Transcranial Magnetic Brain Stimulation to Treat Depression and OCD: Interview with Stanford ’s Dr. Nolan Williams
Chances are, someone you know has been affected by mental health problems. With an estimated world-wide burden of 300 million people, depression can be a severely debilitating condition. In fact, in the past year alone, more than 16 million adults in the US have experienced a major depressive episode. While many of those who seek help are able to find solace in therapy or medication, treatment-resistant depression is not uncommon. Clinicians like Stanford’s Dr. Nolan Williams have been studying the applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation (or TMS) for a variety of neurological conditions. We sat down wi...
Source: Medgadget - December 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The 1990 Bush " Tax Increase " Reduced Taxes
The late President G.H.W. Bush famously reneged on his “no new taxes” pledge and signed the “Bush tax increase” on November 5, 1990, to take effect the following January.   The new law was intended to raise more revenue from high-income households and unincorporated businesses.  It was supposed to raise revenue partly by raising the top tax r ate from 28% to 31% but more importantly by phasing-out deductions and personal exemptions as income on a joint return climbed above $150,00  (the phase-outs were calledthe PEP and Pease provisions).   Treasury estimates expected r...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

Progressive Corporate Governance Reforms
This blog post is part of a larger series on “Stock-Market Short-Termism” (see also my entry onshare-buybacks). I will be assessing one proposed cure, corporate governance reforms, and will argue that it is likely to be iatrogenic. I.On August 15, 2018, Senator Elizabeth Warren formally introduced her “Accountable Capitalism Act”, that would,inter alia,require of all firms generating $1 billion or more in revenue that “no fewer than 40% of its directors are selected by the corporation’s employees.” In mandating that corporations include employeesquastakeholders in the firm &rs...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Stigmatizing Narcissists & Narcissism: Are They the Secondhand Smoke of Our Time?
The thing about smoking cigarettes is that the behavior is something we wanted to stigmatize, in order to decrease its frequency in people. At its height in the 1950s and 1960s, 2 out of every 5 people smoked in the U.S. It’s a huge health hazard, decreasing lifespan and increasing health problems in smokers. But smoking doesn’t just impact the person who smokes. Through decades’ worth of research findings, we now understand the smoking also affects the people around smokers, causing health problems and decreasing lifespans through secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke, therefore, is also something people se...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Minding the Media Narcissism Personality Policy and Advocacy Relationships Stigma Narcissistic Personality Disorder second-hand smoke secondhand smoke Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, December 10th 2018
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 9, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

We Are All Being Played For Being Total Idiots By The ADHA Board And It Is Really Time It Stopped!
I think we can now safely conclude the ADHA Boards are a collection of dishonest and non-transparent agents of Government concealment. – and yes I am being polite!This popped up from the Board Minutes the other day: BoardAgenda Item 17My Health Record performance statisticsMeeting: 22-23 August 2018  OFFICIAL: SensitiveRECOMMENDATIONThat the Board note the current participation and use of the My Health Record by consumers and healthcare providers and the status of the Healthcare Identifiers Service, the National Authentication Service for Health and the National Clinical Terminology Service (provided at At...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - December 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Questioning the Validity of Jeanne Calment's Age
Jeanne Calment is well known as the longest-lived person, with her age at death validated at 122 years. The data for supercentenarians, the exceptionally rare individuals who live to be 110 years of age or older, is very ragged. This is usually the case at the far outside end of a distribution, where the total number of data points is very low. It is usual to find outliers, but some people feel that Jeanne Calment is too much of an outlier given the other validated ages of death for supercentenarians. Only one other person lived to be 119, and no-one else is known to have made it past 117. The yearly mortality rates for su...
Source: Fight Aging! - December 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Alcohol, Smoking, Drugs: Can Digital Solutions Give A Helping Hand To The Addicted?
Alcohol content measuring wristbands, smart lighters, nicotine tracking wearables, stop smoking apps, virtual reality therapies, automated messaging platforms are the newest elements in the arsenal of digital health technologies supporting everyone in the fight against addiction to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs. Addiction and dependency ruins lives Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life. It doesn’t matter whether it’s about cigarettes, alcohol, medication, drugs, gambling, sex, etc., any of these substances or phenomena could cause you strong dependency and might impact you...
Source: The Medical Futurist - December 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Medical Professionals Patients Researchers alcohol cigarette digital health drugs health technology Innovation medication opioid opioid crisis smartphone smartphone apps smoking virtual Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 5th December 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about.NewsCRISPR babies- STATNewsCRISPR babies - BMJNHS to introduce mental health checks for new fathersResearchNIHR SignalsSteroids rapidly reduce children ’s croup symptoms and shorten hospital stays (includes babies)(NIHR Signals review of a recent Cochrane review).Lab grown placentas and pregnancy research.  Guardian report ofresearch letter in Nature. Hyperemesis gravidarumManagement of severe pregnancy sickness and hyperemesis gravidarum (BMJ)Constant sickness is not good news (BMJ - personal experiences) Shrewsbury and Telford H...
Source: Browsing - December 5, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Children ’s and young people’s experiences of loneliness: 2018
Office of National Statistics - Analysis of children's and young people ’s views, experiences and suggestions to overcome loneliness, using in-depth interviews, the Community Life Survey 2016 to 2017 and Good Childhood Index Survey, 2018.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 5, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

National measurement of loneliness: 2018
Office for National Statistics - This compendium provides comprehensive information on the loneliness measurement landscape, the recommended national indicators of loneliness and the question testing underpinning our recommendations.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 5, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Health Survey for England 2017: summary of key findings
National Statistics - The Health Survey for England (HSE) monitors trends in the nation ’s health and care. It provides information about adults aged 16 and over, and children aged 0 to 15, living in private households in England. The survey is used to monitor overweight and obesity and to estimate the proportion of people in England who have certain health conditions and the prevale nce of risk factors and health related behaviours, such as smoking and drinking alcohol.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - December 4, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Medgadget Sci-Fi Contest 2018: Meet The Authors and Read Their Stories
From Jules Verne to Isaac Asimov, science fiction writers have inspired scientists, explorers, and thrill seekers to influence the future of humanity. While Sci-Fi may seem like it’s about the distant future, more often than not it’s commentary on rudimentary technologies that already exist and that are about to mature and reveal their true potential. The authors of this year’s Medgadget Sci-Fi Writing Contest are certainly in tune with the latest trends in biomedicine, the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) into clinical practice, and genetic manipulation taking place in thousands of labs aroun...
Source: Medgadget - December 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Art Exclusive Medicine Source Type: blogs

The Benefits of Mindfulness Meditation for Teens
Life is a lot more complicated for teenagers than most adults give them credit for. Many teenagers are balancing schoolwork with part-time jobs, sports, and an active social life. There are plenty of studies out there that have found teenagers are even more stressed out than adults. And it’s a growing problem. Statistics show that there is a higher percentage of teenagers who experience stress, anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts than in the past. There are many different theories on why this is happening but regardless of the reason, it’s important that teenagers learn ways to effectively handle s...
Source: World of Psychology - December 2, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Julie K. Jones, Ph.D., LPC Tags: Children and Teens Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Parenting Adolescence Mind Body Wellness Yoga Source Type: blogs

Can an Alzheimer's Patient Wander and Die?
Alzheimer's patients often wander and get lost. This behavior can happen at any time or at any stage of the disease. Just because they have never wandered before, doesn't mean they won't do it in the future. Wandering can sometimes result in death.The Alzheimer's Association estimates that 60 percent of persons living with Alzheimer's or a related dementia will wander.Think about it - 6 out of 10.I can assure you if your loved one wanders away, you cannot locate them, and they are lost to you, it can become one of the most horrible and terrifying experiences of your life.Imagine your heart pounding, a sense of hopelessness...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 30, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's wandering statistics alzheimers wandering education how to prevent wandering learning wandering tips Source Type: blogs

Share Buybacks: Mismeasured and Misunderstood
In March of this year,Forbespublished an article with the following lede:The Economist has called them “an addiction to corporate cocaine.” Reuters has called them “self-cannibalization.” The Financial Timeshas called them “an overwhelming conflict of interest.” In an article that won the HBR McKinsey Award for the best article of the year, Harvard Business Review has called them “stock price manipulation.” These influential journals make a powerful case that wholesale stock buybacks are a bad idea—bad economically, bad financially, ba...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 30, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

My Mother Living with Alzheimer's Wandered, and I was the one that was "scared to death"
When a person suffering from Alzheimer's disease wanders away they are at risk. They can die. Of those lost more than 72 hours, only 20 percent survive.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomHow many Alzheimer's patients wander each year?How many are found? How many die from exposure or in accidents?Here is an educated guess --around 125,000 persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease wander away each year.Is it possible that more than 300 Alzheimer's sufferers wander and/or get lost each day? That is an enormous amount of risk. Could it happen to you?What is the Difference Between Alzheimer ’s and DementiaCurrent stat...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - November 30, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers wandering care of dementia patients dementia care elder care help alzheimer help with dementia care home care learning memory care senior care Source Type: blogs

Many Ways of Skinning a Statistical Cat
By SAURABH JHA MD  In this episode of Firing Line, Saurabh Jha (aka @RogueRad), has a conversation with Professor Brian Nosek, a metaresearcher and co-founder of Center for Open Science. They discuss the implications of this study, which showed that there was a range of analytical methods when interrogating the database to answer a specific hypothesis: are soccer referees more likely to give red cards to dark skinned players? What is the significance of the variation? Does the variation in analysis explain the replication crisis? Listen to our conversation at Radiology Firing Line Podcast. (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Data Radiology Firing Line Podcasts data analysis Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

It ’s getting increasingly difficult for replication-crisis sceptics to explain away failed replications
The Many Labs 2 project managed to successfully replicate only half of 28 previously published significant effects By guest blogger Jesse Singal Replicating a study isn’t easy. Just knowing how the original was conducted isn’t enough. Just having access to a sample of experimental participants isn’t enough. As psychological researchers have known for a long time, all sorts of subtle cues can affect how individuals respond in experimental settings. A failure to replicate, then, doesn’t always mean that the effect being studied isn’t there – it can simply mean the new study was conduc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

It ’s getting increasingly difficult for psychology’s replication-crisis sceptics to explain away failed replications
The Many Labs 2 project managed to successfully replicate only half of 28 previously published significant effects By guest blogger Jesse Singal Replicating a study isn’t easy. Just knowing how the original was conducted isn’t enough. Just having access to a sample of experimental participants isn’t enough. As psychological researchers have known for a long time, all sorts of subtle cues can affect how individuals respond in experimental settings. A failure to replicate, then, doesn’t always mean that the effect being studied isn’t there – it can simply mean the new study was conduc...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

No Let Up On The Bad News About Overdose Deaths
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) just issued  Data Brief Number 329, entitled “Drug Overdose Deaths in the United States, 1999-2017.” Drug overdose deaths reached a new record high, exceeding 70,000 deaths in 2017, a 9.6 percent increase over 2016. That figure includes all drug overdoses, including those due to cocaine, methamphetamines, and benzodiazepines. The actual breakdown according to drug category will be reported in mid-December. However,  estimates are opioid-related deaths will account for roughly 49,000 of the total overdose deaths. The big takeaways, quoting...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 29, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Let ’ s Keep Genetic Information an Individual Affair
These times train us to seek continually for more data and more transparency, always assuming that more is better. But some types of data and transparency bring risks, because “A little learning is a dangerous thing.” In particular, sharing genetic information with family members raises daunting ethical issues, along with the need for a mature understanding of consequences, as illustrated by a court case from the UK recently reported in The Guardian. Superficially, this case seems to be a simple balancing act concerning how far a doctor is responsible to fulfill a family member’s right to know. But in con...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 29, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: Genomics Data Transparency Privacy Source Type: blogs

Extracting data from news articles: Australian pollution by postcode
The recent ABC News article Australia’s pollution mapped by postcode reveals nation’s dirty truth is interesting. It contains a searchable table, which is useful if you want to look up your own suburb. However, I was left wanting more: specifically, the raw data and some nice maps. So here’s how I got them, using R. The full details are in this Github repository. There you’ll find the code to generate this report. Essentially, the procedure goes like this: Use rvest to create a data frame from the data table in the online article Clean and pre-process the data using dplyr Join the pollution data w...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - November 28, 2018 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: australia environment statistics geospatial maps pollution rstats Source Type: blogs

The Incredible Benefits of Switching Off Your Phone and Going Outside
You're reading The Incredible Benefits of Switching Off Your Phone and Going Outside, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In today’s digital age, it’s increasingly difficult to get away from technology. Many of us are hopelessly addicted to our phones, with research showing that the average person touches their phone 2600 times in a single day. But if you want to be your best and most motivated self, this habit could be more of a problem than you think. The Problem with Excessive Screen Time All th...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: RebeccaBenson Tags: featured health and fitness internet culture psychology self improvement digital detox screen time screentime Source Type: blogs

Big Data Has Been Getting A Run In The Last Few Weeks But I Sense A Large Dollop Of Skepticism.
This appeared last week:Benefits from big data at risk from untrustworthy, bungling politiciansBy Ross Gittins18 November 2018 — 2:00pmThe digital revolution holds the potential to use mere “data” to improve the budget and the economy, and hence our businesses and our lives. But you have to wonder whether our politicians are up to the challenge.In a speech last week, the Australian Statistician, boss of the Australian Bureau of Statistics, David Kalisch, said the new statistical frontier is “data integration” – you take two or more separate sets of statistics and put them together in way...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - November 28, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Saying No to the Drug Crisis
By BRIAN KLEPPER In a recent essay, VIVIO Health’s CEO Pramod John guides us through four sensible drug policy changes and supporting rationales that could make drug pricing much fairer. Reading through it, one is struck by the magnitude of the drug manufacturing industry’s influence over policy, profoundly benefiting that sector at the deep expense of American purchasers. As Mr. John points out, the U.S. has the world’s only unregulated market for drug pricing. We have created a safe harbor provision that allows and protects unnecessary intermediaries like pharmacy benefit managers. We have created mecha...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Pharmaceuticals Politics Brian Klepper drug prices Pfizer Source Type: blogs

Many social psychologists are impeded by their ideological aversion to evolutionary psychology
By Christian Jarrett A new survey of beliefs held by social psychologists (335 members of the Society of Experimental Social Psychologists) has confirmed previous reports that the field is overwhelmingly populated by researchers of a left-wing, liberal bent. What’s more, David Buss and William von Hippel – the evolutionary psychologists who conducted and analysed the survey – say their findings, published open-access in Archives of Scientific Psychology, suggest that many of these social psychologists are opposed, for ideological reasons, to insights rooted in evolutionary psychology and that this is impe...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological evolutionary psych Political Social Source Type: blogs

Do social psychologists have an ideological aversion to evolutionary psychology?
By Christian Jarrett A new survey of beliefs held by social psychologists (335 mostly US-based members of the Society of Experimental Social Psychology) has confirmed previous reports that the field is overwhelmingly populated by researchers of a left-wing, liberal bent. What’s more, David Buss and William von Hippel – the evolutionary psychologists who conducted and analysed the survey – say their findings, published open-access in Archives of Scientific Psychology, suggest that some social psychologists may be opposed, for ideological reasons, to insights rooted in evolutionary psychology. Buss and von ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 27, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological evolutionary psych Political Social Source Type: blogs

Have you got a “self-actualised” personality? A new test brings Maslow’s ideas into the 21st century
By Christian Jarrett Writing in the last century, Abraham Maslow (pictured left), one of the founders of Humanistic Psychology, proposed that the path to self-transcendence, and ultimately a greater compassion for all of humanity, requires “self-actualisation” – that is, fulfilling your true potential and becoming your authentic self. Now Scott Barry-Kaufman, a psychologist at Barnard College, Columbia University, believes it is time to revive the concept and link it with contemporary psychological theory. “We live in times of increasing divides, selfish concerns, and individualistic pursuits of pow...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Personality Source Type: blogs

An interview with Rosi Sexton: polymath
Jump to follow-up On Sunday 23 September, we recorded an interview with Rosi Sexton. Ever since I got to know her, I’ve been impressed by her polymathy. She’s a musician, a mathematician and a champion athlete, and now an osteopath: certainly an unusual combination. You can read about her on her Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosi_Sexton. The video is long and wide-ranging, so I’ll give some bookmarks, in case you don’t want to watch it all. (And please excuse my garish London marathon track suit.) Rosi recently started to take piano lessons again, after a 20 year break. She plays Ch...
Source: DC's goodscience - November 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

“National narcissism” is rife, finds survey of 35 countries
This study could also be seen as evidence for a cousin of the famous Lake Wobegon effect, or the tendency of people to overestimate their abilities, leading a majority of individuals to view themselves as “above average” in various domains. It shouldn’t be surprising, given what we know about in-group psychology, that people often err similarly when evaluating their own groups relative to others. It would be fascinating to see a study like this repeated on a larger, more cross-nationally representative group of respondents. One could make a case for more highly educated people both overestimating or under...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cross-cultural guest blogger Social Source Type: blogs

A Link Between Marijuana Legalization & Car Crashes? Nonsense
In October, the Highway Loss Data Institute and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety released a self-published report that suggested there’s a strong correlational link between automobile crash rates and the legalization of marijuana in states. This would be harrowing news if the finding was based upon strong scientific evidence. Unfortunately for these institutes, though, the research data is murky at best. And because these organizations self-published the report, rather than going through the scientific peer-review process, it’s hard to take their findings seriously. Before we begin to look at the dat...
Source: World of Psychology - November 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Minding the Media Research Crash Data crashes and marijuana driving with marijuana Highway Loss Data Institute Insurance Institute for Highway Safety marijuana use Source Type: blogs

The mood-stabilising effect of taking the pill has “downstream benefits” for women’s relationships, claims new study
By Christian Jarrett In western nations, the vast majority of sexually active women take the birth control pill at some point in their lives, usually to avoid becoming pregnant. Of increasing interest to some psychologists, the hormone-stabilising effects of the pill may have other important effects, including on the psyche and personal relationships, and these are the focus of a new study in Neurology, Psychiatry and Brain Research. Some earlier studies found that women who take the pill report more emotional stability, in terms of experiencing fewer depressive symptoms, and fewer mental health problems more general...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 20, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Health Mental health Source Type: blogs

Process Re-engineering Can Produce Results, Lumeon Finds
A rigorous look at organizational processes, perhaps bolstered by new technology, can produce big savings in almost any industry. In health care, Lumeon finds that this kind of process re-engineering can improve outcomes and the patient experience too–the very Triple Aim cited as goals by health care reformers. A bad process, according to Robbie Hughes, Founder and CEO for Lumeon, can be described as, “The wrong people have the wrong information at the wrong time.” One example is a surgery unit that Lumeon worked with on scheduling surgeries. The administrative staff scheduled the surgeries based on minim...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: Health Care Healthcare HealthCare IT Fee for Service Fee-For-Value Longitudinal Care Operations Management Optimization Patient Engagement Process Re-engineering Source Type: blogs

Make sure your decision to leave medicine is not based on an emotional response
We know the statistics. More than 50 percent of physicians are experiencing burnout at the hands of EMRs, a nonexistent work-life balance and regulatory constraints to name a few. This is causing physicians to leave clinical medicine and find other work. Some are opting for nonclinical administrative roles, and others are leaving altogether for careers […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/lisa-herbert" rel="tag" > Lisa Herbert, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Using OSX? Compiling an R package from source? Issues with ‘ -fopenmp ’ ? Try this.
You can file this one under “I may have the very specific solution if you’re having exactly the same problem.” So: if you’re running some R code and you see a warning like this: Warning message: In checkMatrixPackageVersion() : Package version inconsistency detected. TMB was built with Matrix version 1.2.14 Current Matrix version is 1.2.15 Please re-install 'TMB' from source using install.packages('TMB', type = 'source') or ask CRAN for a binary version of 'TMB' matching CRAN's 'Matrix' package And installation of TMB from source fails like this: install.packages("TMB", type = "so...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - November 19, 2018 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: programming statistics compiler llvm osx Source Type: blogs

Could Yoga Improve Your Teen ’ s Body Image?
For the parents of teenagers, these are anxious times. Across the US and UK, it appears that mental health issues are on the rise in young people1, with various modern pressures weighing heavily on a generation that is too young to cope. One significant factor is problems with body image, something which profoundly interacts with the self-esteem, happiness and ultimately mental health of young people. Body Image and Teenagers Body image is our mental representation of ourselves. It can be quite far removed from the objective reality of our bodies, and it is also a key part of our wider self-esteem. The way we perceive o...
Source: World of Psychology - November 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Heather Mason Tags: Eating Disorders Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Mindfulness Self-Esteem Women's Issues Body Image Objectification self-worth Social Anxiety Social Withdrawal Yoga Source Type: blogs

Immigration Application Denial Rates Jump 37% Under Trump
New data from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the agency that adjudicates immigration applications, show that denials have jumped significantly. The data for the first nine months of Fiscal Year (FY) 2018, which started in October 2017, show that denials for all manner of immigration benefits —travel documents, work permits, green cards, worker petitions, etc.—increased 37 percent since FY 2016.As Figure 1 shows, the denial rate increased from 8.3 percent to 11.3 percent from FY 2016 to FY 2018. These statistics exclude citizenship applications and include all other immigration forms exce...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - November 15, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Future Trends Help You Choose The Most Fitting Medical Specialty
“I’m a medical student. Which specialty should I choose and what skills will a future doctor need?” “I’m in radiology. Looking at the recent advancements in medical technology, was it a wise choice or should I train myself in something different, too?” These are the questions I most frequently receive after my keynote speeches. While all should be aware of their own physical and intellectual capabilities, here are a few pieces of advice which skills to concentrate on based on the current and future trends in healthcare. The most significant trends in healthcare Artificial intelligence, w...
Source: The Medical Futurist - November 13, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Education Medical Professionals capabilities crowdsourcing digital digital health digital literacy gamification Healthcare Innovation medical specialties medical specialty patient design skills tech Source Type: blogs

The heartbreak of an infertile patient
I am still not able to cope up with negative pregnancy test. I just wished that the test still comes positive. My good looking embryos do not like to settle in my good looking endometrium lining. I wish that I could know what these beautiful embryos wants more from me? Why all these medicines,efforts, patience, care, precautions and prayers for having a baby is not paying off. What else can we do to fulfill our dream to have a baby ?Crying is also not helping. After getting result, I spent entire day in reading positive ivf stories on internet I know that in this journey nobody get success immediately, every couple have th...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - November 13, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Focused review of suicides among armed forces personnel
This report is based on evidence drawn from a review of defence publications, an examination of published statistics relating to suicide, a systematic review of the academic literature, interviews with 53 key stakeholders across defence, a national and international benchmarking exercise and an original academic study of self-harm in the UK. ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - November 12, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Acute Angle Closure: Mastering Tonometry
​Identifying and managing disease often requires the delicate and skillful use of temperamental emergency department machinery. The ability to apply these may appropriately help determine a difficult diagnosis.Glaucoma, we all know, can cause blindness, and acute narrow angle glaucoma refers to the angles within the eye that are not as wide and open as normal. People with acute angle glaucoma have abnormal anatomy within the eye where the angle changes as the eye is dilated. This can cause blockages of fluid drainage from the anterior to posterior changes resulting in increased intraocular pressure. It ca lead to acute a...
Source: The Procedural Pause - November 9, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Conference on Drug Pricing Inject New Statistics Into Debate, Few New Insights (Part 2 of 2)
The first part of this article described the upward pressures on costs and some of the philosophical debates over remedies. This section continues the discussion with several different angles on costs. Universal access and innovation It’s easy to call health care a human right. But consider an analogy: housing could also be considered a human right, yet no one has the right to a twenty-room mansion. Modern drug and genetic research are creating the equivalents of many twenty-room mansions, and taking up residence means the difference between life and death for someone, or perhaps between a long productive life and on...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 9, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: Healthcare Reform Medical Economics Personalized Medicine Precision Medicine Drug Pricing Healthcare Costs Medication Pricing Source Type: blogs

Psychologists claim outrage is getting a bad rap
By guest blogger Jesse Singal Outrage: It’s absolutely everywhere. Today’s world, particularly the version of it blasted into our brains by social media, offers endless fodder, from big, simmering outrages (climate change and many powerful institutions’ refusal to do anything about it) to smaller quotidian ones (every day, someone, somewhere does something offensive that comes to Twitter’s attention, leading to a gleeful pile-on). In part because of rising awareness of the adverse consequences of unfettered digital-age outrage, and of journalistic treatments like So You’ve Been Publicly S...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - November 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: guest blogger Media Morality Technology Source Type: blogs

Conference on Drug Pricing Injects New Statistics Into Debate, Few New Insights (Part 1 of 2)
The price of medications has become a leading social issue, distorting economies around the world and providing easy talking points to politicians of all parties (not that they know how to solve the problem). Last week I attended a conference on the topic at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School. On one level, the increasing role that drugs play in health care is salutary. Wouldn’t you rather swallow a pill than go in for surgery, with the attendant risks of anesthesia, postoperative pain opiates, and exposure to the increasingly scary bacteria that lurk in h...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - November 8, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: Healthcare Reform Medical Economics Personalized Medicine Precision Medicine Drug Pricing Healthcare Costs Medication Pricing Source Type: blogs

Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali
By BISHAL GYAWALI MD Me-too deja vu I read the report of a phase 3 RCT of a “new” breast cancer drug but I had the feeling that I had already read this before. Later I realized that this was indeed a new trial of a new drug, but that I had read a very similar report of a very similar drug with very similar results and conclusions. This new drug is a PARP inhibitor called talazoparib and the deja vu was related to another PARP inhibitor drug called olaparib tested in the same patient population of advanced breast cancer patients with a BRCA mutation. The control arms were the same: physician ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - November 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Drug Discovery Pharmaceuticals Bishal Gyawali Cancer immunotherapy Oncology Source Type: blogs

myLAB Box STI at-home Test Kits. Interview with Lora Ivanova, Co-Founder and CEO at myLAB Box
myLAB Box, a healthcare company based in California, has developed and pioneered an at-home sexually transmitted disease (STD) testing service. With the number of STDs rising, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 20 million new STDs occur annually in the US, and half of these are in people aged 15 to 24. STDs are often symptomless, but can have significant consequences. For instance, an estimated 24,000 women become infertile every year because of undiagnosed STDs. An estimated 80% of sexually active people will have a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection at some point in their lives, and HP...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

We All Have Scars: Let Go of your Childhood ’s pain
You're reading We All Have Scars: Let Go of your Childhood’s pain, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Between the moment we are born, to the moment we reach adulthood, many of us experience incredible, profound pain. Some of us have been sexually, physically, or psychologically abused — and then left to pick up the pieces on our own. In the most vulnerable and sensitive stage of our lives, we’ve been exposed to the deep flaws of those around us. And with that, our deep innocence and...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Samy Felice Tags: blogging featured happiness philosophy psychology relationships self confidence mindset psychology childhood trauma Source Type: blogs

November is National Family Caregivers Month
November is National Family Caregivers Month, honoring all those who care for loved ones with physical and mental health issues. Here are some statistics for caregivers: There are more than 65 million people in the US alone who spend an average of 20 hours a week caring for a loved one.1.4 million children ages 8 to 18 provide care for an adult relative.Approximately 66% of family caregivers are women. 14% of family caregivers care for a special needs child with an estimated 16.8 million caring for special needs children under 18 years old. Stress of family caregi...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - November 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns caregiving facts and figures. Source Type: blogs