Questioning the Link Between Sports-Related Concussions and CTE
This article is submitted on behalf of 26 brain injury experts in neurosurgery, neuropsychology, neurology, neuropathology and public policy at 23 universities and hospitals in the United States and Canada. The additional signatories are: Lili-Naz Hazrati, associate professor of neuropathology at the University of Toronto; clinician-scientist at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto. John Leddy, professor of clinical orthopaedics and rehabilitation sciences at the SUNY Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Barry Willer, professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the SUNY Buffalo Jacobs School of Me...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Boston University CTE football Sports-Related Concussions Source Type: blogs

Am I Depressed or Just Lazy?
I’m often asked, “Am I depressed or just lazy?” It’s a legitimate question, in that many people who suffer from clinical depression will initially feel like they’re just being lazy, not wanting to get off the couch or out of bed. On the surface, the two — laziness and depression — appear to share some passing similarities. But dig just a little deeper and you can quickly determine whether you’re depressed, or are just being lazy. Depression is a serious, debilitating mental illness that impacts millions of Americans each year. It not only causes distress for the person suffe...
Source: World of Psychology - February 12, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Depression Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Psychology Self-Help am i depressed am i depressed or lazy Chronic Laziness Clinical Depression depression quiz Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 318
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 318th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week January is National Slavery and Human Trafficking month. Listen to this insightful podca...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 11, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

The Fusobacterium story as of 2018 – a very long post
This study followed a previous study that suggested an incidence of 1 per million.  However, in this study they estimated 14.4 per million in the 15-30 age group.  This rare disease now did not seem quite so rare. This information caused me to think about the risk to adolescents and young adults from Fusobacterium pharyngitis.  Much thought led to this perspective published in the Annals of Internal Medicine: Expand the Pharyngitis Paradigm for Adolescents and Young Adults Robert M. Centor, MD Current guidelines and review articles emphasize that clinicians should consider group A !-hemolytic streptococ...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - February 11, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 12th 2018
In conclusion, most experimental data on immune changes with aging show a decline in many immune parameters when compared to young healthy subjects. The bulk of these changes is termed immunosenescence. Immunosenescence has been considered for some time as detrimental because it often leads to subclinical accumulation of pro-inflammatory factors and inflammaging. Together, immunosenescence and inflammaging are suggested to stand at the origin of most of the diseases of the elderly, such as infections, cancer, autoimmune disorders, and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, an increasing number of gerontologists have chall...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 11, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Critical Issues in PCI : ” Left ” main cries foul . . . calls for “ Right ” thinkers ?
Conquering  left main disease is considered as crowning glory for the Interventional cardiologists. For over three decades , CABG has remained the undisputed modality which is being challenged  today. Fortunately, the Incidence of true isolated  left main disease is  low .(If Medina bifurcation subset is excluded)   With growing expertise , advanced hardware and Imaging ( like a 360 degree OCT fly through view ) one can virtually sit inside the left main and complete a PCI . Still , coronary care is much . . . much  . . . more than a technology in transit ! Most importantly, these c...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - February 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: CABG Indications cardiac surgery Cardiology -Interventional -PCI cardiology -Therapeutics Cardiology -unresolved questions cardiology wisdom cath lab tips and tricks best option for left main disease left main pci or cabg precombat synta Source Type: blogs

How to Read Like a CEO Without Breaking a Sweat: 47 Books a Year
You're reading How to Read Like a CEO Without Breaking a Sweat: 47 Books a Year, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.   "I read a book one day and my whole life changed" - Orhan Pamuk Yes, it's true. You can a read like a CEO without breaking a sweat. And I know this because I do it. And it's easy. I didn't believe it at first but a year and 47 books later, it became true. Let me first tell you that an average CEO reads about 40 books a year while an average person reads less than 10 books a ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Bruno Tags: featured productivity tips reading how to read more pickthebrain self improvement success success traits Source Type: blogs

MyoKardia Develops Machine Learning Algorithm For Prediction of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Using Wearable Biosensor: Interview
In this study, we collected PPG pulse wave traces from patients with oHCM and healthy volunteers. Using automated analyses, we extracted details about the shape and pattern of the tracings and applied machine learning to identify differences in these features between oHCM patients and healthy volunteers. We found that a sensitive and specific signature of arterial blood flow in oHCM could be identified with the combination of a wrist-worn PPG biosensor and machine learning algorithms.   Medgadget: Have you compared the results of the biosensor created by Wavelet Health with results collected from another similar PPG d...
Source: Medgadget - February 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Cardiology Exclusive Source Type: blogs

Are snowdrops really appearing earlier these days?
At this time of year, give or take a week or two, we expect to see snowdrops in flower. They are purportedly one of the first signs of spring and a welcome sight, despite the imminent snowstorm we’re supposed to be facing in the coming days. Now, earlier varieties of Galanthus nivalis aside, are snowdrops really vernalising sooner rather than later? Here’s a quote from the experts at Kew Gardens, London, who keep an eye on such things and study phenology (year to year changes in seasonal events): Recent signs of change include a shift in the average flowering date of the common snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis). In ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - February 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Responding to John R. Lott Jr. on Illegal Immigrant Criminality
John R. Lott Jr.responded to mycriticism of hisworking paper where he claims to have found that illegal immigrants are more likely to be admitted to Arizona state adult correctional facilities than other Arizona residents.   Lott did not respond to my main criticism directly, which is that the Arizona Department of Corrections (ADC) data do not allow him to identify illegal immigrants with nearly as much precision as he claimed in his paper. Praising the supposedly precise ADC data, Lott claimed that the “huge advantage of using the data that will be presented here from the Arizona Department of Corrections...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 6, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

A More Subtle Demonstration that Telomere Length is Not a Good Measure of Aging
Researchers here find a disconnect between DNA methylation patterns shown to correlate well with age and processes associated with longer telomere length. Telomeres are caps of repeated DNA at the ends of chromosomes that shorten with each cell division, a part of the mechanism limiting the life span of somatic cells. Their average length tends to shorten with age when considered across large populations in a statistical analysis, but this is a tenuous relationship that has also failed to appear in some smaller studies. Here, it seems that older ages as assessed by DNA methylation can correlate with differences in telomera...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Fatal Flaw in John R. Lott Jr. ’s Study on Illegal Immigrant Crime in Arizona
Economist John R. Lott Jr. of theCrime Prevention Research Center released aworking paper in which he purports to find that illegal immigrants in Arizona from 1985 through 2017 have a far higher prison admissions rate than U.S. citizens. Media fromFox News to theWashington Times and theArizona Republic have reported on Lott ’s claims while Attorney GeneralJeff Sessions and RepresentativePaul Gosar (R-AZ) have echoed them from their positions of authority. However, Lott made a small but fatal error that undermines his finding.  Lott wrote his paper based on a dataset he obtained from the Arizona Department of Cor...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 5, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Nursing Trends -- Part 1 of 2
In the November and December 2017 issues ofAmerican Nurse Today, theANA revealed the results ofa survey of almost 6,000 nurses. This nursing survey explored the state of the profession in relation to trends in nursing salaries, the makeup of the nurse clinician workforce, and workplace culture and environment. Let's explore some of what they found -- we'll explore more in next week's blog post.The ANA frequently utilizes significant data to analyze our profession, so diving into their findings can be quite elucidating.  If you're not a member of the American Nurses Association (ANA) and don't have a login to their web...
Source: Digital Doorway - February 5, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career careers nurse nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Nursing Trends and the ANA -- Part 1 of 2
In the November and December 2017 issues ofAmerican Nurse Today, theANA revealed the results ofa survey of almost 6,000 nurses. This nursing survey explored the state of the profession in relation to trends in nursing salaries, the makeup of the nurse clinician workforce, and workplace culture and environment. Let's explore some of what they found -- we'll explore more in next week's blog post.The ANA frequently utilizes significant data to analyze our profession, so diving into their findings can be quite elucidating.  If you're not a member of the American Nurses Association (ANA) and don't have a login to their web...
Source: Digital Doorway - February 5, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career careers nurse nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

FDA Releases Guidance on IND Sponsors
In December, the FDA issued a guidance describing best practices and procedures for timely, transparent, and effective communications between investigational new drug application (IND) sponsors and FDA at critical junctures in drug development, which may facilitate earlier availability of safe and effective drugs. The guidance applies to communications between IND sponsors and FDA during the IND phase of drug development, including biosimilar biological product development (BPD). Guidance Communications between FDA and industry are often opportunities to share information on clinical trials and for the agency to provide ...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 5, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Super Bowl Babies: More Boy Births 9 Months Later?
Ah, Super Bowl Sunday. One of the unofficial national holidays of Americans, and second only to Thanksgiving in the amount of food and drink consumed. The annual championship game of the National Football League in the U.S. is often the most-watched television event of the year. During any big event — whether man-made or natural — researchers often find surprising trends in birth rates. When you follow the data, all sorts of interesting things can be discovered. Let’s find out how Super Bowl Sunday influences birth rates in America. Let’s face it. The Super Bowl has become one of those annual pasti...
Source: World of Psychology - February 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Family General Psychology Research Sports baby boys Birth Rate boy births male-to-female ratio more boys born Pregnancy super bowl babies Source Type: blogs

Do You Want to Stay Happy Together?
When couples come to therapy, it is because something has gone wrong in their relationship. While the problems they bring run the gamut, there is one thing that is almost always a common denominator. When asked how they met they get this far-away look — usually with a sigh — and then tell the tale of how they fell in love. During the telling, they are transported back to a happier time. As they reveal their dance of romance, their bodies soften and breathing changes. For these few moments they have put down their weapons, and it is not unusual even with the most combative couples for a slight smile to come thro...
Source: World of Psychology - February 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Daniel Tomasulo, Ph.D. Tags: Books Communication Marriage and Divorce Proof Positive Relationships Self-Help Conflict Resolution Couples Counseling Intimacy Marriage And Family Therapist Source Type: blogs

Anti-Hiring Conspiracy Between UNC and Duke Medical Faculty
Former Duke University Radiologist Danielle Seaman, MD, has filed a federal anti-trust claim that Duke and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) agreed to not hire medical staff from each other ’s clinical institution. UNC and Duke administrators deny that there was ever a secret agreement to not poach doctors from one another. However, in 2015, after three years of pursuing a position in UNC ’s cardiothoracic imaging division, she was denied on the basis of the hiring pact. “I agree that you would be a great fit for our cardiothoracic imaging division, “said Paul Molina, MD, UNC&rsq...
Source: radRounds - February 3, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Schizophrenia Prevalence: Fear-Mongering, Fake News & the NIMH
It’s odd what upsets some people. Take E. Fuller Torrey and Elizabeth Sinclair’s recent take on a change in the way a single number — the 12-month prevalence rate of schizophrenia — is displayed on the National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH) website. This esoteric number has little impact in most people’s lives. If you live with schizophrenia or know someone who does, they most likely don’t give a hoot about it. Like most people, they probably don’t even know what it means. But these two authors do care, suggesting the number was reduced due to a hypothesized renewed foc...
Source: World of Psychology - February 1, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology Research E Fuller Torrey incidence rates of schizophrenia Prevalence Rates prevalence rates of schizophrenia schizophrenia prevalence Treatment Advocacy Center Source Type: blogs

Masimo SedLine for Improved Brain Monitoring Under Anesthesia FDA Cleared
Masimo won FDA clearance for its Next Generation SedLine brain function monitoring, a system for assessing the brain while under anesthesia. Next Generation SedLine relies on four EEG (electroencephalography) leads that acquire brain signals from both sides of the brain. The new version of the offering includes an improved signal processing engine that can help anesthesiologists have a better idea of what’s going on inside the cranium. The new engine produces a newly tuned Patient State Index (PSi) the readings from which can be easily integrated into a physician’s decision making process. The product also...
Source: Medgadget - February 1, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiac Surgery Critical Care Neurology Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

When gambling might be a problem
Follow me on Twitter @Howard_Shaffer Just as we’ve finished welcoming the new year, sports fans are getting ready to celebrate the Super Bowl. This event marks the single most active gambling-related activity in the world. For most gamblers, betting on the outcome of a sporting event, lottery drawing, casino table game, or any event with an outcome determined by chance represents an entertaining recreational activity. However, for some, gambling can become an addiction. Excessive gambling recognized as an addiction Gambling disorder is now a part of the American Psychiatric Association’s latest version of its d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Howard J. Shaffer, PhD, CAS Tags: Addiction Behavioral Health Source Type: blogs

Nuance Communications Focuses on Practical Application of AI Ahead of HIMSS18
Is there a hotter buzzword than Artificial Intelligence (AI) right now? It dominated the discussion at the annual RSNA conference late last year and will undoubtedly be on full display at the upcoming HIMSS18 event next month in Las Vegas. One company, Nuance Communications, is cutting through the hype by focusing their efforts on practical applications of AI in healthcare. According to Accenture, AI in healthcare is defined as: A collection of multiple technologies enabling machines to sense, comprehend, act and learn so they can perform administrative and clinical healthcare functions. Unlike legacy technologies that are...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 31, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Colin Hung Tags: Health Care Healthcare Healthcare AI HealthCare IT Radiology Voice Assistant Technology Artificial Intelligence Imaging Workflow Source Type: blogs

“The bone-marrow niche in MDS and MGUS: implications for AML and MM.” Part 2.
Back to the Dana-Farber study that I wrote about a couple of days ago. The section titled “Therapeutic opportunities” is interesting. How to prevent progression, that is. As you can imagine, the chef’s daily special consists only of conventional treatments. For example, the authors make a reference to the Spanish study (Mateos et al) that I have repeatedly condemned here on the blog. The Spanish researchers–some with strong ties to the big pharmaceutical companies (hello???)–tested lenalidomide and dexamethasone on a group of SMM patients. The study claims to have prolonged progression-free su...
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll The bone-marrow niche in MDS and MGUS: implications for AML and MM. Dana Farber high risk myeloma SMM Source Type: blogs

Has “ high risk ” become a new disease?
As I was working on the post I published yesterday, I ran into a very interesting 2015 editorial by a Finnish professor on the issue of HIGH RISK and decided it was worth a post of its own, before I go on and finnish, I mean, finish! the bone microenvironment post.    Here’s the link: goo.gl/CWAexK Prof. Järvinen argues that “high risk” has become a disease today. That is, relatively healthy people can start seeing themselves as no longer relatively healthy. AND, he adds, “almost every treatment has inherent risks.” Who can determine the threshold for “high risk&...
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 30, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll high risk Prof. Järvinen Source Type: blogs

State Of The Economy
Bloomberg hasa good piece on the US economy under President Trump. Headline takeaway: on almost all metrics, the economy has improved or remained largely unchanged since he took office.From Q4 2016 to Q4 2017:-       GDP grew by 2.5 percent, the fastest annual increase since Q4 2015, and higher than the post-recession average of 2.2 percent.-       Real nonresidential investment increased by 6.3 percent, higher than the post-recession average of 4.8 percent and after falling in three of four quarters in 2016.-        Theunemployment r...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 30, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Pre- and post-doctoral research/programmer positions in MEG research at the Neuroscience of Language Lab in NYU Abu Dhabi (PIs Pylkk änen & Marantz)
NeLLab is hiring!Come work with us in a wonderfully diverse environment in a cosmopolitan setting!Pre- and post-doctoral research/programmer positions in MEG research at the Neuroscience of Language LabinNYU Abu Dhabi (PIsPylkk änen& Marantz)The Neuroscience of Language Lab at NYU Abu Dhabi (http://www.psych.nyu.edu/nellab/) has openings for research scientists, which could be realized either as pre-doctoralRAships or as a post-doc. One position is specifically computational: it could be realized as a pure programmer position or as research position with a significant software development component. All positions ...
Source: Talking Brains - January 30, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Your questions about rabies: answered
You’ve probably already seen the news: A 6 year old boy in Florida has died of rabies. He had handled a sick bat (some reports said he was trying to rescue the critter), and that was enough contact to transmit the virus. Once symptoms begin, rabies in almost always fatal — so the only way to prevent this from happening again is to avoid contact, and get rabies prophylaxis (a series of injections) if there’s an exposure. Is rabies common? Yes — in a way. In the U.S. there are only a handful of human cases a year (43 cases from 2000 through 2013, the most recent statistics I could find.) But ther...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/roy-benaroch" rel="tag" > Roy Benaroch, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Infectious Disease Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

RWJF Opioid Challenge: You Can Help
By CHELSEA POLANIECKI AND CHANLY PHILOGENE Opioid overdoses are the leading cause of death for Americans under 50 years old. In fact, the majority of drug overdose related deaths involve an opioid. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, deaths from prescription opioids—drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone—have more than quadrupled since 1999. The U.S. is currently experiencing an opioid epidemic, as more than 2 million Americans have become dependent on, or abused prescription pain pills and street drugs. Substance misuse is not only affecting the users but also their families...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Catalyst @ Health 2.0 Opioid Source Type: blogs

Another blow for ego-depletion theory – practice counteracts the effects of diminished willpower
By Alex Fradera Ego depletion is the notion that willpower is a fuel that gets burned away by effort, and once it burns low we lose our focus and bow to our immediate desires. However, this once dominant theory has recently come into question, thanks in part to a large-scale replication that failed to find an ego-depletion effect and a meta-analysis that argued that the size of the effect is minimal. Complicating the picture, other recent findings have provided a strong demonstration of the effect. But now researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz have released a pre-print at PsyArxiv in which they sugge...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Source Type: blogs

MedPAC ’s Repeal And Replace MIPs Campaign Will Not End Well
By KIP SULLIVAN “[T]his is tough. I don’t know how to proceed…. Lord help the staff who must bring all this together.” That was how Dr. Francis Crosson, chairman of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC), reacted to the commission’s baffling discussion at its January 11 meeting moments before it voted 14-2 to replace the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) with something called the “voluntary value program” (VVP) (pp. 167-169 of the transcript ). MedPAC’s staff must now summarize the January 11 discussion and prepare a report for inclusion in MedPAC’...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized CMS MACRA MedPAC MIPS P4P VVP Source Type: blogs

I should have done this by now...
Today marks the day of 12 years of blogging. Twelve years! During this time, I've managed to remain a mysterious pseudonym to almost everyone. Very few people know who I am.But a lot has changed since then. TheOpen Science movement, the rise of multiple platforms for critique, theReplication Crisis in social psychology, the emergence ofmethodological terrorists, data police, and destructo-critics. Assertive psychologists and statisticians with large social media presences have openly criticized flawed studies using much harsher language than I do. Using their own names. It's hard to stay relevant...Having a pseudonym now s...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 27, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

AbStats, VR & the Future of Digital Health : A Conversation with Brennan Spiegel
By JASON CHUNG Just before the holiday break, in my new capacity as the Law and Technology Editor for The Health Care Blog, I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Brennan Spiegel, the Director of Cedars-Sinai Health Services Research, about his new digital health innovations as well as his views on the medtech and data privacy landscapes. Dr. Spiegel leads an interdisciplinary team which investigates how digital health technologies such as wearable sensors, smartphone applications and virtual reality can strengthen trust among patients and doctors, improve outcomes and cut costs. Below is a transcript of selected moments o...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

MOC Survey Update
The MOC survey, sponsored by Practicing Physicians of America, continues to be completed by a wider and wider physician group across the United States and US territories. Every single state and US territory have physicians who have contributed so far, but more are still needed to improve the credibility and statistical significance of the survey. Many physicians and state medical societies have (Source: Dr. Wes)
Source: Dr. Wes - January 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Westby G. Fisher, MD Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer ’s Drug Solanezumab Fails in Phase 3 Clinical Trial
This study was the first major Alzheimer ’s clinical trial to require molecular evidence of amyloid deposition in the brain for enrollment. While the treatment did have some favorable effects, in the main measure of outcome — measured with a cognitive test called the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale —the researchers did not observe any statistically significant benefit compared with placebo.One Good Reason To Consider an Alzheimer's Clinical TrialThe authors suggest that while it is not certain that this particular strategy or drug could be effective, it is possible that eithe...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - January 25, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers clinical tiral alzheimers symptoms clinical trial news solanezumab Source Type: blogs

Brain-Computer Interface Lets Users Learn to Move Cursor in Seconds
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow severely disabled people to control wheelchairs, robotic arms, and of course computers. While much progress has been achieved toward improving the accuracy and precision of these devices, they have required long periods of tedious training for users to get acquainted with the technology. The computer has to be taught to understand each user’s unique electrical activity patterns that code for desired movement that the person wants to perform. Now a team of researchers has come up with something incredible and unexpected. They’ve come up with a way of “calibrating...
Source: Medgadget - January 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Rehab Source Type: blogs

MOC Survey Update
The MOC survey, sponsored by Practicing Physicians of America, continues to be completed by a wider and wider physician group across the United States and US territories. Every single state and US territory have physicians who have contributed so far, but more are still needed to improve the credibility and statistical significance of the survey. Many physicians and state medical societies have (Source: Dr. Wes)
Source: Dr. Wes - January 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: DrWes Source Type: blogs

A Learning EHR for a Learning Healthcare System
Can the health care system survive the adoption of electronic health records? When the HITECH act mandated the installation of EHRs in 2009, we all hoped they would propel hospitals and clinics into a 21st-century consciousness. Instead, EHRs threaten to destroy those who have adopted them: the doctors whose work environment they degrade and the hospitals that they are pushing into bankruptcy. But the revolution in artificial intelligence that’s injecting new insights into many industries could also create radically different EHRs. Here I define AI as software that, instead of dictating what a computer system should ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Healthcare AI AI EHR Artificial Intelligence EHR Virtual Assistants Learning EHR Learning Health Care System Machine Learning Source Type: blogs

The Ongoing Challenges of Schizophrenia
They are silent because the division walls are broken down in the brain, and hours when they might be understood at all begin and leave again. —Rainer Maria Rilke, “The Insane” Schizophrenia is an elusive disease, which makes it a difficult one to relate to among the general population. It is easy to sympathize with someone who is suffering from an evident physical malady, such as a broken leg, or even an invisible illness, like cancer, which generally attacks the body in ways that are not cognitive in nature. One is readily able to put oneself in that person’s place and empathize with their plight....
Source: World of Psychology - January 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Casey Clabough Tags: Communication Personal Psychology Schizophrenia Stigma Suicide Violence and Aggression Delusions Depression Empathy Hallucinations Miscommunication Mystery Nonverbal communication Paranoia Psychosis Schizoaffective Disorder Source Type: blogs

Pharma ’ s (Big) Data Problem
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD C.P. Snow, author of “The Two Cultures” Despite (some might say, because of) a raft of new biological methods, pharma R&D has struggled with its EROOM problem, the fact that the cost of successfully developing a new drug, including the cost of failures, has been relentlessly increasing, rather than decreasing, over time (EROOM is Moore spelled backwards, as in Moore’s Law, describing the rapid pace of technology improvement over time). Given the impact of technology in so many other areas, the question many are now asking is whether technology could do its thing in pharma, and ma...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized CP Snow Culture Data David Shaywitz Source Type: blogs

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/26 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft on the topic of “Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a statistic stating that roughly 117 million people have one or more chronic health conditions. One in four people has two more chronic conditions. That is so many people! It’s 2018 and there are tons of innovative technologies out there. Why aren’t we doi...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Digital Health EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Healthcare HealthCare IT Healthcare Social Media #HITsm Topics Chronic Disease Management Medicasoft Monica Stout Patient Portals Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease (Book Index)
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Mayo Clinic: Transparency, Deception, and Ice Cream
BY NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD The Mayo Clinic in Minneapolis has held the top spot on the U.S. News and World Report hospital rankings for the past two years. That’s an impressive accomplishment. But one despite the closure of community hospitals that negatively impact rural Minnesota towns. Citing staff shortages, reduced inpatient censuses and ongoing financial challenges, Mayo decided to move all inpatient services from the hospital in Albert Lea, Minnesota, including labor and delivery, to a town more than 20 miles away. In response to pleas for reconsideration, Mayo Clinic Vice President Bobby Ga...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

DC Private Schooling: A Portrait in Diversity?
Private schools are the preserves of rich, white people, and if they weren ’t around education would be more racially integrated. That’s probably the assumption many people have, and it could be what people reading about a recent Shanker Institute report on segregation in Washington, DC, might have gathered.“It’s no secret that the District’s public schools are highly segregated, with a recent analysis showing that nearly three-quarters of black students attend schools where they have virtually no white peers,” began aWashington Poststory on the Shanker analysis. “But a recent repo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 22, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

New … or rather, perhaps not so new: a “ new ” long-term follow-up study on MGUS
In conclusion…As a U.S. myeloma expert once told me, statistics are useful only to specialists who wish to compare the results of their own statistical studies. He told me that as far as patients are concerned, statistics are useless. I concur. (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cancer statistics Long-Term Follow-up of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance myeloma Source Type: blogs

Opioid addiction is an epidemic. Let ’s treat it like one.
If we want to talk about the opioid epidemic as an actual epidemic, let’s use the same terms we use for communicable disease: agent, vector/environment, host. Virulence. Transmission. Immunity. The media has done a great job of providing descriptive statistics of the epidemic. And recent oversight, both legislative and advisory, have attempted to focus on altering vector (prescriber) behavior in the wake of apparent failed attempts to reduce agent virulence. What seems to be lacking in the overall discussion though, in my opinion, is a focus on the host. That is where eradication of epidemics has generally been more ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heath-mcanally" rel="tag" > Heath McAnally, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 315
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 315th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Rob Macsweeney of Critical Care Reviews posts the 2 hour livestream of the ADRENAL...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

The new year begins
For some of you, the New Year has already started, but I’ve been in a lovely position where I’ve been on leave and haven’t yet started “work” – though the work of living is always present! It’s traditional at this time to year to review the past year and plan for the coming months, so today’s post is a few musings on both. Last year I noticed I’d been working on this blog for nearly 10 years! Astonishing really, because it was intended to be a learning experience for me during my recovery from a mTBI. It kinda grew like Topsy, and here I am 10 years down the road still ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - January 21, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Uncategorized healthcare biopsychosocial Pain pain management allied health Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 88 with Dan Davis
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Resus for dummies or resus for clever people? Dr Dan Davis and the art of ART. I was at Luna Park in Sydney last year. It is an ageing un-reconstructed theme park with rickety roller coasters, a whole bunch of noisy rides and fairground attractions. It is all very retro to the point of being almost ironically cool. That’s all wasted on the kids that love it. It has got all the classics and none of the super-stars. It is the old way of doing the theme park th...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean Advanced Resuscitation Training art Dan Davis resus for dummies Source Type: blogs

Psilocybin (from magic mushrooms) plus meditation and spiritual training leads to lasting changes in positive traits
By Emma Young “Conferences on psychedelics are popping up everywhere, like mushrooms!” said Jakobien van der Weijden, of the Psychedelic Society of the Netherlands, when I met her in Amsterdam last week. Indeed, research into the use of psychedelic (mind-altering) drugs as tools in the treatment of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and end-of-life angst, is on the increase. Psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, may help to alleviate symptoms of depression by altering brain activity in key areas involved in emotional processing, for example. Now a study in the Journal of Psychopharmacolo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Brain Mental health Personality Source Type: blogs