FAIR SCAAP Crime Report Has Many Serious Problems
The Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR) recently released areport on illegal immigrant incarceration rates that is poorly contrived and terribly executed.   FAIR uses the number of illegal immigrants counted under theState Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP), which compensates local and state governments for incarcerating some illegal immigrants, to calculate the illegal immigrant incarceration rate.   FAIR finds that illegal immigrants, as measured by the number of SCAAP aliens, are incarcerated at much higher rates than natives and legal immigrants according to their faulty methods. The...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 6, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

There ’s Another Area Of Psychology Where Most Of The Results Do Replicate – Personality Research
Of 78 previously published trait-outcome associations, around 87 per cent successfully replicated, from Soto, 2019 By Christian Jarrett While psychology has been mired in a “replication crisis” recently – based on the failure of contemporary researchers to recreate some of its most cherished findings – there have been pockets of good news for certain sub-disciplines in the field. For instance, some replication efforts in cognitive psychology and experimental philosophy or X-phi have been more successful, suggesting that results in these areas are more robust. To this more optimistic list we may now ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Personality Replications Source Type: blogs

The Rationale for Minimum Wage Increases
This morning I gave oral testimony to theVermont Senate Economic Committee on their proposal to raise the state minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2024. As part of my written evidence, I explored in detail the rationale for minimum wage hikes from the “Fight for $15” campaigners and other think-tanks. Below is a slightly edited version of that section of my testimony, which has wider applicability.–Theoretically, a minimum wage hike can improve the functioning of a labor market when employers are “monopsonistic. ” When firms have significant labor market power over employees, raising a wage floor ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 5, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Top Smart Algorithms In Healthcare
As artificial intelligence tools have been invading more or less every area of healthcare, we made a list to keep track of the top smart algorithms aiming for better diagnostics, more sophisticated patient care or further sighted predictions of diseases. Does A.I. beat doctors? Only if you lived under a rock for the last couple of years, could you not have heard about artificial intelligence. Some might have even come across the spread and potential of A.I. in healthcare. Not only smart algorithms themselves but also the hype around A.I. has grown immensely, thus every time a new study about deep learning or machine...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI cancer death future Health Healthcare pathology prediction Radiology technology Source Type: blogs

Top Smart Algorithms In Healthcare
As artificial intelligence tools have been invading more or less every area of healthcare, we made a list to keep track of the top A.I. algorithms aiming for better diagnostics, more sophisticated patient care or further sighted predictions of diseases. Does A.I. beat doctors? Only if you have lived under a rock for the last couple of years could you not have heard about artificial intelligence. Some might have even come across the spread and potential of A.I. in healthcare. Not only smart algorithms themselves but also the hype around A.I. has grown immensely, thus every time a new study about deep learning or mach...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI cancer death future Health Healthcare pathology prediction Radiology technology Source Type: blogs

The Elements of a Productive Mindset
You're reading The Elements of a Productive Mindset, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. It seems that most of us are quite busy nowadays. There are so many things we want to accomplish, yet so little time. This is what makes it crucial for us to perfect our organizational skills, in order to maximize the time we have at our disposal. It can be quite disappointing to have a lot of things on your mind and, nevertheless, fail to accomplish them because of lack of productivity, motivation, perseverance, so on and...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: maryjames Tags: featured motivation productivity tips self improvement focus time management Source Type: blogs

The Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language – BCBL- (San Sebastián, Basque Country, Spain) is offering a postdoctoral position focused on the neurobiological basis of predictive processing and statistical learning.
The main project will focus on the oscillatory correlates of predictive processing in vision and audition with a special focus on neural entrainment phenomena and top-down control. The project is part of a collaborative research effort of the BCBL with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem funded by the ERC with PIs: Ram Frost (Hebrew U), Craig Richer (BCBL), Nicola Molinaro (BCBL). The expected time frame is one year with a possible extension to another year.The project is based upon a set of EEG and MEG experiments that will be designed to uncover the neural mechanisms supporting predictive processing – across sensory...
Source: Talking Brains - February 5, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Innovation Amidst the Crisis: Health IT and the Opioid Abuse Epidemic | Part 1 – A Strategic Framework
Colin Konschak Dave Levin  By COLIN KONSCHAK, FACHE and DAVE LEVIN, MD The opioid crisis in the United States is having a devastating impact on individuals, their families, and the health care industry. This multi-part series will focus on the role technology can play in addressing this crisis. In this article, we propose a strategic framework for evaluating and pursuing technical solutions. Future articles will explore specific areas and solutions within this framework. A Full-Blown Crisis One of the authors recently had the opportunity to participate in a multi-stakeholder workshop in Cleveland, OH dedicated to find...
Source: The Health Care Blog - February 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Tech Colin Konschak Dave Levin Divurgent Health IT Opioid epidemic Sansoro Health Source Type: blogs

Games people play - "Be Afraid" on the Macro level
"That thing that you do," or "that thing that always happens to you" is the key idea of Schema therapy.Back in the 60s this idea of repetitive patterns of behavior was popularized as Games People Play by Eric Berne, the father of Transactional Analysis.Several decades later the idea of dysfunctional repetitive patterns of behavior became offical with the DSM - III (Diagnoses and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association, third edition) axis 2 diagnoses of personality disorders.There is a new tag being created on MBH, "games people play" which will identify articles which descr...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

Colorado End-of-Life Options Act – 125 Prescriptions in 2018
In 2016, Colorado voters approved Proposition 106, which enacted the Colorado End-of-Life Options Act. This Act allows an eligible terminally-ill individual with a prognosis of six months or less to live to request and self-administer medical aid-in-dying medication in order to voluntarily end his or her life. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has published its second annual statistical report, describing Colorado’s participation in End-of-Life Options activities. In 2018, 125 patients received prescriptions.  While the reported data is not as complete as the Oregon and Washington reports,...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 4th 2019
In this study, we examined the benefits of early-onset, lifelong AET on predictors of health, inflammation, and cancer incidence in a naturally aging mouse model. Lifelong, voluntary wheel-running (O-AET; 26-month-old) prevented age-related declines in aerobic fitness and motor coordination vs. age-matched, sedentary controls (O-SED). AET also provided partial protection against sarcopenia, dynapenia, testicular atrophy, and overall organ pathology, hence augmenting the 'physiologic reserve' of lifelong runners. Systemic inflammation, as evidenced by a chronic elevation in 17 of 18 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokin...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Age of A.I. Will Value Compassionate Care More Than Ever
While modern medicine created the professional, efficient, metric-driven medic alienated from the patients, the need for compassionate care is more urgent than ever. However, that’s not only up to the physician but also the organization, because individual attempts might result in burnout symptoms. Adoption of A.I. could change the situation for the better in the future, as it would create space for doctors and nurses to spend more quality time with patients. The question is, are doctors ready for it? Medicating Albert, the plush armadillo Two years ago, my niece had to spend two weeks in hospital as she partia...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI care compassionate care digital digital health future healthare nursing physician technology Source Type: blogs

Family Caregivers are the Heart and Soul of Alzheimer's Care
These statistics should make it glaringly obvious that family caregivers are indispensable to our nation as well as to the rest of the world. Without this so-called free care, global health systems would be in far worse trouble than they currently are. I am one of that army of caregivers. Over the span of two decades, I have provided primary care for a total of seven elders, four of whom had dementia of different types. Therefore, I know intimately the toll that years of caregiving for someone with dementia can take. Below, three other family caregivers give us... Read the full article on HealthCentral for advice from fami...
Source: Minding Our Elders - February 2, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Which Should We Treat First: Mental Illness or Addiction?
Substance use can alter behaviors, moods, and personalities so severely for people with addiction that without specialized knowledge and experience, it’s difficult to determine underlying causes such as mental illness or trauma. I credit psychological intervention for pushing me into recovery from alcoholism. Addiction is a mental illness, but is it one that needs to be treated before anything else? Or should we be stopping people from hitting their addiction bottom and helping them recover from their comorbid conditions concurrently? What Is Addiction? Before we can discuss treatment, we need to understand what addi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Publishers Recovery Substance Abuse The Fix Treatment Mental Illness Substance Abuse Disorder Source Type: blogs

It Doesn't Matter How Fit You Are, Excess Fat Tissue Still Raises the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease
Being physically fit is very much better for long term health than being unfit. But in this era of cheap and attractive calories, it is quite possible to be both physically fit and overweight to some degree. Many people are. Unfortunately, being fit doesn't meaningfully protect against the detrimental effects of excess fat tissue on health and disease risk. If you are carrying more visceral fat tissue, then you have a higher risk of all of the common age-related diseases, when compared with someone of the same level of fitness with less visceral fat tissue. Not so many years ago, metrics based on the ratio of height...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Alternative therapies for cancer
This study was not designed to directly compare non-conventional therapies with conventional ones, and the results do not mean that all unproven remedies are useless. In fact, an unproven treatment may become conventional if rigorous research proves its worth. There are many types of alternative treatments (including herbs, vitamins, homeopathy, yoga, and acupuncture) that might have different effects and have not yet been well studied. Importantly, this study did not examine the interaction of conventional and alternative treatments (which in some cases may cause problems). In addition, this study did not actually find th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Health Source Type: blogs

Reduced Blood Pressure Lowers Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment, but Not Dementia?
Data from a large human trial has shown that control of blood pressure in older individuals, achieved through lifestyle changes and medication, reduces the risk of mild cognitive impairment by 20% or so, but not the risk of dementia. This is a nuanced result; given what is known of the way in which blood pressure interacts unfavorably with a range of mechanisms related to the development of dementia, it is certainly easier to blame the study design, as the authors do here. There is plenty of evidence to show that hypertension damages the brain directly, causing a greater incidence of ruptured capillaries and tiny areas of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Facts About E-Verify: Use Rates, Errors, and Effects on Illegal Employment
ConclusionE-Verify has become one of the largest government surveillance programs in the United States. It checks the identification numbers of tens of millions of legal workers per year, and hundreds of thousands of disproportionately larger businesses use the program. Despite this success, most businesses refuse to adopt the program, and most employees are not checked against the system. Only four states have adopted E-Verify mandates covering all private employers, and even these states cannot manage to enforce their mandates. Through erroneous non-confirmations, E-Verify has harmed nearly three quarters of a million le...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Benzodiazepines and Addiction
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 31, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs

Could A.I. Turn The Tables On The Physician Burnout Epidemic?
There’s an urgent need to lower the staggering levels of physician burnout around the globe as it results in reduced quality of life for the medical community, decreased levels of patient care – and a worsening human resources crisis in the long run. While technology, especially EHRs, are often considered as an essential factor contributing to physician burnout, we expect artificial intelligence to significantly reduce the administrative burden an improve medical professionals’ work experience in the future. < The rough numbers of physician burnout The emotional and mental well-being of medical p...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 31, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine administration administrative AI burnout digital health EHR future health technology Healthcare Innovation medical medical records physician physician burnout Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How to Change Your Psychological Identity
 We all know that addiction, severe depression, and other conditions change our personality. What few know, however, is just how deeply ingrained that change can be, and how difficult (and scary) it can be to try to become “ourselves” again. In this episode, we examine such changes through the experiences of our guest, who overcame depression and addiction, and now helps others do the same. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest David Essel, MS, OM, is a number one best-selling author (10), counselor, master life coach, international speaker and ministe...
Source: World of Psychology - January 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Depression General Recovery The Psych Central Show Addiction David Essel Gabe Howard Personality Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 30th January 2019
Lots of things you may need to know about, this week!Care Quality CommissionMaternity services survey 2018NICE and other guidanceNICEIPG639 -Laparoscopic cerclage for cervical incompetence toprevent late miscarriage or preterm birth, SIGNChildren and young people exposed prenatally to alcohol - StatisticsBreastfeeding at 6 to 8 weeks after birth (Public Health England) ResearchIndicators for monitoring maternal and neonatal qualitycare: a systematic reviewPremature babies have fewer complications if a lowerplatelet count is accepted (NIHR Signal)Review of research published in the New England Journal of...
Source: Browsing - January 30, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Price ’ s Protein Puzzle: 2019 update
Chains of amino acids strung together make up proteins and since each amino acid has a 1-letter abbreviation, we can find words (English and otherwise) in protein sequences. I imagine this pursuit began as soon as proteins were first sequenced, but the first reference to protein word-finding as a sport is, to my knowledge, “Price’s Protein Puzzle”, a letter to Trends in Biochemical Sciences in September 1987 [1]. Price wrote: It occurred to me that TIBS could organise a competition to find the longest word […] contained within any known protein sequence. The journal took up the challenge and publis...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - January 30, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: bioinformatics computing statistics algorithm amino acid search words Source Type: blogs

“Better Than A Bartender?” Not Necessarily, Suggests Review Of 40 Years Of Research On Criminal Profiling
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski The profession of “criminal profiler” is one shrouded in secrecy, even giving off a hint of danger. Yet when the American psychiatrist James A. Brussel began profiling a particular suspect in the 1950s, law enforcement officers were not entirely inclined to trust him. However, it turned out Brussel accurately defined the suspect’s height, clothing and even religion. This spectacular success was the beginning of the profession of the profiler. The FBI formed its Behavioral Science Unit in 1974 to study serial predators. Since then, the art and craft of criminal profil...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Forensic guest blogger Source Type: blogs

Are Criminal Profilers “Any Better Than A Bartender”? Not Necessarily, Suggests Review Of 40 Years Of Relevant Research
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski The profession of “criminal profiler” is one shrouded in secrecy, even giving off a hint of danger. Yet when the American psychiatrist James A. Brussel began profiling a particular suspect in the 1950s, law enforcement officers were not entirely inclined to trust him. However, it turned out Brussel accurately defined the suspect’s height, clothing and even religion. This spectacular success was the beginning of the profession of the profiler. The FBI formed its Behavioral Science Unit in 1974 to study serial predators. Since then, the art and craft of criminal profil...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Forensic guest blogger Source Type: blogs

Are Criminal Profilers “Any Better Than A Bartender?” Not Necessarily, Suggests Review Of 40 Years Of Relevant Research
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski The profession of “criminal profiler” is one shrouded in secrecy, even giving off a hint of danger. Yet when the American psychiatrist James A. Brussel began profiling a particular suspect in the 1950s, law enforcement officers were not entirely inclined to trust him. However, it turned out Brussel accurately defined the suspect’s height, clothing and even religion. This spectacular success was the beginning of the profession of the profiler. The FBI formed its Behavioral Science Unit in 1974 to study serial predators. Since then, the art and craft of criminal profil...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Forensic guest blogger Source Type: blogs

MBH index - School lock downs 2017 - 2018
Number of children who experienced school lock downs in the U.S. 2017-2018 = 4 millionNumber of school lock downs in the U.S. 2017 - 2018 = 6,200Number of school lock downs, on average, per day in U.S. schools 2017 - 2018 = 16Source - Washington Post as reported in The Week on 01/11/19Editor's note:There is growing evidence that school lock down drills are very traumatizing to children which raises the question of whether the benefit of such practices are worth the psychological and social costs.These statistics also make one pause and consider what kind of a society we have become as a result of our love of freely availab...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

When a pelvic exam is traumatic
Discussions engendered by the movement connected us to people rather than just to a number, subtly shifting how we as a society think about and process sexual violence. On social media, the hashtag #triggerwarning alerts viewers to potentially disturbing information. However, little discussion has focused on the intersection of trauma and health care. What does research tell us? Studies have found that survivors of sexual assault have higher rates of anxiety compared to the general population. They may also be affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can make them feel as though they are being re-traum...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Huma Farid, MD Tags: Adolescent health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Travel Ban Separates Thousands of U.S. Citizens from Their Spouses & Minor Children
President Trump announced the first version of his “travel ban” 2 years ago this weekend. The policy has already separated thousands of U.S. citizens from their spouses and minor children. In its current form, the travel ban blocks visas to nationals of five majority Muslim countries. By the end of this fiscal year, the government is on pace to separate an estimated 15,000 spouses and adopted minor children of U.S. citizens.While the State Department has not publicly revealed the exact figures, prior trends in visa issuances indicate that as of January 1, 2019, the travel ban had already prevented 9,284 spouses...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 29, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

The Return of Reefer Madness
Alex Berenson ’s recent attempt to generate panic at the prospect that marijuana use may become legalized and normalized, with his book Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence,  even borrows its title from the camp 1930s propaganda film  Reefer Madness.  While not nearly as over-the-top as the film, Berenson certainly exaggerates suggestions that marijuana can cause psychosis.Drawing on the 2017 report of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on “Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommenda...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 28, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

PCP and Family Physician Wait Times increasing 50% in Many Markets
The majority of physicians in the U.S. are now salaried and working for large health systems (see:For the first time ever, less than half of physicians are independent). Also, wait times for an appointment with a family physician or primary care physician (PCP) are increasing (see:PCP wait times are 50% higher than 2014). This can be the source of great frustration for patients (see:Report: 20% of patients have changed doctors because of long wait times). These two facts may or may not be related. Here is an excerpt from the article on physician wait times:The average patient waits 29.3 days to see a family medicine physic...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 28, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Medical Consumerism Public Health Source Type: blogs

Intelligent or Wise?
Good grades are all the rage these days. They’re supposed to measure how intelligent and industrious you are. Students strive for a high GPA, with the goal of being admitted into a top college. When they get that acceptance letter, all that hard work seems to have paid off. Time for celebration! You’ve made it! You’re set for life! Yay! Except when you’re not. Being intelligent and industrious is not everything. It is simply the ability to think logically, understand concepts, know formulas and be able to work hard. But, and this is a big but, studies have shown that there is no correlation between ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Brain and Behavior College Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Academics Intellect Wisdom Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 28th 2019
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Artist ’ s Note-January 2019
Original art and artist’s blurbs are presented in collaboration with the students of the University of Illinois Chicago program in Biomedical Visualization.  by Isabel Romero Calvo Sexual abuse of patients is an extremely serious problem in our health care system that is not widely discussed in part due to negative implications for health care providers. Courageously, the Editorial of AJOB is shedding light on this topic by publishing “Serious Ethical Violations in Medicine: A Statistical and Ethical Analysis of 280 Cases in the United States from 2008-2016” by DuBois in their January 2019 issu...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Art Featured Posts Sexual abuse Source Type: blogs

What is the Therapeutic Alliance?
The Therapeutic Alliance Simply put: the Therapeutic Alliance is the mutual bond between therapist and client, as well as the willingness from the patient to immerse in the treatment experience. While it seems like a little thing, it is the most powerful factor in the process of emotional and psychological healing, according to MentalHelp.net. If you do not trust your therapist, you will not be able to fully open up to them and have honest conversations. Without this openness, there will be no progress made on your past trauma. Without progress made on your past trauma, your addiction will fester again in the future and th...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 25, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Complementary Therapies Comprehensive behavioral treatment Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment behavioral therapy complimentary therapy holistic therapy Therapeutic Alliance therapist Source Type: blogs

" Studies Show " : Or Do They?
This study generates causal estimates but does not directly test for the effect of paid leave on hours worked. Rather, the study examines the likelihood of being employed four quarters after taking leave and findsnosignificant relationship between this variable and paid leave.In a nod to the potential economic tradeoffs of mandating paid parental leave, the Upshot reassures us that: surveys have found  either no effect or a positive effect on productivity and turnover.The cited survey suggests that the overwhelming majority of employers find that paid leave has no effect or a positive effect on productivity, prof...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 25, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Recruiting Patients for Clinical Trials Via a Smartphone App
Recruiting subjects for clinical trials has been a recurring challenge over the years including concerns that low-income and minorities are underrepresented in them (see:Low-Income, Uninsured Patients Often Excluded from Clinical Trials;Site-Less Clinical Trials as a Possible Means to Democratize Them). Because of this underrepresentation, the results of trials are often less valid. Here's an excerpt from an article on this topic (see: Barriers to Clinical Trial Recruitment and Possible Solutions: A Stakeholder Survey):A staggering number of clinical trials fail to meet recruitment goals, which leads to delays, early t...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 25, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Source Type: blogs

Unsettling Statistics About Radiologist Burnout and Depression
Burnout and depression have become dire epidemics in the medical community, and it ’s unclear if there’s a way to improve physician mental health. Among the specialists grappling with immense stress are radiologists, with 45 percent reporting feelings of burnout, according to a new report from Medscape.The  2019 National Physician Burnout, Depression& Suicide Reportsurveyed over 15,000 physicians across more than 29 specialties. The researchers found that the vast majority of depressed physicians, or over 66 percent, feel that their mental health impacts their workplace behavior. Fourteen percent of th...
Source: radRounds - January 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Effective Altruism and Effective Research for Human Longevity
The effective altruism movement is a good example of the sort of thing that can only arise in the modern information-rich environment of easily available data and cheap communication. It is half a reaction against the waste, fraud, and general ineffectiveness that characterizes all too much large-scale philanthropy, and half a chance to meaningfully reexamine what everyday philanthropy can look like in an age of greater communication and knowledge. It is easy to salve the conscience by donating to a group that one believes are going to do good, and most people go no further than this. That allows charities to become ineffi...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Diversity beyond gender  — a new year pledge
You can read the original post Digital Science’s Medium blog. Happy New Year! As we regret our former cheese-based life choices and get back into the swing of things, January is also a time to look forward and make resolutions. 2019 could be a year of great change and uncertainty. One topic never far from our minds is diversity and inclusion, specifically ensuring that ALL people are represented and heard. During this time of change, one way that we can achieve greater representation within research is to each commit to doing one small thing to change the current culture. On Saturday 3rd November 2018 we held a ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - January 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Suze Kundu Tags: Uncategorized Diversity SpotOn SpotOn18 Source Type: blogs

Diversity beyond gender   – a new year pledge
You can read the original post Digital Science’s Medium blog. Happy New Year! As we regret our former cheese-based life choices and get back into the swing of things, January is also a time to look forward and make resolutions. 2019 could be a year of great change and uncertainty. One topic never far from our minds is diversity and inclusion, specifically ensuring that ALL people are represented and heard. During this time of change, one way that we can achieve greater representation within research is to each commit to doing one small thing to change the current culture. On Saturday 3rd November 2018 we held a ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - January 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Suze Kundu Tags: Uncategorized Diversity SpotOn SpotOn18 Source Type: blogs

Violent Crime down in U.S. 49% in last 24 years.
From Pew Research Center Fact Tank, 01/03/2019Violent crime in the U.S. has fallen sharply over the past quarter century. The two most commonly cited sources of crime statistics in the U.S. both show a substantial decline in the violent crime rate since it peaked in the early 1990s. One is an annual report by the FBI of serious crimes reported to police in approximately 18,000 jurisdictions around the country. The other is an annual survey of more than 90,000 households conducted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which asks Americans ages 12 and older whether they were victims of crime...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

Has U.S. Health Care Spending Finally Stabilized? An Outlook for 2019
By ETIENNE DEFFARGES  The official 2017 statistics from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) are out, and there are some good news: The annual growth rate of health care spending is slowing down, and is the lowest since 2013 at 3.9%—it was 4.3% for 2016 and 5.8% for 2015. The bad news is that our health care cost increases are still well above inflation, and that we spent $3.5 trillion in this area, or 17.9% of GDP. Americans spent $10,739 on health care in 2017, more than twice as much as of our direct economic competitors: This per capita health care spending was $4,700 in Japan; $5,700 in G...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Finance Medicaid Medicare Etienne Deffarges Health insurance healthcare costs Healthcare spending Source Type: blogs

Your Perfect New Excuse For Ordering Unhealthy Food And Drink: “Altruistic Indulgence”
By Christian Jarrett On the way to meet your friend at a cafe you’re confident about sticking to your resolutions for healthier living. It soon goes awry though – no, not because of your weak willpower, but due to your excess empathy. Your friend orders first and plumps for the super indulgent Winter Warmer Chocca Mocha with added marshmallows. You follow suit, sensing that if you’d stuck with your original plans for a skinny coffee, you’d have made your friend feel awful. There is now a name for this behaviour: You just engaged in “altruistic indulgence”, the most appealing of excuses f...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Health Social Source Type: blogs

Behind the recent good news in cancer statistics
Good news is always welcome, especially when talking about something as serious as cancer. And there is plenty of welcome information in the American Cancer Society ’s release of our annual report on“Cancer Statistics, 2019” and its accompanying consumer-oriented version of“Cancer Facts& Figures 2019.” Among the good news in this report: A significant […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/j-leonard-lichtenfeld" rel="tag" > J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

What Can Brain Imaging Tell Us About Violent Extremism?
In this study,Sacred Values included:Palestinian right of returnWestern military forces being expelled from all Muslim landsStrict sharia as the rule of law in all Muslim countriesArmed jihad being waged against enemies of MuslimsForbidding of caricatures of Prophet MohammedVeiling of women in publicWhat were theNonsacred Values? We don't know. I couldn't find examples anywhere in the paper. It's crucial that we know what these were, to help understand the “sacralization” of nonsacred values, which was observed in an fMRI experiment (described later). So I turned to the Supplemental Material ofBerns et al. (201...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 21, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 21st 2019
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs