4 At-Risk Behaviors in Teens & What Parents Can Do
Teens are known to have a penchant for impulsivity and instant gratification. Even scientists have studied these habits and come to the conclusion that teen brains are simply wired for risk. But just what kind of at-risk or high-risk behaviors should parents be on the lookout for? To start with, at-risk behaviors are defined as anything that puts adolescents on the path to future negative consequences such as injury, poor health, incarceration and even death. Since most teens rarely think ahead to the consequences of their actions, it’s up to parents to recognize some of these dangerous behaviors and caution the...
Source: World of Psychology - January 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Bullying Children and Teens College Parenting Sexuality Substance Abuse Children At Risk Teen Depression Teen Drug Use Source Type: blogs

One of the Ways Researchers Narrow the Search for Drugs to Slow Aging
Small molecule and drug candidate libraries are huge. Much of modern medical research is a process of screening subsets of those libraries in search of molecules that can produce benefits with minimal side-effects. Usually the output of a successful screen is taken as a starting point for further exploration and molecular tinkering, to improve the effect or minimize undesirable side-effects. The great hope for gene therapy is that it will render all of this largely obsolete by offering ways to directly influence a molecular mechanism to a configurable degree without meaningful side-effects. That remains a way off in the fu...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Young Men Who Endorse The Masculine Ideal of Success Enjoy Greater Psychological Wellbeing
By Christian Jarrett Recently it’s been difficult to avoid the mantra that masculinity is toxic. There’s that viral Gillette advert encouraging men to be nicer (provoking a mix of praise, scorn and outrage); and the claim from the American Psychological Association (APA), in its promotion for its new guidelines on working with men and boys, that “traditional masculinity—marked by stoicism, competitiveness, dominance and aggression—is, on the whole, harmful” – a message welcomed by some, but criticised by many others, including Steven Pinker who dubbed it “ludicrous&...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Gender Mental health Source Type: blogs

Third International Conference on End of Life Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice
Here is the program for the Third International Conference on End of Life Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice. Pretty awesome.   Thursday 7 March, 2019 08.30-09.00Registration & Welcome Coffee 09.00-09.10Welcome by the Chair of the Scientific Committee – Kenneth Chambaere (BE) 09.10-09.30Introduction by an external speaker (TBC) Plenary 1: Latest developments in assisted dying around the world 09.30-10.00Developments in European countries – Agnes van der Heide (NL) 10.00-10.30Recent developments and the future of MAiD in Canada – Jocelyn Downie (CAN) 10.30-11.00A review of developmen...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Irving Fisher's Search for Stable Money: What We Can Learn
ConclusionIn thinking about monetary alternatives, there is no better place to start then a review of Irving Fisher ’s work, especiallyThe Purchasing Power of Money.   His insights can guide all those interested in improving the current government fiat money regime and in avoiding the mistakes of the past.  The Fed, in particular, ought to listen to what Fisher had to say about sound money—that is, money of stable purchasing power.  There is no perfect mone tary system, but one needs to understand what a “good system” would look like in order to move in the right direction.  A de...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: James A. Dorn Source Type: blogs

Large Genome-Wide Study Finds Only a Few Genetic Influences on Human Longevity
The influence of genetic variants on natural variations in human longevity is a very complex matter. The evidence to date supports a model in which thousands of genes have individually tiny, conditional effects. Near all associations identified in any given study population have failed to appear in any of the other study populations, and effect sizes for the very few longevity-associated genes that do appear in multiple studies are not large in the grand scheme of things. These variants provide a small increase in the odds of living to be very old, but the individuals bearing them are still diminished and damaged by aging....
Source: Fight Aging! - January 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Postdoc position available in the O-Lab at Duke University
We are looking for a highly motivated early-career scientist to join the O-Lab, led by Prof. Tobias Overath, in the Department of Psychology& Neuroscience at Duke University. Work in our lab investigates how sounds, from simple sinusoids to complex speech signals, are processed in the human brain, using a combination of behavioral (psychoacoustics) and neuroimaging methods (fMRI, EEG, ECoG) to track the underlying neural processes. Current projects investigate the transformation from acoustic to linguistic analysis of temporal speech structure, online measures of statistical learning, and optimization of cochlear ...
Source: Talking Brains - January 17, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

AI-Powered Wheelchair Controlled by Facial Expressions: Interview with CEO of HOOBOX Robotics
Hoobox Robotics, a robotics company based in São Paulo, Brazil, has developed the “Wheelie 7”, a wheelchair controlled using facial recognition technology. Incorporating AI developed by Intel, the technology allows users to control the movements of a motorized wheelchair using just their faces. The technology is envisaged as being particularly helpful for users who cannot use their hands to control a motorized device. The tech consists of a 3D camera that records a user’s facial expressions (no body sensors are required) and an on-board computer that interprets the expressions and sends commands to...
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Rehab Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 16th January 2018
Some recent things you might need to know aboutNICENICE are consulting on updating the guideline on intrapartum care for healthy women and babies. Their surveillance consultationcloses on 22 January 2019.  StatisticsBirth characteristics in England and Wales:2017. Office for National Statistics - live births by sex, ethnicity and month, maternities by place of birth and with multiple births and stillbirths by age of parents and quarter.Maternity services monthly statistics: September 2018, experimental statistics. NHS.NHS England Atlas of Shared Learning – case studiesImproving the quality of care for ...
Source: Browsing - January 16, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Immediately Re-Watching Lecture Videos Doesn ’t Benefit Learning
By Christian Jarrett Given a passage of text to study, many students repeatedly re-read it in the hope the information will eventually stick. Psychology research has shown the futility of this approach. Re-reading is a poor strategy, it’s too passive and it leads the mind to wander. Much better to test yourself on what you read, or explain it to yourself or someone else. Now a paper in Experimental Psychology suggests the same is true of lecture videos – immediately re-watching them doesn’t lead to any greater learning. Leonardo Martin and his team asked 72 participants to watch two lecture videos, ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs

How to Reduce the Risk of Winter Falls for Aging Adults
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), falls are the leading cause of death from injury among older adults. Thom Disch has a passion for this topic and has been compiling statistics and stories related to this healthcare crisis for over a decade. Thom owns HandiProducts, a web-based business that showcases the dozens of products that he has developed specifically for preventing slips and falls. He also wrote “Stop the Slip,” which is packed with practical tips. Read the full article on HealthCentral for tips and leads to products to reduce falls: Carol Bradley Bursack is the Candid Caregiver Medi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - January 14, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

15-Minute MRI Coming Out of the University of Arizona
Researchers at the University of Arizona ’s College of Engineering are reducing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan time to 15 minutes by using multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), a technology that eliminates many of the time-consuming elements of MRI.The group of researchers led by Nan-kaei Chen, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering, were awarded a $2.1 million grant from theNational Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to create faster MRI scans that will be beneficial to patients who struggle to lay still in the machine for 40 minutes to an hour. The five- year project specifically t...
Source: radRounds - January 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Consequences of Mayor de Blasio's Mandated Personal Leave
This week Mayor Bill de Blasio proposedmandating paid personal leave benefits for all employees in New York City. The policy, which applies to both full and part-time workers, would make New York City the first city to mandate personal leave in the country.The policy is billed as benefiting the 500,000 workers in New York City that currently have no personal days off. Although the idea may sound fresh and New Yorkers no doubt like the sound of paid time off, they may be less enthused if they understood the economics of mandated benefits.Currently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 32 percent of an average U.S. ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Vanessa Brown Calder Source Type: blogs

Commissioning Healthcare Policy: Hospital Readmission and Its Price Tag
By ANISH KOKA MD  The message comes in over the office slack line at 1:05 pm. There are four patients in rooms, one new, 3 patients in the waiting room. Really, not an ideal time to deal with this particular message. “Kathy the home care nurse for Mrs. C called and said her weight yesterday was 185, today it is 194, she has +4 pitting edema, heart rate 120, BP 140/70 standing, 120/64 sitting” I know Mrs. C well. She has severe COPD from smoking for 45 of the last 55 years. Every breath looks like an effort because it is. The worst part of it all is that Mrs. C just returned home from the hospital just days...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Hospitals Medicare Anish Koka hospital readmissions HRRP MedPAC Source Type: blogs

Surgery for appendicitis? Antibiotics alone may be enough
I remember when my best friend in fifth grade couldn’t make our much-anticipated end-of-the-school-year camping trip because he had just undergone surgery for appendicitis. Now I prevent kids from participating in their school activities for four to six weeks after I remove their appendix. But what is the appendix, why do we have an organ that causes so many problems, and do you need surgery for appendicitis? Role of the appendix is unclear The appendix is a fingerlike tube, about three to four inches long, that comes off of the first portion of the colon. It is normally located in the lower right abdomen, just after...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher J. Burns, MD Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

How Three Physician Scientists Are Taking Strides to Improve Our Health
Brain injuries, cancer, infections, and wound healing are some of the complex and pressing health concerns we face today. Understanding the basic science behind these diseases and biological processes is the key to developing new treatments and improving patient outcomes. Physician scientists—medical doctors who also conduct laboratory research—are essential to turning knowledge gained in the lab into innovative treatments, surgical advances, and new diagnostic tools. In this blog, we highlight the work and impact of three trauma surgeon scientists funded by NIGMS at different stages in their careers: Dr. Nicol...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - January 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Ashley Swanson Tags: Being a Scientist Physical Trauma and Sepsis scientist profiles Training Wound Healing Source Type: blogs

Heart disease and breast cancer: Can women cut risk for both?
Very often I encounter women who are far more worried about breast cancer than they are about heart disease. But women have a greater risk of dying from heart disease than from all cancers combined. This is true for women of all races and ethnicities. Yet only about 50% of women realize that they are at greater risk from heart disease than from anything else. Currently in the US, three million women are living with breast cancer, which causes one in 31 deaths. Almost 50 million women have cardiovascular disease, which encompasses heart disease and strokes and causes one in three deaths. Here’s what’s reall...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Breast Cancer Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Trial By Error: My Letter to LP Study ’ s Senior Author
By David Tuller, DrPH Alan Montgomery is a professor of medical statistics and clinical trials at the University of Nottingham’s School of Medicine. He is also the senior author of the Lightning Process study published in 2017 in Archives of Disease in Childhood, a BMJ journal. Professor Montgomery formerly worked at University of Bristol, along […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - January 7, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: David Tuller Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 526
Answer:Enterobius vermicularisAs noted by Florida Fan, the diagnostic features shown in this case include the cephalic alae, esophageal bulb, and " D-shaped " eggs (oval with a flattened side). Natalie Ellis described them as'coffee bean'or'paper weight'shaped - I had never heard those analogies before!Thanks to Bernardino Rocha and Silvia for the interesting comments about the different Oxyuroidea found in mammals, reptiles and amphibians (see the comments section on this post for the full details). Thank you also to Old One who reminded us that dogs and cats do not have pinworm and are not the so...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 5, 2019 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: January 5, 2019
This article has spoiler alerts, so I won’t go into details here, but the gist is that some critics of the record-breaking Netflix adaptation of Josh Malerman’s 2014 novel by the same name feel the story villainizes people with mental illness. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - January 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Children and Teens Narcissism Personality Psychology Around the Net Relationships Research Stigma Bird Box Child custody children and mental health conversation Neuroticism Personality Traits study Terrorism Source Type: blogs

New Study Underlines the Importance of Annual Mammography
Women who undergo annual breast cancer screenings have a decreased risk of mortality and a better treatment experience upon diagnosis, according to a group of researchers lead by L ászló Tabár, MD.In their study recently published in  Cancer,Dr. Tab ár and his investigators looked at data collected by the Swedish Cancer Registry of 52,000 women who had either received mammography or had never been screened for breast cancer between 1977 and 2015, and contrasted that information with studies between 1958 and 1976, which is considered the pre-sc reening era.They evaluated breast cancer diagno...
Source: radRounds - January 5, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

The VERDICT Trial
This study is unable to comment on whether patients with STEMI(-) Occlusion MI have benefit from emergent cath, because that is not the population studied and this subgroup is not commented on.This study is just the most recent in a long long line of similar literature. Context is everything for understanding this study. See below for an excerpt from theOMI Manifesto which summarizes the existing literature and provides details on each study:-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Counter-argument:“Haven’t there been RCTs showing no benefit ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - January 4, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

The Fentanyl Crisis and What You Need to Know
What is Fentanyl? According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine, but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug, and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain, for side effects surrounding aggressive cancer treatments or to manage pain after major surgery. It can be administered as an injection, a transdermal patch or as a lozenge. Under the medical supervision of a professional, there is little risk for addiction. However, that is not to be overlooked, as any exposure to Fentanyl at all will run the ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 3, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Heroin Medical Substance Abuse Synthetic drug abuse drug abuse epidemic fentanyl opioid Source Type: blogs

Now John Bargh ’s Famous Hot-Coffee Study Has Failed To Replicate
By Jesse Singal If you Google “holding a warm cup of coffee can” you’ll get a handful of results all telling the same story based on social priming research (essentially the study of how subtle cues affect human thoughts and behavior). “Whether a person is holding a warm cup of coffee can influence his or her views of other people, and a person who has experienced rejection may begin to feel cold,” notes a New York Times blog post, while a Psychology Today article explains that research shows that “holding a warm cup of coffee can make you feel socially closer to those around you.&r...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Replications Social Source Type: blogs

Cato's 2018 Immigration Research in Review
ConclusionImmigration has been one of the top policy issues since 2015.   Cato scholars have been at the forefront of publishing new facts and figures to illuminate this debate.  This post does not include our other activitiessuch as our work with Rep. Grothman (R-WI) to reduce immigrant welfare consumption, our numerouspublicdebates,summations of outside research, andweekly analysis of immigration-related events.   We hope to continue this pace of original research in 2019 and beyond.     (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 31, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 31st 2018
In conclusion, there are many anti-aging strategies in development, some of which have shown considerable promise for slowing down aging or delaying the onset of age-related diseases. From multiple pre-clinical studies, it appears that upregulation of autophagy through autophagy enhancers, elimination of senescent cells using senolytics, transfusion of plasma from young blood, neurogenesis and BDNF enhancement through specific drugs are promising approaches to sustain normal health during aging and also to postpone age-related diseases. However, these approaches will require critical assessment in clinical trials to determ...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 30, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

New Study Shows Most Americans Are Lonely
If you are feeling lonely, you’re not alone. A recent study involving 340 San Diego County residents of various ages has found that loneliness is shockingly widespread.1 The study suggests that there is a 76% prevalence of moderate to severe loneliness in American society. This is a bombshell statistic. After all, our country has enshrined the pursuit of happiness in its constitution and prides itself on having a high standard of living (twelfth in the world), which apparently doesn’t equate with living well. What went wrong? The hopeful news in this study is that there is an inverse relationship between l...
Source: World of Psychology - December 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John Amodeo, PhD Tags: Depression General Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Personal Psychology Relationships Self-Help Spirituality Friendship Loneliness social life social media Source Type: blogs

Statistical Certainty: Less is More
By ANISH KOKA MD  The day after NBC releases a story on a ‘ground-breaking’ observational study demonstrating caramel macchiatas reduce the risk of death, everyone expects physicians to be experts on the subject. The truth is that most of us hope John Mandrola has written a smart blog on the topic so we know intelligent things to tell patients and family members. A minority of physicians actually read the original study, and of those who read the study, even fewer have any real idea of the statistical ingredients used to make the study. Imagine not knowing whether the sausage you just ate contain...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Data Health Policy Anish Koka Brian Nosek data analysis HRRP randomized controlled trials statistics Source Type: blogs

Can exercise help conquer addiction?
As an athlete, I think regularly about the potential health benefits of exercise for my patients. Every week, I treat patients hospitalized at Brigham and Women’s Hospital with significant medical problems that are a direct result of severe addiction, ranging from seizures and strokes to heart valve and joint infections. I also care for outpatients at the Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Addiction Recovery Program. In both settings, I provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT) such as buprenorphine-naloxone for opioid use disorder, and extended-release naltrexone for both alcohol use disorder and opioid u...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire Twark, MD Tags: Addiction Exercise and Fitness Health Source Type: blogs

Evidence for a Human Late Life Mortality Plateau is an Illusion Arising from Bad Data
Mortality rises with age. In fact the very definition of aging is that it is a rise in mortality rate due to intrinsic causes, the accumulation of unrepaired damage and subsequent systems failure. Some years ago it was quite robustly established that, after a certain point, aged flies stop aging in this sense. Their mortality rates remain at a very high plateau, and do not further increase over time. Since then, researchers have crunched the numbers and debated back and forth over whether or not human demographic data shows any signs of a similar phenomenon. The challenge is the sparse, poorly gardened nature of the demogr...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 26, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Investigating Sex Chromosome Effects on Longevity in Mice
The well-known difference in longevity between genders, in which females live longer than males, is not peculiar to our species. It is present in most gendered species examined to date, which strongly suggests that these differences in the pace of aging arise quite robustly from the interaction of evolutionary pressures with gender roles in mating and reproduction. Males can achieve reproductive fitness by investing resources into mating sooner rather than later, while for females greater fitness arises through investing resources to retain the capacity to mate successfully over time. The male candle burns brighter and les...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 25, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Can Humor Alter Your Brain Chemistry?
“If I had no sense of humor, I would long ago have committed suicide.”  ~ Mahatma Gandhi Do you know why everyone isn’t in a mental hospital? Because there isn’t enough room. Philosophers have long observed a dearth of happiness among humanity. Henry David Thoreau said, “Most men lead lives of quiet desperation.” John Stuart Mill observed, “Unquestionably, it is possible to do without happiness; it is done involuntarily by nineteen-twentieths of mankind.” Abd ar-Rahman III, who reigned as the most powerful prince of Iberia for half a century, had this to say about ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Nichole Force, M.A. Tags: Books Depression Self-Help Humor Laughter neuroplasticitiy Neuroscience Sadness Source Type: blogs

Evidence-Based Satire
By SAURABH JHA Sequels generally disappoint. Jason couldn’t match the fear he generated in the original Friday the 13th. The sequel to the Parachute, a satirical piece canvassing PubMed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing parachutes to placebo, matched its brilliance, and even exceeded it, though the margin can’t be confirmed with statistical significance. The Parachute, published in BMJ’s Christmas edition, will go down in history with Jonathan Swift’s Modest Proposal and Frederic Bastiat’s Candlemakers’ Petition as timeless satire in which pedagogy punched above, indeed d...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED RogueRad Source Type: blogs

CMS Should Boost the Signal on Social Determinants of Health
By HERB KUHN  Historically, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) stance on the influence that social determinants of health (SDOH) have on health outcomes has been equal parts signal and noise. In April 2016, the agency announced it would begin adjusting the Medicare Advantage star ratings for dual-eligibility and other social factors. This was amid calls for increased equity in the performance determinations from the managed care industry. At the same time, CMS continued to refuse risk-adjustment for SDOH in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) despite the research supporting th...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Hospitals CMS Herb Kuhn HRRP Social Determinants of Health Source Type: blogs

Self-Care For Caregivers: The Most Challenging Task
A study from the Family Caregiving Alliance found that adult children caring for their parents, as well as parents caring for chronically ill children, may have their lifespan shortened by four to eight years. Caregivers could conceivably alter these statistics if they practice reasonable self-care. View slideshow on HealthCentral with tips on how to approach caregiver self-care - at times a nearly impossible task: MedicareFAQ – Medicare Resource Center Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol   &nbs...
Source: Minding Our Elders - December 21, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

New Census Data Show Migration to Low-Tax States
The Census Bureauhas released new data on state population growth between July 2017 and July 2018. Domestic migration between the states is one portion of annual population change. The Census data show that Americans are continuing to move from high-tax to low-tax states.This Cato study examined interstate migration using IRS data for 2016. The new Census data confirms that people are moving from tax-punishing places such as California, Connecticut, Illinois, New York, and New Jersey to tax-friendly places such as Florida, Idaho, Nevada, Tennessee, and South Carolina.In the chart, each blue dot is a state. The vertical axi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Physician Burnout, Data Scientist, Facebook, and Patient Engagement
It’s been quite a while since I did a Twitter round up and so I thought it would be fun to take a quick look around the Twittersphere to see what people are sharing. You all probably already know you can follow me anytime on Twitter (@techguy) or the Healthcare Scene Twitter account (@HealthcareScene). We’re always sharing and connecting with others in the healthcare IT community. Now, without further ado, some tweets I saw that stood out to me and a little bit of short commentary (some might say snark) on each. Very concerning is the increasing rates of physician, nurse and other healthcare burnout. Further, ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - December 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Ambulatory Analytics/Big Data C-Suite Leadership Clinical Communication and Patient Experience Hospital - Health System Facebook Gabe Charbonneau MD Savvy Coop Tamara McCleary Source Type: blogs

Empirical Evidence for Stock-Market Short-Termism?
This blog post is part of a larger series on stock-market “short-termism”. See also my entries onshare buybacks and progressivecorporate governance reforms.I. IntroductionTo recapitulate the “myopia thesis”: managers of publicly traded firms are hostage to diversified shareholders who forego careful study of the firm’s fundamentals and instead respond to the latest, easily digestible quarterly earnings report. Rather than undertaking investments that might have a substantial retu rn down the road, managers mimic the priorities of transient shareholders uninterested in a firm’s ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 18, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Is Greenland Melt “Off the Chart?”
That ’s what the second author said about a newpaper on Greenland ’s ice, which arrived just in time for the annual meeting of the signatories of the UN’s 1992 treaty on climate change, this time in Katowice, Poland. Appearing inNature, Rowan University Geologist Luke Trusel and several coauthors claimed ice-core data from Central-Western Greenland revealed melting in the recent two decades that has been “exceptional over at least the last 350 years.” The paper appeared in the December 6 issue ofNature.Howexceptional?“Our results show a pronounced 250% to 575% increase in melt intensity ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Patrick J. Michaels Source Type: blogs

69% Oppose Creating Federal Paid Leave Program If It Harms Women ’s Career Prospects
The national  Cato 2018 Paid Leave Survey of 1,700 adults finds widespread support for creating a federal paid leave program, with 74% in favor. However, 69% of Americans would oppose establishing a federal paid leave program if it meant that fewer women would get promoted and become managers. But would establishing a federal program actu ally do this? Research suggests that it could and that’s why we asked about it on the survey:Read about the full survey results and methodology here.First, let ’s consider the different career outcomes between women in the United States and women in Western...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 17, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Emily Ekins Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali: November 2018
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD  Keynote speech There was a very sobering piece in NEJM by the FDA last month in which the authors try to explore what went wrong with the Keynote-183, Keynote-185 and checkmate 602 trials testing PD-1 inhibitors combinations with pomalidomide or lenalidomide and dexamethasone in multiple myeloma. Interim analysis of Keynote 183 and 185 revealed detrimental effects on overall survival (OS) with hazard ratios of 1.61 and 2.06, not explained by differences in toxicities alone. The checkmate 602 trial was also halted in light of these findings and also showed higher mortality in t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Pharmaceuticals Physicians Bishal Gyawali Cancer drugs cancer immunotherapy Clinical Trials FDA Oncology PD-1 inhibitors Source Type: blogs

AusHealthIT Poll Number 453 – Results – 16th December, 2018.
Here are the results of the poll.Should The ADHA Be Publicly Releasing The Full Usage And Access Statistics For The myHR As The Board Papers Clearly Show They Have Them?Yes 98% (115) No 1% (1) I Have No Idea 1% (1) Total votes: 117 What an amazing poll. Most clearly believe the ADHA is wrongly much to secretive. The Chair was obviously the vote for more secrecy or was it Tim K? We will never know. Any insights on the poll welcome as a comment, as usual. A really, great t urnout of votes! It must have been a very, very easy question as only 1/117 readers were not sure what the appropriate answer was. Again, many,...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - December 15, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Trump Administration Continues to Expand Interior Immigration Enforcement
Today, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) released areport detailing deportations (henceforth “removals”) conducted by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) during fiscal year 2018.  This post present data on removals in historical context – combined with information fromPew and theCenter for Migration Studies on the number of illegal immigrants present in the United States.ICE deported 95,360 illegal immigrants from the  interior of the United States in 2018, up from 81,603 in 2017.  Removals from the interior peaked during the Obama administration in 2011 at 237,941 (Figur...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Trump Administration Increases Immigration Enforcement at Businesses
President Trump ’s administration has increased immigration enforcement at worksites, just as he promised.  Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) arrested 2,304 people at worksites in the fiscal year 2018, a more than 7-fold increase from the previous fiscal year and about 6.7-fold more than the last full ye ar of the Obama administration. ICE ’s worksite arrests fall into two categories: criminal or administrative.  Any citizen or noncitizen whom ICE suspects of having committed a criminal violation, such as identity fraud, can be arrested.  Administrative arrests are for civil violator...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Destigmatizing Hearing Loss with Technology: Interview with Eargo CEO Christian Gormsen
Today, 500 million people globally suffer from hearing loss, however, most individuals wait on average seven years before dealing with the condition due to a combination of factors, including stigmas and misconceptions related to hearing aids. In the U.S. alone, an estimated 40 million individuals live with untreated hearing loss. Stepping in to address this need is Eargo, a U.S.-based hearing aid manufacturer that has been focused on creating products that are smaller, less visible, and more cost effective than traditional hearing aids since 2010. The company’s Eargo Plus and Eargo Max products implement F...
Source: Medgadget - December 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Exclusive Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

The physiological stress response is larger in the morning than evening
The real-world implications are far from clear and the result needs to be replicated with larger samples By Emma Young When’s the best time of day to give someone bad news? First thing in the morning or early evening? Yes, if it’s in the morning, they have longer to work out what to do about it, but you might be better off plumping for the evening because according to a new study, published open-access in Neuropsychopharmacology, they’re likely to suffer less of a physiological stress response at this time.  If a threat – whether physical or psychological – doesn’t quickly vanish, ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 13, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Mental health Source Type: blogs

5 Ways in which Big Data is Advancing Telemedicine
Conclusion Big data analytics gives the physicians access to massive volumes of information which increases the diagnostic accuracy and results in efficiency in healthcare delivery. Combining the power of Telehealth with Big data has the potential to transform the healthcare delivery system and is of immense benefit to both the patients as well as healthcare providers. Data security and privacy concerns are the biggest threats to this advancements. Enforcement of appropriate security measures need to ensured so that the vast reservoir of healthcare data can be harnessed to its full potential. About Rahul Varshneya Rahul Va...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - December 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Guest Blogger Tags: Administration Analytics/Big Data Clinical Digital Health Genomic Medicine Healthcare HealthCare IT Telemedicine Telemedicine and Remote Monitoring Arkenea Benchpoint Rahul Varshneya Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 12th December 2018
This report contains case studies of health visitors, family workers, midwives, social care and children ’s centres staff helping families through pregnancy as well as areas experimenting with a new local government role of consultant public health midwife.AcknowledgementsHealthcare Information for All discussion group; King ’s Fund Library Health Management and Policy Alert; Embed Health Consortium Health Bulletin. (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - December 12, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

“An additional reason to abandon learning styles” – teachers and pupils do not agree on the pupils’ preferred learning style
By Christian Jarrett “Learning styles” – there can be few ideas that have created such a stark disconnect between the experts on the ground and the evidence published in scholarly journals. Endorsed by the overwhelming majority of teachers, yet dismissed by most psychologists and educational neuroscientists as a “neuromyth”, the basis of learning styles is that people learn better when taught via their preferred learning modality, usually (but not always) described as either visual, auditory or kinaesthetic. Many studies have already uncovered serious problems with the learning styles concept,...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - December 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs