I should have done this by now...
Today marks the day of 12 years of blogging. Twelve years! During this time, I've managed to remain a mysterious pseudonym to almost everyone. Very few people know who I am.But a lot has changed since then. TheOpen Science movement, the rise of multiple platforms for critique, theReplication Crisis in social psychology, the emergence ofmethodological terrorists, data police, and destructo-critics. Assertive psychologists and statisticians with large social media presences have openly criticized flawed studies using much harsher language than I do. Using their own names. It's hard to stay relevant...Having a pseudonym now s...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 27, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

AbStats, VR & the Future of Digital Health : A Conversation with Brennan Spiegel
By JASON CHUNG Just before the holiday break, in my new capacity as the Law and Technology Editor for The Health Care Blog, I had the opportunity to interview Dr. Brennan Spiegel, the Director of Cedars-Sinai Health Services Research, about his new digital health innovations as well as his views on the medtech and data privacy landscapes. Dr. Spiegel leads an interdisciplinary team which investigates how digital health technologies such as wearable sensors, smartphone applications and virtual reality can strengthen trust among patients and doctors, improve outcomes and cut costs. Below is a transcript of selected moments o...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

MOC Survey Update
The MOC survey, sponsored by Practicing Physicians of America, continues to be completed by a wider and wider physician group across the United States and US territories. Every single state and US territory have physicians who have contributed so far, but more are still needed to improve the credibility and statistical significance of the survey. Many physicians and state medical societies have (Source: Dr. Wes)
Source: Dr. Wes - January 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Westby G. Fisher, MD Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer ’s Drug Solanezumab Fails in Phase 3 Clinical Trial
This study was the first major Alzheimer ’s clinical trial to require molecular evidence of amyloid deposition in the brain for enrollment. While the treatment did have some favorable effects, in the main measure of outcome — measured with a cognitive test called the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale —the researchers did not observe any statistically significant benefit compared with placebo.One Good Reason To Consider an Alzheimer's Clinical TrialThe authors suggest that while it is not certain that this particular strategy or drug could be effective, it is possible that eithe...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - January 25, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers clinical tiral alzheimers symptoms clinical trial news solanezumab Source Type: blogs

Brain-Computer Interface Lets Users Learn to Move Cursor in Seconds
Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow severely disabled people to control wheelchairs, robotic arms, and of course computers. While much progress has been achieved toward improving the accuracy and precision of these devices, they have required long periods of tedious training for users to get acquainted with the technology. The computer has to be taught to understand each user’s unique electrical activity patterns that code for desired movement that the person wants to perform. Now a team of researchers has come up with something incredible and unexpected. They’ve come up with a way of “calibrating...
Source: Medgadget - January 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Rehab Source Type: blogs

MOC Survey Update
The MOC survey, sponsored by Practicing Physicians of America, continues to be completed by a wider and wider physician group across the United States and US territories. Every single state and US territory have physicians who have contributed so far, but more are still needed to improve the credibility and statistical significance of the survey. Many physicians and state medical societies have (Source: Dr. Wes)
Source: Dr. Wes - January 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: DrWes Source Type: blogs

A Learning EHR for a Learning Healthcare System
Can the health care system survive the adoption of electronic health records? When the HITECH act mandated the installation of EHRs in 2009, we all hoped they would propel hospitals and clinics into a 21st-century consciousness. Instead, EHRs threaten to destroy those who have adopted them: the doctors whose work environment they degrade and the hospitals that they are pushing into bankruptcy. But the revolution in artificial intelligence that’s injecting new insights into many industries could also create radically different EHRs. Here I define AI as software that, instead of dictating what a computer system should ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: EHR Electronic Health Record Healthcare AI AI EHR Artificial Intelligence EHR Virtual Assistants Learning EHR Learning Health Care System Machine Learning Source Type: blogs

The Ongoing Challenges of Schizophrenia
They are silent because the division walls are broken down in the brain, and hours when they might be understood at all begin and leave again. —Rainer Maria Rilke, “The Insane” Schizophrenia is an elusive disease, which makes it a difficult one to relate to among the general population. It is easy to sympathize with someone who is suffering from an evident physical malady, such as a broken leg, or even an invisible illness, like cancer, which generally attacks the body in ways that are not cognitive in nature. One is readily able to put oneself in that person’s place and empathize with their plight....
Source: World of Psychology - January 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Casey Clabough Tags: Communication Personal Psychology Schizophrenia Stigma Suicide Violence and Aggression Delusions Depression Empathy Hallucinations Miscommunication Mystery Nonverbal communication Paranoia Psychosis Schizoaffective Disorder Source Type: blogs

Pharma ’ s (Big) Data Problem
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD C.P. Snow, author of “The Two Cultures” Despite (some might say, because of) a raft of new biological methods, pharma R&D has struggled with its EROOM problem, the fact that the cost of successfully developing a new drug, including the cost of failures, has been relentlessly increasing, rather than decreasing, over time (EROOM is Moore spelled backwards, as in Moore’s Law, describing the rapid pace of technology improvement over time). Given the impact of technology in so many other areas, the question many are now asking is whether technology could do its thing in pharma, and ma...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized CP Snow Culture Data David Shaywitz Source Type: blogs

Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management – #HITsm Chat Topic
We’re excited to share the topic and questions for this week’s #HITsm chat happening Friday, 1/26 at Noon ET (9 AM PT). This week’s chat will be hosted by Monica Stout (@MI_turnaround) from Medicasoft on the topic of “Patient Portals and Chronic Disease Management.” The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a statistic stating that roughly 117 million people have one or more chronic health conditions. One in four people has two more chronic conditions. That is so many people! It’s 2018 and there are tons of innovative technologies out there. Why aren’t we doi...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: #HITsm Digital Health EHR Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR Healthcare HealthCare IT Healthcare Social Media #HITsm Topics Chronic Disease Management Medicasoft Monica Stout Patient Portals Source Type: blogs

Precision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease (Book Index)
In January, 2018, Academic Press published my bookPrecision Medicine and the Reinvention of Human Disease. This book has an excellent " look inside " at itsGoogle book site, which includes the Table of Contents. In addition, I thought it might be helpful to see the topics listed in the Book's index. Note that page numbers followed by f indicate figures, t indicate tables, and ge indicate glossary terms.AAbandonware, 270, 310geAb initio, 34, 48ge, 108geABL (abelson leukemia) gene, 28, 58ge, 95 –97Absidia corymbifera, 218Acanthameoba, 213Acanthosis nigricans, 144geAchondroplasia, 74, 143ge, 354geAcne, 54ge, 1...
Source: Specified Life - January 23, 2018 Category: Information Technology Tags: index jules berman jules j berman precision medicine Source Type: blogs

Mayo Clinic: Transparency, Deception, and Ice Cream
BY NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD The Mayo Clinic in Minneapolis has held the top spot on the U.S. News and World Report hospital rankings for the past two years. That’s an impressive accomplishment. But one despite the closure of community hospitals that negatively impact rural Minnesota towns. Citing staff shortages, reduced inpatient censuses and ongoing financial challenges, Mayo decided to move all inpatient services from the hospital in Albert Lea, Minnesota, including labor and delivery, to a town more than 20 miles away. In response to pleas for reconsideration, Mayo Clinic Vice President Bobby Ga...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

DC Private Schooling: A Portrait in Diversity?
Private schools are the preserves of rich, white people, and if they weren ’t around education would be more racially integrated. That’s probably the assumption many people have, and it could be what people reading about a recent Shanker Institute report on segregation in Washington, DC, might have gathered.“It’s no secret that the District’s public schools are highly segregated, with a recent analysis showing that nearly three-quarters of black students attend schools where they have virtually no white peers,” began aWashington Poststory on the Shanker analysis. “But a recent repo...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 22, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

New … or rather, perhaps not so new: a “ new ” long-term follow-up study on MGUS
In conclusion…As a U.S. myeloma expert once told me, statistics are useful only to specialists who wish to compare the results of their own statistical studies. He told me that as far as patients are concerned, statistics are useless. I concur. (Source: Margaret's Corner)
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cancer statistics Long-Term Follow-up of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance myeloma Source Type: blogs

Opioid addiction is an epidemic. Let ’s treat it like one.
If we want to talk about the opioid epidemic as an actual epidemic, let’s use the same terms we use for communicable disease: agent, vector/environment, host. Virulence. Transmission. Immunity. The media has done a great job of providing descriptive statistics of the epidemic. And recent oversight, both legislative and advisory, have attempted to focus on altering vector (prescriber) behavior in the wake of apparent failed attempts to reduce agent virulence. What seems to be lacking in the overall discussion though, in my opinion, is a focus on the host. That is where eradication of epidemics has generally been more ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heath-mcanally" rel="tag" > Heath McAnally, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 315
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 315th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Rob Macsweeney of Critical Care Reviews posts the 2 hour livestream of the ADRENAL...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 22, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: Education LITFL review Source Type: blogs

The new year begins
For some of you, the New Year has already started, but I’ve been in a lovely position where I’ve been on leave and haven’t yet started “work” – though the work of living is always present! It’s traditional at this time to year to review the past year and plan for the coming months, so today’s post is a few musings on both. Last year I noticed I’d been working on this blog for nearly 10 years! Astonishing really, because it was intended to be a learning experience for me during my recovery from a mTBI. It kinda grew like Topsy, and here I am 10 years down the road still ...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - January 21, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: adiemusfree Tags: Uncategorized healthcare biopsychosocial Pain pain management allied health Source Type: blogs

Jellybean 88 with Dan Davis
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Resus for dummies or resus for clever people? Dr Dan Davis and the art of ART. I was at Luna Park in Sydney last year. It is an ageing un-reconstructed theme park with rickety roller coasters, a whole bunch of noisy rides and fairground attractions. It is all very retro to the point of being almost ironically cool. That’s all wasted on the kids that love it. It has got all the classics and none of the super-stars. It is the old way of doing the theme park th...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Doug Lynch Tags: JellyBean Advanced Resuscitation Training art Dan Davis resus for dummies Source Type: blogs

Psilocybin (from magic mushrooms) plus meditation and spiritual training leads to lasting changes in positive traits
By Emma Young “Conferences on psychedelics are popping up everywhere, like mushrooms!” said Jakobien van der Weijden, of the Psychedelic Society of the Netherlands, when I met her in Amsterdam last week. Indeed, research into the use of psychedelic (mind-altering) drugs as tools in the treatment of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and end-of-life angst, is on the increase. Psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, may help to alleviate symptoms of depression by altering brain activity in key areas involved in emotional processing, for example. Now a study in the Journal of Psychopharmacolo...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological Brain Mental health Personality Source Type: blogs

Important insights on the growing home use of tDCS brain stimulation: older-than-expected users, positive self-reported results for treatment of depression but negative for self-enhancement, and a couple areas of concern (severe burns, frequency)
This study provides the largest and most comprehensive survey to-date of users of consumer tDCS devices. Obtaining a deeper knowledge of what drives home users—to purchase and use a consumer tDCS device (or for many, to cease to use it)—has important implications, both for ongoing debates about the ethical implications of the home use of tDCS, as well as for discussions of the regulation of direct-to-consumer neurotechnology. Thus, the present study not only provides an empirical foundation on which to base policy recommendations, but also offers a concrete, empirical perspective on a debate that has too-often ...
Source: SharpBrains - January 18, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology brain-stimulation Consumer neurotechnology Direct-to-consumer neuroscience do it yourself Neuroethics non-invasive tDCS Transcranial-direct-current-stimulation Source Type: blogs

Science left unquestioned on BBC Radio 4 Today
When there’s something “sciencey” on BBC Radio4 Today program, the interviewers never seems to ask any of the obvious “sciencey” questions about the subject. Today was no exception… A Professor from Liverpool was suggesting should could reduce Caesarean section rates by giving the expectant mothers whose labour was not progressing a drink of bicarbonate of soda. Apparently, blood around the uterus (or womb) was too acidic in these women. I looked at this research which seems to have been published in June 2017 [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28587493], not entirely sure why it&rsqu...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - January 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

Science left unquestioned on BBC Radio 4 Today (again)
When there’s something “sciencey” on BBC Radio4 Today program, the interviewers never seems to ask any of the obvious “sciencey” questions about the subject. Today was no exception… A Professor from Liverpool was suggesting could reduce Caesarean section rates by giving the expectant mothers, whose labour was not progressing, a drink of bicarbonate of soda. Apparently, blood around the uterus (or womb) was too acidic in these women. I looked at this research which seems to have been published in June 2017 [https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28587493], not entirely sure why it’s s...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - January 17, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

More on EBV and myeloma stem cells
A few months ago, before all the kitten chaos began in our lives (read: when I had a bit more free time!), I came across a 2013 Johns Hopkins University Ph.D. thesis titled “Persistence of EBV in the cancer stem cells fraction of multiple myeloma,” by Sunetra Biswas. [Reminder: EBV is the acronym for Epstein-Barr Virus, about which I’ve written a bunch of posts, most recently in October 2017…A connection has finally been established between EBV and MM in SOME patients.] I began reading, and drafting a post about, Dr. Biswas’ thesis, which is very interesting but also quite technical here and ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - January 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll EBV Epstein-Barr myeloma stem cell Sunetra Biswas Source Type: blogs

New Government Terrorism Report Provides Little Useful Information
This report was required by President Donald Trump’sexecutive order that, among other things, originally established the infamous travel ban.   The new DHS/DOJ report produces little new information on immigration and terrorism and portrays some misleading and meaningless statistics as important findings.  Interestingly, the draft version of the report had more interesting and useful information that was mysteriously edited out of the f inal public version.  It’s remarkable that, given almost a year to produce such a report and with the vast resources of the federal government combined with reams...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Childhood obesity is a grave threat to our nation ’s health
We’ve known for some time the prevalence of obesity is growing among Americans — not just adults, but children, too. Obesity is associated with a long list of medical problems, including heart and other vascular diseases, diabetes, and joint problems. It is encouraging that recently the seemingly inexorable growth of pediatric obesity prevalence seems to have reached a plateau. But we still have a future problem looming for population health as these children grow up. A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine evaluates a couple of key questions regarding obesity in childre...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/christopher-johnson" rel="tag" > Christopher Johnson, MD < /a > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Starting this year with a bang!!!
I never make resolutions because I can't keep them. BUT.....I've decided that we are going to make a few changes around here! I think that I forget that I AM NOT THE ONE WHO HAS DIABETES! (OK, would you please come stamp that across my forehead so that every time I look in the mirror I get reminded???) LOL!!! This is HIS disease, not mine. And I/we do have a life!We have been saving our pennies and it came down to the big decision. Do we remodel the kitchen or do we buy a small used travel trailer and join one of my sisters and her hubby on some of their adventures?Hmmmm.... he wante...
Source: Wife of a Diabetic - January 16, 2018 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

When tears turn into pearls: Post-traumatic growth following childhood and adolescent cancer
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski It’s hard to imagine a crueller fate than when a child receives a diagnosis of an illness as difficult as cancer. A young human being, still not fully formed, is suddenly and irrevocably thrown into a situation that many adults are unable to cope with. Each year, around 160,000 children and youngsters worldwide are diagnosed with cancer, and this trend is growing in industrialised societies. Faced with such facts, it is particularly important to understand how children cope. What traces of the experience remain in their psyche if they manage to survive? Partial answers to these ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cancer guest blogger Source Type: blogs

Can the dwindling numbers of primary care physicians explain decreased life expectancy?
Newborns born in 29 other countries of the world have life expectancies exceeding 80 years; yet, an infant born in the U.S. in 2016 is expected to live only 78.6 years according to recently released statistics. While death rates fell for 7 of the 10 biggest killers, such as cancer and heart disease, they climbed for the under-65 crowd. The irrefutable culprit is the unrelenting opioid epidemic. Last year, life expectancy declined for the first time since 1993. The last two-year decline was in 1962 and 1963, more than a half-century ago. I predicted (accurately) it would decline again this year unless there was a ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/niran-s-al-agba" rel="tag" > Niran S. Al-Agba, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Primary Care Public Health & Source Type: blogs

Why You Shouldn ’ t Give Up on Your New Year ’ s Resolutions
The time honored tradition of making New Year’s resolutions is deeply rooted in our modern culture. Perhaps because it is a new year, we feel it’s a good time where we can also be renewed. We can change. We can become a better person. Somewhere between 40 and 50 percent of people make New Year’s resolutions (American Medical Association, 1995; Epcot Poll, 1985). But how many people actually keep at least one of their resolutions? Contrary to popular opinion, most people who make New Year’s resolutions keep at least one of them far longer than is believed. For example, this article in U.S. News &...
Source: World of Psychology - January 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: Brain and Behavior General Holiday Coping Inspiration & Hope Psychology Self-Esteem Self-Help don't quit New Year's resolution new years resolutions sticking with your resolutions Source Type: blogs

Deconstructing the anxiety epidemic
Anxiety is an epidemic. An estimated 40 million adults have symptoms of anxiety. America spends $42 billion a year on treatment of the condition. Women are 60 percent more likely to develop anxiety than our male counterparts. The average age of onset is 11 across genders. These numbers are terrifying to me as a clinician, a woman, and a mother. But is there anything we can do to slow these statistics from what seems to be an endless climb north? Or, are the intergenerational symptom patterns that emerge within families simply a case of genetic destiny? This blog is designed to strip anxiety down to the studs and reveal som...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 15, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/sarah-sarkis" rel="tag" > Sarah Sarkis, PhD < /a > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Eugenics, UCL and freedom of speech
Jump to follow-up On Monday evening (8th January 2018), I got an email from Ben van der Merwe, a UCL student who works as a reporter for the student newspaper, London Student.  He said “Our investigation has found a ring of academic psychologists associated with Richard Lynn’s journal Mankind Quarterly to be holding annual conferences at UCL. This includes the UCL psychologist professor James Thompson”. He asked me for comment about the “London Conference on Intelligence”. His piece came out on Wednesday 10th January. It was a superb piece of investigative journalism.  On the same ...
Source: DC's goodscience - January 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: ethics eugenics genetics UCL Universities University College London Adam Rutherford Francis Galton James Thompson Karl Pearson Steve Jones Toby Young Source Type: blogs

Obese Army Recruits Pose a Challenge to U.S. National Security
The U.S. Army draws a disproportionate share of its recruits from the southern part of the U.S. As a have noted in a previous blog note about the"stroke belt" and also as documented in other news articles, the southern part of the country is not a healthy environment for many of its residents (see: Stroke Belt; Cognitive Decline Documented in the U.S. Southern"Stroke Belt" States;Adult Obesity Prevalence Maps). To quote some statistics from from this latter CDC reference:The South had the highest prevalence of obesity (32.0%), followed by the Midwest (31.4%), the Northeast (26.9%), and the Wes...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 13, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Medical Consumerism Preventive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Five Factor Model personality disorder scales: An introduction to a special section on assessment of maladaptive variants of the five factor model.
----Five Factor Model personality disorder scales: An introduction to a special section on assessment of maladaptive variants of the five factor model. //Psychological Assessment - Vol 22, Iss 2 The Five-Factor Model (FFM) is a dimensional model of general personality structure, consisting of the domains of neuroticism (or emotional instability), extraversion versus introversion, openness (or unconventionality), agreeableness versus antagonism, and conscientiousness (or constraint). The FFM is arguably the most commonly researched dimensional model of general personality structure. However, a notable limitation of existing...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - January 12, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Research and Reviews in the Fastlane 191
This article has spawned a lot of controversy. It is worth reading to understand why. Recommended by: Justin Morgenstern Emergency Medicine Samuels EA, et al. “Sometimes You Feel Like the Freak Show”: A Qualitative Assessment of Emergency Care Experiences Among Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Patients. Annals of emergency medicine. 2017. PMID: 28712604 This is a qualitative study of transgender patients who visited an ED in the US. This article is a must read as providers often lack insight into the complexities of caring for transgender patients and systemic barriers to conscientious care. T...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - January 10, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin Morgenstern Tags: Emergency Medicine Gastroenterology R&R in the FASTLANE Respiratory Resuscitation EBM Education recommendations research and reviews Source Type: blogs

Immigrants Don't Lower Blue-Collar American Wages
Yesterday, Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) gave aspeech on the floor of the Senate about “putting an end, once and for all, to chain migrations.”  The main argument that Senator Cotton made is that immigrants lower the wages of blue-collar American workers.  Senator Cotton said:That means that you have thousands and thousands of workers with absolutely no consideration for what it means for the workers who are already here … The wages of people who work with their hands and work on their feet hold the type of jobs that require you to take a shower after you get off work, not before they got to work.&...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 9, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

5 common problems that can mimic ADHD
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, is very common — according to the most recent statistics, one in 10 children between the ages of 4 and 17 has been diagnosed with this problem. So it’s not surprising that when parents notice that their child has trouble concentrating, is more active or impulsive than other children, and is having trouble in school, they think that their child might have ADHD. But ADHD isn’t the only problem that can cause a child to have trouble with concentration, behavior, or school performance. There are actually lots of problems that ca...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Behavioral Health Children's Health Mental Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

New insights into lifetime personality change from “meta-study” featuring 50,000 participants
By Christian Jarrett It’s a question that goes to the heart of human nature – do our personalities change through life or stay essentially the same? You might think psychology would have a definitive answer, but this remains an active research question. This is partly because of the practical challenge of testing the same group of individuals over many years. Now a major new contribution to the topic has been made available online at the PsyArXiv repository. The researchers, led by Eileen Graham at Northwestern University, have compared and combined data from 14 previously published longitudinal studies, t...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Developmental Personality Source Type: blogs

Stop Calling it an Opioid Crisis--It's a Heroin and Fentanyl Crisis
The National Center for Health Statisticsreported last month that a record 63,600 deaths occurred in 2016 due to overdoses. Diggingdeeper into that number shows over 20,000 of those deaths were due to the powerful drug fentanyl, more than 15,000 were caused by heroin, and roughly 14,500 were caused by prescription opioids, although it has been known for years that, inmost cases of prescription opioid deaths, the victims hadmultiple other potentiating drugs onboard. The rest of the deaths were due to methamphetamines, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and methadone.Drugs Involved in U.S. Overdose Deaths* - Among the more than 64,00...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

College Degree And Income Potential
Everyone “knows” that college graduates make more money than people without a college degree.  So, if you take everyone with a college degree and put them in bucket A, and put everyone without a college degree in bucket B, the average wage of bucket A will be higher than B. So, does that mean you should get a college degree in order to get higher income? Does getting a college degree actually help you earn more money? No. It doesn’t. Photo by JOHN TOWNER on Unsplash The real thing that will help you earn more is acquiring valuable skills.  Many people acquire skills in college, so it isn’t...
Source: Productivity501 - January 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Mark Shead Tags: Development Source Type: blogs

Cancer Cure?
No there is not a cancer cure. We need to keep remembering that. We are told by our doctors that there is no evidence of disease or some thing along those lines - which just boils down to " we are not capable of finding it yet " . If your doctor tells you that you are cured, please find a new one asap.In this day and ageshould there be a new definition of cured of cancer? I'm not sure. I have friends who tell me they are cured. I try to figure out what they are talking about. Seriously, where did this cured business come from? I want to question their position on this but in some ways do not want to know." U...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - January 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient cancer bonds cancer cure cancer treatment lies Source Type: blogs

Is Forgetfulness An Indication of Alzheimer's Disease?
Millions of aging boomers wonder if their memory lapses are from normal aging or a sign that they are developing Alzheimer’s. There’s some basis for the worry. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million people in the U.S. are living with it. One in three seniors will die with Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. While these statistics are scary, you shouldn’t let them cloud the reality that many of us will age normally and will not develop AD, or any other type of dementia.  Read the full article on HealthCentral about memory and what it means for possible Alzh...
Source: Minding Our Elders - January 5, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Key Articles in Health IT from 2017 (Part 2 of 2)
The first part of this article set a general context for health IT in 2017 and started through the year with a review of interesting articles and studies. We’ll finish the review here. A thoughtful article suggests a positive approach toward health care quality. The author stresses the value of organic change, although using data for accountability has value too. An article extolling digital payments actually said more about the out-of-control complexity of the US reimbursement system. It may or not be coincidental that her article appeared one day after the CommonWell Health Alliance announced an API whose main purp...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - January 4, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Andy Oram Tags: 3D Printing ACO Apple Connected Health Digital Health Gadgets Genomics Google Healthcare AI Healthcare Analytics Healthcare API Healthcare Devices Healthcare IT Security Healthcare Reimbursement HIE Meaningful Use Medical D Source Type: blogs

No Surprise, Life Expectancy Declined Again
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD Newborns born in 29 other countries of the world have life expectancies exceeding 80 years; yet, an infant born in the US in 2016 is expected to live only 78.6 years according to recently released statistics. While death rates fell for 7 of the 10 biggest killers, such as cancer and heart disease, they climbed for the under-65 crowd. The irrefutable culprit is the unrelenting opioid epidemic. Last year life expectancy declined for the first time since 1993. The last two-year decline was in 1962 and 1963, more than a half-century ago. I predicted (accurately) it would decline again this year unless ther...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

When Your Antidepressant Isn ’ t as Safe as You Think
Conclusion Although the diversity of depression is well-recognized, almost all the drugs made to treat depression inhibit reuptake of one or another monoamine neuromediator, and very little has changed in our approach towards treatment since the advent of the first antidepressant drug. In order to overcome the dangers and limitations of therapy with antidepressants, there is an urgent need to create antidepressants that have a novel mechanism of action and better tolerance. More caution should be exercised by medical professionals when prescribing anti-depressants, as the ability to promote positive effects in many patient...
Source: World of Psychology - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Antidepressant Brain Blogger Medications Publishers Antidepressants clinical studies Depression discontinuation syndrome Effectiveness Of Antidepressants non-tricyclic antidepressants Research SSNRIs Ssris withdrawal Source Type: blogs

No Significant Increase in U.S. Autism Rates for the First Time in Decades
Rates of U.S. autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis may be stabilizing, report Time and other news outlets, who base their reports on a research letter from JAMA. The letter reviews 2014 through 2016 data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which indicate that the prevalence rate for ASD remains statistically flat. It holds at 2.4 percent for U.S. children and adolescents.  Information in the report was based on in-person household interviews, with mostly parents reporting on ASD diagnoses among 30,502 children and adolescents. The report lists the prevalence rate for boys as 3.54 percent and for girl...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - January 3, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: News Speech-Language Pathology Autism Spectrum Disorder Language Disorders Research Speech Disorders Source Type: blogs

Here ’s what the evidence shows about the links between creativity and depression
By Alex Fradera There’s a stereotype that mental distress is an almost inevitable part of being highly creative. But is there any substance to this idea, or have we been misled – by biographers drawn to artists with colourful and chaotic lives, and the conceits of cultural movements like the romantics? Scientific attempts to resolve this question, which have mainly focused on disorders of mood, have so far struggled to reach a definitive answer. However, in a new review in Perspectives on Psychological Science, Christa Taylor of Albany State University has applied surgical precision to open up the existing...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Creativity Mental health Source Type: blogs

High-Quality Early Childhood Programs Can Change Lives
The most comprehensive look to date at the benefits of early childhood education found that 102 of 115 programs improved at least one outcome for children beyond a statistical doubt. And the economic and social benefits continue to pay dividends, sometimes well into adulthood. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - January 3, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: RAND Corporation Source Type: blogs

Lesion-Symptom Mapping: A one day online workshop organized by C-STAR
The Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR; https://cstar.sc.edu/) is organizing a one day online workshop on Lesion-Symptom-Mapping methods, Thursday January 25th, between 10am and 4pm Eastern Daylight Time (US East coast). Please join us online that day, for an exciting line-up of speakers!This focus of this workshop will be on the pressing issues in the methods of Lesion Symptom Mapping, rather than on new neurocognitive findings. To make this workshop as interactive as possible, invited speakers will present for up to 30 minutes, followed by 20 minutes for question time and discussion...
Source: Talking Brains - January 3, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs