The public “deserve to know” that there is an overlooked subset of people who thrive after major depression
By Emma Young Depression is a chronic, recurrent, lifelong condition. Well, that’s the current orthodox view – but it is overstated, argues a team of psychologists led by Jonathan Rottenberg at the University of South Florida. “A significant subset of people recover and thrive after depression, yet research on such individuals has been rare,” they write in their recent paper in Perspectives on Psychological Science. They propose a definition for “high functioning after depression” (HFAD); argue that the advice given to people with depression need not be so gloomy; and lay out key areas f...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 30, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs

Are Clonally Expanded Stochastic Mutations Important in Brain Aging?
Beyond the risk of cancer, does random mutational damage to nuclear DNA provide a significant contribution to degenerative aging? Mutation counts rise with age, but if it was a case of every cell becoming a little mutated over the course of its duties before it is replaced, than it would be fairly clear that nuclear DNA damage isn't all that important. The vast majority of single mutations have little significant effect within the cell in which they occur, and that cell is just one of countless others. Cells divide, however, and thus mutations spread. Mutations in stem cells and other prolific cell populations can lead to ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 29, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Should You Get a Mammogram?
Leda Derderich wishes she’d started having mammograms sooner. Dederich had stage IV breast cancer diagnosed at age 45, two years after she and her doctor discussed and dismissed the need for a routine screening mammogram while breastfeeding at age 43. That decision to delay screening mammograms may have meant that she lost the chance to find and treat her breast cancer before it had spread beyond the breast. It’s a decision she regrets now, and blames on the confusion around mammogram guidelines. I have had a much harder time accepting that I was not screened for breast cancer before it was too late. No...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - October 28, 2018 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography ACOG ACR ACS Guidelines mammogram Stage IV USPSTF Source Type: blogs

Should You Get a Mammogram?
Leda Derderich wishes she had. Dederich had stage IV breast cancer diagnosed at age 45, two years after she and her doctor discussed and dismissed the need for a routine screening mammogram while breastfeeding at age 43. That decision to delay screening mammograms may have meant that she lost the chance to find and treat her breast cancer before it had spread beyond the breast. It’s a decision she regrets now, and blames on the confusion around mammogram guidelines. I have had a much harder time accepting that I was not screened for breast cancer before it was too late. Not because I couldn’t be bothere...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - October 28, 2018 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography ACOG ACR ACS Guidelines mammogram Stage IV USPSTF Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 29th 2018
This study shows that some genetic changes linked to cancer are present in surprisingly large numbers of normal cells. We still have a long way to go to fully understand the implications of these new findings, but as cancer researchers, we can't underestimate the importance of studying healthy tissue." Early Onset of Menopause Correlates with Shorter Life Expectancy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/10/early-onset-of-menopause-correlates-with-shorter-life-expectancy/ Aging is a phenomenon affecting all organs and systems throughout the body, driven by rising levels of molecular damage. The v...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 28, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Where Will the 500,000 Teens With Autism Work When They ’ re Adults?
October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month, hosted by the U.S. Department of Labor. Although this has been a designated event—in various forms—since 1945, few companies actively recruit people with disabilities. A structured UPS on-the-job training program helps young adults with autism prepare for life and work.   Job Programs for People With Autism Show Promise   Website Connects Employers to Job-Seekers With Autism A recent article in the Houston Chronicle highlights this issue. The headline shares a statistic from advocacy group Autism Speaks, estimating that 500,000 teens with au...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - October 26, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: News Slider Speech-Language Pathology Autism Spectrum Disorder Source Type: blogs

When breast cancer screening guidelines conflict: Some patients face real consequences
Are my breast cancer and I on the wrong side of statistics, or just caught in the confusing and potentially devastating conflict between medical societies about when women should start breast-cancer screening? One morning more than a year ago, it didn’t seem like either. As both of my kids cuddled in bed with my husband and me, I started the conversation I’d been dreading. “Remember when I went to the doctor a few weeks ago?” I reminded my children. “Well, it turns out they found a bump in my boob. If it stays, it won’t be good for me. So we have to take it out.” “What is it?...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/leda-dederich" rel="tag" > Leda Dederich < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Antipsychotics Don't Help ICU delirium
by Drew Rosielle (@drosielle)It just gets worse and worse for the idea that antipsychotics have efficacy for delirium.Last year Iposted about the RCT of haloperidol, risperidone, or placebo for delirium symptoms in'palliative'patients. I'm pretty sure I called for more controlled,'high quality,'trials, and we are lucky enough to have another.This one is arandomized, double-blinded, registered, controlled trial of haloperidol, ziprasidone, or placebo for ICU delirium, just published in NEJM.The trial took place in a geographically diverse group of US-based intensive care units. They enrolled adult patients in medical or sur...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 25, 2018 Category: Palliative Care Tags: delirium icu journal article rosielle Source Type: blogs

Assessing the Genetic Influence on Human Life Span
The falling cost of gene sequencing allows for genetic data to be incorporated into studies of ever larger populations. At least hundreds of thousands of entire human genomes have been sequenced, and more selective sequencing has been undertaken for millions more. This data is now beginning to show up in epidemiological studies that tackle questions of health, choice, aging, and longevity. What should we expect to see emerge from this scientific analysis? It seems fairly clear from the extensive existing evidence, data that results from many association studies carried out in search of gene variants correlated with ...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 24, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

BCBL Post Doc on neurocomputational basis of language learning and statistical learning
The Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language – BCBL- (San Sebastián, Basque Country, Spain) is offering a postdoctoral position focused on neurocomputational basis of language learning and statistical learning, as part of ERC-funded research project (PI: Ram Frost).The successful candidate will join an interdisciplinary team of researchers studying the cognitive and neural mechanisms underlying statistical learning and language learning from behavioural and computational perspectives. Work undertaken related to this position will contribute to integrating these different perspectives in an explicit neuroc...
Source: Talking Brains - October 24, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Police Clearance Rates Are Not Lower in States with Many Illegal Immigrants
Immigrant criminality and its impact on the United States is one of the most important issues in the public debate over immigration. In order to provide new insight into this topic, my coauthor Michelangelo Landgrave and I have attempted to estimate theillegal immigrantincarceration rate. I have also written a shortpaper on Texas criminal conviction rates by immigration status and crime based on data provided by the state of Texas. All three papers found that illegal immigrants were less likely to be convicted or incarcerated for crimes than native-born Americans.Mypaper on illegal immigrant crime rates in Texas is based o...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 23, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

5 Ways a Chronic Illness Can Affect Your Relationship
And how to get them through it as a team. Can romantic relationships survive a chronic illness? If you or your loved one has recently been diagnosed, knowing how to handle possible changes can help you stay in love despite the emotional news of serious health problems or disease. What is a chronic illness or disease? The specific definition gets a bit tricky, as “[there] is not only tremendous variation in the diseases that are included under the umbrella term ‘chronic disease’ but also variation in the time a disease must be present for something to be referred to as chronic,” but for the purposes ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 22, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Chronic Pain Communication Health-related Publishers Relationships YourTango Chronic Disease chronic health condition Chronic Illness Source Type: blogs

Is There a Mid-Life Crisis in Heart Disease Prevention?
By: Dr. Yvonne Commodore-Mensah, Dr. Lola Coke & Dr. Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb Heart disease, as defined by the 2017 American Heart Association Statistics, effects nearly half of American adults—and a striking number of adults in ‘midlife,’ aged 35-64.  Though largely preventable, the disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States and claims The post Is There a Mid-Life Crisis in Heart Disease Prevention? appeared first on Johns Hopkins Nursing Magazine. (Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University)
Source: Nursing Blogs at Johns Hopkins University - October 22, 2018 Category: Nursing Authors: Editor Tags: New heart disease high blood pressure Hypertension Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, October 22nd 2018
In this report, we propose that the molecular mechanisms of beneficial actions of CR should be classified and discussed according to whether they operate under rich or insufficient energy resource conditions. Future studies of the molecular mechanisms of the beneficial actions of CR should also consider the extent to which the signals/factors involved contribute to the anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and other CR actions in each tissue or organ, and thereby lead to anti-aging and prolongevity. RNA Interference of ATP Synthase Subunits Slows Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 21, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Quell Non-Medication Solution for Chronic Pain: Interview with CEO Shai Gozani
Chronic pain affects 100 million Americans and is the most common cause of long-term disability. Long-term use of pain medications has significant risks, and chronic pain is a major contributor to opioid overuse. NeuroMetrix hopes to offer effective, non-medication solutions for chronic pain. The Waltham, MA-based company has developed the Quell wearable device, which uses principles of neurostimulation to decrease the sensation of chronic pain. In a newly published study, 4 out of 5 users reported decreased pain after 60 days of use. We spoke with NeuroMetrix founder and CEO Shai Gozani, MD, PhD, to find out more abo...
Source: Medgadget - October 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Exclusive Medicine Neurology OTC Pain Management Rehab Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

How to pay for long-term care
The topic of paying for long-term care is an overlooked issue in health care. None of us want to think about living our final days in the nursing home, but statistically speaking, many of us will. How will you pay for it? What are the options? Long-term care in this country can be divided into two general classes based on funding: governmental and private payers. In terms of government programs, Medicaid will pay for a nursing home or rehab, whereas Medicare only pays for a maximum of 100 days of post-hospital recovery care. On the other hand, private insurance companies offer what is referred to as long-term care insuranc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kevin-tolliver" rel="tag" > Kevin Tolliver, MD, MBA < /a > Tags: Policy Geriatrics Public Health & Source Type: blogs

Do Deep Roots Explain Firm Management Practices?
Management practices in firms differ widely between countries according to research summarized by economistsNicholas Bloom and John Van Reenen.   The differences between well-managed firms and those that are poorly managed are significant and could help explain differences inTotal Factor Productivity (TFP) between countries.   In the field of economic history, economistsLouis Putterman and David N. Weil (henceforth P&W) found that the length of time that a population of a country has lived with a centralized state and with settled agriculture (henceforth, Deep Roots) are powerful predictors of their GDP per c...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh, Andrew Forrester Source Type: blogs

Story-listening shows promise as an intervention for people living with dementia
By Emma Young Listening to a story is known to be cognitively demanding, in part because the listener has to pay close attention to, and remember, plot and character detail in order to understand what’s going on. Attention and memory are both diminished in people living with dementia. Might regularly reading aloud to such patients help, then, to train their attention and memory, and function as a treatment? A new study of people with various kinds of dementia, published in Psychology and Neuroscience, suggests that it could.  A total of 43 patients with Alzheimer’s, vascular dementia or general cognitive ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 18, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Memory Source Type: blogs

7 reasons why this physician works half-time
By the time you read this, I will have completed a transition to working half-time. Now, I know a lot of docs out there think emergency docs are already only working half-time, so perhaps I ought to start with explaining why that isn’t the case, even if emergency physicians work fewer hours than many other physicians. Let’s start with the fact that most Americans consider 35 to 40 hours a week to be a full-time job. A typical emergency physician works 12 twelve-hour shifts a month or 16 eight-hour shifts per month. Add an hour on to the end of each of those shifts “to clean up” and perhaps another h...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/james-m-dahle" rel="tag" > James M. Dahle, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

A Biotech Industry CEO on mTOR Inhibitors and the Treatment of Aging
There is a point in the life of a young biotech company at which one traditionally appoints an established figure from industry as the CEO. Running a company that is in the public eye due to clinical trials and heading in the direction of an IPO requires a whole different set of skills than were needed for early growth and technical success in development programs. It also tends to be a sign of the changing balance of influence between founders, investors, and industry partners as development programs progress. This happened earlier in the year for Navitor Pharmaceuticals, one of a number of companies working on mTOR inhib...
Source: Fight Aging! - October 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs

A soaring maternal mortality rate: What does it mean for you?
Update: A new guideline from the World Health Organization (WHO) aims to help reduce steadily rising rates of caesarean sections around the globe. While crucial at times for medical reasons, Cesarean births are associated with short-term and long-risks health risks for women and babies that may extend for years. In June 2018, Serena Williams told Vanity Fair about her journey to motherhood, including the story of how she nearly died a few days after giving birth. In September, Beyoncé punctuated her Vogue cover with the story of how she developed a life-threatening pregnancy condition called pre...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neel Shah, MD, MPP, FACOG Tags: Health Health trends Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Trauma-informed care: What it is, and why it ’s important
Update Writing in the October 10, 2018 New England Journal of Medicine, Eve Rittenberg, MD, assistant professor at Harvard Medical School and practicing physician at Brigham and Women’s Fish Center for Women’s Health, reflects on the impact the Kavanaugh hearing and #MeToo movement have had on patients who have experienced sexual violence. Important principles of trauma-informed care—including ways to ask permission, offer control, and find support—described in her article and in Monique Tello’s post below can make a real difference to many women and health care professionals alike. ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Health care Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

October in Prenatal Loss Awareness Month
Many people are not aware that 1 in 4 pregnancies ends in loss. That statistic feels even more staggering when you look at the yearly number: that approximately one million pregnancies in the United States and Canada end in early pregnancy loss, SIDS, miscarriage, stillbirth, or the death of the newborn child. Pregnancy and Infant Loss are deeply painful experiences that many families face daily, but they receive little attention. Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness Month can reach and teach others about the needs of bereaved parents.Here are 7 ways to help a loved one or friend deal with early pregnanc...
Source: Dr. Deborah Serani - October 15, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Tags: awareness campaigns parenting pregnancy loss Source Type: blogs

Oct 12, Experimenter Effects in Behavioral Research: Today in the History of Psychology (12th October 1966)
Robert Rosenthal's classic book 'Experimenter Effects in Behavioral Research' was published. The book grew out of a reanalysis of the statistical data within Rosenthal's own doctoral dissertation which he stated 'suggested strongly that my hypothesis or expectation about how the subjects should respond had somehow been communicated to the subjects so that my hypothesis might have become a self-fulfilling prophecy.' Such was the impact of the Robert Rosenthal's book that by 1979, The Science Citation Index (SCI) and the Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCITM) reported that it had been cited over 740 times. See following lin...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - October 13, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

What Big Pharma does NOT want you to know about LDL cholesterol
Those of you following these Wheat Belly and Undoctored Blog posts know that it is no secret that Big Pharma is a predatory, manipulative, cutthroat industry that employs underhanded and unethical tactics as routine business. Part of their huge economic success is that they are so effective in getting my colleagues, mainstream physicians, to drink their Kool-Aid and do a lot of the dirty work for them. Just witness what happened in the opioid crisis—it couldn’t have happened without the willing participation of physicians. It’s no different with “treating” cholesterol, total and LDL, with stat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - October 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates cholesterol LDL lipoproteins low-carb small ldl undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

How to Really Get Important Things Done
You start researching something important online and find that 20 minutes later you’re on some stranger’s Facebook page, scanning their photos and reading the comments. You’re writing an article, and before you know it, you’ve picked up your phone and started scrolling Instagram. You’re working on a presentation, and every 2 minutes you refresh your inbox. You also send a few texts, and see what’s on clearance on your favorite clothing site. It’s all-too easy to get distracted—even when we’re doing interesting, rewarding work. Which is tough because the most powerful re...
Source: World of Psychology - October 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Habits Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Success & Achievement Beating Procrastination Personal Priorities Productivity Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 10th October 2018
Some recent things you might need to know about. ResearchWorldviews in Evidence Based NursingFear of Childbirth, Postpartum Depression, and Birth ‐Related Variables as Predictors of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After ChildbirthHealth Information and Libraries JournalMothers ’ perception of maternal and child health information disseminated via different modes of ICT in NigeriaStatisticsMaternity Services Monthly StatisticsJune 2018  Female Genital Mutilation (FGM)April 2018 to June 2018NewsStillbirths and newborn deaths reviewed by south Wales health boardAcknowledgement: Embed Health Consortium Hea...
Source: Browsing - October 10, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: blogs

The Top Sleep Apps To Start Your Bedtime Tracking Journey
Instead of angels, dragons or unicorns, trackers may guard your dreams in the 21st century – which at least gives you a chance to gain more insight into your sleep data and actually improve your bedtime. If you want to become the master of sleep tracking, start with an app. Here, we collected the top sleep apps to choose from! With data for a better bedtime Research shows that humans spend one-third of their lives with sleeping or at least attempting to do so. If you have trouble with the snooze, there have been many traditional and non-traditional, legal and illegal methods to help: sleeping pills, booze, marijuana,...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 10, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Medical Professionals Patients android app apps fitness future iphone Personalized medicine sleep sleep app sleep sensor sleep tracker smartphone technology wearables Source Type: blogs

The Gender Pay Gap: Why We Fight The Narrative
The Economist reports on an interesting new study undertaken on differences in gender pay:According to data for 8.7m employees worldwide gathered by Korn Ferry, a consultancy, women in Britain make just 1% less than men who have the same function and level at the same employer. In most European countries, the discrepancy is similarly small. These numbers do not show that the labour market is free of sex discrimination. However, they do suggest that the main problem today is not unequal pay for equal work, but whatever it is that leads women to be in lower-ranking jobs at lower-paying organisations.The figures for Britain i...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 9, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Governors Fiscal Report 2018
The Cato Institute has released its 14th biennialfiscal report card on the governors.The report uses statistical data to grade the governors on their taxing and spending records since 2016. Governors who have cut taxes and spending the most receive the highest grades, whereas those who have increased taxes and spending the most receive the lowest grades.Five governors were awarded an A: Susana Martinez of New Mexico, Henry McMaster of South Carolina, Doug Burgum of North Dakota, Paul LePage of Maine, and Greg Abbott of Texas.Eight governors were awarded an F: Roy Cooper of North Carolina, John Bel Edwards of Louisiana, Tom...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 9, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

“My-side bias” makes it difficult for us to see the logic in arguments we disagree with
By Christian Jarrett In what feels like an increasingly polarised world, trying to convince the “other side” to see things differently often feels futile. Psychology has done a great job outlining some of the reasons why, including showing that, regardless of political leanings, most people are highly motivated to protect their existing views. However a problem with some of this research is that it is very difficult to concoct opposing real-life arguments of equal validity, so as to make a fair comparison of people’s treatment of arguments they agree and disagree with. To get around this problem...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Thought Source Type: blogs

The Importance of Distraction-Free Parenting
Parents today are generally aware of why it is a problem to let their kids constantly be on phones, computers and TVs. They know it impacts kids’ sleep, that it is a factor in childhood obesity, that it is associated with delayed language development in babies and delayed social skills development in children and teens. They know that too much time of screens is a predictor of academic problems and social anxiety and that it is linked to attention, emotional and conduct problems. Nonetheless, many parents find it difficult to limit their kids’ use of devices. Partly it’s because they have become so common...
Source: World of Psychology - October 8, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Children and Teens Communication Family Habits Parenting Technology Active Listening better communication Smartphone social media Source Type: blogs

Clicking checkboxes doesn ’t meaningfully improve care
Earlier this week, I was pleased to learn that my practice had achieved a statistically significant increase in box clicking. In reviewing data from our accountable care organization, graphs were shown to us demonstrating improved compliance with several of the measures that they’ve instituted institution-wide for the purpose of reporting back to Medicare on how well we are taking care of our patients. One of these measures is the ever popular “falls prevention” button. Continue reading ... Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/fred-n-pelzman" rel="tag" > Fred N. Pelzman, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

On “ us ” and “ them ” : what if we ’ re one of “ them ” ?
Over the past few years I’ve been pondering the presumed gap between people living with pain and the people who “treat” or work with them.  Most of my readers will know that I live with widespread pain (aka fibromyalgia) or pain that is present in many parts of my body, and the associated other symptoms like DOMS that last for weeks not a day or two, and increased sensitivity to heat, cold, pressure, chilli, sound and so on. I first “came out” with my pain about 15 years ago: that is, I first disclosed to people I worked with that I had this weird ongoing pain – and finally joined...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - October 7, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Professional topics Research Therapeutic approaches inclusion inequality Source Type: blogs

Over 100 Million Immigrants Have Come to America Since the Founding
America is a nation of immigrants, and throughout its history, it has received nearly 100 million immigrants. I almost wrote that America “welcomed” them, but the fact is that very few of those 100 million were broadly popular with the public when they arrived. They came nonetheless. They thrived, and those immigrants—at least those who stuck it out in the face of harassment and discrimination—and their descendants built the c ountry that we have today.The term “immigrants” refers to foreigners who come to the United States with the intention to settle permanently. They are distinct from...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 4, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

The IVF doctor ’s bedside manner
Most doctors are great at talking sweetly to patients at the time of the first consultation, because they want to lure the patient in for treatment.  It ’s easy to give patients lots of hopes and promises, and many patients like this , because it boosts their confidence , and they like the doctor’s positivity. They feel that being treated by a confident and optimistic doctor will improve their chance of getting pregnant.But this has a downside and can backfire , because when the cycle fails , the patient feels completely let down. The same highly positive doctor becomes negative, and starts to ignore the p...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - October 4, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 3rd October 2018
This report uses 2017 data to show key achievements made in neonatal care for preterm babies in England, Scotland and Wales. The report contains key findings and selected recommendations for quality improvement of neonatal care going forward.Acknowledgements: Embed Health Consortium Health Bulletin, NICE Newsletter, King ’s Fund Library Health Management and Policy Alert; BMJ alerts (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - October 3, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Trump Has Cut Christian Refugees 64%, Muslim Refugees 93%
In a campaign address, Donald Trumptold his supporters that “if you are Syrian and you’re Christian, it’s almost impossible to come into the United States… it’s all going to change.” After his inauguration, he reiterated the promise. “They’re chopping off the heads of everyone, but more so, the Christians,” hetold CBN News. “I thought it was very, very unfair, so we’re going to help them.”But he hasn ’t. Refugee resettlement has changed, but not for the better. While his administrationhas reduced Muslim refugee arrivals 93 percent compared to th...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 3, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

​Encourage Your Teen to Practice Self-Care
We have a serious problem affecting our teens and no one is talking about it. Every year, teens are facing a crisis thanks to an increase in pressure to be perfect. Competitive college programs, unpaid internships for industry entry, mountains of homework, extra curricular activities, struggles within their social group, family and home life troubles. It is enough to make anyone teen depressed. In fact, there are disturbing statistics around teen suicide. Suicide has become the second leading cause of death among youth between the ages of 11 and 24. Stories involving children as young as 10 give heartbreaking details of a ...
Source: World of Psychology - October 3, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Children and Teens College Parenting Perfectionism Self-Help Student Therapist Students Source Type: blogs

Anterior MI in paced rhythm, dismissed by cardiologist, patient died.
Conclusion: This represents the largest study of patients with VPR and angiographically-proven ACO.The MSC were highly sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of ACO in patients presenting to the ED with VPR and symptoms of acute coronary syndrome.-----------------------------------------------------------Comment by KEN GRAUER, MD (10/3/2018):-----------------------------------------------------------How good are paced tracings for detecting ACO (Acute Coronary Occlusion)? The answer is, much better than has previously been appreciated by still all-too-many clinicians. The goal...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - October 3, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

A soaring maternal mortality rate: What does it mean for you?
In June 2018, Serena Williams told Vanity Fair about her journey to motherhood, including the story of how she nearly died a few days after giving birth. In September, Beyoncé punctuated her Vogue cover with the story of how she developed a life-threatening pregnancy condition called preeclampsia, which can lead to seizures and stroke. Throughout the summer, headlines like “Dying to Deliver” and “Deadly Deliveries” and “Maternal Mortality: An American Crisis” popped up on newsfeeds and streamed on screens across America. As a professor who studies safety in pregnancy, I ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - October 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neel Shah, MD, MPP, FACOG Tags: Health Health trends Pregnancy Women's Health Source Type: blogs

HOW TO Support Patient Education Through Technologies?
There’s nothing new about an information-savvy patient. The novelty is the array of digital technologies and internet-based communication tools aiming at appeasing that appetite beyond just asking doctors for advice. How could medical professionals help their patients understand the most possible about diseases, drugs, treatments and alternative care with the help of innovative means? Here’s our overview. Like it or not, patients google symptoms One of the most visible consequences of digital health is the change in the relationship between patients and doctors. The latter are not the exclusive source of medica...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 2, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Empowered Patients From Chance to Choice Healthcare Design Medical Professionals Social media in Healthcare communication digital digital health doctor-patient doctor-patient relationship future health communication patient educati Source Type: blogs

NHS key statistics: England, October 2018
House of Commons Library - This briefing paper provides a summary of NHS demand, performance and capacity of services in England. It includes A&E statistics, waiting lists, ambulance data, delayed discharges, staffing levels including doctors and nurses, and more.BriefingMore detail (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - October 2, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: NHS measurement and performance Source Type: blogs

Expensive Hospitals: The Enemy Within
By ANISH KOKA MD Everyone agrees that health care is bankrupting the nation. The prevailing winds have carried the argument that a system that pays per unit of health care delivered and thus favors volume over value is responsible. The problem, you see, was the doctors. They were just incentivized to do too much. This incontrovertible fact was the basis for changes in the healthcare system that favored hospital employment and have made the salaried physician the new normal. Yet, health care costs remain ascendant. Why? It turns out overutilization in the US healthcare system isn’t what its cracked up to be. Figure 1...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Finance Patients Physicians Anish Koka expensive health care finances health care finances Incentives Source Type: blogs

Nursing Jobs, Cost of Living, & Where to Hang Your Hat
In my work as a career coach for nurses and healthcare professionals, I frequently witness those who work in nursing struggling with decisions related to finding work and the relative cost of living in terms of where they live or where they might move.Making decisions about your workstyle and lifestyle can be fraught with anxiety and concern about the future -- let's unpack that conundrum.Photo by Joey Csunyo on UnsplashWorkstyle and LifestyleFiguring out where to live and work can be a difficult choice. On the one hand, you want to earn up to your potential and receive the highest possible wage according to...
Source: Digital Doorway - October 1, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: advanced practice nurses career career development career management careers healthcare careers job search nurse careers nurse practitioners nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

“ WAR ’ S NEW WOUNDS. A shock wave of brain injuries ”
That was the headline in a Washington Post article written by Ronald Glasser, published on Sunday, April 8, 2007. It reported a rather astounding statistic that applies to veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars: About 30% of soldiers in those conflicts have been directly exposed to IED or other powerful explosions. That exposure has resulted in diffuse physical trauma to their brains. To paraphrase Mr. Glasser, detonation of any powerful explosive generates a blast wave of high pressure that spreads out at about twice the speed of sound away from the explosion, and travels with great force over hundreds of yards. The in...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - October 1, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Merzenich Tags: Aging and the Brain Brain Fitness Brain Trauma, Injury Cognitive impairments Source Type: blogs

Lesser-Skilled Immigrants Are Still Important to the U.S. Economy
A common argument employed by those opposed to lesser-skilled immigrants is that they are simply out of place in America ’s high-tech economy. We often hear that the only workers we need now are those with advanced degrees. Yet according tothe Bureau of Labor Statistics, 115 million Americans —74 percent of the total—were employed in jobs that do not require a Bachelor’s degree in 2016. Moreover, nearly a quarter of all jobs were those without any education requirement.Share of Employment by Education RequirementThe opponents of lesser-skilled immigrants could respond by claiming that while this is ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 28, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Postdoc: Evolution of downy mildew pathogens
Postdoctoral Researcher – Evolution of downy mildew pathogens The Quesada Lab at North Carolina State University invites applications for a Postdoctoral Researcher position. The Postdoc will be responsible for performing evolutionary genomics research with downy mildew plant pathogens affecting specialty crops. The project will focus on studying host adaptation in downy mildew pathogens and shifts in pathogen populations that have resulted in failure of control methods such as host resistance and fungicides. Next generation sequencing and multi-locus sequencing will be used for isolate genotyping. Phenotyping assays ...
Source: Fungal Genomes and Comparative Genomics - September 27, 2018 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Jason Stajich Tags: postdoc ncsu powdery mildew Source Type: blogs

August 2010 Man of the Month: E-Patient Dave
Richard Davies deBronkart Jr , known by many as e-Patient Dave, is a cancer patient and blogger who, in 2009, became a noted activist for health care transformation through participatory medicine and personal health data rights. In 2010, he became a published author and Disruptive Women in Health Care’s August Man of the Month. I was a middle-aged guy going through life, as involved with my own health care as I was with my car’s carburetor, which is to say, virtually not at all. And then I found out I was almost dead. That’s how my interview with Dave started. Dave was diagnosed in January 2007 with Stage...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - September 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dw at disruptivewomen.net Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs