Does ’ 13 Reasons Why ’ Increase Suicide Rates?
Conflicting research released last month gave us a very unclear answer about whether simply watching or being exposed to a television show about teen suicide — Netflix’s 13 Reasons Why (13RW) — results in an increase in actual teen suicide in real life. One study found a correlation (not a causal relationship) between the two, while another study found declines in suicidal thoughts and self-harm behaviors. So what’s the real story? 13 Reasons Why is a Netflix television series that explores the first-hand account of a fictional teenage girl’s life and eventual suicide. The second season delve...
Source: World of Psychology - May 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Children and Teens General Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Students Suicide 13 Reasons Why 13rw suicidal Source Type: blogs

In Praise Of Dementia
By Charles Foster Statistically there is a good chance that I will ultimately develop dementia. It is one of the most feared conditions, but bring it on, I say. It will strip me of some of my precious memories and some of my cognitive function, but it will also strip me of many of the […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 2, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Charles Foster Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Health Care Neuroethics ageing bioethics books Charles Foster's Posts Children and Families Collective Responsibility Disability, Chronic Conditions and Rehabilitation End of life decisions medical e Source Type: blogs

Be Skeptical of Income and Wealth Claims
As the 2020 presidential election campaign heats up, get ready for a torrent of claims about incomes, wealth, and inequality. The rich are grabbing all the wealth! The working class is struggling! The middle class never had it so good!In my op-ed yesterday inThe Hill, I noted that politicians and pundits are often sloppy or untruthful with data when making such claims. But a different issue is that there are pessimistic and optimistic versions of most income and wealth statistics.Economist Joseph Stiglitz opted for the pessimistic in his recentNew York Times op-ed: “Some 90 percent have seen their incomes stagnate or...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Poll Shows Caregivers Need Help Flagging Early Warning Signs
May is upon us! Today marks the beginning of Better Hearing & Speech Month (BHSM), when public education about communication disorders shines a well-deserved spotlight on audiology and speech-language pathology. The 2019 BHSM theme is Communication Across the Lifespan, making the opening outreach focus on communication disorders in young children a great place to start. Today ASHA unveils new survey results that shed light on the state of parental awareness about the signs of speech, language, and hearing disorders. Early intervention and parental involvement has been a consistent focus—and passion—througho...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - May 1, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shari Robertson Tags: Audiology Events News Slider Speech-Language Pathology Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 1st May 2019
Some recent things you might want to know about...NIHR SignalsSummaries of recent researchNew insights into how ethnicity and culture affect maternal mental healthSocial mediaBMJ feature on learning from birthing stories on TwitterStatisticsBreastfeeding at 6 to 8 weeks after birth (Public Health England)Maternity statistics for January 2019 (NHS Digital)NewsNHS to roll out blood test for pre-eclampsia (BMJ)Acknowledgements: Embed Health Consortium Health Bulletin, King's Fund Library Health Management and Policy Alert, emails from NIHR and BMJ (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - May 1, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

A Jungian Approach to Individual Neuropathological Specimens
I was readingThe Undiscovered Self (1958) by Carl Jung today, and noted that Jung's description of individual patients could also be applied to individual tumors:" The statistical method shows the facts in the light of the ideal average but does not give us a picture of their empirical reality.... The distinctive thing about real facts, however, is their individuality.... There is and can be no self-knowledge based on theoretical assumptions, for the object of this knowledge is an individual - a relative exception and an irregular phenomenon. Hence, it is not the universal and the regular that characterize the individ...
Source: neuropathology blog - May 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: people Source Type: blogs

The “Back Story” of the JAMA Wellness Smackdown (Part 1)
This article became the single most influential article in Health Affairs history, with 935 academic citations alone, plus an untold number of start-ups, corporate program implementations, and references in lay publications. Unfortunately, when you attract that much attention with a finding that is basically fabricated, someone is bound to notice. In this case, the someone was me. (I also encouraged RAND’s ace wellness researcher, Soeren Mattke, to take part in the effort, which he expertly did.)  It turns out that most if not all of the studies in this meta-analysis never should have made it t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Al Lewis Wellness Workplace Wellness workplace wellness programs Source Type: blogs

Measles Vaccine Effectiveness – Supportive Data
Where data are available, reported rates of measles are inversely related to vaccination coverage.  This observation is true for virtually every country … from Algeria to Zambia  – and are most evident as percentage vaccine coverage exceeds 80 percent.  The following charts are based on WHO statistics for measles incidence and estimates (rather than individual reports) of true vaccine coverage.  Note in the following charts, that when groups of countries are compared, the disease rates themselves are often numerically lower for countries which have attained highest vaccination coverage [1,2...
Source: GIDEON blog - April 29, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: Ebooks Epidemiology ProMED Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 29th 2019
In this study, we report the age-associated differences between fetal MSC (fMSC) populations and MSCs isolated from elderly donors with respect to their transcriptomes. We successfully reprogrammed fMSCs (55 days post conception) and adult MSC (aMSC; 60-74 years) to iPSCs and, subsequently, generated the corresponding iMSCs. In addition, iMSCs were also derived from ESCs. The iMSCs were similar although not identical to primary MSCs. We unraveled a putative rejuvenation and aging gene expression signature. We show that iMSCs irrespective of donor age and cell type re-acquired a similar secretome to that of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Paracetamol Papers
I have secretly obtained a large cache of files from Johnson& Johnson, makers of TYLENOL ®, the ubiquitous pain relief medication (generic name: acetaminophen in North America,paracetamol elsewhere). The damaging information contained in these documents has been suppressed by the pharmaceutical giant, for reasons that will become obvious in a moment.1After a massive upload of materials to Wikileaks, it can now be revealed that Tylenol not only...eases social rejectionmends a broken heartlessens mortality salience(i.e., fear of death)reduces antisocial behaviortreats chronic anxiety disorder...but along with the goo...
Source: The Neurocritic - April 27, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Race-Based Medicine Can Blind Doctors from Social Injustice
By PHUOC LE MD Fifteen years ago, as a medical student, I learned a terrifying lesson about blindly using race-based medicine. I was taking care of Mr. Smith, a thin man in his late 60s, who entered the hospital with severe back pain and a fever. As the student on the hospital team, I spent over an hour interviewing him, asking relevant questions about his medical and social history, the medications he took, and the details of his symptoms. I learned Mr. Smith was a veteran who ran into tough times that left him chronically homeless, uninsured, and suffering from hypertension and diabetes. I performed a complete physica...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 26, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health disparities Medical Practice health inequities Phuoc Le race-based medicine Source Type: blogs

Is Second Place Emotionally Worse Than Coming Third? New Insights From The 2016 Olympics
This study provides updated evidence that suggests that gold medallists are happiest on the podium and that no meaningful difference exists in happiness levels between silver and bronze medallists. However, the thought process and reflections between second and third-placed athletes do seem to vary, with silver medallists being more preoccupied by thoughts of how things could have been better and what would have happened if their opponents had behaved differently. These thought processes may act as a defence mechanism in order to protect their self-esteem and self-image. By reflecting on external factors, such as their opp...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Replications Sport Source Type: blogs

Are Bronze Medallists Really Happier Than Silver Medallists? New Insights From The 2016 Olympics
This study provides updated evidence that suggests that gold medallists are happiest on the podium and that no meaningful difference exists in happiness levels between silver and bronze medallists. However, the thought process and reflections between second and third-placed athletes do seem to vary, with silver medallists being more preoccupied by thoughts of how things could have been better and what would have happened if their opponents had behaved differently. These thought processes may act as a defence mechanism in order to protect their self-esteem and self-image. By reflecting on external factors, such as their opp...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Replications Sport Source Type: blogs

Agencies Charged with Enforcing Immigration Laws Incarcerate Immigrants, Unsurprisingly
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) recently released areport on immigrants incarcerated in the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and as pretrial detainees by the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS).   The report offers some comments on state and local incarceration of non-citizens, but no systematic information.  BOP and USMS are bothagencies within the DOJ, so it is simpler to look at the numbers for the DOJ altogether.The DHS and DOJ are two agencies charged with enforcing immigration laws and incarcerating those who violate them, so it is unsurprising that a large percentage o...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 24, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Maybe We ’re At Full EHR Adoption. What Now?
Today, I was looking at some statistics from the ONC on hospital use of EHRs. You won’t be surprised to hear that as of 2017, more than 95% of hospitals had an EHR in place. Since vanishingly few technologies are ever deployed by all possible parties, it’s probably fair to call this full adoption, in […] (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - April 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: AI/Machine Learning Analytics/Big Data C-Suite Leadership Clinical EMR-EHR Healthcare IT Hospital - Health System EHR Data Queries EHR Data Use Guideline Adherence Hospital EHR Adoption Hospital Operations Improvement ONC patient Source Type: blogs

Light Physical Activity Slows Brain Aging
In recent years, with the enthusiastic adoption of accelerometers by the designers of epidemiological studies, it has become clear that even quite modest levels of physical activity correlate strongly with improved health and a slower pace of age-related degeneration. In most human data there is no way to establish which of these is cause and which of these is consequence, but animal studies are quite definitive on the point that exercise produces improvements in health, even if it doesn't appear to extend life span. Physical activity, like all interventions, has a dose-response curve, and there is a sizable difference bet...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Are Female And Male Brains Fundamentally Different? An Expert Pours Cold Water On Recent Claims That A Brain-Scan Study of Foetuses Proves They Are
By guest blogger Gina Rippon In case you hadn’t noticed, there is an ongoing debate about the existence of differences between women’s and men’s brains, and the extent to which these might be linked to biological or to cultural factors. In this debate, a real game-changer of a study would involve the identification of clear-cut sex differences in foetal brains: that is, in brains that have not yet been exposed to all the different expectations and experiences that the world might offer. A recent open-access study published in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience by Muriah Wheelock at the University of Was...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Gender guest blogger Methods Source Type: blogs

The Fight over Particulate Matter
The EPA and conventional air pollution regulations are back in the news. NPRreported that the seven-member Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC), which provides the EPA with technical advice for National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is “considering guidelines that upend basic air pollution science.” But NPR’s oversimplified depiction of a settled scientific debate ignores real misgivings about the science that has justified the regulations and provides an opportunity to ask questions about the proper role of science in publi c policy.The pollutant in question is particulate matter (PM), tiny p...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Peter Van Doren Source Type: blogs

Punishing Housing Providers for Racial Imbalances They Didn't Cause Will Only Lead to More Racial Bias
The federal Fair Housing Act ( “FHA”) makes it unlawful to discriminate based on race (among other categories) in the sale, rental, and financing of housing. Four years ago, in a case calledTexas Department of Housing v. Inclusive Communities Project, the Supreme Court determined that the FHA allows certain claims based on “disparate impact”—meaning that tenants don’t need to prove discriminatory intent behind housing policies, only an adverse effect on members of their protected class, even if it was the unintended result of an otherwise neutral policy.Enter Waples Mobile Home Park in F...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro, Nathan Harvey Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 22nd 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Now More Than Ever, the Case for Medicaid Expansion
Sam Aptekar Phuoc Le By PHUOC LE, MD and SAM APTEKAR A friend of mine told me the other day, “We’ve seen our insured patient population go from 15% to 70% in the few years since Obamacare.” As a primary care physician in the Midwest, he’s worked for years in an inner-city clinic that serves a poor community, many of whom also suffer from mental illness. Before the Affordable Care Act (ACA), the clinic constantly struggled to stay afloat financially. Too often patients would be sent to an emergency room because the clinic couldn’t afford to provide some of the simplest medical tests, ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Medicaid ACA insurance coverage Medicaid Expansion Obamacare Phuoc Le Sam Aptekar Source Type: blogs

Does Clonidine Work Managing Withdrawal Symptoms?
What is Clonidine? Originally developed as a nasal decongestant, Clonidine has been found to work very well for patients experiencing withdrawal symptoms from opiates. According to the JamaNetwork, Clonidine produces a rapid and statistically significant decrease in opiate withdrawal signs and symptoms. Clonidine administration for 14 days enabled all patients to be successfully detoxified from chronic opiate administration. In all patients studied, clonidine was a safe and effective non-opiate treatment of opiate withdrawal that suppressed the effect, signs, and symptoms of opiate withdrawal. Withdrawal Symptoms When some...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - April 19, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Anxiety Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Substance Abuse drug detox medicated-assisted detox opiate abuse opiate addiction opioid opioids prescriptio Source Type: blogs

10 Outstanding Companies for Women ’s Health
The women’s health technology or so-called femtech market has been on the rise for the last couple of years, but it has mainly revolved around fertility and pregnancy. We believe that female health topics reach far beyond such traditional issues and players should concentrate more on menopause, endometriosis, or mental health, just to name a few areas. Thus, we tried to collect companies which are on top of their game in the conventional fertility and/or pregnancy area, but also start-ups and ventures who are looking way beyond that. Here’s our guide to 10 outstanding companies in women’s health. The w...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 18, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Business Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Telemedicine & Smartphones companies company digital digital health digital health technologies femtech health technology Innovation market women women's health Source Type: blogs

A Gold Standard Does Not Require Interest-Rate Targeting
Stephen Moore and Herman Cain, the two recent nominees to the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, have in the past suggested returning to a gold standard (although Moore now says he favors merely consulting a broad range of commodity prices as leading indicators). In response, a number of recent op-eds criticized the idea of reinstating a gold standard. The critics unfortunately show little theoretical understanding of the mechanisms by which a gold standard works, and consult no evidence about how the classical gold standard worked in practice.I don ’t seek to defend the nominees, who I think are poor choices on oth...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

A Metric of Biological Age Based on a Systems Biology View of Aging
There is no shortage of theorizing on the nature of aging: its biochemical causes; its evolutionary origins; how it progresses; how to measure it. In any era in which thinking is cheap and life science research is expensive, there will be a lot more theorizing than data. While the tools of biotechnology cost less than ever, and the price continues to fall even as capabilities increase radically, I think it arguably the case that we are still in the era of relatively cheap thought and relatively expensive research. One area in which theory and modeling has over the years found its way to practical use in clinical med...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Spring Cleaning Primer: 15 Ways to Get Organized in 5 Minutes or Less
Getting organized can sound exhausting, especially if your house is filled with heaps and piles of stuff. Maybe it’s on the counters. Maybe it’s on your dining room table (and every other table in your home). Maybe it’s your entire closet. Wherever the clutter resides, you’re finding it incredibly frustrating. Because for one, clutter is all you can find—your keys, your home insurance policy, that bill that’s due any day now, not so much. And rest assured you’re not alone. Ashley Hatcher, the owner of Neat Method in Washington D.C., cited the following statistic: Ameri...
Source: World of Psychology - April 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Happiness Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Perfectionism Self-Help Stress Source Type: blogs

Break Free of Your Anxiety and Phobias in 4 Simple Steps
Anxiety that causes serious discomfort shouldn’t have to go on forever. Yet long-term talk therapy and treatment with medications don’t always free a person who’s suffering. Millions of Americans are dealing with some form of anxiety disorder: according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), each year, 40 million American adults grapple with an anxiety disorder in some form.  One approach that can help you break free of anxiety and phobias is a simple series of steps. Unlike open-ended talk therapy, it’s not expensive or time-consuming, and unlike ...
Source: World of Psychology - April 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Robert London, MD Tags: Anxiety and Panic Source Type: blogs

Visualizing the Cost of Age-Related Disease as Disability Adjusted Life Years
Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) are a statistical construct used in epidemiology to assess the harms caused by disease, particularly the chronic diseases of aging, as these are by far the greatest burden of disease that is inflicted upon the population as a whole. The costs of aging are huge, however they are measured. It is the greatest single cause of human suffering and death, and the economic effects of this constant destruction of human lives and capabilities are sized to match. The greatest good any of us can do in the world as it stands today is to work towards bringing aging under medical control. D...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 17th April 2019
Some recent things you might want to know about...NHS England Atlas of Shared Learning (Case studies)Introduction of the ‘RAPP’ (Respiration, Activity, Perfusion, Position) Tool to minimise the risk of Sudden Unexpected Postnatal Collapse (Bedford)NICE ConsultationsComment invited on these draft guidelines:Preterm labour and birth (update): draft guidance consultation.  Closing date for comments: 30 April 2019.Intrapartum care: women with existing medical conditions or obstetric complications and their babies: topic engagement.  Closing date for comments: 2 May 2019.Twin and triplet pregnanc...
Source: Browsing - April 17, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: blogs

Autism Is But One Part of a Complex Personality Structure
April is Autism Awareness Month. To review: Autism is one of the five pervasive developmental disorders (PDD) listed in the DSM 5 (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual) which provides diagnostic guidelines for mental health professionals. Autism is characterized by difficulties in social interactions, a narrow and particular range of interests and repetitive behaviors. Although it is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors, research has yet to identify the differences in the brain that determine what makes people with autism different from the norm. Since the combination of attributes can b...
Source: World of Psychology - April 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Aspergers Autism Communication anti-vaccination Asperger Syndrome Autism Awareness Month Autism Spectrum Disability polio Stereotypes Stigma Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence Selects Embryos to Optimize In-Vitro Fertilization
Ever since its advent, in vitro fertilization has relied on trained specialists with a keen eye to select which embryos look more viable. This is a great responsibility since roughly only half of IVF procedures are successful. Any improvement of this process would be of great benefit to the expectant parents. Researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine have now developed an computer vision system, powered by artificial intelligence algorithms, that is able to identify with impressive accuracy whether a given human embryo will probably make it in the womb. The system was trained using 12,000 photos of embryos, all photographed ex...
Source: Medgadget - April 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Informatics Ob/Gyn Reproductive Medicine Source Type: blogs

Why Is the USA Only the 35th Healthiest Country in the World?
By ETIENNE DEFFARGES According the 2019 Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index, the U.S. ranks 35th out of 169 countries. Even though we are the 11th wealthiest country in the world, we are behind pretty much all developed economies in terms of health. In the Americas, not just Canada (16th) but also Cuba (30th), Chile and Costa Rica (tied for 33rd) rank ahead of us in this Bloomberg study. To answer this layered question, we need to look at the top ranked countries in the Bloomberg Index: From first to 12th, they are Spain; Italy; Iceland; Japan; Switzerland; Sweden; Australia; Singapore; Norway; Israel; Luxe...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Economics Health disparities Health Policy American healthcare Etienne Deffarges Mediterranean Diet Opioids world health Source Type: blogs

Reducing residual cardiovascular risk
Reducing residual cardiovascular risk in patients treated with statins and having hypertriglyceridemia was addressed by Reduction of Cardiovascular Events with Icosapent Ethyl–Intervention Trial (REDUCE-IT) [1]. REDUCE-IT was a double blind placebo controlled multicenter randomized trial. Patients with established cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus with other risk factors treated with statins were evaluated. At study inclusion they needed to have fasting triglyceride levels between 135 and 499 mg/dL and LDL cholesterol level 41 to 100 mg/dL. They were randomized to either 2 g of icosapent ethyl twice ...
Source: Cardiophile MD - April 15, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis Tags: Cardiology Source Type: blogs

A High Level Review of Medical Marijuana
This article isn ’t going to change your practice. Why am I reviewingBraun et al. ’s survey regarding oncologists’ beliefs, practices, and knowledge regarding medical marijuana use? 1. I went to a Willie Nelson concert and my clothes still reek of marijuana; 2. One of my palliative care fellows is interested in understanding Palliative Care clinicians ’ educational needs regarding marijuana; 3. I visited a dispensary in Pennsylvania where I was told medical marijuana treats diseases ranging from opioid addiction to headaches to nausea and vomiting (in pregnant woman). This annoyed me and I wanted to...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - April 14, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: arnold marijuana oncology physician Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 15th 2019
In this study, we found that senescent chondrocytes isolated from OA patients secrete more EVs compared with nonsenescent chondrocytes. These EVs inhibit cartilage ECM deposition by healthy chondrocytes and can induce a senescent state in nearby cells. We profiled the miR and protein content of EVs isolated from the synovial fluid of OA joints from mice with SnCs. After treatment with a molecule to remove SnCs, termed a senolytic, the composition of EV-associated miR and protein was markedly altered. The senolytic reduced OA development and enhanced chondrogenesis, and these were attributable to several specific differenti...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

It Really Is Just A Farce How The ADHA Is Being Run. It Needs Urgent And Meaningful Repair!
First we need a bit of background. Take this partial page:-----Board PapersThe intent of the Australian Digital Health Agency Board (Board) is to publish as many Board documents as is feasible. Generally Board papers are published after the minutes for that meeting have been accepted. This is usually at the next Board meeting. When clarification or correction of the minutes is required, publication of the Board papers may be delayed.Board documents that are draft, not finalised or sensitive will not be published. Board Meeting 6 December 2018 – Board Papers (Download)Item 4 - CEO Report, December 2018 (PDF, 602KB) a...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - April 14, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Application and Funding Trends in Fiscal Year 2018
On September 28, 2018, the Department of Defense and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Act, 2019 and Continuing Appropriations Act, 2019  was signed into law. The law includes an NIGMS budget of $2,872,780,000 for Fiscal Year (FY) 2019—a 3.1% increase from FY 2018. This budget increase follows a 5.1% rise in funding in FY 2018. NIGMS is committed to ensuring that taxpayers get the best possible returns on their investments in fundamental biomedical research [PDF, 702KB] . As part of this commitment to stewardship [PDF, 7.89MB], we regularly monitor trends in our funding portfolio...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - April 11, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Director’s Messages Funding Trends Funding Outcomes Funding Policies MIRA NIGMS Strategic Plan R01 Source Type: blogs

Feeling sick? There ’s an app for that! – The Big Symptom Checker Review
Do you feel under the weather but don’t want to go to the doctor yet? Are you searching for a solution to inform yourself about any possible condition from the comfort of your home and with the ease of your phone or computer? Of course, there’s an app for that! Not only one, but numerous. Join us as we test how well several services perform at gauging possible diagnoses based on one’s signs and symptoms. We entrust our diagnosis with the Mayo Clinic, WebMD, Your.MD,Symptomate and Ada symptom checker services. Here’s our big symptom checker review. The age of symptom checkers Are you feeling na...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 11, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine & Smartphones diagnostics doctor Health Healthcare home patient primary care review smart medicine smartphone apps symptom symptom checker technology Source Type: blogs

21 Small Ways to Make Life Simpler
“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”Leonardo da Vinci “The aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden because of their simplicity and familiarity.” Ludwig Wittgenstein I love simplifying my life. It makes me more effective and life less stressful. It makes me calmer and happier. But where do you start? Or continue if you are already on your way? In this week's article I’d like to share 21 small habits that help me to live a simpler life. Pick one of these to get started and keep doing it until it sticks and becomes just another normal part of your life. 1. Breathe. ...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Personal Development Source Type: blogs

The Interventions Testing Program Finds Glycine Supplementation has a Tiny Effect on Mouse Life Span
The NIA Interventions Testing Program (ITP) is a very conservative organization. The organizers take compounds that cannot possibly do more than slightly slow aging, largely those that upregulate stress response mechanisms in a similar way to calorie restriction, and rigorously test them in large mouse studies. The results are of the best quality, and tend to demonstrate that most earlier, less rigorous studies overestimated the effects of compounds on life span. This is an expensive business, but I would say one of dubious practical value. The practice of calorie restriction shows us the likely bounds of the possib...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 10, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Finally Some Robust Research Into Whether “Diversity Training” Actually Works – Unfortunately It’s Not Very Promising
Main results from Chang et al, 2019 – the study is laudable for showing exactly how diversity programmes should be evaluated By Jesse Singal Diversity trainings are big business. In the United States, companies spend about £6.1 billion per year, by one estimate, on programmes geared at making companies more inclusive and welcoming to members of often-underrepresented groups (British numbers aren’t easy to come by, but according to one recent survey, over a third of recruiters are planning to increase their investment in diversity initiatives). Unfortunately, there’s little e...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Occupational Social Source Type: blogs

Mental Health Professionals: US Statistics 2017
The mental health workforce in the United States is barely keeping up with the growing need for its services. According to the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there are more than 577,000 mental health professionals practicing in the U.S. today whose main focus is the treatment (and/or diagnosis) of a mental health or substance abuse concern. The data, the latest available, are from the 2016-2017 period. As people become more aware of the value of good mental health, they’re finding it increasingly difficult to access mental health services. Since 2011, the mental health professional wor...
Source: World of Psychology - April 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Mental Health Professionals Mental Health Statistics Source Type: blogs

Threefold Increases in Border Arrests for Nicaraguans and Indians in 2018
Since 2012, Border Patrol has apprehended a growing number of nationals from countries other than Mexico —almost all of them from Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Last year, however, the agency saw threefold increases in apprehensions of Nicaraguans and Indians. These spikes may represent a widening awareness that America will accept people from around the world who come to the border to request asylum.Figure 1 shows that from fiscal year 2017 to 2018, the number of Nicaraguans arrested by Border Patrol increased from 1,098 to 3,337 —a 204 percent increase—and the number of Indians grew from 3,135 to...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 9, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

They Still Call It An " Opioid Epidemic. " Why's That?
TheCleveland Plain Dealer recently  reported that, while overdose deaths have come down slightly over the past year in the Cleveland metropolitan region, a new killer has emerged on the scene: cocaine mixed with fentanyl.The Cuyahoga County Coroner ’s Office informs the public that cocaine was involved in 45 percent of overdose deaths last year, the highest rate in ten years. It reports that cocaine is being found in combination with fentanyl with increasing frequency, and it is believed that many cocaine users are either unaware of the pres ence of fentanyl or, if they are, they are uncertain as to the amo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 9, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

More on Commodity Price Targeting
In a previous post, I argued that Paul Volcker didn ’t put a stop to inflation by having the Fed systematically increase interest rates when commodity prices rose, and lower them when commodity prices fell. While commodity-price targeting, aka a “price rule” for monetary policy, had some prominent proponents back in the 1980s, neither Volcker n or any other Fed chair embraced the idea.Today ’s post has to do with two things that Ididn ’t say in that earlier one. I didn ’t say that commodity price movements played no part at all in the Fed’s decision-making. And I didn’t say w...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 9, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

Data Annotators: The Unsung Heroes Of Artificial Intelligence Development
How do you create a smart algorithm? Where and how do you get the data for it? What do you need for a pattern recognizing program to work well and what are the challenges? Nowadays, everyone seems to be building artificial intelligence-based software, also in healthcare, but no one talks about one of the most important aspects of the work: data annotation and the people who are undertaking this time-consuming, rather monotonous task without the flare that usually encircles A.I. Without their dedicated work, it is impossible to develop algorithms, so we thought it is time to sing an ode to the superheroes of algorithm devel...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 9, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine AI algorithm annotation data data annotation doctor Health Healthcare physician smart algorithm technology Source Type: blogs

What Will Being Healthy Mean In The Future?
The objective is not “just” being healthy anymore but also being in the best shape possible. The healthy lifestyle craze that started in the 1980s is augmented with technologies and penetrates every area and moment of life. In his book, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, Yuval Noah Harari argues that as technology encompasses every tiny part of our health, we will gradually let technology take over our decision-making capacities. In a couple of decades, tiny sensors and big data might tell us whether we are sick or healthy. Medical decisions in our life won’t rely on our feelings of illness or wellness, ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 6, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Bioethics Health Sensors & Trackers AI doctor dystopia future Healthcare healthy healthy lifestyle history history of medicine Innovation patient philosophy progress technology Source Type: blogs

What the Data Say About Equal Pay Day
This week saw the passing of “Equal Pay Day,” which marks the culmination of the roughly three extra months that an average female employee had to work in 2019 to match the amount of money made by an average male worker in 2018. Many people see the pay gap as unjust, but is it really a result of rampant sexism in the workpl ace as the criticsallege?Asurvey unveiled on Tuesday by CNBC and Survey Monkey suggests that, actually, both men and women are equally pleased with their employment situations and the earnings gap can largely be explained by women being more likely on average to choose part-time work.“...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chelsea Follett Source Type: blogs

To Boost Your Self-esteem, Write About Chapters Of Your Life
This article is being co-published with our partners at Aeon where you can also listen to an audio version.  Christian Jarrett (@Psych_Writer) is Editor of BPS Research Digest and the author of a forthcoming book on personality change (Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST)
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Personality The self Source Type: blogs

Podcast: From Homeless to Prisoner to Olympian
 In his teens, Tony Hoffman was a BMX Amateur being featured on magazine covers. But soon after, he was a drug addict living in the streets and ultimately ending in prison. After his parole, a now clean Tony returned to the BMX world in a big way: by taking the silver medal in the 2016 Olympics. Since then, Tony has dedicated his life to helping others with addiction issues with his motivational speaking and special projects. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest After paroling prison on December 13, 2008, Tony Hoffman started living out his dream, with his addiction behind...
Source: World of Psychology - April 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Recovery Sports The Psych Central Show Addiction BMX Gabe Howard Olympics prison Tony Hoffman Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs