What's new in midwifery - 5th June 2019
Two weeks'worth of recent things.  StatisticsFemale genital mutilation, Jan - Mar 2019Maternity statistics, Feb 2019Quarterly conceptions to women aged under 18 years, England and Wales, Jan - Mar 2018Mental healthThe perinatal mental health (PMH) matrix: Improving the quality of care for women (NICE Blog)Global healthWhy Rohingya women risk dangerous home births in Bangladesh's refugee camps (The New Humanitarian)And alsoTaking the p***: the decline of the great British public toilet (Royal Society for Public Health) Acknowledgements, as ever to King's Fund Library, Embed Health Consortium. (Source: Browsing)
Source: Browsing - June 5, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Geriatric Medicine Recertification Completed
I am happy to announce that I passed the test.  I am referring to the geriatrics examination given by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM).  This means that I am recertified as a Board Certified Specialist in Geriatric Medicine. Recertification is required every 10 years, and this was the third time I succeeded.  You would think it gets easier each time, but the opposite is true.  New drugs, new side effects, new theories of aging, and new statistics had me studying two hours each morning for a good five weeks prior to the exam.  The test itself was a full day, with subject matter that co...
Source: Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - June 5, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Jeffrey Levine Tags: An Aging World Art & Medicine Featured Medical Articles Geriatric Medicine Long-Term Care geriatrics gerontology Healthcare Quality Improving Medical Care Jeff Levine MD Jeffrey M Levine MD Source Type: blogs

Is The ADHA Setting Us All Up For The Mother OF All Confusion On Medication Lists?
The release from the ADHA came out a few days ago:Engaging pharmacists to enhance medicines safety30 May 2019: The Pharmacist Shared Medicines List is a new feature coming to My Health Record that provides a complete view of a consumer ’s medicines, including non-prescription and over the counter products. The Pharmaceutical Society of Australia’s report Medicine Safety: Take Care cites some sobering statistics on medicines safety in Australia: 250,000 hospital admissions annually as a result of medication-related problems, at an annual cost of $1.4 billion. The good news is that half of these problems are thou...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - June 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Ban the Box and Statistical Discrimination
With 25 percent of the world ’s prison population, the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate of any country in the world. Over 600,000 people are released from American prisons each year and, sadly, about two-thirds of them will be rearrested within three years. Creating opportunities for people released from prison to rein tegrate into society has rightly become a key focus of criminal justice reformers.In recent years, “Ban The Box” policies and legislation, which require companies to delay asking whether job applicants have a criminal record until later in the hiring process, have become a popular po...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 4, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Peter Van Doren Source Type: blogs

Digital Skin Care: Top 8 Dermatology Apps
Each year 2-3 million non-melanoma and 132,000 melanoma skin cancers occur globally according to statistics from the WHO. Thus, every tool has to be deployed for early detection and intervention. As smartphone penetration already reached the quarter of the Earth’s population, smartphone apps seem to be a viable way to go against skin conditions. Here, we collected the top dermatology apps to aid your digital skin care. As smartphones take over the world, dermatology apps multiply As technology continues to advance, so too does its accessibility to the general population. In 2013, only 56 percent of Americans ow...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 4, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine & Smartphones dermatology Health Healthcare Innovation patient patient information skin smart health smart healthcare smartphone apps technology Source Type: blogs

Exploring Feeding/Swallowing Disorders Versus Eating Disorders in Children
What would you say if a graduate student or clinical fellow asked you to explain the difference between a feeding/swallowing disorder and an eating disorder for pediatric patients? As a pediatric feeding and swallowing specialists, I answer this question with, “It’s complicated.” Often, an overriding medical issue—such as gastrointestinal issues or poor oral strength and coordination due to prematurity—causes feeding and swallowing disorders. As medical issues resolve, feeding and swallowing issues can persist. And, over time, these issues could gradually change from medically based issues to...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - June 3, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jennifer WIlson Tags: Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia eating disorders Feeding Disorders Social Media Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 3rd 2019
In conclusion, there is solid evidence that obesity deregulates cellular mechanisms related to nutrient sensing. Altered Intercellular Communication It is accepted that aging impacts the organism at the cellular level, but also decreases the capacity of cells of an organism to interact. During aging, there is a decreased communication at the neuronal, neuroendocrine, and endocrine levels. Two of the most compelling examples of impaired communication are inflammaging and immunosenescence. The inflammaging phenotype results in elevated cytokines. These cytokines can accelerate and propagate the aging process. T...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 2, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Does Obesity Literally Accelerate Aging?
In conclusion, there is solid evidence that obesity deregulates cellular mechanisms related to nutrient sensing. Altered Intercellular Communication It is accepted that aging impacts the organism at the cellular level, but also decreases the capacity of cells of an organism to interact. During aging, there is a decreased communication at the neuronal, neuroendocrine, and endocrine levels. Two of the most compelling examples of impaired communication are inflammaging and immunosenescence. The inflammaging phenotype results in elevated cytokines. These cytokines can accelerate and propagate the aging process. T...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Growing Beyond Labels: We are Not Simply a Disorder
Reliably, about once a month, I come across someone who believes that a person who’s been diagnosed with X, Y, or Z mental disorder has, in effect, a life-crippling disability. Somehow they got a hold of the diagnostic manual of mental disorders or read some symptoms or an article or two online, and suddenly they feel like they know everything about a condition. If a person has a disorder like depression, they believe that they know everything they need to know about that person. When I was seeing patients back in graduate school, I sometimes looked at some of them that way too. But in the intervening 20+ years, I&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - May 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Policy and Advocacy Psychiatry Psychology destigmatization identity Label Mental Health Stereotypes Source Type: blogs

Predictions and Parachutes
By SAURABH JHA, MD What does it take to create a decision rule? In this episode of Radiology Firing Line podcast Saurabh Jha (@RogueRad) has a discussion with Robert W. Yeh MD MBA about the deep thought and complex statistics involved in creating a decision rule to guide therapy which have narrow risk-benefit calculus, specifically a rule for how long patients should continue dual anti-platelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention. They also discuss the motivation behind the legendary, and satirical, parachute RCT published in the recent Christmas edition of the BMJ, which delighted satirists all over the wo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Medical Practice Radiology Firing Line Podcasts RogueRad @roguerad decision rule Robert Yeh Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Hearing Loss and Tau Levels in Alzheimer's Disease
There is a correlation between hearing loss and progression of dementia via conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. It remains an open question as to the direction of causation in this relationship - or indeed whether there is little to no causation, and this is a case of two independent manifestations of the same underlying process of damage and dysfunction. Many aspects of aging are correlated simply because aging is, at root, caused by the accumulation of a small number of forms of cell and tissue damage. If a greater degree of any one type of damage is present, then all of the consequences of that damage will tend to b...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 31, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Link Between Teens ’ Time On Digital Devices And Lower Wellbeing Is “Too Small To Merit Substantial Scientific Discussion”
By Christian Jarrett My friends and I would often be so hooked on the latest Sega Mega Drive video game that we’d play all day long, breaking only for munchies or when nature called. Our parents would urge (plead with) us to get outside, especially when it was sunny. “The fresh air and exercise will do you good”, they would say, or similar. Fast forward to now, and the anxiety over all the time that children and young people spend in front of screens, be it playing video games, watching TV or using social media, has of course only intensified. Surely it can’t be mentally or physically healthy, can i...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Mental health Technology Source Type: blogs

Understanding Machine Learning And Deep Learning In Medicine
Algorithms, datasets, machine learning, deep learning, cognitive computing, big data, and artificial intelligence: IT expressions that took over the language of 21st-century healthcare with surprising force. If medical professionals want to get ahead of the curve, they rather get familiarized with the basics of A.I. and have an idea of what medical problems they aim to solve. So, let’s take a closer look at machine learning and deep learning in medicine. The ante-room of artificial intelligence The term “artificial intelligence” might be misleading as due to the overuse of the expression, its meanin...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 30, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine AI algorithm deep learning Health Healthcare Innovation machine learning smart smart algorithm smart health technology Source Type: blogs

State of Cloud Cybersecurity
Long-time readers of Healthcare IT Today will know that we love good infographics here at the office. There is nothing better than interesting statistics delivered in a compact, visually appealing format. The Center for Connected Medicine (CCM), based in Pittsburgh and part of UPMC, recently released a “State of Cloud Cybersecurity in Health Care” infographic […] (Source: EMR and HIPAA)
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 30, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Colin Hung Tags: Healthcare IT Hospital - Health System Security and Privacy CCM Center for Connected Medicine cloud cyber security Data Breach Healthcare Data Security Source Type: blogs

Cloud Computing for Clinical Trial Data: Interview with Jackie Kent, SVP and Head of Product, Medidata
Medidata offers data collection, analysis, and presentation services for clinical trials through its cloud computing AI platform. The aim of the system is to reduce the workload involved in data handling and analysis. This can be considerable in clinical trials, where enormous amounts of data are generated from diverse clinical sites, making the resulting datasets challenging to assemble, analyze, and organize. Medidata offers a secure centralized platform to collect and store such data, and also provides a data analysis and presentation service so that customers can see how the trial is progressing without having to crunc...
Source: Medgadget - May 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Informatics Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: What is Schizophrenia?
    What is schizophrenia? From pop culture’s view to Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, view of herself to a leading mental health doctor and professor’s view. What are the actual symptoms? What is the difference between a hallucination and delusion? What is it like to experience one? How do you manage it? How is social media changing the way it is viewed? In this first episode of Inside Schizophrenia, Rachel and co-host Gabe Howard with special guest Dr. Ali Mattu explore this often misrepresented mental illness. Highlights From ‘Schizophrenia’ Episode [00:40] Would you th...
Source: World of Psychology - May 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Inside Schizophrenia Peer Support Self-Help Source Type: blogs

“ What if I just ignore my SIBO? ”
By just engaging in the basic strategies in the Wheat Belly Total Health, Wheat Belly 10-Day Grain Detox, or Undoctored programs, many mild cases of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, SIBO, reverse. These efforts thereby restore your ability to ingest prebiotic fibers without diarrhea, bloating, gas, abdominal discomfort, joint pain, and dark emotional feelings. Many people thereby are relieved of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, fibromyalgia, or restless leg syndrome, or have greater power in reversing autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Unfortunately, not everybody enjoys reversal of SIBO with our b...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: SIBO grain-free probiotic undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Change and the Case for Being a Medical Conservative:
When my favorite podcaster, the economist Tyler Cowan, asked Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel what nonobvious advice he would give to medical students today, the answer surprised me. The famous bioethicist said:  I do think that this is probably the most exciting time in American medicine in a century, since really about 1910, 1920. And it causes a lot of anxiety for people, so I want to be sympathetic to that…. …We would prefer no change. But I do think, if you can go with the change, this is a super exciting time when lots of things are changing, and you can have a real positive impact in shaping the ...
Source: Dr John M - May 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr John Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 27th 2019
In this study, we found that cofilin competes with tau for direct microtubule binding in vitro, in cells, and in vivo, which inhibits tau-induced microtubule assembly. Genetic reduction of cofilin mitigates tauopathy and synaptic defects in Tau-P301S mice and movement deficits in tau transgenic C. elegans. The pathogenic effects of cofilin are selectively mediated by activated cofilin, as active but not inactive cofilin selectively interacts with tubulin, destabilizes microtubules, and promotes tauopathy. These results therefore indicate that activated cofilin plays an essential intermediary role in neurotoxic signaling th...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 26, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Join Experts, Activists and Philanthropists in the Call for Mental Health: Time to Act
There is no happiness or health without mental health for all. The International Foundation of Research and Education (iFred) and Founder Kathryn Goetzke, hosted ‘The Future of Health’ for the first ever World Happiness Virtual Agora. The event brought together leading scientists, educators, innovators, technologists, business leaders, entrepreneurs, and youth to share why and how mental health must be addressed today. The talks were compelling and full of action steps you, as someone who cares about mental health, can take now to create action and movement in your community. Check out the latest statistics, tr...
Source: World of Psychology - May 26, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Inspiration & Hope Source Type: blogs

A man in his sixties with chest pain at midnight with undetectable troponin
Written by Pendell MeyersA male in his 60s with no known past medical history presented at midnight with chest pain over the past 3 hours. The pain started just after eating, and at first he thought it was " reflux, " however he decided to call 911 after a few hours when it did not improve.Here is his presenting ECG:What do you think?Here are the relevant findings:Slight STE in V12.5 mm STE in V2Slight STD in V4-V6Definite STD in II, III, and aVFHyperacute T-waves in V2, and likely also in aVLThese findings are highly specific for LAD occlusion. We have many cases of this pattern on this blog, involving STE and h...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - May 26, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Can Digital Health Go Off-Grid And Still Save Lives?
What would you do without your smartphone or laptop for a week? Some cannot even imagine putting them down for a second, not thinking much of the vulnerability of our entire digital existence. What if a hurricane destroys the electric grid? What if power supplies will get cut off by unstoppable rain? What about a future dystopic scenario with our traditional energy sources depleted due to overconsumption? And what if we just look at less fortunate parts of the world where stable electricity service is a rare treasure? We collected some examples of how medicine could become more independent from the traditional electricity ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Africa asia Caribbean development digital digital health Healthcare smartphone solar sustainability technology Source Type: blogs

Meet Debara Tucci, Incoming Director of NIDCD
The recently appointed director of NIDCD brings an extensive research background in hearing loss, ear disease, and cochlear implantation—and an enthusiasm for addressing barriers to hearing health care. Interview by Jillian Kornak The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently named Debara L. Tucci the next director of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), replacing acting director Judith Cooper. Tucci will leave her position as professor of surgery in the Division of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences at Duke University Medical Center, where she has served on...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - May 24, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Jillian Kornak Tags: Academia & Research Audiology Health Care News Private Practice Schools Slider Aging and Hearing Loss audiologist hearing health care public health Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Mental Health Info – Telling Fact from Fiction
 Being hospitalized for any reason is never a fun time, but there are some instances where it can be a harrowing experience. This is especially true for psychiatric patients, who are already in a crisis even before being plunged into the hospital atmosphere, which can overwhelm them. This disconnect between patients and hospital staff has long been an issue. Today’s guest shares some insights on her work to improve this relationship.   Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest John M. Grohol, Psy.D. is the founder & CEO of PsychCentral.com, a mental health a...
Source: World of Psychology - May 23, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: General Research The Psych Central Show Dr John Grohol Gabe Howard Internet Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

Considering the Experience of Being One of the Last Mortals
With the development of rejuvenation therapies underway, and accelerating, somewhere ahead lies a dividing line. Some people will be the last to age to death, too comprehensively damaged for the technologies of the time to recover. Everyone else will live indefinitely in youth and health, protected from aging by periodic repair of the underlying cell and tissue damage that causes dysfunction and disease. Where is that dividing line? No one can say in certainty. I look at the children of today, with long lives ahead of them, and find it hard to believe that in a hundred years the problem won't be solved well in time for the...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Environmental Effects on the Mind and Body:  Depression Relief
Nature is an important aspect of our daily lives that is too often taken for granted. Now, in our technologically-driven society, we are often shut away from nature, and the times that we are out in nature, we are unable to appreciate it in its entire splendor. It is hard to truly separate yourself from the rest of the world, considering we are always “on”, but the effects of doing so prove beneficial to your general well-being and emotional clarity. “[We] are all a part of nature. We are born in nature; our bodies are formed of nature; we live by the rules of nature,” writes Wesley P. Sc...
Source: World of Psychology - May 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Taylor Bourassa Tags: Brain and Behavior Depression General Research Sunlight Vitamin D Source Type: blogs

Should Cities Spend More on Transit?
Transit ridership is plummeting almost everywhere, yet officials in many cities are still devising hugely expensive plans for transit projects. One such city is Austin, whose leaders are talking about spending between$6 billion and $10.5 billion on new transit lines (and the final cost always ends up being more than the projections).The need for these plans is contradicted by the rapid decline in transit ridership in Austin. Census data show that, despite a 59 percent increase in the number of workers in the last decade, the number of Austin-area employees who rely on transit to get to work has declined by more than 10 per...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 21, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Randal O ' Toole Source Type: blogs

Professor Tim Wu Makes The Case Against Antitrust Policy
It is common to hear proponents of antitrust action against big tech firms talk up the potential for  future harms to consumers from sustained dominance by Facebook, Google, and Amazon. In her influential“Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox,” lawyer Lina Khan argued that “the current market is not always a good indication of competitive harm” and that antitrust authorities should “ask what the future market will look like.” This sentiment was recently echoed by economist Jason Furman ina digital competition review for the UK government.One of the best cases against such an ap...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 20, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Self-management: What do we think about it?
Self-management is all about the person living with their chronic health problem, learning how to maximise their wellbeing and limit the impact of their health problem on their life. The words might be well-known – but how self-management is best carried out, by whom, and when is a vexed question. I stumbled upon a study carried out by Van Wely, Boiten, Verhoef, Eijckelhof, Van Hooft, Van Staa et al (2019) where, using Q-methodology (more about this shortly), they examined the beliefs about self-management of a group of Dutch physiotherapists. First of all, why is this something to blog about on a blog about p...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 19, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Coping Skills Coping strategies Professional topics Research Science in practice independence living well persistent pain Resilience self management Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 20th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Trump ’s Latest Plan Shows That the Pro-Immigrant Side Is Winning
In conclusion, this proposal does nothing to address other important immigration reforms, includingthe 11 million illegal immigrants in the United States,the “dreamer” population, or theinadequate lesser-skilled guest worker programs. While it leaves out a lot and makes some big mistakes, the president is giving up an important talking point with his latest plan: that there are just too many immigrants coming to this country. That ’s a win for the pro-immigrant side. (Source: Cato-at-liberty)
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Artificial Intelligence to Speed up Alzheimer ’s Disease Research
Researchers from UC Davis and UC San Francisco have developed a new artificial intelligence tool to scale up Alzheimer’s research. They have created a deep learning system to identify amyloid plaques in brain slices of patients, spotting specific subtypes of Alzheimer’s disease, in the process enabling precision medicine and faster research. The team used a database of example images to train their machine learning algorithm to identify different types of brain changes seen in Alzheimer’s diseases. This includes discriminating between so-called cored and diffuse plaques, and identifying abnormalities in b...
Source: Medgadget - May 16, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Informatics Neurology Pathology Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Poor Sense of Smell Correlates with Increased Mortality in Older Individuals
It is quite easy to find correlations between the many varied aspects of aging. People age at different rates, largely due to differences in lifestyle choices: exercise, calorie intake, smoking, and so forth. Genetics are less of an influence. While there is tremendous interest in the genetics of aging, I have to think that this is something of a case of a hammer in search of a nail. This is an era of genetic technologies and genetic data, in which the cost of the tools has fallen so low and the scope of the capabilities has expanded so greatly that everyone is tempted to use it in every possible circumstance. Yet outside ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

DC Vouchers: Bang for the Buck
Standardized test scores aren ’t what they used to be. FromA Nation at Risk in 1983 toCommon Core around 2010, they were close to exclusively how we assessed whether students and schools were succeeding. But over the years the monomaniacal focus on test scores increasingly grated on schools and families, and with the Common Core threatening to put everyone on the road to the exact same standards and tests, there was a political revolt. At about the same time an empirical revolt was brewing,withincreasingevidence that schools ’ test scores may not correlate all that well with other important outcomes, ranging fr...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 16, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Dying for the Ultimate Selfie: We ’ re Really Bad at Accurately Assessing Risk
Selfies are the journaling of our time. We take them everywhere we go, not only to remind our future selves of things we’ve done, but to also broadcast to the world what a fun, exciting, and carefully-curated life we lead. But in a story that’s becoming as commonplace as school shootings in America, more and more people are either dying or putting themselves in extreme physical danger to take the ultimate selfie. And for what? Fame in the form of more likes and followers on social media. Why are we so bad at rationally assessing risk in situations such as this? It’s hard to believe we’ve come to a ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: John M. Grohol, Psy.D. Tags: General Mental Health and Wellness Narcissism Psychology Technology Source Type: blogs

Caster Semenya, What ’s Next?
Guest Post: Torbjörn Tännsjö, Kristian Claëson Emeritus Professor of Practical Philosophy Statistically speaking, women perform less well than men in most sports. Their top results are 10-12 % worse than those of men. If they are to have a chance to compete at the top level, they need a protected space. At least, this has been […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Genetics Health Care Guest Post sports syndicated Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Social Anxiety, Delusions, Rejection, and Mental Illness!
 Most people suffer from certain social anxieties. Just the idea of speaking in front of a crowd can make otherwise confident people break into a nervous sweat. Fear of rejection is also very common in society… just ask any teenager who’s too afraid to ask out their crush. In this episode, we talk about these common feelings from the perspective of having additional mental illness thrown in, creating a blend that is no one’s favorite.   SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW “You’re afraid of being humiliated. You’re afraid of what you just said.” – Michelle Hammer   Hi...
Source: World of Psychology - May 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Tags: A Bipolar, A Schizophrenic, and a Podcast Anxiety and Panic Depression Source Type: blogs

There Is Limited Evidence To Support The Widely Held Belief That Psychotherapy Changes The Body As Well As The Mind
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski Looking at the latest epidemiological data, it could be argued that we are in the midst of a pandemic of mental illness, of dimensions never before seen in human history. The WHO estimates that over 350 million people around the world are presently suffering from depression, which constitutes almost 5-6 per cent of the population. At its extreme, depression may lead to suicide, by which it is estimated that around 1 million people die every year. And the numbers continue growing. Faced with this rising tide of illness, it is impossible to overestimate the importance of hard facts and ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: biological guest blogger Health Mental health Therapy Source Type: blogs

Hope Contagion: 13 Reasons Why It ’ s Time to Change Direction
There are so many reasons more, but let’s start with 13. As we can argue all day about if suicide contagion is “real”, yet why not focus on Hope? Our goal is to come up with a Hope contagion, and we need your help to make it possible. The reasons why we need to change direction to hope, now, are endless. We compiled many statistics on hopelessness, and as you will see they are shocking. But instead of focusing on the statistics, let’s just look at the news. The college entrance scandal, the #MeToo movement, weapon carrying to school, teen suicide & contagion, and more. Believe it or not, each an...
Source: World of Psychology - May 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Kathryn Goetzke Tags: Suicide Source Type: blogs

A Timely Reminder Of Just How Bad The Health Sector Is At Digital Security.
This appeared last week:The Un-healthiness of the Australian Health Sector ’s Data SecuritySquire Patton Boggs Australia  May 3 2019 More than twelve months after the commencement of the Australian Notifiable Data Breach Scheme,[1] statistics published by the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) have begun to reveal trends present in the 812 notifiable data breaches recorded in Australia between 22 February and 31 December 2018. One key trend is the clear susceptibility of the health care industry, which suffered one fifth of all data breaches recorded in Australia throughout 2018, the highes...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - May 10, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

How Could Digital Tools Help Fight Against Anti-Vaccination?
Anti-vaccination movements lure increasingly more people into skipping potentially life-saving immunization against infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, or rubella, highly impairing herd immunity for entire communities. Social media platforms could restrict the reach of anti-vax messages, groups, and activities, with algorithms recommending tailor-made content and health apps providing information about vaccinations. Here’s our collection of the most recent steps and digital tools supporting the fight against anti-vaccination and its believers. 300 percent increase in measles globally In a widely shared...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 8, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine anti-vaccination anti-vax anti-vaxxer digital disease disease outbreak facebook figth Health Healthcare infection Innovation measles movement social media technology Source Type: blogs

Amid Crisis, Ports Process 34% Fewer Central Americans
For the first time ever, two countries —Guatemala and Honduras—have surpassed Mexico as the top nations of origin for immigrants apprehended crossing illegally into the United States. Along with El Salvador, immigrants from three Northern Triangle countries of Central America have made up three quarters of Border Patrol apprehensions this year.Nearly all Central Americans cross the border and seek out a Border Patrol agent to turn themselves in to. The primary reason that they do this, rather than come to a port to apply, is that Customs and Border Protectionhas capped the number of undocumented immigrants it w...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 7, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Preventing Youth Suicide: Strategies That Work
American children are taking their own lives at an alarming rate. Over 7 percent of high school students say they engaged in non-fatal suicidal behavior, while 17 percent say they seriously considered suicide within the previous year, according to a nationwide survey. For children under 15, the prevalence of death by suicide nearly doubled from 2016 to 2017. Considering these sobering statistics, it’s no surprise that suicide has become the second leading cause of death for youth between the ages of 12 and 18. Sadly, many parents don’t recognize the signs of depression in their children until a crisis occurs. ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachael Reeder, LCSW Tags: Children and Teens Communication Depression Parenting Suicide Source Type: blogs

Intensive treatment of blood pressure helps prevent memory decline in older adults
This study, as well as the larger SPRINT study, also demonstrated that overall intensive treatment of blood pressure in older adults is safe. However, we do know that some individuals may develop dizziness, imbalance, and in rare instances strokes with intensive blood pressure lowering. For that reason, it is important to discuss your blood pressure management with your primary care physician and follow his or her recommendation. How do cardiovascular risk factors affect brain health? We have evidence from studies of the population, studies of brain scans, and studies of animals, that treatment of cardiovascular risk facto...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gad Marshall, MD Tags: Alzheimer's Disease Brain and cognitive health Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Memory Prevention Source Type: blogs

Dipstick Technology Approved by FDA for Urinalysis at Home
I seem to have lost track of advancements in dipstick technology understanding that it is well established in such areas as pregnancy testing. Home glucose testing for diabetics, of course, is growing increasingly sophisticated with the test strips beingread by a meter. A recent article indicated that this meter technology can be replaced by the camera in a smartphone for recording and analyzing dipstick color changes when screening for kidney disease (see:FDA approves smartphone camera –based dipstick product). Below is an excerpt from the article: Healthy.io, based in Tel Aviv, Israel, has obtained U...
Source: Lab Soft News - May 6, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Clinical Lab Industry News Clinical Lab Testing Diagnostics Food and Drug Administration Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Lab Industry Trends Lab Processes and Procedures Medical Consumerism Medical Research Poi Source Type: blogs

An experimental study of pharmaceutical cannabis in fibromyalgia
This study is one of the growing number of studies beginning to examine the effects of cannabinoids on pain, and offers a tiny window into what might be happening. Note: the study was performed in collaboration with the cannabis producer, and one of the authors is an employee of this company. Although his role was only to comment on the protocol and final version of the paper, it’s worth noting this relationship. The study question In this study, the researchers were looking to understand the analgesic effect of inhaled pharmaceutical-grade cannabis as a plant rather than an extract, using four different variet...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - May 6, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies News Pain conditions Research cannabis experiment fibromyalgia Source Type: blogs

5G In Healthcare: Boosting Remote Brain Surgeries, Connected Health, Or Medical VR
The next telecommunication revolution is just around the corner: the promises of high bandwidth, low latency and low-power-low-cost of 5G will open the gate to a flood of new inventions and the implementation of ideas, which are already long in the public consciousness – such as stable augmented reality or truly immersive virtual reality platforms powered by networks. 5G in healthcare will finally allow the building of infrastructure suitable for the interplay of health sensors, algorithms, and smart devices, for the smooth operation of telemedicine, or even for providing a way for parents to interact with babies who...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 4, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Telemedicine & Smartphones 5G connected digital Innovation IoT medical medical technology mobile mobile health Surgery telecom telecommunication telehealth telesurgery Source Type: blogs

It ’s the Demographics, Stupid: The Employment Rate Is Better Now Than Its Pre-Crisis Peak
Today ’s jobs numberssurprised on the upside. The unemployment rate fell to 3.6 percent and 263,000 jobs were created in April, exceeding analysts ’ expectations.Yet one indicator looks as if it still lags its pre-crisis peak: the employment-to-population ratio.The headline rate for all aged 16+ topped out at 63.4 percent in December 2006. Today, it stands at just 60.6 percent (a 2.8 percent point decline). To translate that difference to hard numbers: if the employment rate of 2006 was replicated today, 7.4 million more people would be in work.Should this be a matter of great concern? No. For there ’s a ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 3, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ryan Bourne Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Trauma Is Possible – with Help
When you see news accounts of people experiencing traumatic events, shootings, violent or sexual assaults, kidnappings, accidents, fires, drowning and more, it may seem both commonplace and far removed at the same time. The fact that the news tends to sensationalize such terrible events might numb you to the magnitude of the trauma these victims endured. But when it happens to you, you’re stunned, frozen with fear, totally unprepared. The aftermath leaves you deeply scarred, physically, psychologically and emotionally shattered. I know exactly how this feels. I was a victim of such trauma. Yet, I did overcome this l...
Source: World of Psychology - May 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Inspiration & Hope Personal PTSD Trauma support Trauma Therapy traumatic experience Source Type: blogs

Statistical Ambiguity Should Never Be Glossed Over
This study was conducted, as noted, by HHS researchers. This is certainly not disqualifying  per se, but it should cause us to readjust our priors. While peer-review has many, many problems as a vetting mechanism for quality, at least it ’s a  vetting mechanism. Moreover, generally speaking, more prestigious journals do tend to demand more scrupulous econometric work.It ’s worth noting that before we even dive into the methodology, the study itself admits that whatever causal effect is at play here, the likely mechanism is that newly eligible Medicaid enrollees in states that expanded Medicaid ar...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 2, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs