The Value of Living
Jeffrey Miron,Peter Van Doren, andRyan BourneDuring pandemics, what economic costs associated with regulation should society tolerate to reduce health risks? Economists usually argue that the answer should be guided by the decisions we observe in labor markets in which individuals accept additional morbidity and mortality risk in return for higher compensation. Coal miners and construction workers, for example, are paid more than others with similar skills because they face higher statistical risk of injury and death on the job. A recent estimate of the Value of a Statistical Life (VSL) is $9 million, which impli...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 20, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey Miron, Peter Van Doren, Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Conspiracy Theory Disorder: Understanding Why People Believe
Whenever something new happens — whether it’s a pandemic that grips the world, a rise in a disorder’s diagnosis, or a new technology being rolled out — people have theories. Specifically, conspiracy theories. More often than not, such theories are based upon specious links between one or more unrelated events. Rarely do conspiracy theories have any scientific backing. And when they do, it’s often a lone article or white paper published online. Or maybe just a YouTuber who “was told by my friend who works at so-and-so.” Friend-of-a-friend-of-someone-who-knows (or works there, someon...
Source: World of Psychology - April 20, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Psychology Research 5g Conspiracy Theories conspiracy theory disorder coronavirus covid19 Source Type: blogs

Knee arthroscopy: Should this common knee surgery be performed less often?
Imagine you’re walking along and suddenly experience excruciating knee pain. Though it initially seems stuck in one position, after a minute or two you can limp along home, but just barely. At your doctor’s visit, an x-ray is normal but symptoms continue for weeks. An MRI is performed and now you have an explanation: a torn meniscus. (Two menisci — rubbery cartilage pads that act as shock absorbers — separate the bottom of your knee bone from the top of your shin bone.) A month later, you’re no better despite rest, pain medicines, and physical therapy. It’s time for surgery to fix it, ri...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Injuries Osteoarthritis Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs

Sunday Sermonette: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Skin Diseases
For those who claim that the Bible is the literal and inerrant word of God, and who claim to live by the Bible, Leviticus 13 and 14 ought to pose a considerable problem. Of course nobody who makes that claim is sincere. They just skip the embarrassing parts. Noah's ark is a fun story with animals. You can build a theme park around it. These chapters, however, are just deeply weird.It's important to note that " leprosy " here does not mean the disease which has been given that name in modern times, now more properly called Hansen's Disease. None of the symptoms described here correspond to those of Hansen's diseas...
Source: Stayin' Alive - April 19, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Did Mitigation Save Two Million Lives?
Alan ReynoldsIn the April 16 White House briefing, President Trump again said, as he often has before, that “models predicted between 1.5 and 2.2 million deaths” if we had not endured the various economic shutdowns imposed by the Governors of 42 States. The severity and breadth of those statewide shutdowns was initially encouraged, and is now justified, by just one dramatic statistic. That number was the 2.2 million U.S. deaths supposedly at risk from COVID-19.The famed 2.2 million estimate first reached viral status in the March 31 White House briefing by Doctors Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx. They displayed ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 17, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

The Official Estimates of COVID-19 Deaths Are Way Too Low
By KEN TERRY While President Trump mulls whether to reopen the country again in May, and as Fox & Friends host Brian Kilmeade suggests that “only” 60,000 people will die from the coronavirus, there are some warning signs that the White House COVID-19 Task Force’s prediction of 100,000-240,000 deaths may be way too low. That isn’t surprising, considering that Administration officials said this projection depended on us doing everything right. Of course, it appears that large sections of the country have done many things wrong—whether it’s Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ re...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy COVID-19 deaths Ken Terry Pandemic Trump Source Type: blogs

There Is No Connection Between Measles Infections and Immigrants in the United States
Alex Nowrasteh andAndrew C. ForresterEarlier this week, we published a  post on how there was no relationship between the spread of notifiable diseases in the United States and immigrant populations. Prior to the COVID-19 crisis,several commentators were concerned that immigrants – especially illegal immigrants – were spreading serious diseases like measles. This is a follow up post focusing on measles specifically, which is one notifiable disease. A legitimate role of immigration policy is to limit the international spread of contagious diseases like measles. However, it’s also important t...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 17, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, Andrew C. Forrester Source Type: blogs

Neglected Diseases – Neglected Once Again
written by Dr. Stephen A. Berger For several years, the World Health Organization has been following a group of twenty-or-so Neglected Tropical Diseases. In the Developed World, these conditions are largely unknown to the general public, and even to physicians working in fields outside of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases. In only three months, the list of neglected diseases has grown to include more than 360 infectious conditions – all because of a single new viral disease called COVID-19. As of this morning, 287 cases of COVID-19 had been reported in the DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo) resulting in 23 d...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 17, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Diagnosis Epidemiology Outbreaks Source Type: blogs

Rationale for Testing Anticoagulants Against COVID-19
This article originally appeared on the Timmerman Report here. The post Rationale for Testing Anticoagulants Against COVID-19 appeared first on The Health Care Blog. (Source: The Health Care Blog)
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Patients Physicians anticoagulants cardiology coronavirus Ethan Weiss thrombosis Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Quarantine Home Office Design Tips
Ahh, home sweet…. office? For many of us, this is the new reality. But whether you have a permanent home office or just a temporary one for the COVID-19 quarantine, your work area should be a comfortable space that allows for optimal productivity. In today’s podcast, Gabe speaks with Donald M. Rattner, architect and author of My Creative Space: How to Design Your Home to Stimulate Ideas and Spark Innovation, 48 Science-based Techniques. Donald offers easy-to-apply tips for setting up a workspace with your mental health in mind. Which way should your desk face? Does it have to be neat and tidy? Join us for a g...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Creativity General Interview LifeHelper Podcast Professional The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

A brief summary of our recent work: An Exploratory Study of Accomplished Librarian-Researchers
In this study we find that that there are many paths to becoming an accomplished librarian-researcher and numerous factors are conducive to achieving this distinction. A positive research environment includes high institutional expectations; a variety of institutional supports for research; and extrinsic rewards, such as salary increases, tenure, promotion, and opportunities for advancement. We further conclude that a librarian’s research network may be an important factor in becoming an accomplished librarian-researcher. This finding is supported by both the research network analysis and responses to open-ended ques...
Source: Organization Monkey - April 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Marie Kennedy Tags: library writing Source Type: blogs

60-something with wide complex tachycardia: from where does the rhythm originate?
p.p1 {margin: 0.1px 0.0px 0.1px 0.1px; font: 9.0px Helvetica}An elderly woman with history of coronary disease presented with CP and SOB and hypotension by EMS.  EMS had attempted adenosine x 2 without success.Here is her ED ECG:Here is the ED physician's interpretation:IMPRESSIONUNCERTAIN REGULAR RHYTHM, wide complex tachycardia, likely p-waves.LEFT BUNDLE BRANCH BLOCK [120+ ms QRS DURATION, 80+ ms Q/S IN V1/V2, 85+ ms R IN I/aVL/V5/V6]Comparison Summary: LBBB and tachycardia are new.What do you think?Smith:  This is indeed a regular wide complex tachycardia.  I do not see P-waves.  Retrograde P-w...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - April 15, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

The deadly racial disparity of COVID-19
There is an old adage within the black community that says, “When White America catches a cold, Black America has pneumonia.” African American patients with COVID-19 are dying at a significantly higher rate compared to other races. These statistics are currently reported within the state of Louisiana and cities of Chicago and Milwaukee. At the […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 14, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/daniel-k-amponsah" rel="tag" > Daniel K. Amponsah, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Source Type: blogs

We Tend To See Acts We Disapprove Of As Deliberate — A Bias That Helps Explain Why Conservatives Believe In Free Will More Than Liberals
By guest blogger Jesse Singal One of the most important and durable findings in moral and political psychology is that there is a tail-wags-the-dog aspect to human morality. Most of us like to think we have carefully thought-through, coherent moral systems that guide our behaviour and judgements. In reality our behaviour and judgements often stem from gut-level impulses, and only after the fact do we build elaborate moral rationales to justify what we believe and do. A new paper in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology examines this issue through a fascinating lens: free will. Or, more specifically, vi...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 14, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Morality Political Social Source Type: blogs

COVID: Supplements, the Immune System, and Preventative Care
In the midst of a viral pandemic, with orders to “shelter at home” in effect, parents may be wondering what else can be done to protect the health of their families. Unprecedented circumstances often lead to feelings of a loss of control, which can sometimes generate a sense of fear, and even sadness. Minimizing unnecessary travel and condensing trips to the grocery store or pharmacy is a vital part of slowing the spread of illness, however, there are also ways to take care of yourself and your children that can improve the function of the innate immune system, lessen stress, and increase the chances of staying...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - April 14, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Air Quality COVID COVID-19 Immunity Vitamins & Supplements Zinc Source Type: blogs

No Relationship Between Notifiable Diseases and Immigrant Populations
Alex Nowrasteh andAndrew C. ForresterThe international spread of the SARS ‐​CoV‐​2 virus that causes the disease COVID-19 has prompted many governments to close their borders. Immigration policy plays an important role in limiting the international spread of contagious diseases.Prior to the COVID-19 crisis,several commentators were concerned that immigrants – especially illegal immigrants – were spreading serious diseases in the United States. This blog post is the first in a series to answer the question of whether immigrants spread serious notifiable diseases other than COVID-19 in the ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 13, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, Andrew C. Forrester Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 13th 2020
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The COVID-19 Data We Have May Not Be The Data We Need
Alan ReynoldsCOVID-19 statistics that are easiest for reporters to find and explain are often the ones we keep hearing about in daily news reports. A  perennial favorite is theJohn Hopkins University graphical database which is constantly updated to add up the cumulative number of “confirmed” cases, deaths and recoveries since January 21 for separate countries and the world.To switch the focus from these familiar multi ‐​month totals to what is happening now, however, I built this simple graph of daily new deaths and daily new confirmed cases. It does suggest recent flattening, though pr...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 10, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

The Risk of Too Much Air Safety Regulation —Further Thoughts
ConclusionThe FAA ’s investigation into the 737 Max crashes is ongoing and some troubling facts have already surfaced; more are certain to follow. These observations notwithstanding, the fact that the technology exists that could have saved lives and avoided injuries in the air does not imply that it would have bee n prudent to implement those safety measures. Policymakers must not be myopic in their zeal “to do something.” They must, of necessity, exercise due diligence so as not to implement costly air safety measures that drive up airfares and cause consumers to substitute high‐​risk highway travel...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 8, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Peter Van Doren, Dennis L. Weisman Source Type: blogs

Lies, Trump lies and COVID 19 statistics
(Source: in regione caecorum rex est luscus)
Source: in regione caecorum rex est luscus - April 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: blogs

Rejuvenation of Immune Function is One of the More Important Outcomes to Engineer through the Treatment of Aging
One would hope that it does not require an ongoing pandemic and related hysteria to point out that old people have poorly functioning immune systems, and thus suffer disproportionately the burden of infectious disease. But perhaps it does. The 2017-2018 seasonal influenza, a modestly more severe occurrence of something that happens every year, killed something like 60,000 people in the US alone, with little notice or comment. There is nothing so terrible that it won't be accepted - ignored, even - if it is normal. Floodgates of funding for infectious disease research and development have been opened in response to C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

The Debacle of Hydroxychloroquine and Azithromycin for COVID19
I discussed the use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for patients with COVID19 on my March 27th edition of This Week in Cardiology Podcast. This is an important topic not only because of the specifics of treating patients but also vital because it shows how easily human beings can be misled. Here is a an edited transcript of my words: A conversation I had with my Dad this week made me realize the seriousness of this matter. My Dad is a retired insurance executive with a background in electrical engineering.  He is smart, but I could not convince him that the evidence prompting people to advoc...
Source: Dr John M - April 6, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 6th 2020
This study delves into the mechanisms by which a short period of fasting can accelerate wound healing. Fasting triggers many of the same cellular stress responses, such as upregulated autophagy, as occur during the practice of calorie restriction. It isn't exactly the same, however, so it is always worth asking whether any specific biochemistry observed in either case does in fact occur in both situations. In particular, the period of refeeding following fasting appears to have beneficial effects that are distinct from those that occur while food is restricted. Multiple forms of therapeutic fasting have been repor...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 5, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Quick and Dirty Lesson about the Trade Deficit
Daniel J. IkensonThe trade balance is calculated as the difference between the value of U.S. exports and the value of U.S. imports. The United States “runs a trade deficit” when Americans purchase more goods and services from foreigners than foreigners purchase from Americans.To be more precise, the trade deficit is the amount by which the total value of purchases of U.S. consumers, businesses, and governments from foreign suppliers exceeds the total value of purchases of foreign consumers, businesses, and governments from U.S. suppliers.The trade deficit gets a  lot of negative attention. It’s ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 4, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Daniel J. Ikenson Source Type: blogs

The New Normal: Managing Anxiety During a Pandemic
Usually, each day we wake up we can predict how our day will go. We have an outlined schedule that we follow, and we adapt to adjustments throughout the day because they are often minor. We establish a routine that makes us feel safe and comfortable. Routines give us a sense of normalcy. Predictability allows us to feel safe. When these two exist together we often feel that we are in control of our lives. In the absence of routine and predictability there is fear and panic. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) defines fear and panic as follows: A marked and persistent fear that is excessive or ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Yvette Young, LPC Tags: Anxiety and Panic coronavirus COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Why is COVID-19 Less Severe in Children?
by Gertrud U. Rey The prevalence of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is steadily increasing around the world. Yet despite this unsettling fact, one statistic continues to hold true: most infected children experience mild symptoms, respond well to treatment, recover more quickly than adults, and have a better prognosis. An initial report from China showed […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - April 2, 2020 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Gertrud Rey Information ACE2 childhood infections coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic SARS-CoV-2 viral viruses Source Type: blogs

India ’s COVID Conundrum: To Lockdown or Not to Lockdown
By SOMALARAM VENKATESH, MD  In “Asterix and the Roman Agent”, Julius Caesar deploys Tortuous Convolvulus to cause internal conflict among the Indomitable Gauls. Until then, the only fights the peaceful Gaulish village witnessed were between Unhygienix, the fishmonger and Fulliautomatix, the village smith. The Gauls always stood united against the Roman army and in spite of the occasional free-for-all, would always come together at the end for a boisterous feast.  In the new millennium, India – like many other countries – has exhibited deep fault lines circumscribing hardened ideologi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy lockdown Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Using Death as Motivation to Live
 How often do you think about death? If you’re like most people, you probably try to keep it in the back corners of your mind. But according to today’s guest, Kate Manser, remembering you might die tomorrow is the best inspiration to live today. Kate asserts that when we incorporate a certain level of mortality awareness into our daily lives, it motivates us to value life so much more and to live each day with intention. We start to find joy in the small things and live in a way that makes a positive outward ripple for all of humanity. So how do we manage to think about death without falling into fear? Tune...
Source: World of Psychology - April 2, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Death & Dying General Grief and Loss Inspiration & Hope Interview LifeHelper Podcast The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Debating the Direction of Causation Between Physical Decline and Cognitive Decline in Aging
Researchers here suggest that the direction of causation between physical decline and cognitive decline is largely the opposite of the present consensus. Most of the evidence of recent decades points to physical decline, and associated lack of activity, having a negative impact the brain. Certainly there are any number of studies showing exercise to have a beneficial effect on cognitive function. Here, however, researchers propose that declines in cognitive function lead the declines in physical function in aging. Someone dies somewhere in the world every 10 seconds owing to physical inactivity - 3.2 million peopl...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Immediate Changes Needed for Physicians to Stay in Business During the Pandemic
Practices cannot survive the COVID-19 cash flow crisis By JEFF LIVINGSTON, MD Will doctors be able to keep their practices open during the worst pandemic in our lifetime? Our country needs every available doctor in the country to fight the challenges of Covid-19. Doctors working in independent practices face an immediate cash flow crisis threatening their ability to continue services. The CARES Act was signed into law on Friday, March 27, 2020. The law offers much-needed help to the acute needs of hospitals and the medical supply chain. This aid will facilitate the production of critical supplies such as...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Economics Physicians The Business of Health Care Jeff Livingston Medical Practice Pandemic private practice Source Type: blogs

Our Liberties Have Value Too
Ryan BourneWhen thinking through the wisdom of COVID-19 lockdowns and orders, commentators often compare the value of lives saved against some loss of economic output (GDP) to determine whether the measure was cost ‐​effective. But this is an apples vs. oranges comparison.The value of a statistical life is some calculation of what the average U.S. citizen is willing to pay for a reduction in their probability of dying. Suppose I ’m willing to pay $20,000 to avoid a 0.2 percent chance of death. The value of a statistical life for me is thus $20,000/0.2 percent = $10 million per statistical life...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 31, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Bipolar & Substance Abuse Disorders: A Complex Diagnosis that Demands Integrated Medical & Psychological Care
The word “bipolar” has become colloquially associated with anything that changes rapidly or is unpredictable: the weather, technology, sports teams, politics, or even a teenager’s attitude. But for roughly 46 million people worldwide, being “bipolar” is far more serious than typical unpredictability, mood swings, or temperamental behavior. And, when bipolar disorder is complicated by substance use disorder (SUD), the situation can become incredibly dangerous for the individual and those around them. Recognizing the symptoms of bipolar and the complicating factors of substance use disorder is c...
Source: World of Psychology - March 30, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marlon Rollins Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Bipolar Recovery Substance Abuse Addiction Recovery Bipolar Disorder Detox Dual Diagnosis World Bipolar Day Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 30th 2020
This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. Outlining Some of the Science Behind Partial Reprogramming at Turn.bio https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/outlining-some-of-the-science-behind-partial-reprogramming-at-turn-bio/ Tur...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Time to Move on the Economy vs. Public Health Debate
Ryan BourneHuman life is highly valuable. Basic economic reasoning therefore suggests that, given the risks of COVID-19 to vulnerable populations, we should be willing to withstand large economic costs to prevent the risk of substantial numbers of deaths. This is particularly true if most of those economic costs are temporary.In response to Donald Trump ’stweet last week suggesting “WE CANNOT LET THE CURE BE WORSE THAN THE PROBLEM ITSELF,”many economists have indeed been makingthese points.They highlight estimates suggesting that the estimated value of a statistical life (commonly around $9.3 million...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 27, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Minimizing the Risks of PTSD from the COVID-19 Pandemic
It is a stressful time. Many have begun feeling the emotional and psychological effects of being quarantined. People are being told to stay indoors, to limit leaving their home except for necessities and to skip socializing altogether, if possible. Supermarket shelves are empty; toilet paper and hand sanitizer are sold out. Many communities are placing restrictions on where people can go. Buzzwords like “social distancing” and “martial law” are in the news in recent weeks. Hospitals are overcrowded and staff are overworked. Many playgrounds, amusement parks, hotels and beaches have been closed until...
Source: World of Psychology - March 27, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Dr. Annie Tanasugarn Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness PTSD coronavirus COVID-19 quarantine traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Anorexic and Pregnant
I was diagnosed with anorexia nervosa over a decade ago. Blinded by the eating disorder to the damage that was occurring both internally and externally, the possibility of infertility did not occur to me. When I married at 21, my husband and I both dreamed of one day becoming parents and I lived in this optimism for some time. However, after my periods stopped for 7 years, I began to doubt if being a mother would ever be my reality.  As an eating disorder patient, I had been regularly informed of the risk factors of my illness, some of which included amenorrhoea, the absence of menstruation, and a high chance of infer...
Source: World of Psychology - March 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Esther Dark Tags: Anorexia Eating Disorders Personal Pregnancy Infertility Source Type: blogs

How Psychology Researchers Are Responding To The COVID-19 Pandemic
By Matthew Warren The world is currently in an unprecedented state of upheaval and uncertainty. As countries fight to minimise the spread of COVID-19, everyone is adjusting to the “new normal”, remaining at home and practising social distancing. And the same is true of the psychologists whose work we report on every day at Research Digest: labs have been shut and experiments have suddenly been put on hold in the wake of the pandemic. But many psychologists have also begun launching new research to understand how the present crisis is affecting us, and to inform our response to it. So this week, I’ve ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 26, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Feature Health Source Type: blogs

Behavioural “Nudges” Are Ineffective At Encouraging Commuters To Carpool Or Take The Bus
By Emma Young You’ll probably be familiar with the idea of behavioural “nudges” — interventions that encourage people to make better choices, without changing the actual options available. As a concept, nudging has become hugely popular, with at least 200 “nudge units” in governments and institutions around the world. We’ve certainly reported on a few studies finding that simple nudges encourage people to give more to charity, and help people to make healthier soft drink choices from fast food menus, for example. You might be forgiven for thinking, then, that there are no limi...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 25, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Decision making Occupational Source Type: blogs

New ways to detect emergent viruses
In a recently published review dedicated to the diagnostics of viral infections, a Russian research team featuring MIPT (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) researchers is the first to systematically describe and summarize the cutting-edge technologies available. A number of new effective methods of virus detection have been developed over the past few years, including those targeted at unknown pathogens. The authors described the so-called high-throughput next-generation sequencing as a potent new approach. The method promises to revolutionize the detection and analysis of new pathogenic viruses, but it will be at...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - March 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Coronavirus Source Type: blogs

Reviving Cardiomyocytes via Coincubation with Mitochondria
This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - March 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

5 Truths Survivors of Suicide Loss Need to Know Right Now
In the wake of losing someone to suicide, there is much pain and confusion, to say the least. I want to list these five simple truths right up front for those who may need to hear them right away: It isn’t your fault. Do not be ashamed. Your grief is complicated. Healing is possible. You still have life. 1. It isn’t your fault. Losing someone to suicide can often fill us with very specific emotions: Guilt. Regret. Blame. But it is important to talk back to these feelings. It is important to realize and understand that you simply cannot carry the weight of someone else’s decision. Suicide is a very...
Source: World of Psychology - March 24, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Bonnie McClure Tags: Depression Inspiration & Hope Stigma Suicide grief grieving Suicide Loss Survivor Guilt Source Type: blogs

A primer on assessing intelligence in laboratory studies - ScienceDirect
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0160289620300180AbstractThis paper is an attempt to provide a brief guide to major conceptual and statistical problems that are unique to the study of individual differences in intelligence and various intellectual abilities, in the context of laboratory experimental studies, and to suggest strategies to successfully navigate these problems. Such studies are generally designed so that the goal is to evaluate the relationships between individual differences in basic task performance or related markers on the one hand, and individual differences in intellectual abilities...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - March 24, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Exponential growth is terrifying
This example illustrates just how fast exponential growth is. It was proposed on twitter by Charles Arthur (@charlesarthur) who attributes the idea to Simon Moores. Here’s Wembley Stadium. The watering system develops a fault: in minute 1 one drop of water is released; minute 2, two drops, minute 3 four drops, and so on. Every minute the number of drops doubles. How long will it take to fill Wembley stadium? The answer is that after 44 minutes, before half-time, the stadium would overflow. Here’s why. The sequence is 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, . . . so the nth term in the sequence is 2n – 1. For example, the 4th te...
Source: DC's goodscience - March 23, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: COVID-19 epidemiology Uncategorized exponential geometric Source Type: blogs

Virus Crisis Economic FAQ
Arnold Kling1. Why are we so concerned about this virus, which so far (as of mid-March) has killed many fewer people than an ordinary flu?The key to the answer lies in the words “so far.” The virus seems to spread at a phenomenal rate, with cases doubling more than once a week. If the number of deaths were to double once a week, then starting from about 200 deaths on March 15, by the end of May the total would be 200,000 deaths, which is about ten times the number that we get from ordinary flu.The Imperial College papermade an extrapolation that warned of the possibility hundreds of thousands of deaths if socia...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 23, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Arnold Kling Source Type: blogs

Immigrants Aid America During COVID-19 Crisis
David BierAs the COVID-19 spreads through the United States, the governmenthas closed its borders to foreigners. Yet millions of immigrants already here are working every day to defeat the contagion or mitigate its economic effects. From cleaning away germs to developing cures for them to delivering needed supplies, immigrants are disproportionately engaged in the effort to defeat COVID-19. Indeed, immigrants are overrepresented in nearly every job that is critical during this pandemic.Health Care and DiagnosisOn the front lines of this battle are the nearly1.7 million foreign ‐​born medical and health care workers who...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 23, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Can AI diagnose COVID-19 on CT scans? Can humans?
Vidur Mahajan Vasanth Venugopal By VASANTH VENUGOPAL MD and VIDUR MAHAJAN MBBS, MBA What can Artificial Intelligence (AI) do? AI can, simply put, do two things – one, it can do what humans can do. These are tasks like looking at CCTV cameras, detecting faces of people, or in this case, read CT scans and identify ‘findings’ of pneumonia that radiologists can otherwise also find – just that this happens automatically and fast. Two, AI can do things that humans can’t do – like telling you the exact time it would take you to go from point A to point B (i.e. Google maps), or like ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - March 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence COVID-19 Health Tech AI coronavirus CT scans Pandemic Radiology Vasanth Venugopal Vidur Mahajan Source Type: blogs

Viruses Are Not Quite Alive and Not Quite Dead, and Other Things to Know About COVID-19
What they are capable of is replicating and adapting, and each virus has a unique way of doing that. Viruses are programmed to detect particular surface proteins or channels on the outside of a cell, and make their way in via the favored route. A Cellular Doorway For COVID-19, the favorite avenue to cellular entry appears to be the ACE-2, or angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, receptor. This part of the cell plays a role in regulating blood pressure. Major areas of the body that produce high amounts of cells with ACE-2 receptors include the lungs, the heart and the GI tract. Cells within the lungs contain type 2 pneumocytes w...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - March 20, 2020 Category: Child Development Authors: Alan Greene MD Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Coronavirus COVID COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Robert Murphy on Market Monetarism
George SelginInthe latest installment in his series, " Understanding Money Mechanics, " Bob Murphy takes on Market Monetarism, andScott Sumner's case for having central banks practice NGDP level targeting in particular. A commentator there writes, " I hope George S. pipes up to defend MM! Seeing the other side can helps [sic] me to understand the theory better. "Far be it from me to refuse such a request!Murphy devotes much of his post to distinguishing Market Monetarism from both old-time Monetarism and Austrian monetary economics. Much of what I have to say also concerns those distinctions. I hope to ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 16, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Non- A, Non -B Aortic dissection : Incidence ,classification & outcome
Aortic dissection is a unique cardiac emergency that tests our collective understanding of vascular anatomy and pathology .It poses the ultimate challenge to the expertise and wisdom of both cardiologists, and surgeons. Freezing the Aortic Time machine The philosophy of management swings between total inaction* in some (As in most Type B & few Type A as well ) to “No holds barred” approach in others. (In most Type A and few Type B). *Read it (also) as medical management that includes powerful Aortic pulse attenuation therapy with beta-blockers ( Unfortunately medical management is considered as Inaction by ...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - March 13, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Aortic diseases aortic dissection Non A Non B Aortic dissection tem debakey stanford classification dissect penn Source Type: blogs

This Is A Rather Worrying Trend And I Think It Is Just An Attempt To Inappropriately And Falsely Boost #myHealthRecord Statistics.
Suddenly we are seeing all sorts of sessions being funded by the ADHA to encourage lay staff and non medicos to access the #myHR.Here are some examples.First we have:Community Nurses navigating My Health Record: Q&A with Experts When: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 Time: 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM AEDT Where: Online - join via your computer! Your Hosts: Australian Digital Health Agency and the Australian College of NursingAbout the webinarClose to two billion documents have been uploaded to the national My Health Record system, with more than 100 million uploaded in December alone. With increasing clinical content healthcar...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - March 13, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs