Updating ethnic contrasts in deaths involving the coronavirus (COVID-19), England and Wales: deaths occurring 2 March to 28 July 2020
This report confirms that when adjusting for age, rates of death involving Covid-19 remain greater for most ethnic minority groups, and most notably so for people of Black African, Black Caribbean, Bangladeshi and Pakistani ethnic background. The statistical modelling shows that a large proportion of the difference in the risk of Covid-19 mortality between ethnic groups can be explained by demographic, geographical and socioeconomic factors. It also found that although specific pre-existing conditions place people at greater risk of Covid-19 mortality generally, it does not explain the remaining ethnic background differenc...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 19, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 19th 2020
In conclusion, we found that regardless of the presence of multimorbidity, engaging in a healthier lifestyle was associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women; however, not all lifestyle risk factors equally correlated with life expectancy, with smoking being significantly worse than others. A Hydrogel Scaffold to Encourage Peripheral Nerve Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/10/a-hydrogel-scaffold-to-encourage-peripheral-nerve-regeneration/ The nervous system of mammals is poorly regenerative at best. The use of implantable scaffold materials is one of the...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 18, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Why p values can ’ t tell you what you need to know and what to do about it
Conclusions in the 2017 paper).  If you were willing to assume a 50:50 prior chance of there being a real effect the p = 0.005 would correspond to FPR50 = 0.034, which sounds satisfactory (from Table, above, or web calculator). But if, for example, you are testing a hypothesis about teleportation or mind-reading or homeopathy then you probably wouldn’t be willing to give a prior of 50% to that being right before the experiment. If the prior  probability of there being a real effect were 0.1, rather than 0.5, the Table above shows that observation of p = 0.005 would suggest, in my example, FPR = 0.24 an...
Source: DC's goodscience - October 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: Uncategorized P values seminars statistics Source Type: blogs

From the desert to the lab: dr. berger
Today is the birthday of our co-founder Dr. Stephen A. Berger, and the perfect time to share his personal story and the history behind the creation of GIDEON. Steve has been the “beating heart” of the company’s medical knowledge and insight since its inception. GIDEON could not be what it is today and will be tomorrow, without him. Join us on Memory Lane as we celebrate Dr. Berger’s contribution to the medical community. A TALENTED YOUNG DOCTOR Steve was brought up in New York and was destined to become either a lawyer or a doctor. Thankfully for us, he fell in love with the latter field. Dr. Berger...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Events News Tech Source Type: blogs

Dr James McCune Smith
James McCune Smith (1813-1865) was the first African American to gain a degree in medicine.  He was unsuccessful in gaining a place at medical school in New York state, his home state, so his friends and benefactors paid for him to travel to Glasgow, so he gained a degree at the University of Glasgow.  That university isbuilding a new learning hub and naming it after him.As well as being a physician, he was an abolitionist, working with Frederick Douglass, and made contributions to the fields of physiology and medical statistics.  TheWikipedia page about him is a good starting point. I found t...
Source: Browsing - October 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: Black History Month medical history Source Type: blogs

Evidence for High Intensity Interval Training to be More Beneficial than Moderate Exercise in the Elderly
Researchers here report on the results five years in to a study comparing the effects of different exercise programs on mortality in older people. While the high intensity interval training group are clearly doing well in comparison to their peers, there is a cautionary tale in study design for the other two groups, in that the control individuals appear to have been inspired by their inclusion in the study to exercise more than the study participants who were assigned to the moderate intensity training group. Taken as a whole, the results nonetheless provide yet more corroborating evidence for exercise to reduce mortality...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 15, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Amiodarone – class IIIa
Amiodarone – class IIIa Amiodarone is designated as class IIIa antiarrhythmic agent in the Modernized Classification of Cardiac Antiarrhythmic Drugs [1]. This is the group of voltage dependent K+ channel blockers. It is a nonselective K+ channel blocker. Another drug in class IIIa is dronedarone, which is a related drug free of iodine atoms and hence the thyroid related adverse effects of amiodarone. Amiodarone is useful in wide range of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias and it is a so called broad spectrum antiarrhythmic agent and widely used. Amiodarone prolongs QTc, but torsades des pointes is rare, pos...
Source: Cardiophile MD - October 15, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: ECG / Electrophysiology Polysorbate and hypotension with amiodarone Source Type: blogs

The New Deal and Recovery, Part 8 (Supplement): The Brookings Report
George SelginIn assessing the New Deal's contribution to economic recovery, I've naturally tended to draw on fairly recent research. That keeps me from being accused of being out of date. But it makes me vulnerable to the charge of overlooking the testimony of experts who studied the New Deal's consequences at first hand.To that charge, I plead an emphatic Not Guilty! Those who know me will back me up when I say that I'm actually an antiquarian at heart, who'd much rather read a musty old report than any recent journal article. So I've read plenty of contemporary writings on the course of the depression and recovery, and t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 14, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

“Under the radar” – Ongoing Lassa Fever Outbreak
By Dr. Stephen A. Berger Nigeria is battling the largest recorded Lassa Fever outbreak to-date   Lassa Fever in Nigeria is a paradigm for Infectious Disease outbreaks that continue to threaten massive populations “under the radar” during the COVID-19 pandemic. As of October 3, 2020, a total of 1,112 fatal cases of COVID-19 had been reported in Nigeria. In terms of population size, the statistical likelihood of dying from this disease in Nigeria – or in Singapore – is exactly the same. But then…nobody in Singapore is dying these days from Lassa Fever.     WHAT IS LASS...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 13, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

New Research on Illegal Immigration and Crime
Alex NowrastehAndrew Forrester, Michelangelo Landgrave, and I  published a new working paper on illegal immigration and crime in Texas. Our paper is slated to appear as a  chapter in a volume published by Oxford University Press in 2021. Like ourother research on illegal immigration and crime in Texas, this working paper uses data collected by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) that records and keeps the immigration statuses of those arrested and convicted of crimes in Texas. As far as we ’ve been able to tell, and we’ve filed more than 50 state FOIA requests to confirm, Texas is th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 13, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

How Well Do You Know Yourself? Research On Self-Insight, Digested
By Emma Young “There are three things extremely hard: steel, a diamond, and to know one’s self.” – Benjamin Franklin, Poor Richard’s Almanac, 1750. Franklin was writing over 250 years ago. Surely we humans have learned strategies since then to aid self-insight — and avoid well-known pitfalls. Most of us are familiar, for example, with the better-than-average effect, the finding that most of us rank ourselves above average at everything from driving ability to desirable personality traits (even though of course we can’t all be right). So armed with this kind of knowledge,...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 13, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Feature The self Source Type: blogs

State of the nation 2020: children and young people ’s wellbeing
This report collates published evidence on the wellbeing in children and young people over the period of March to August 2020, including: statistics on the personal wellbeing of children and young people in England and the UK; a wider set of indicators on their; relationships; health; education and skills; personal finance; activities; and where they live.ReportPress release (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 13, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Mental Health Source Type: blogs

DOL ’s H-1B Wage Rule Massively Understates Wage Increases by up to 26 Percent
David J. BierThe Department of Labor ’s (DOL)new rule changes how it calculates the mandatory minimum wage —called the prevailing wage—for employers of H-1B and permanent foreign workers. DOL adopts a fundamentally flawed methodology as its basis to inflate the prevailing wage. But a bigger issue is that DOL itself failed to understand how much its methodological changes would artificially raise th e required wages. DOL estimated the wage effects of its rule using completely erroneous assumptions, and so it understates to the public the wage increases by, in many cases, as much as 26 percent.The...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 9, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus: adult social care key issues and sources
House of Commons Library -This briefing aims to provide a high-level overview of policy in relation to adult social care since the start of the coronavirus outbreak in early 2020, including the development of key UK Government guidance. It also provides information on some key issues that have been raised during the course of the outbreak including statistics on deaths in care homes, funding for adult social care, and testing for care home staff and residents.BriefingHouse of Commons Library - publications (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 9, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Library Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Social care Source Type: blogs

Advancing maternal justice on both sides of the Atlantic
Positive pregnancy and birthing experiences go beyond merely having a healthy mother and baby — so, too, does maternal justice, a term that encompasses broad goals. Affordable, timely, high-quality, equitable, and dignified care during and after pregnancy is essential for all birthing people. Maternal justice is a model of culturally sensitive care that aims to dismantle inequities in maternity care and maximize maternal health and well-being. It rests on human rights and requires us to chip away at racism entrenched in health systems. How do race and ethnicity affect pregnancy and birth? Globally, Black, indigenous,...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Isioma D. Okolo, MBChB, MRCOG, DTMH Tags: Adolescent health Health care disparities Parenting Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

New York City ’s COVID-19 outbreak from the eyes of a pulmonary and critical care team’s biostatistician
December 15, 2018.  My coworker is moving to California. She’s a statistician for a group of pulmonary and critical care physicians at our New York City hospital, and I’m a statistician who’s trying not to do too many things wrong, only three months into my first job out of school. “I think you’d be good wi th […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 7, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/katherine-hoffman" rel="tag" > Katherine Hoffman < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

Medical distillery : How to eliminate evidence based falsehoods in medical literature ?
If science is considered as a journey towards truth,.. knowledge, data, and statistics are the key companions in this infinite voyage to the dreamy destination. While hundreds & thousands of scientists do travel in this turbulent road daily, pursuing their mundane work, there are very few researchers worried about the true purpose of their journey, the quality of the road they travel, the dangerous fault lines they create. It has become a taboo topic to criticize medical science even after realizing the fact that we are compelled to follow and glorify some of the best nonsense. Dr. Jhon Loannidhis Pr...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - October 5, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized audit of medical science bioethics cleansing of medical literature Dr. Jhon Loannidhis ethics in medicine medical science distillery Source Type: blogs

Cardiologists need to keep an open mind and be capable of listening to, and learning from, the Emergency Physician
Conclusion: This represents the largest study of patients with VPR and angiographically-proven ACO. The MSC were highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of ACO in patients presenting to the ED with VPR and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome.===================================MY Comment by KEN GRAUER, MD (10/4/2020):===================================Today ’s case provides a superb example of how acute OMI can sometimes be definitively recognized even in the presence ofpacing. Unfortunately, this was not recognized by the cardiology team despite...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - October 4, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

New column and podcast up:
Last week, I wrote a column on one of the most controversial clinical trials in cardiology. The EXCEL trial pitted stents vs bypass surgery for people who have left main coronary artery disease. The trial has been beset with controversy. The three areas of debate surround the definition of MI (or heart attack), the increased risk of death in the stent arm, and selective publishing of data. Here is the column: Latest EXCEL MI Analysis Settles Nothing; Flaws Remain You should study this one because it hints at how precarious medical evidence can be. On the This Week in Cardiology podcast, I discuss EXCE...
Source: Dr John M - October 3, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Postal Banking: An Idea Whose Time Has Returned?
Lawrence H. WhiteOn September 17th, Senators Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Bernie Sanders (D-VT) went onFacebook Live to announce their introduction of the Postal Banking Act, a bill that would have the US Postal Service provide a " public option " in some retail banking services. Postal banking has been proposed many times in recent years as a progressive reform. The Joe Biden –Bernie Sanders " Unity Task Force Recommendations "document (p. 74) endorsed the idea in August as a way of " ensuring equitable access to banking and financial services. " Senator Gillibrand introduced a similar...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 1, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

Big Government, Big Business, Big Protectionism
Scott LincicomeIt is commonly assumed on the left and (increasingly) the right that free markets boost —and that government regulation checks—the growth and market power of large corporations. Liberalized international trade and investment policies, in particular, are often criticized by market skeptics as a tool that Big Business uses to entrench its dominant position to the detriment of workers and potential competitors. Libertarians and other free market advocates, of course, believe much the opposite: that free market competition fuels “creative destruction”—i.e., the economically‐...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 30, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Scott Lincicome Source Type: blogs

Obstacles to Value-Based Care Can Be Overcome
By KEN TERRY (This is the seventh in a series of excerpts from Terry’s new book, Physician-Led Healthcare Reform: a New Approach to Medicare for All, published by the American Association for Physician Leadership.) Even in a healthcare system dedicated to value-based care, there would be a few major barriers to the kinds of waste reduction described in this book. First, there’s the ethical challenge: Physicians might be tempted to skimp on care when they have financial incentives to cut costs. Second, there’s a practical obstacle: Clinical guidelines are not infallible, and large parts of medicine h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Value-Based Care healthcare reform Ken Terry Source Type: blogs

The Future of Emergency Medicine: 6 Technologies That Make Patients The Point-of-Care
Car crashes, home injuries, fires, natural disasters: every minute – if not every second – spent without treatment in such cases of medical emergencies and high-risk patients could reduce the chance of survival or proper recovery. In fact, when deprived of oxygen, permanent brain damage begins after only 4 minutes, while death can occur as soon as 4-6 minutes later. In this race against time, digital health technologies that turn patients into the point-of-care could prove to be game-changers for first responders and emergency units.  From driverless cars through medical drones to artificial intelligence (...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 29, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Healthcare Policy Portable Medical Diagnostics Robotics Telemedicine & Smartphones digital health Health 2.0 Innovation technology emergency emergency medicin Source Type: blogs

Trump and Biden Tax Policies
Chris EdwardsPenn-Wharton ’s budget teamhas produced new estimates of the effects of Joe Biden ’s fiscal proposals. This post looks at PW’s tax distribution estimates.PW presents estimated effective tax rates by income group, including individual income taxes, corporate income taxes, and payroll taxes. The estimates assume that corporate taxes land partly on capital income and partly on labor income. Effective tax rates are taxes paid by an income group divided by the group ’s income.Joe Biden ’scampaign site says, “President Trump spent the remainder of his first year in office fighting...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 28, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

40 Something Man with Palpitations and Grouped Beating: Is it Wenckebach?
FromDr.Smith:A 40 something male complained of palpitations.  See the ECG below and how Ken Grauer dissects this grouped beating.===================================MY Comment by KEN GRAUER, MD (9/27/2020):===================================The 12-lead ECG and accompanying long lead II rhythm shown in Figure-1 was obtained from a 40-something year old man who was found to have a fairly slow and irregular heart rate. He was hemodynamically stable at the time this tracing was done. Imagine this is the only history available.What is the rhythm? Is this Wenckebach?Clinically  —...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - September 25, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: ECG Interpretation Source Type: blogs

America ’s Foreign Share Is In The Bottom Third Among Richest Nations
David J. BierAmerica ’simmigrant share of its  population stagnated under President Trump for multiple years for the first time since the Great Recession—possibly for the first time during an economic boom since the 1960s. This fact should be assessed against a backdrop in which the United States already had one of the most restrictive migration polic ies in the world.New statistics from the United Nations for 2019confirm that the United States ranks in the bottom third among wealthy countries both in terms of foreign ‐​born share of its population and per‐​capita increase in foreign‐...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 25, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David J. Bier Source Type: blogs

Obstetrics and Gynecology Needs Palliative Care
by Nathan Riley " Can you all, please, just leave us alone? "One particular experience with the death of a newborn stands out in my mind. Moments after birth the baby was breathless, and the neonatology team could not intubate. All of the kingdom ’s pediatric surgeons and other specialists rushed to labor and delivery to no avail. The baby was born with a four centimeter gap in his trachea, an irreparable condition. The mother sat there, holding her dying baby as he took his last breaths while physicians, nurses, and residents were busy as usual. Click-clacking away on computers. Adjusting blankets. As...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - September 24, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: gynecology obstetrics palliative care pediatrics prenatal riley Source Type: blogs

The Breonna Taylor decision
I am very happy to say that I am not a lawyer. I note that as far as I have been able to find on the informational sites I frequent -- be they corporate media, magazines and blogs, whatever -- I have not found any lawyers who have yet stepped forward to offer a critique of the decision not to prosecute police officers in the death of Breonna Taylor. Paul Campos, for example,has chosen to write about something else today -- agreed, probably something even more important -- but still.We may yet see some legal eagle commentary, but in the meantime I'm going to speculate that they don't want to speak the truth and be taken the...
Source: Stayin' Alive - September 24, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Politics, Elections, and the Post-Truth Era
Let’s talk politics and lies. Why are they so rampant today? In today’s Psych Central Podcast, our host speaks with author and communications expert Tim Ward who explains why the truth matters so much — especially regarding our elected officials. They discuss our cognitive biases, like the “halo” and “anchoring” effects, that can cause us to turn a blind eye and believe the lies we hear. Learn about the different types of lies politicians tell and learn how can we avoid being the victims of fake news.  Click on the player above to listen now!   We want to hear from you! P...
Source: World of Psychology - September 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Gabe Howard Tags: Ethics & Morality Minding the Media The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Study: Elders today are in significantly better shape –physically and cognitively–than three decades ago
Conclusions: The results of this study provide strong evidence that cognitive performance is better in more recent cohorts of older people compared to their counterparts measured 28 years earlier. (Editor’s Note: The cognitive performance measures used underlie traits such as memory, attention, processing speed and problem solving.) The Study in Context: Brain scans show lower accumulation of tau and amyloid pathology among cognitive “super-agers” Reminder: A brain-friendly lifestyle is the best approach to delay cognitive decline and dementia Cognitive training, diet, exercise, and vascular management ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 23, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness cognitive decline cognitive performance tests cognitive-abilities cognitive-performance Cognitive-tests elders lower cognitive abilities older Source Type: blogs

Shedding Light on Sepsis
Sepsis is the body’s overactive and extreme response to an infection. It’s unpredictable, can progress rapidly, and affects more than 1.7 million people in the United States each year. Without prompt treatment, it can lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. NIGMS supports state-of-the-art sepsis research, including the development of rapid diagnostics and new therapeutics. September is Sepsis Awareness Month, and we’re highlighting a few resources that offer more information about this condition. Our infographic provides details at a glance on basic statistics and the future of sepsis research...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Injury and Illness Bacteria Infectious Diseases Sepsis Systems Biology Viruses Source Type: blogs

The Most Reliable COVID-19 Online Resources: Your Ultimate Guide
In the era of fake news, mask naysayers and, dare we say, covidiots, relevant news often gets lost under the rubble of conspiracy theories and what not. 2020 already feels like a lucid fever dream as it is and we would be better off being well-informed by trustworthy sources of information. However, even leading authorities are lagging behind in this respect. The WHO only recently stopped releasing its daily PDF COVID reports in favour of an online dashboard. On the other hand, Johns Hopkins put one together in 3 days in January. It took the WHO 8 months since the first outbreak to have its own. The health authority als...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 17, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Digital Health Research Healthcare Policy Security & Privacy testing online resources digital technology applications covid covid19 Good Judgement Project WHO sewage data vaccine who dashboard worldometer Johns Hopkins JHU Source Type: blogs

The garden moths of 2020
With Covid-19 lockdown hitting some people very hard, it seems churlish to complain about its effects on me. It felt hard – no pub visits with friends, no limited time outdoors and so not much chance for nature photography and long walks with the dog, no rehearsing with C5 The Band nor the bigMouth choir, no panto to plan for etc, like I say, relatively easy, but still hard. Dark Crimson Underwing As such, I was really hoping for an exciting moth year to keep me sane, and I have had some crackers, but numbers and diversity seem to have been low…all I’ve really seen for the last couple of weeks are quite ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - September 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Lepidoptera Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

The new garden moths of 2020
With Covid-19 lockdown hitting some people very hard, it seems churlish to complain about its effects on me. It felt hard – no pub visits with friends, no limited time outdoors and so not much chance for nature photography and long walks with the dog, no rehearsing with C5 The Band nor the bigMouth choir, no panto to plan for etc, like I say, relatively easy, but still hard. Dark Crimson Underwing As such, I was really hoping for an exciting moth year to keep me sane, and I have had some crackers, but numbers and diversity seem to have been low…all I’ve really seen for the last couple of weeks are quite ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - September 14, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Lepidoptera Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Stress & Community | Acronyms | Media Tips | TAPP 77
Discussions that matter. In our private space, we can have the vulnerability needed for authentic, deep discussions. Discussions not limited to a sentence or two at a time.No ads. No spam. No fake news. No thoughtless re-shares. Just plain old connection with others who do what you do!Privacy. The A&P Professor community has the connectivity of Facebook and Twitter, but the security of a private membership site. None of your information can be shared outside the community, so you can share what you like without it being re-shared to the world. Like your dean, for instance. In our community, you can share your frustrati...
Source: The A and P Professor - September 13, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Dispatch from the Land of the Eighty-five Percent
So. I suppose we have some catching up to do.Schuyler and I are in Virginia. Where we live.Well, that's partially true. Schuyler lives here half the time, splitting her time from month to month with her mother, who now lives in Michigan. It's not complicated on paper, as divorce rarely is, but in practice it's probably going to be fraught with unforeseen peril, as divorce almost always is. I have Schuyler here with me for one more week, and then my month without her begins. I think we can all predict how well I'll take that, but there it is. The price of change. Perhaps it's the fee for exchanging the predictable ennui of ...
Source: Schuyler's Monster: The Blog - September 12, 2020 Category: Disability Authors: Rob Source Type: blogs

The Medical AI Floodgates Open, at a Cost of $1000 per Patient
By LUKE OAKDEN-RAYNER In surprising news this week, CMS (the Centres for Medicare & Medicaid Services) in the USA approved the first reimbursement for AI augmented medical care. Viz.ai have a deep learning model which identifies signs of stroke on brain CT and automatically contacts the neurointerventionalist, bypassing the first read normally performed by a general radiologist. From their press material: Viz.ai demonstrated to CMS a significant reduction in time to treatment and improved clinical outcomes in patients suffering a stroke. Viz LVO has been granted a New Technology Add on Payment of up to&nb...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Health Tech AI Luke Oakden-Rayner Reimbursement Source Type: blogs

When We Follow Orders To Hurt Someone, We Feel Their Pain Less Than If We Hurt Them Freely
By Emma Young It’s one of the best-known and also controversial experiments in psychology: in 1963, Stanley Milgram reported that, when instructed, many people are surprisingly willing to deliver apparently dangerous electrical shocks to others. For some researchers, this — along with follow-up studies by the team — reveals how acting “under orders” can undermine our moral compass. Milgram’s interpretation of his findings, and the methods, too, have been criticised. However, the results have largely been replicated in experiments run in the US, Poland, and elsewhere. And in 20...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 7, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Morality Perception Social Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 7th 2020
In conclusion, using a large cohort with rich health and DNA methylation data, we provide the first comparison of six major epigenetic measures of biological ageing with respect to their associations with leading causes of mortality and disease burden. DNAm GrimAge outperformed the other measures in its associations with disease data and associated clinical traits. This may suggest that predicting mortality, rather than age or homeostatic characteristics, may be more informative for common disease prediction. Thus, proteomic-based methods (as utilised by DNAm GrimAge) using large, physiologically diverse protein sets for p...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Federal Aid Creates Central ‐​Planning Power
This study argues that Congress should repeal all federal aid-to-state programs for many reasons, including that aid comes with costly strings attached that destroy local democracy.Richard Epstein and Mario Loyolanoted about aid programs: “When Americans vote in state and local elections, they think they are voting on state and local policies. But often they are just deciding which local officials get to implement the dictates of distant and insulated federal bureaucrats, whom even Congress can’t control.”I came across a table (p. 82) in New Jersey ’s budget that lists the $15 billion the state rece...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 4, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

How COVID-related stress can disrupt your brain circuits and nine tips to prevent it
COVID-19 has touched each of us somehow. Many now recognize that caring for our mental health is as essential as addressing the virus if we are to emerge stronger, more connected and more resilient. The Ancient Greeks said “know thyself” to live soundly, but it is only now that we have the technology to start understanding how our individual experiences arise from the complexity of our brains. Gaining understanding of our brain responses offers a window into how mental health symptoms arise, and allows us to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic on mental health. At the Stanford Center for Precision Men...
Source: SharpBrains - September 3, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: World Economic Forum Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness accelerated accelerated learning Anhedonia anxiety disorder biotypes brain circuits Brain-Plasticity chronic-stress clinical depression Cognitive Fog cognitiv Source Type: blogs

Longevity-Risk-Adjusted Global Age, by Country
People tend to live longer in some parts of the world than in others, the result of a cultural distribution of lifestyle choices such as smoking and becoming overweight, environmental exposure to, say, particulate air pollution and infectious disease, and access to medical technology. One can use the worldwide statistics of life expectancy to produce a "longevity-risk-adjusted global age" to compare with chronological age: longevity-risk-adjusted global age is higher than chronological age in countries with a higher late-life mortality rate and shorter life expectancy. What happens at the population level says ve...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 3, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Announcing The COVID-19 Symptom Data Challenge
By FARZAD MOSTASHARI In Partnership with Resolve to Save Lives, Carnegie Mellon University, and University of Maryland, Catalyst @ Health 2.0 is excited to announce the launch of The COVID-19 Symptom Data Challenge. The COVID-19 Symptom Data Challenge is looking for novel analytic approaches that use COVID-19 Symptom Survey data to enable earlier detection and improved situational awareness of the outbreak by public health and the public.  How the Challenge Works: In Phase I, innovators submit a white paper (“digital poster”) summarizing the approach, methods, analysis, findings, relevant figures...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: COVID-19 Data Health Policy challenge Facebook Source Type: blogs

The AMA Opioid Task Force 2020 Report Should Come as No Surprise to Those Who Follow the Data
Jeffrey A. SingerThe American Medical Association recently released itOpioid Task Force 2020 Report. The Task Force found there was a 37.1 percent decrease in opioid prescriptions between 2014 and 2019; a 64.4 percent increase in the use of state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) in the last year (739 million queries in 2019); and hundreds of thousands of physicians accessing continuing medical education courses on opioid prescribing (now mandatory in some states). However, the report states:Despite these efforts, illicitly manufactured fentanyl, fentanyl analogues and stimulants (e.g. methamphetamine...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 31, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

The hardly hidden costs
Chronic/persistent pain management is not sexy. No-one gets a magic cure. Lives are not saved – at least not in a way that mortality statistics show. Chronic pain management is under-funded. And now: buried in a list of other proposed service cuts in the local health board’s plan to save millions of dollars, is a proposal to “save” $650,000 from the pain clinic. You’ll note also reductions in community services, GP support for vulnerable, and healthy lifestyles programmes. https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/122558278/hundreds-of-staff-nurses-and-services-may-be-axed-at-canterbury-d...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - August 30, 2020 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Interdisciplinary teams News Pain conditions Research Science in practice Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The ultimate outrage
 Okay, probably not. Nobody knows what the ultimate outrage is, we've fallen into a black hole of outrages and there is no bottom. But for the Commissioner of the FDA to stand up before TV cameras in the White House and tell a blatant lie because his God Emperor ordered him to is such a grotesque perversion of public responsibility, professional ethics and basic morality that I don't see any room underneath him.Specifically,James Hahn told the world that 35 out of 100 people who would otherwise die from Covid-19 would survive if given convalescent plasma. That was a lie, which Hahn repeated to the world on orders, bec...
Source: Stayin' Alive - August 25, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

What I Wish I Had Said about Mental Health and Suicide
Thirty years ago, the atmosphere surrounding mental health and suicide was very different than it is today, especially in some areas. Even today, where you live could affect the information, help, and reactions you receive. Since that time, I’ve learned a better way to respond when a loved one struggles. If someone you care about changes in some way, something may be wrong. The difficulties go beyond available support. According to statistics, most people who ultimately end their lives are dealing with a mental illness or behavior disorder — whether they realize it or not — though this is not always true....
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jan McDaniel Tags: Depression Personal Suicide Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Is Police (CIT) Crises Training Needed?
A mentally ill man is standing in your yard yelling at the mailbox. What do you do? You call the police, right? Not so fast, according to today’s guest, mental health advocate Gabriel Nathan. There is a better way to do things. Gabriel believes that rather than training police officers to de-escalate people in mental health crises, the police shouldn’t be called at all in these situations. Our host Gabe has a different take on things, as he is an advocate for training police officers in crisis intervention practices. Join us for an enlightening and nuanced conversation regarding the role of the police when it ...
Source: World of Psychology - August 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: General Interview Not Crazy Podcast Policy and Advocacy Source Type: blogs

3 Things Medical Events Could Learn From Video Game Streamers
500 000, 500 000 and 100 000: these are the numbers of attendees to recent live events that lasted for hours, even during the ongoing pandemic. No, these aren’t the statistics for the thousands of beachgoers flocking en masse and risking contracting the virus. Rather, these numbers refer to those who tuned in worldwide to watch video game livestreams of Guy Beahm (Dr Disrespect), Michael Grzesiek (Shroud) and Tyler Blevins (Ninja), respectively. These individuals, known as streamers, gathered those numbers remotely in less than one day for only one livestream event. The numbers don’t end with viewers either ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - August 25, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Medical Education conference technology medical event video games gaming streaming Source Type: blogs

Industry Mix in L.A. Area Helps Explain Recent Record Unemployment Rates
The Los Angeles Combined Statistical Area reported more than 270,000 job cuts between March and early August. Considering which industries have cut jobs may provide a window into the area's unique labor market and help explain how the area currently has among the highest unemployment in the nation. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - August 24, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Jason Michael Ward Source Type: blogs