New Study Underlines the Importance of Annual Mammography
Women who undergo annual breast cancer screenings have a decreased risk of mortality and a better treatment experience upon diagnosis, according to a group of researchers lead by L ászló Tabár, MD.In their study recently published in  Cancer,Dr. Tab ár and his investigators looked at data collected by the Swedish Cancer Registry of 52,000 women who had either received mammography or had never been screened for breast cancer between 1977 and 2015, and contrasted that information with studies between 1958 and 1976, which is considered the pre-sc reening era.They evaluated breast cancer diagno...
Source: radRounds - January 5, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

The VERDICT Trial
This study is unable to comment on whether patients with STEMI(-) Occlusion MI have benefit from emergent cath, because that is not the population studied and this subgroup is not commented on.This study is just the most recent in a long long line of similar literature. Context is everything for understanding this study. See below for an excerpt from theOMI Manifesto which summarizes the existing literature and provides details on each study:-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Counter-argument:“Haven’t there been RCTs showing no benefit ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 4, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

The Fentanyl Crisis and What You Need to Know
What is Fentanyl? According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine, but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain, for side effects surrounding aggressive cancer treatments or to manage pain after major surgery. It can be administered as an injection, a transdermal patch or as a lozenge. Under the medical supervision of a professional, there is little risk for addiction. However, that is not to be overlooked, as any exposure to Fentanyl at all will run the ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 3, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Medical Substance Abuse Synthetic drug abuse drug abuse epidemic fentanyl opioid Source Type: blogs

Now John Bargh ’s Famous Hot-Coffee Study Has Failed To Replicate
By Jesse Singal If you Google “holding a warm cup of coffee can” you’ll get a handful of results all telling the same story based on social priming research (essentially the study of how subtle cues affect human thoughts and behavior). “Whether a person is holding a warm cup of coffee can influence his or her views of other people, and a person who has experienced rejection may begin to feel cold,” notes a New York Times blog post, while a Psychology Today article explains that research shows that “holding a warm cup of coffee can make you feel socially closer to those around you.&r...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Replications Social Source Type: blogs

Cato's 2018 Immigration Research in Review
ConclusionImmigration has been one of the top policy issues since 2015.   Cato scholars have been at the forefront of publishing new facts and figures to illuminate this debate.  This post does not include our other activitiessuch as our work with Rep. Grothman (R-WI) to reduce immigrant welfare consumption, our numerouspublicdebates,summations of outside research, andweekly analysis of immigration-related events.   We hope to continue this pace of original research in 2019 and beyond.     (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 31, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 31st 2018
In conclusion, there are many anti-aging strategies in development, some of which have shown considerable promise for slowing down aging or delaying the onset of age-related diseases. From multiple pre-clinical studies, it appears that upregulation of autophagy through autophagy enhancers, elimination of senescent cells using senolytics, transfusion of plasma from young blood, neurogenesis and BDNF enhancement through specific drugs are promising approaches to sustain normal health during aging and also to postpone age-related diseases. However, these approaches will require critical assessment in clinical trials to determ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 30, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

New Study Shows Most Americans Are Lonely
If you are feeling lonely, you’re not alone. A recent study involving 340 San Diego County residents of various ages has found that loneliness is shockingly widespread.1 The study suggests that there is a 76% prevalence of moderate to severe loneliness in American society. This is a bombshell statistic. After all, our country has enshrined the pursuit of happiness in its constitution and prides itself on having a high standard of living (twelfth in the world), which apparently doesn’t equate with living well. What went wrong? The hopeful news in this study is that there is an inverse relationship between l...
Source: World of Psychology - December 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Depression General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Personal Psychology Relationships Self-Help Spirituality Friendship Loneliness social life social media Source Type: blogs

Statistical Certainty: Less is More
By ANISH KOKA MD  The day after NBC releases a story on a ‘ground-breaking’ observational study demonstrating caramel macchiatas reduce the risk of death, everyone expects physicians to be experts on the subject. The truth is that most of us hope John Mandrola has written a smart blog on the topic so we know intelligent things to tell patients and family members. A minority of physicians actually read the original study, and of those who read the study, even fewer have any real idea of the statistical ingredients used to make the study. Imagine not knowing whether the sausage you just ate contain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Data Health Policy Anish Koka Brian Nosek data analysis HRRP randomized controlled trials statistics Source Type: blogs

Can exercise help conquer addiction?
As an athlete, I think regularly about the potential health benefits of exercise for my patients. Every week, I treat patients hospitalized at Brigham and Women’s Hospital with significant medical problems that are a direct result of severe addiction, ranging from seizures and strokes to heart valve and joint infections. I also care for outpatients at the Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Addiction Recovery Program. In both settings, I provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT) such as buprenorphine-naloxone for opioid use disorder, and extended-release naltrexone for both alcohol use disorder and opioid u...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire Twark, MD Tags: Addiction Exercise and Fitness Health Source Type: blogs

Evidence for a Human Late Life Mortality Plateau is an Illusion Arising from Bad Data
Mortality rises with age. In fact the very definition of aging is that it is a rise in mortality rate due to intrinsic causes, the accumulation of unrepaired damage and subsequent systems failure. Some years ago it was quite robustly established that, after a certain point, aged flies stop aging in this sense. Their mortality rates remain at a very high plateau, and do not further increase over time. Since then, researchers have crunched the numbers and debated back and forth over whether or not human demographic data shows any signs of a similar phenomenon. The challenge is the sparse, poorly gardened nature of the demogr...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 26, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Investigating Sex Chromosome Effects on Longevity in Mice
The well-known difference in longevity between genders, in which females live longer than males, is not peculiar to our species. It is present in most gendered species examined to date, which strongly suggests that these differences in the pace of aging arise quite robustly from the interaction of evolutionary pressures with gender roles in mating and reproduction. Males can achieve reproductive fitness by investing resources into mating sooner rather than later, while for females greater fitness arises through investing resources to retain the capacity to mate successfully over time. The male candle burns brighter and les...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Can Humor Alter Your Brain Chemistry?
“If I had no sense of humor, I would long ago have committed suicide.”  ~ Mahatma Gandhi Do you know why everyone isn’t in a mental hospital? Because there isn’t enough room. Philosophers have long observed a dearth of happiness among humanity. Henry David Thoreau said, “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation.” John Stuart Mill observed, “Unquestionably, it is possible to do without happiness; it is done involuntarily by nineteen-twentieths of mankind.” Abd ar-Rahman III, who reigned as the most powerful prince of Iberia for half a century, had this to say about ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nichole Force, M.A. Tags: Books Depression Self-Help Humor Laughter neuroplasticitiy Neuroscience Sadness Source Type: blogs

Evidence-Based Satire
By SAURABH JHA Sequels generally disappoint. Jason couldn’t match the fear he generated in the original Friday the 13th. The sequel to the Parachute, a satirical piece canvassing PubMed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parachutes to placebo, matched its brilliance, and even exceeded it, though the margin can’t be confirmed with statistical significance. The Parachute, published in BMJ’s Christmas edition, will go down in history with Jonathan Swift’s Modest Proposal and Frederic Bastiat’s Candlemakers’ Petition as timeless satire in which pedagogy punched above, indeed d...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED RogueRad Source Type: blogs

CMS Should Boost the Signal on Social Determinants of Health
By HERB KUHN  Historically, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) stance on the influence that social determinants of health (SDOH) have on health outcomes has been equal parts signal and noise. In April 2016, the agency announced it would begin adjusting the Medicare Advantage star ratings for dual-eligibility and other social factors. This was amid calls for increased equity in the performance determinations from the managed care industry. At the same time, CMS continued to refuse risk-adjustment for SDOH in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) despite the research supporting th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Hospitals CMS Herb Kuhn HRRP Social Determinants of Health Source Type: blogs

Self-Care For Caregivers: The Most Challenging Task
A study from the Family Caregiving Alliance found that adult children caring for their parents, as well as parents caring for chronically ill children, may have their lifespan shortened by four to eight years. Caregivers could conceivably alter these statistics if they practice reasonable self-care. View slideshow on HealthCentral with tips on how to approach caregiver self-care - at times a nearly impossible task: MedicareFAQ – Medicare Resource Center Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   &nbs...
Source: Minding Our Elders - December 21, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

New Census Data Show Migration to Low-Tax States
The Census Bureauhas released new data on state population growth between July 2017 and July 2018. Domestic migration between the states is one portion of annual population change. The Census data show that Americans are continuing to move from high-tax to low-tax states.This Cato study examined interstate migration using IRS data for 2016. The new Census data confirms that people are moving from tax-punishing places such as California, Connecticut, Illinois, New York, and New Jersey to tax-friendly places such as Florida, Idaho, Nevada, Tennessee, and South Carolina.In the chart, each blue dot is a state. The vertical axi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Physician Burnout, Data Scientist, Facebook, and Patient Engagement
It’s been quite a while since I did a Twitter round up and so I thought it would be fun to take a quick look around the Twittersphere to see what people are sharing. You all probably already know you can follow me anytime on Twitter (@techguy) or the Healthcare Scene Twitter account (@HealthcareScene). We’re always sharing and connecting with others in the healthcare IT community. Now, without further ado, some tweets I saw that stood out to me and a little bit of short commentary (some might say snark) on each. Very concerning is the increasing rates of physician, nurse and other healthcare burnout. Further, ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - December 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Ambulatory Analytics/Big Data C-Suite Leadership Clinical Communication and Patient Experience Hospital - Health System Facebook Gabe Charbonneau MD Savvy Coop Tamara McCleary Source Type: blogs

Empirical Evidence for Stock-Market Short-Termism?
This blog post is part of a larger series on stock-market “short-termism”. See also my entries onshare buybacks and progressivecorporate governance reforms.I. IntroductionTo recapitulate the “myopia thesis”: managers of publicly traded firms are hostage to diversified shareholders who forego careful study of the firm’s fundamentals and instead respond to the latest, easily digestible quarterly earnings report. Rather than undertaking investments that might have a substantial retu rn down the road, managers mimic the priorities of transient shareholders uninterested in a firm’s ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 18, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Is Greenland Melt “Off the Chart?”
That ’s what the second author said about a newpaper on Greenland ’s ice, which arrived just in time for the annual meeting of the signatories of the UN’s 1992 treaty on climate change, this time in Katowice, Poland. Appearing inNature, Rowan University Geologist Luke Trusel and several coauthors claimed ice-core data from Central-Western Greenland revealed melting in the recent two decades that has been “exceptional over at least the last 350 years.” The paper appeared in the December 6 issue ofNature.Howexceptional?“Our results show a pronounced 250% to 575% increase in melt intensity ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Patrick J. Michaels Source Type: blogs

69% Oppose Creating Federal Paid Leave Program If It Harms Women ’s Career Prospects
The national  Cato 2018 Paid Leave Survey of 1,700 adults finds widespread support for creating a federal paid leave program, with 74% in favor. However, 69% of Americans would oppose establishing a federal paid leave program if it meant that fewer women would get promoted and become managers. But would establishing a federal program actu ally do this? Research suggests that it could and that’s why we asked about it on the survey:Read about the full survey results and methodology here.First, let ’s consider the different career outcomes between women in the United States and women in Western...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Emily Ekins Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali: November 2018
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD  Keynote speech There was a very sobering piece in NEJM by the FDA last month in which the authors try to explore what went wrong with the Keynote-183, Keynote-185 and checkmate 602 trials testing PD-1 inhibitors combinations with pomalidomide or lenalidomide and dexamethasone in multiple myeloma. Interim analysis of Keynote 183 and 185 revealed detrimental effects on overall survival (OS) with hazard ratios of 1.61 and 2.06, not explained by differences in toxicities alone. The checkmate 602 trial was also halted in light of these findings and also showed higher mortality in t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Pharmaceuticals Physicians Bishal Gyawali Cancer drugs cancer immunotherapy Clinical Trials FDA Oncology PD-1 inhibitors Source Type: blogs

AusHealthIT Poll Number 453 – Results – 16th December, 2018.
Here are the results of the poll.Should The ADHA Be Publicly Releasing The Full Usage And Access Statistics For The myHR As The Board Papers Clearly Show They Have Them?Yes 98% (115) No 1% (1) I Have No Idea 1% (1) Total votes: 117 What an amazing poll. Most clearly believe the ADHA is wrongly much to secretive. The Chair was obviously the vote for more secrecy or was it Tim K? We will never know. Any insights on the poll welcome as a comment, as usual. A really, great t urnout of votes! It must have been a very, very easy question as only 1/117 readers were not sure what the appropriate answer was. Again, many,...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - December 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Trump Administration Continues to Expand Interior Immigration Enforcement
Today, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released areport detailing deportations (henceforth “removals”) conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) during fiscal year 2018.  This post present data on removals in historical context – combined with information fromPew and theCenter for Migration Studies on the number of illegal immigrants present in the United States.ICE deported 95,360 illegal immigrants from the  interior of the United States in 2018, up from 81,603 in 2017.  Removals from the interior peaked during the Obama administration in 2011 at 237,941 (Figur...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Trump Administration Increases Immigration Enforcement at Businesses
President Trump ’s administration has increased immigration enforcement at worksites, just as he promised.  Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrested 2,304 people at worksites in the fiscal year 2018, a more than 7-fold increase from the previous fiscal year and about 6.7-fold more than the last full ye ar of the Obama administration. ICE ’s worksite arrests fall into two categories: criminal or administrative.  Any citizen or noncitizen whom ICE suspects of having committed a criminal violation, such as identity fraud, can be arrested.  Administrative arrests are for civil violator...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Destigmatizing Hearing Loss with Technology: Interview with Eargo CEO Christian Gormsen
Today, 500 million people globally suffer from hearing loss, however, most individuals wait on average seven years before dealing with the condition due to a combination of factors, including stigmas and misconceptions related to hearing aids. In the U.S. alone, an estimated 40 million individuals live with untreated hearing loss. Stepping in to address this need is Eargo, a U.S.-based hearing aid manufacturer that has been focused on creating products that are smaller, less visible, and more cost effective than traditional hearing aids since 2010. The company’s Eargo Plus and Eargo Max products implement F...
Source: Medgadget - December 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Exclusive Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

The physiological stress response is larger in the morning than evening
The real-world implications are far from clear and the result needs to be replicated with larger samples By Emma Young When’s the best time of day to give someone bad news? First thing in the morning or early evening? Yes, if it’s in the morning, they have longer to work out what to do about it, but you might be better off plumping for the evening because according to a new study, published open-access in Neuropsychopharmacology, they’re likely to suffer less of a physiological stress response at this time.  If a threat – whether physical or psychological – doesn’t quickly vanish, ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Mental health Source Type: blogs

5 Ways in which Big Data is Advancing Telemedicine
Conclusion Big data analytics gives the physicians access to massive volumes of information which increases the diagnostic accuracy and results in efficiency in healthcare delivery. Combining the power of Telehealth with Big data has the potential to transform the healthcare delivery system and is of immense benefit to both the patients as well as healthcare providers. Data security and privacy concerns are the biggest threats to this advancements. Enforcement of appropriate security measures need to ensured so that the vast reservoir of healthcare data can be harnessed to its full potential. About Rahul Varshneya Rahul Va...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - December 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Administration Analytics/Big Data Clinical Digital Health Genomic Medicine Healthcare HealthCare IT Telemedicine Telemedicine and Remote Monitoring Arkenea Benchpoint Rahul Varshneya Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 12th December 2018
This report contains case studies of health visitors, family workers, midwives, social care and children ’s centres staff helping families through pregnancy as well as areas experimenting with a new local government role of consultant public health midwife.AcknowledgementsHealthcare Information for All discussion group; King ’s Fund Library Health Management and Policy Alert; Embed Health Consortium Health Bulletin. (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - December 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

“An additional reason to abandon learning styles” – teachers and pupils do not agree on the pupils’ preferred learning style
By Christian Jarrett “Learning styles” – there can be few ideas that have created such a stark disconnect between the experts on the ground and the evidence published in scholarly journals. Endorsed by the overwhelming majority of teachers, yet dismissed by most psychologists and educational neuroscientists as a “neuromyth”, the basis of learning styles is that people learn better when taught via their preferred learning modality, usually (but not always) described as either visual, auditory or kinaesthetic. Many studies have already uncovered serious problems with the learning styles concept,...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs

Transcranial Magnetic Brain Stimulation to Treat Depression and OCD: Interview with Stanford ’s Dr. Nolan Williams
Chances are, someone you know has been affected by mental health problems. With an estimated world-wide burden of 300 million people, depression can be a severely debilitating condition. In fact, in the past year alone, more than 16 million adults in the US have experienced a major depressive episode. While many of those who seek help are able to find solace in therapy or medication, treatment-resistant depression is not uncommon. Clinicians like Stanford’s Dr. Nolan Williams have been studying the applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation (or TMS) for a variety of neurological conditions. We sat down wi...
Source: Medgadget - December 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The 1990 Bush " Tax Increase " Reduced Taxes
The late President G.H.W. Bush famously reneged on his “no new taxes” pledge and signed the “Bush tax increase” on November 5, 1990, to take effect the following January.   The new law was intended to raise more revenue from high-income households and unincorporated businesses.  It was supposed to raise revenue partly by raising the top tax r ate from 28% to 31% but more importantly by phasing-out deductions and personal exemptions as income on a joint return climbed above $150,00  (the phase-outs were calledthe PEP and Pease provisions).   Treasury estimates expected r...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

Progressive Corporate Governance Reforms
This blog post is part of a larger series on “Stock-Market Short-Termism” (see also my entry onshare-buybacks). I will be assessing one proposed cure, corporate governance reforms, and will argue that it is likely to be iatrogenic. I.On August 15, 2018, Senator Elizabeth Warren formally introduced her “Accountable Capitalism Act”, that would,inter alia,require of all firms generating $1 billion or more in revenue that “no fewer than 40% of its directors are selected by the corporation’s employees.” In mandating that corporations include employeesquastakeholders in the firm &rs...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Stigmatizing Narcissists & Narcissism: Are They the Secondhand Smoke of Our Time?
The thing about smoking cigarettes is that the behavior is something we wanted to stigmatize, in order to decrease its frequency in people. At its height in the 1950s and 1960s, 2 out of every 5 people smoked in the U.S. It’s a huge health hazard, decreasing lifespan and increasing health problems in smokers. But smoking doesn’t just impact the person who smokes. Through decades’ worth of research findings, we now understand the smoking also affects the people around smokers, causing health problems and decreasing lifespans through secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke, therefore, is also something people se...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Narcissism Personality Policy and Advocacy Relationships Stigma Narcissistic Personality Disorder second-hand smoke secondhand smoke Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 10th 2018
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

We Are All Being Played For Being Total Idiots By The ADHA Board And It Is Really Time It Stopped!
I think we can now safely conclude the ADHA Boards are a collection of dishonest and non-transparent agents of Government concealment. – and yes I am being polite!This popped up from the Board Minutes the other day: BoardAgenda Item 17My Health Record performance statisticsMeeting: 22-23 August 2018  OFFICIAL: SensitiveRECOMMENDATIONThat the Board note the current participation and use of the My Health Record by consumers and healthcare providers and the status of the Healthcare Identifiers Service, the National Authentication Service for Health and the National Clinical Terminology Service (provided at At...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - December 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Questioning the Validity of Jeanne Calment's Age
Jeanne Calment is well known as the longest-lived person, with her age at death validated at 122 years. The data for supercentenarians, the exceptionally rare individuals who live to be 110 years of age or older, is very ragged. This is usually the case at the far outside end of a distribution, where the total number of data points is very low. It is usual to find outliers, but some people feel that Jeanne Calment is too much of an outlier given the other validated ages of death for supercentenarians. Only one other person lived to be 119, and no-one else is known to have made it past 117. The yearly mortality rates for su...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Alcohol, Smoking, Drugs: Can Digital Solutions Give A Helping Hand To The Addicted?
Alcohol content measuring wristbands, smart lighters, nicotine tracking wearables, stop smoking apps, virtual reality therapies, automated messaging platforms are the newest elements in the arsenal of digital health technologies supporting everyone in the fight against addiction to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs. Addiction and dependency ruins lives Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life. It doesn’t matter whether it’s about cigarettes, alcohol, medication, drugs, gambling, sex, etc., any of these substances or phenomena could cause you strong dependency and might impact you...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Medical Professionals Patients Researchers alcohol cigarette digital health drugs health technology Innovation medication opioid opioid crisis smartphone smartphone apps smoking virtual Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 5th December 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about.NewsCRISPR babies- STATNewsCRISPR babies - BMJNHS to introduce mental health checks for new fathersResearchNIHR SignalsSteroids rapidly reduce children ’s croup symptoms and shorten hospital stays (includes babies)(NIHR Signals review of a recent Cochrane review).Lab grown placentas and pregnancy research.  Guardian report ofresearch letter in Nature. Hyperemesis gravidarumManagement of severe pregnancy sickness and hyperemesis gravidarum (BMJ)Constant sickness is not good news (BMJ - personal experiences) Shrewsbury and Telford H...
Source: Browsing - December 5, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Children ’s and young people’s experiences of loneliness: 2018
Office of National Statistics - Analysis of children's and young people ’s views, experiences and suggestions to overcome loneliness, using in-depth interviews, the Community Life Survey 2016 to 2017 and Good Childhood Index Survey, 2018.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 5, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

National measurement of loneliness: 2018
Office for National Statistics - This compendium provides comprehensive information on the loneliness measurement landscape, the recommended national indicators of loneliness and the question testing underpinning our recommendations.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 5, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Health Survey for England 2017: summary of key findings
National Statistics - The Health Survey for England (HSE) monitors trends in the nation ’s health and care. It provides information about adults aged 16 and over, and children aged 0 to 15, living in private households in England. The survey is used to monitor overweight and obesity and to estimate the proportion of people in England who have certain health conditions and the prevale nce of risk factors and health related behaviours, such as smoking and drinking alcohol.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 4, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Sci-Fi Contest 2018: Meet The Authors and Read Their Stories
From Jules Verne to Isaac Asimov, science fiction writers have inspired scientists, explorers, and thrill seekers to influence the future of humanity. While Sci-Fi may seem like it’s about the distant future, more often than not it’s commentary on rudimentary technologies that already exist and that are about to mature and reveal their true potential. The authors of this year’s Medgadget Sci-Fi Writing Contest are certainly in tune with the latest trends in biomedicine, the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) into clinical practice, and genetic manipulation taking place in thousands of labs aroun...
Source: Medgadget - December 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Art Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Benefits of Mindfulness Meditation for Teens
Life is a lot more complicated for teenagers than most adults give them credit for. Many teenagers are balancing schoolwork with part-time jobs, sports, and an active social life. There are plenty of studies out there that have found teenagers are even more stressed out than adults. And it’s a growing problem. Statistics show that there is a higher percentage of teenagers who experience stress, anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts than in the past. There are many different theories on why this is happening but regardless of the reason, it’s important that teenagers learn ways to effectively handle s...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Children and Teens Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Parenting Adolescence Mind Body Wellness Yoga Source Type: blogs

Can an Alzheimer's Patient Wander and Die?
Alzheimer's patients often wander and get lost. This behavior can happen at any time or at any stage of the disease. Just because they have never wandered before, doesn't mean they won't do it in the future. Wandering can sometimes result in death.The Alzheimer's Association estimates that 60 percent of persons living with Alzheimer's or a related dementia will wander.Think about it - 6 out of 10.I can assure you if your loved one wanders away, you cannot locate them, and they are lost to you, it can become one of the most horrible and terrifying experiences of your life.Imagine your heart pounding, a sense of hopelessness...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 30, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's wandering statistics alzheimers wandering education how to prevent wandering learning wandering tips Source Type: blogs

Share Buybacks: Mismeasured and Misunderstood
In March of this year,Forbespublished an article with the following lede:The Economist has called them “an addiction to corporate cocaine.” Reuters has called them “self-cannibalization.” The Financial Timeshas called them “an overwhelming conflict of interest.” In an article that won the HBR McKinsey Award for the best article of the year, Harvard Business Review has called them “stock price manipulation.” These influential journals make a powerful case that wholesale stock buybacks are a bad idea—bad economically, bad financially, ba...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 30, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

My Mother Living with Alzheimer's Wandered, and I was the one that was "scared to death"
When a person suffering from Alzheimer's disease wanders away they are at risk. They can die. Of those lost more than 72 hours, only 20 percent survive.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomHow many Alzheimer's patients wander each year?How many are found? How many die from exposure or in accidents?Here is an educated guess --around 125,000 persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease wander away each year.Is it possible that more than 300 Alzheimer's sufferers wander and/or get lost each day? That is an enormous amount of risk. Could it happen to you?What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaCurrent stat...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 30, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers wandering care of dementia patients dementia care elder care help alzheimer help with dementia care home care learning memory care senior care Source Type: blogs

Many Ways of Skinning a Statistical Cat
By SAURABH JHA MD  In this episode of Firing Line, Saurabh Jha (aka @RogueRad), has a conversation with Professor Brian Nosek, a metaresearcher and co-founder of Center for Open Science. They discuss the implications of this study, which showed that there was a range of analytical methods when interrogating the database to answer a specific hypothesis: are soccer referees more likely to give red cards to dark skinned players? What is the significance of the variation? Does the variation in analysis explain the replication crisis? Listen to our conversation at Radiology Firing Line Podcast. (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Data Radiology Firing Line Podcasts data analysis Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

It ’s getting increasingly difficult for replication-crisis sceptics to explain away failed replications
The Many Labs 2 project managed to successfully replicate only half of 28 previously published significant effects By guest blogger Jesse Singal Replicating a study isn’t easy. Just knowing how the original was conducted isn’t enough. Just having access to a sample of experimental participants isn’t enough. As psychological researchers have known for a long time, all sorts of subtle cues can affect how individuals respond in experimental settings. A failure to replicate, then, doesn’t always mean that the effect being studied isn’t there – it can simply mean the new study was conduc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

It ’s getting increasingly difficult for psychology’s replication-crisis sceptics to explain away failed replications
The Many Labs 2 project managed to successfully replicate only half of 28 previously published significant effects By guest blogger Jesse Singal Replicating a study isn’t easy. Just knowing how the original was conducted isn’t enough. Just having access to a sample of experimental participants isn’t enough. As psychological researchers have known for a long time, all sorts of subtle cues can affect how individuals respond in experimental settings. A failure to replicate, then, doesn’t always mean that the effect being studied isn’t there – it can simply mean the new study was conduc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

No Let Up On The Bad News About Overdose Deaths
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) just issued  Data Brief Number 329, entitled “Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States, 1999-2017.” Drug overdose deaths reached a new record high, exceeding 70,000 deaths in 2017, a 9.6 percent increase over 2016. That figure includes all drug overdoses, including those due to cocaine, methamphetamines, and benzodiazepines. The actual breakdown according to drug category will be reported in mid-December. However,  estimates are opioid-related deaths will account for roughly 49,000 of the total overdose deaths. The big takeaways, quoting...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 29, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs