic, and there seem to have been many very important factors at play. One that hasn’t been discussed very much, but probably needs to be examined, is whether the kind of schools students attend makes a difference. At least one author, Stella Morabito atThe Federalist,has discussed this, and has identified many problems that she thinks are associated with public schools ranging from their large sizes to their seeming hostility to Christianity.All of the problems she discusses may be factors —school size has been suspect for ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 11, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Corey A. DeAngelis Source Type: blogs

287(g) Does Not Fight Crime, But It Does Increase Assaults against Police Officers
Fear of immigrant criminality is driving many changes to domestic immigration enforcement programs during the Trump administration.   One of the earliest such changes was the reactivation of the287(g) program that allows state or local law enforcement agencies to enforce federal immigration law after entering into a partnership with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).   The Obama administration substantially scaled back 287(g) afternumerousgovernmentreports found serious flaws in the program.   Gaston County, North Carolina sheriff Alan Cloninger said his sheriff’s office enrolled in 287(g)...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 11, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

NIH-funded postdoc, and Research assistant / Lab manager position available in the O-Lab at Duke
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Arial} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px Arial} span.s1 {font: 12.0px Arial}We are looking for highly motivated early-career researchers to join theO-Lab, led by Prof. Tobias Overath, in the Department of Psychology& Neuroscience at Duke University. Work in our lab investigates how sounds, from simple sinusoids to complex speech signals, are processed in the human brain, using a combination of behavioral (psychoacoustics) and neuroimaging methods (fMRI, EEG, ECoG) to track...
Source: Talking Brains - April 11, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Why All the Hype About NAEP?
Here we go again. The 2017 round of theNation ’s Report Card was released today. The results shouldn ’t surprise anyone – they arealmost entirely flat at the national level. However, that doesn ’t stop educators and education reformers fromspinning the results to fit whatever agendas they might have. Those who defend previous reforms claim thatcomputer-based testing must be to blame for stagnant performance – and that students today are “relatively poorer” than they were in the past. On the other hand, groups calling for additional reform claim that the NAEP results should startle ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Corey A. DeAngelis Source Type: blogs

No Major Lessons from New National Test Scores
Another set of national exam results —theNational Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) —is upon us, and much will likely be made of them. But in the aggregate, what the new scores show is just that things haven’t changed much over the last couple of years, and only as captured by this particular test. Burrowing down and comparing states, subgroups of kids, and smaller jurisdiction s that have implemented different policies, spent more or less, and experienced numerous other things, might suggest some avenues for further exploration, but the only conclusion we can state with any confidence is that not...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Social Communication Disorder and the SLP
Jackson, age 10, is in fifth grade and fits the social communication disorder (SCD) profile. He has difficulty making friends. In an effort to be part of a conversation, he sometimes interrupts or changes the topic abruptly. Jackson doesn’t pick up on nonverbal cues and often misinterprets his classmates’ intentions or feelings. In the classroom, he has difficulty expressing his ideas in an organized way, and he struggles to understand nonliteral language, make inferences and draw conclusions when he reads curriculum materials. His classmates sometimes tease him If you are a speech-language pathologist working ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 9, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Phyllis Bonelli Tags: Academia & Research Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Autism Spectrum Disorder social communication disorder social skils Source Type: blogs

SINUVA, a Corticosteroid Releasing Sinus Implant, Now Available for Nasal Polyps
Intersect ENT, based in Menlo Park, California, is releasing in the U.S. its SINUVA sinus implant for treating nasal polyp disease in adults that underwent previous surgical sinus procedures. The device elutes mometasone furoate, a corticosteroid, to reduce inflammation directly at the polyps. The drug is released for approximately 90 days after the SINUVA is implanted in an in-office procedure. “After years of development and multiple clinical studies, we are thrilled to provide physicians with SINUVA to treat patients with nasal polyps. SINUVA offers an alternative to patients who have exhausted routine medic...
Source: Medgadget - April 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Source Type: blogs

Nurses: Moving at the Speed of Trust
Seeking a career in nursing could be characterized as an exercise in trust. We nurses willingly endure a grueling educational experience; place ourselves in the hands of nursing professors and professional nurse preceptors; and otherwise trust that the blood, sweat, tears, and expense of pursuing our goal is worthwhile. In essence, we move at the speed of trust as we enter the universe of a nursing career.Photo by Alternate Skate on UnsplashTrusting OurselvesThe first act of trust intrinsic to our nursing journey is trust in the self. Even while our peers, colleagues, friends, or family may caution us agains...
Source: Digital Doorway - April 9, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare healthcare careers nurse nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Postdoctoral position at Center for Language Science, Pennsylvania State University
The Center for Language Science (CLS) at The Pennsylvania State University (http://cls.psu.edu) invites applications for a postdoctoral position. The CLS is home to a cross-disciplinary research program that includes the NSF training program, ‘Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE): Translating cognitive and brain science in the laboratory and field to language learning environments’ that was awarded to The Pennsylvania State University and the University of California, Riverside. The program provides training i n translational research on language learning and bilingualism that includes a...
Source: Talking Brains - April 9, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

GORE CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder Approved by FDA for PFO Closure
The FDA has approved the GORE CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder for patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure procedures that have shown to reduce the chance of stroke in some patients. The CARDIOFORM is already being used in the U.S. for closing of atrial septal defects up to 17 millimeters in size. The catheter-delivered device consists of two discs that make contact with the tissue walls on both sides of the PFO and come together to block the passage of blood between the atria. “The soft and conformable design of Gore’s device is ideal for providing long-term repair of PFOs of any shunt size,” said John Rhodes, MD,...
Source: Medgadget - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

New study once again casts doubt on PSA screening
This study adds to the discouraging screening literature, and again, simply does not support screening of asymptomatic individuals,” he said. Fortunately, Garnick added, men diagnosed with prostate cancer following a PSA test may not have to be treated either in the short or long term. Depending on tumor characteristics, some can opt to have their cancer monitored with active surveillance, which relies on periodic prostate biopsies or MRI to look for new signs that treatment may be necessary. “Hopefully, current research that uses sophisticated genetic testing or biomarkers of prostate cancer may help provide m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Screening Source Type: blogs

The science behind what makes a bestselling book
This post has been cross-posted from the SpringerOpen blog. A team of researchers from Northeastern University, Boston, used a big data approach to investigate what makes a book successful. By evaluating data from the New York Times Bestseller Lists from 2008 to 2016, they developed a formula to predict if a book would be a bestseller. Creating the formula for success The authors evaluated sales numbers and patterns from 2,468 fiction titles and 2,025 non-fiction titles from the New York Times Bestseller Lists 2008-2016 to create their formula for predicting how well a book would sell and whether it would be a bestseller. ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Lucy Eccles Tags: Publishing Books SpringerOpen Source Type: blogs