A Perspective on Longevity Biotech Investment from James Peyer of Kronos BioVentures
James Peyer, formerly of Apollo Ventures and now at the larger Kronos BioVentures, has a range of interesting views on the new and growing longevity biotechnology industry. Apollo Ventures was one of the earlier longevity-focused funds to emerge from the comparatively small community of scientists, patient advocates, and investors enthusiastic to accelerate progress towards the treatment of aging as a medical condition. The presentation here was given earlier this year at the Ending Age-Related Diseases conference organized by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation. In the matter of creating new medical therapies, t...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Another MCQ Test on the USMLE
By BRYAN CARMODY, MD One of the most fun things about the USMLE pass/fail debate is that it’s accessible to everyone. Some controversies in medicine are discussed only by the initiated few – but if we’re talking USMLE, everyone can participate. Simultaneously, one of the most frustrating things about the USMLE pass/fail debate is that everyone’s an expert. See, everyone in medicine has experience with the exam, and on the basis of that, we all think that we know everything there is to know about it. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of misinformation out there – especially when we&rs...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Education Medical Practice Brian Carmody Step 1 USMLE USMLE Step 1 Source Type: blogs

National Substance Abuse Prevention Month in October
. National Substance Abuse Prevention Month in October October is National Substance Abuse Prevention Month, a time to bring awareness to substance abuse and how the cycle of use begins. In an effort for young individuals to recognize the signs before the cycle starts, National Substance Abuse Prevention Month aims to slow, and eventually stop, the rising numbers of substance abuse statistics. Various organizations and governments have started using National Months and Days to help bring awareness to certain issues, which can prove to be very beneficial for the causes they support. History of National Substance Abuse Preve...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 28, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Alcohol Children Parenting child development family family disease family involvement family program family support family therapy homeless children military children National Substance Abuse Prevention Month Source Type: blogs

Bruin Biometrics Is on a Mission to End Pressure Ulcers: Interview with CEO Martin Burns
Earlier this year, Medgadget reported on the FDA’s clearance of the SEM Scanner, a device created by Los Angeles-based Bruin Biometrics (BBI). The SEM Scanner is a wireless, handheld device that detects changes in sub-epidermal moisture as an indicator of risk for developing a pressure ulcer. Moisture can indicate the presence of localized edema and tissue fluid-related inflammation well before visual and tactile tests that represent the diagnostic standard of care today. To learn more about the challenges of pressure ulcers, their impact on the healthcare system, and how the SEM Scanner is making an impact improving...
Source: Medgadget - October 28, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Critical Care Exclusive Medicine Plastic Surgery Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Massachusetts Ban on Most Self-Defense Firearms Violates Second Amendment
Ilya Shapiro andJames KnightMassachusetts law currently prohibits ownership of “assault weapons,” the statutory definition of which includes the most popular semi-automatic rifles in the country, as well as “copies or duplicates” of any such weapons. As for what that means, your guess is as good as ours. A group of plaintiffs, including two firearm dealers and the Gun Owners’ Action League, challenged the law as an unconstitutional violation of their Second Amendment rights. Unfortunately, both a federal trial judge and appellate court upheld the ban—though they could not agree on why.Th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 28, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ilya Shapiro, James Knight Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 28th 2019
In this study, the enhanced mice live somewhat longer than their unmodified peers, though not as much longer as is the case for the application of telomerase gene therapy. The mice do also exhibit reduced cancer risk, however. The scientists here class telomere shortening as a cause of aging, which is not a point universally agreed upon. Reductions in average telomere length in tissues looks much more like a downstream consequence of reduced stem cell activity than an independent mechanism. Researchers obtain the first mice born with hyper-long telomeres and show that it is possible to extend life without any geneti...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Artificial Blood: Unsolvable Biological Puzzle Or Soon-To-Be Reality?
What is the common denominator for milk, lamb blood, urine, and beer? You would never guess, so we let you off the hook: they were all tried as substitutes for blood during experiments on the quest to find an alternative fluid to replace the elixir of life: human blood. Despite the tremendous efforts, though, artificial blood remains an unsolvable biological puzzle with only a few innovative solutions that give hope that one day it will become a reality. An entire bloody business in vein? Blood has been the symbol of life for millennia – as it is connected so vehemently to good health and well-being. People no...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Biotechnology Future of Medicine blood donation history biology history of medicine artificial artificial blood substitute Source Type: blogs

The Resurrection of Aducanumab Doesn't Change the Picture for Amyloid- β Clearance in Alzheimer's Disease
It took a long time and many failed attempts for the research community to get to the point at which amyloid-β could be successfully cleared from the brains of Alzheimer's patients. Unfortunately, the data to date strongly suggests that this isn't an effective approach to therapy, at least not on its own, even though it is clearly the case that the increased levels of amyloid-β in the aging brain should be removed. It is a characteristic difference between old brain tissue and young brain tissue, and there is plenty of evidence for it to be harmful. This failure to achieve clinical success may be because a...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Can exercise help treat anxiety?
Chances are good that you, or someone you know, is dealing with anxiety. One in five Americans over 18, and one in three teenagers 13 to 18, reported having a chronic anxiety disorder during the past year. And when I talk to college students, they’re not at all surprised that a whopping 63% of students felt tremendous anxiety during their freshman year, according to a report by the National College Health Association. The toll of anxiety can be high: it increases a person’s risk for other psychiatric disorders like depression, and can contribute to diabetes and cardiovascular problems. One sobering study shows ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John J. Ratey, MD Tags: Anxiety and Depression Exercise and Fitness Mental Health Source Type: blogs

20 Medical Technology Advances: Medicine in the Future – Part II.
Nanorobots swimming in blood vessels, in silico clinical trials instead of experimenting with drugs on animals and people, remote brain surgeries with the help of 5G networks – the second part of our shortlist on some astonishing ideas and innovations that could give us a glimpse into the future of medicine is ready for you to digest. Here, we’re going beyond the first part with medical tricorders, the CRISPR/Cas-9 gene-editing method, and other futuristic medical technologies to watch for. 11) In silico clinical trials against testing drugs on animals As technologies transform every aspect of healthcare,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 23, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Artificial Intelligence E-Patients Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Genomics Health Sensors & Trackers 3d printing AI bioprinting blockchain clinical trials CRISPR digital digital health drug development genetics Innovat Source Type: blogs

2018 urgent and emergency care survey statistical release
Care Quality Commission - This survey looked at people ’s experiences of using Type 1 (major A&E) and Type 3 (urgent care centres, minor injury units, urgent treatment centres) urgent and emergency care services, from decision to attend to leaving. One hundred and thirty two trusts took part in the survey, of which 63 trusts had both a Type 1 and a Type 3 department, and 69 trusts had only a Type 1 A&E. The survey only includes Type 3 departments that are run directly by acute trusts, and not those run in collaboration with, or exclusively by others.ReportMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 23, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Patient involvement, experience and feedback Quality of care and clinical outcomes Source Type: blogs

Aubrey de Grey on the TAME Metformin Trial
As you may or may not have heard, the TAME metformin trial recently received the remaining $40 million in philanthropic funding that is needed to progress. The trial will cost $75 million in total, and to my eyes this is quite the waste of funding. Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation is far more polite on this topic in today's editorial, which isn't too surprising given our respective views on regulation. I'll set aside for the moment the point that metformin is a weak treatment with a small effect size on life span, unreliable animal data, life span data in humans arising from a single trial for diabetic...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Preventing falls in older adults: Multiple strategies are better
Despite considerable research and clinical effort, falls among people 65 and older are on the rise. An older adult is treated in the emergency room for a fall every 11 seconds, with injuries ranging from simple cuts and bruises to broken bones. Hip fractures are the most serious injury from falls, and more than half of older adults hospitalized for hip fractures after a fall never regain their previous levels of mobility or quality of life. Further, falls are a leading cause of death among older adults. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an older adult dies from a fall every 19 minutes. Despite th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Brad Manor, PhD Tags: Caregiving Health Healthy Aging Injuries Safety Source Type: blogs

We need physician leaders who understand our problems
You cannot work in medicine today without being inundated with burnout statistics and commentary on your feed, coming to your inbox, or spoken from stages about the state of medicine we are in. The data is dire: we are disengaged, we are making mistakes, we are not heard, and we are not empowered to make […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 22, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sasha-k-shillcutt" rel="tag" > Sasha K. Shillcutt, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Physician Practice Management Public Health & Policy Source Type: blogs

PhD Opportunities in San Sebastian, Spain--BCBL
The Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities has published the call for PhD Students 2019. The application period is from 17/10/19 to 07/11/19 at 14:00h.The call offers:1 PHD STUDENT POSITION (4-YEAR CONTRACT)  TO JOIN PROJECT PGC2018-093408-B-I0- THALANG – FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE HUMAN THALAMUS TO LANGUAGE SYSTEMS ACROSS DEVELOPMENT TO BE SUPERVISED BY PEDRO M. PAZ-ALONSOKey words: Thalamus, Language Systems, Reading, Vision, Functional Connectivity, Structural Connectivity, Lateral Geniculate Nucleus, Medial Geniculate Nucleus, PulvinarSummar...
Source: Talking Brains - October 22, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Psychiatric Medications: Separating Fact From Fiction
 Psychiatric medications are the religion and politics of the mental health advocacy world — don’t bring them up unless you want a fight to break out. Luckily, here at Not Crazy, we don’t shy away from confrontation.  In this episode, we cover the good, the bad, and the ugly surrounding medications. Like whether or not you should take them. We tackle side effects like feeling numb and sexual dysfunction and share our personal histories with medication therapy. Listen now! (Transcript Available Below) SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts Gabe Howard is an award-winning wr...
Source: World of Psychology - October 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: Antidepressant Antipsychotic General Medications Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Psychology Research Sexuality Stimulants Treatment Source Type: blogs

The Most Popular Teens Gain Status Through A Combination Of Aggression And Kindness
By Emily Reynolds For many teenagers, being popular is the ultimate form of success. But how to get there is not always so clear. Past research has identified two types of popular teens: the aggressive and the prosocial. Aggressively popular teens are more likely to be coercive or hostile whilst seeking popularity; the prosocial are co-operative and more likely to be stereotypically “nice”. But in new research from Florida Atlantic University and the University of Montreal, published in Child Development, a third group has emerged: the “bistrategic” teen. This group is neith...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: bullying Developmental Social Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 21st 2019
In this study, AT1-AAs were detected in the sera of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and the positive rate was 44.44% vs. 17.46% in non-PAD volunteers. In addition, analysis showed that AT1-AAs level was positively correlated with PAD. To reveal the causal relationship between AT1-AAs and vascular aging, an AT1-AAs-positive rat model was established by active immunization. The carotid pulse wave velocity was higher, and the aortic endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was attenuated significantly in the immunized rats. Morphological staining showed thickening of the aortic wall. Histological examination showe...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

AusHealthIT Poll Number 497 – Results – 20th October, 2019.
Here are the results of the poll.Do You Believe The ADHA Does Not Release Clinical Usage Statistics For The #myHealthRecord Because They Are So Low And Would Reveal The System To Be A Failure?Yes 97% (95) No 1% (1) They Have Another Reason For Secrecy (Please Expain In A Comment) 1% (1) I Have No Idea 1% (1) Total votes: 98 Well that was pretty clear. The vast majority think the #myHealthRecord statistics are a secret because they are not very good in terms of clinical usage of the system. A ny insights on the poll welcome as a comment, as usual. A very reasonable turn out of votes. It must have been a fairly ea...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - October 20, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Do Illegal Immigrants Increase Drunk Driving Deaths?
ConclusionWe find no statistical evidence to suggest that places with more illegal immigrants are more at risk for drunk driving deaths. Of course, there are individual instances to the contrary and those illegal immigrants who commit real crimes should be punished like everybody else, but their presence doesn ’t seem to affect overall drunk driving deaths. Although our regressions results are correlative and not causal in nature, they suggest that illegal immigrants do not affect overall drunk driving deaths. (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, Andrew C. Forrester Source Type: blogs

The 4 Skills of Highly Successful People That Nobody Talks About
You're reading The 4 Skills of Highly Successful People That Nobody Talks About, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Modern businesses are acutely aware of the measure of success or failure. Ultimately, we’re all classified as one or the other and it’s fair to say most of us would prefer to be put in the “successful” group. But how do you get there? Success can be measured by many metrics, and who’s to say how success should be defined? What you consider successful may not be ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tom Casano Tags: featured motivation philosophy self improvement success balance Source Type: blogs

Cow Companions And A Consciousness Competition: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Researchers have painted a picture of how our happiness has fluctuated over the past two centuries, by analysing the frequency of positive and negative words contained in millions of published texts. The war years showed dips in happiness, according to this measure, while peak happiness occurred in the UK in the 1920s and in Germany in the 1800s, the researchers write in The Conversation. This week in bovine psychology: cows have friends, whom they like to lick and prefer to graze next to. Cows can even recognise their companions in photographs ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

HUMM Releases First Affordable Patch for Improving Working Memory: Exclusive Interview
We previously interviewed Humm, a San Francisco-based neuroscience company, when they had first released their Edge headset – an electrical stimulation device that helped users by boosting their working memory. Humm is focused on helping people continue to learn and grow throughout their lives. The idea behind their innovations is that through stimulation of the prefrontal cortex—a crucial area of the brain for decision making and learning—people’s ability to process and store information will be improved. Humm uses a safe and proven method of electrical stimulation called tACS (transcranial alterna...
Source: Medgadget - October 18, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Neurology Psychiatry Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Larry Summers Wisdom On Wealth Inequality
Ryan BourneChris Edwards arguedearlier in the week that wealth inequality statistics alone tell us little to nothing interesting about the American economy. It seemsLarry Summers agrees (see from 8h 27 mins).In a speech at PIIE yesterday, the former Treasury Secretary under Bill Clinton outlined why wealth inequality wasn ’t a particularly useful measure to consider the justness of a society.He highlighted, for example, that the arguments about wealth inequality and political power appear to have almost no validity. Interest groups and corporate lobbying are much more important sources of political power than wealthy...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Welfare State Causes Wealth Inequality —Euro Experience
Chris EdwardsDemocrats running for president are condemning wealth inequality while calling for an increase in social spending. But expanding social spending would magnify wealth inequality, not reduce it, because it would displace private wealth accumulation by lower- and middle-income households.Evidence comes froma study by Pirmin Fessler and Martin Schurz for the European Central Bank. The authors explore the relationship between government social spending and wealth distribution in 13 European countries using a survey database of 62,000 households. The database contains household balance sheet information.Regression a...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Red Ribbon Week
What is Red Ribbon Week? Red Ribbon Week is October 23-31, a time to get involved in the fight against drugs and bullying. This week-long campaign is celebrated in schools nationwide and provides an opportunity for parents, students, and concerned individuals to take a stand against the violence and drug dependency that can wreak havoc on communities and futures alike. The History of the Red Ribbon Campaign Red Ribbon Week began with the nonprofit organization National Family Partnership (NFP) as a result of the tragic murder of an undercover narcotics officer. In 1985, DEA agent Enrique Camarena was tortured to death by ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 18, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Substance Abuse bullying child development children drug abuse and prevention drug addiction drugs red ribbon week Source Type: blogs

Red Ribbon Week
What is Red Ribbon Week? Red Ribbon Week is October 23-31, a time to get involved in the fight against drugs and bullying. This week-long campaign is celebrated in schools nationwide and provides an opportunity for parents, students, and concerned individuals to take a stand against the violence and drug dependency that can wreak havoc on communities and futures alike. The History of the Red Ribbon Campaign Red Ribbon Week began with the nonprofit organization National Family Partnership (NFP) as a result of the tragic murder of an undercover narcotics officer. In 1985, DEA agent Enrique Camarena was tortured to death by ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 18, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Substance Abuse bullying child development children drug abuse and prevention drug addiction drugs red ribbon week Source Type: blogs

Want To Know Whether A Psychology Study Will Replicate? Just Ask A Bunch Of People
A version of The Thinker displayed in Buenos Aires By guest blogger Jesse Singal As most observers of psychological science recognise, the field is in the midst of a replication crisis. Multiple high-profile efforts to replicate past findings have turned up some dismal results — in the 2015 Open Science Collaboration published in Science, for example, just 36% of the evaluated studies showed statistically significant effects the second time around. The results of Many Labs 2, published last year, weren’t quite as bad, but still pretty dismal: just 50% of studies replicated during that effort. Some of these...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

A Small Clinical Trial of Transcranial Electromagnetic Stimulation Shows Benefits in Alzheimer's Patients
Researchers here report on a small clinical trial of a form of electromagnetic stimulation, claiming reduction in amyloid burden and improvement in cognitive function in Alzheimer's patients. Other approaches to electromagnetic stimulation have been tested in human trials for Alzheimer's disease and failed; the authors here argue that the details of the methodology used matter greatly. It is not unreasonable to expect electromagnetic fields to have effects on cellular metabolism, and there are a range of efforts to try to affect everything from neurodegeneration to wound healing via this class of approach. There is always ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Ranks of NPs and PAs Expanding; Will Increasingly Dominate Primary Care
I have blogged extensively lately about the future of primary care, suggesting that NPs and PAs will dominate the professional ranks of this first tier of healthcare. NPs in particular are at the core of the staffing for the CVS and Walmart walk-in clinic facilities (see:Retail Drug Stores Emerging as Healthcare Hubs for First-Tier Primary Care;Walmart Shapes Its Own Primary Care, Unbundling Strategy;Defining and Delineating the Changing First Tier of Healthcare). Physicians, of course, will still play a critical role in primary care, consulting for the more complex cases and assisting in the referral of patients to m...
Source: Lab Soft News - October 14, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Innovations Medical Consumerism Population Health Public Health Source Type: blogs

Kelsey Moody Presenting on the LysoClear Program at Ending Age-Related Diseases 2019
Kelsey Moody of Ichor Therapeutics presented on the LysoClear development program at the Ending Age-Related Diseases conference organized by the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation earlier this year. LysoClear is an example of the commercial development of a rejuvenation therapy, taken all the way from the starting point of the discovery of microbial enzymes capable of breaking down certain forms of harmful age-related molecular waste that contribute to aging and age-related diseases. The actual research is largely done, and the task now is to focus on manufacture, regulatory approval, and entry into the clinic. Take...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

Persistence pays off: After 8 ‑year follow-up, study finds robust and sustained antidepressant response to deep brain stimulation (DBS)
Conclusions: In>8 years of observation, most participants experienced a robust and sustained antidepressant response to SCC DBS. News in Context: Ethical issues raised around deep brain stimulation (DBS) research Closing the Circuit: Helen Mayberg’s research could revolutionize depression treatment Expo Day: Neuroenginnering, BPI, Arrowsmith Program & ARPF from SharpBrains (Source: SharpBrains)
Source: SharpBrains - October 14, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology antidepressant area-25 brain pacemaker brain stimulation DBS deep-brain-stimulation depression Helen-Mayberg neurosurgical treatment Source Type: blogs

How are hospitals supposed to reduce readmissions? Part III
By KIP SULLIVAN, JD The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) and other proponents of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) justified their support for the HRRP with the claim that research had already demonstrated how hospitals could reduce readmissions for all Medicare fee-for-service patients, not just for groups of carefully selected patients. In this three-part series, I am reviewing the evidence for that claim. We saw in Part I and Part II that the research MedPAC cited in its 2007 report to Congress (the report Congress relied on in authorizing the HRRP) contained no studies supporting tha...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Medicare health reform Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program HRRP Kip Sullivan MedPAC Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Joker Movie and Mental Illness
Did the movie Joker portray mental illness correctly and does it matter? We passionately go over the movie Joker from the lense of people living with mental illness and discuss whether or not there are implications of making a movie like this. Does it help us or hurt us? What if it does both? Listen in to hear Gabe’s freakishly good recollection of scenes from the movie as Jackie struggles to separate entertainment from reality.  Spoiler Alert: You don’t need to see Joker to appreciate this conversation but we do go over the plot and reveal some important scenes from the movie. (Transcript Available Below)...
Source: World of Psychology - October 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Not Crazy Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Antidepressant Antipsychotic Depression Minding the Media Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs

Why are there not more occupational therapists in pain rehabilitation?
A question I’ve asked myself many times! As a small profession with a long history (as long as physiotherapy, TBH), it does seem odd that there are many, many pain rehabilitation services where never an occupational therapist has darkened the door. Some of the reasons lie within the profession: in general, occupational therapists are busy being clinicians and have little time for research. In New Zealand, few occupational therapists pursue higher degrees, and many avoid statistical analyses, experimental design, randomised controlled studies. In fact, some occupational therapists have argued that the tailored appr...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 13, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: ACT - Acceptance & Commitment Therapy Clinical reasoning Cognitive behavioral therapy Coping strategies Occupational therapy Pain conditions Resilience/Health interprofessional teams pain rehabilitation persistent pain Source Type: blogs

I Wonder Why The Government Is So Secretive With Clinical Usage Statistics For The #myHealthRecord?
As far as I know there are two public sources of data.First we have the information found here:https://www.myhealthrecord.gov.au/statisticsMy Health Record statisticsThe Australian Digital Health Agency publishes a range of statistics about how My Health Record is being used by healthcare provider organisations and consumers. The statistics include information about registrations, document uploads and prescription/dispense documents being recorded. My Health Record statistics dashboard My Health Record statistics dashboard These are the most interesting from my perspective: Clinical document uploadsTotal number...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - October 13, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

World Mental Health Day 2019: Letter to a Suicidal Person
By the time you read this blog, two or three people will have taken their lives. In fact, every 40 seconds someone completes suicide; Close to 800,000 die by suicide every year. According to the World Health Organization, there are more deaths from suicide than from war and homicide together. Suicide is the second leading cause of death between people ages 15 to 29. These statistics don’t surprise me since I’ve lost two family members and several friends to suicide, and about one third of the people I know have lost a loved one to suicide. I am familiar with the desperation and rationale that leads someone to t...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Therese J. Borchard Tags: Depression Suicide World Mental Health Day Suicidal Thoughts Source Type: blogs

When Patients Are Maintained to Improve Hospital Stats: A Case Study
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. A ProPublica investigation discovered a pattern in some transplant patients at Newark Beth Israel Hospital (NJ): In a few cases, patients were kept in the ICU for one year after transplant and then quickly sent to a long-term care facility where they died. The story came to light when ProPublica learned of Darryl Young, a heart transplant patient who suffered brain damage during his surgery and remains in an unresponsive state (PVS).  The reporters apparently brought the story to the patient’s sister who had no idea that her brother was only being kept breathing to help the hospital&rsquo...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Organ Transplant & Donation professional ethics Source Type: blogs

From Surgeries To Keeping Company: The Place Of Robots In Healthcare
Assisting surgeries, disinfecting rooms, dispensing medication, keeping company: believe it or not these are the tasks medical robots will soon undertake in hospitals, pharmacies, or your nearest doctor’s office. These new ‘colleagues’ will definitely make a difference in every field of medicine. Here’s our overview to understand robotics in healthcare better so that everyone can prepare for the appearance of mechanic helpers in medical facilities. Metallic allies for the benefit of the vulnerable While there are concerns for machines replacing people in the workforce, we believe there are adv...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Robotics blood digital health future of hospital Healthcare medical medical robot nanorobot nanotechnology pharmacies social social companion social companion robot Surgery telemedical Source Type: blogs

People Prefer Their Jobs To Be Taken By Robots, Not Other Workers
By Emily Reynolds The rise of automation has already had a significant impact on the work lives of millions of people — and it shows no signs of stopping. In a study released earlier this year, the Office for National Statistics found 1.5 million workers in Britain at “high risk of losing their jobs to automation”, with women and low-paid workers bearing the brunt of the risk. And another paper published in Social Science and Medicine found that exposure to automation risk exacerbated poor health: higher risk of automation meant higher job uncertainty and subsequently a greater chance of physical and...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 8, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Occupational The self Source Type: blogs

Postdoctoral Fellow -- The NEURAL (NEURoscience of Adult Language) Research Lab at Indiana University Bloomington
The NEURAL (NEURoscience of Adult Language) Research Lab at Indiana University Bloomington is seeking a postdoctoral fellow to begin in spring or summer 2020, working with Dr. Brielle Stark. The position is open for an initial 1-year, with an option to renew dependent on performance and funding.Research in the lab focuses on understanding brain-behavior relationships in neurogenic communication disorders, largely post-stroke aphasia. We are most interested in understanding processes related to language production. We have a Siemens Prisma 3T MRI scanner and an EEG suite as part of our Imaging Research Facility, which ...
Source: Talking Brains - October 8, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

MEDITECH eh – Investment in Canadian EHR Market Pays Off
When MEDITECH released their latest statistics for their Canadian operations, I was floored – 47% market share and 35 years of collaboration in Canada. I knew MEDITECH had been in the country for a long time, but I had no idea their ROOTS ran so deep [Canadian readers will get the joke]. Recently, MEDITECH sent […] (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - October 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Colin Hung Tags: Ambulatory EMR-EHR Health IT Company Healthcare IT Hospital - Health System Canadian EHR Christine Parent EHR Canada Interior Health Authority Meditech MEDITECH Expanse Ontario Shores for Mental Health Source Type: blogs

The Rise and Rise of Quantitative Cassandras
By SAURABH JHA, MD Despite an area under the ROC curve of 1, Cassandra’s prophesies were never believed. She neither hedged nor relied on retrospective data – her predictions, such as the Trojan war, were prospectively validated. In medicine, a new type of Cassandra has emerged –  one who speaks in probabilistic tongue, forked unevenly between the probability of being right and the possibility of being wrong. One who, by conceding that she may be categorically wrong, is technically never wrong. We call these new Minervas “predictions.” The Owl of Minerva flies above its denominator. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Data Medical Practice Physicians RogueRad @roguerad acute kidney injury AI deep learning machine learning predictions Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

10 foods that may impact your risk of dying from heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes
Could just 10 foods substantially impact your risk of dying from a cardiometabolic disease (CMD) like type 2 diabetes, heart disease, or stroke? Maybe. A study published in JAMA provides some insight into the degree to which 10 specific foods and nutrients affect the risk of dying from CMD. The study found that in 2012, eating suboptimal levels of 10 foods or nutrients — too much of some and not enough of others — was associated with more than 45% of deaths due to type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. 10 foods associated with nearly half of CMD deaths The researchers developed a risk assessment model that...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine D. McManus, MS, RD, LDN Tags: Diabetes Health Healthy Eating Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 7th 2019
In conclusion, our findings link the calcification of the vascular tissue with the expression of FGF23 in the vessels and with the elevation of circulating levels this hormone. Permanently Boosting Levels of Natural Killer Cells in Mice to Increase Cancer Resistance https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/permanently-boosting-levels-of-natural-killer-cells-in-mice-to-increase-cancer-resistance/ Researchers here demonstrate a very interesting approach to immunotherapy: they introduce engineered stem cells in mice that will give rise to additional natural killer T cells, boosting the capability of the ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 6, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Economics of Ethnic Enclaves
DiscussionEnclaves are often formed naturally, and they lower the costs of gathering information for newly arrived immigrants. These immigrants benefit economically and culturally, and these benefits are often perceived as outweighing the potential costs of enclave life. Since ethnic enclaves will not disappear, making them better is the easiest approach to encourage faster and better assimilation.Granting illegal immigrants legal status wouldencourage many to contribute in new ways to the formal market economy and improve their skills and income over the long run.Also, research has shown that legalizing illegal immigrants...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

The Economics of Ethnic Enclaves
DiscussionEnclaves are often formed naturally, and they lower the costs of gathering information for newly arrived immigrants. These immigrants benefit economically and culturally, and these benefits are often perceived as outweighing the potential costs of enclave life. Since ethnic enclaves will not disappear, making them better is the easiest approach to encourage faster and better assimilation.Granting illegal immigrants legal status wouldencourage many to contribute in new ways to the formal market economy and improve their skills and income over the long run.Also, research has shown that legalizing illegal immigrants...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Poll: 58% of Americans Favor Vouchers for K –12 Private School
Emily EkinsTheCato 2019 Welfare, Work, and Wealth National Survey finds a solid majority (58%) of Americans favor a proposal that would allow parents to use a “voucher to enroll their children in a private school” with “government helping to pay the tuition” while 40% oppose.Full survey results and report found here.African Americans, lower-income Americans, high school graduates, and Republicans are most likely to favor letting parents use vouchers to send their kids to private school.More than two-thirds (69%) of African Americans support school vouchers, compared to 56% of White and Latino Americ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Emily Ekins Source Type: blogs