Do not underestimate the power of touch
Many months have passed since the spring day when I was hit with the news from my yearly mammogram, but those typewritten words are forever etched in my memory: “The density appears greater in left breast.” My doctor comforted me with statistics showing that mammograms aren’t 100 percent accurate — but she also lost no time in sending me to a surgeon named Dr. Prewitt. Upon meeting him, I immediately felt sure that I would be in good hands. He explained the procedure he’d use and answered my questions with clarity and a very welcome gentleness. He expressed doubt about the diagnosis, but said,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/betsy-willis" rel="tag" > Betsy Willis < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Patients Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The tyranny of metrics – a book review
From the Amazon web site: How the obsession with quantifying human performance threatens our schools, medical care, businesses, and government Today, organizations of all kinds are ruled by the belief that the path to success is quantifying human performance, publicizing the results, and dividing up the rewards based on the numbers. But in our zeal to instill the evaluation process with scientific rigor, we’ve gone from measuring performance to fixating on measuring itself. The result is a tyranny of metrics that threatens the quality of our lives and most important institutions. In this timely and powerful book, Jer...
Source: DB's Medical Rants - April 27, 2018 Category: Internal Medicine Authors: rcentor Tags: Medical Rants Source Type: blogs

Mirror, Mirror: To Improve Your Confidence, Change How You See Yourself
You're reading Mirror, Mirror: To Improve Your Confidence, Change How You See Yourself, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. In mid-2016, Dove published their third Global Beauty and Confidence Report, after interviewing 10,500 females across 13 countries. The results were rather worrying. They found that only 4% of women around the world considered themselves beautiful, but 72% felt pressure to look a certain way. 9 out of 10 girls wished they could change at least one aspect of their physical appearances. Ev...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: evelynmarinoff Tags: confidence featured happiness psychology self improvement personal growth pickthebrain positivity self image Source Type: blogs

A Troubling Nomination to the U.S. Sentencing Commission
One of the jobs of a think tanker is to synthesize information from other sources and put it in the context of his or her particular field. Hard data are particularly important to our work because data are measurable outcomes from policy and practice in the real world. No one cares what anyone at Cato “feels.” Feelings have their place, of course. Measuring the feelings of a particular group or groups of people can be useful in the aggregate because people will act in accordance with those feelings, but those feelings make up just another metric on which we collect data to explain the world. Reliable data ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jonathan Blanks Source Type: blogs

Update: Study finds continued birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) well into our 70s
___ Time for SharpBrains eNewsletter, bringing you the latest in in brain health and mental health research, tools and thinking. Also, a quick heads-up for those based in the UK: the Imperial College Centre for Neurotechnology will host a keynote by Alvaro Fernandez in London on Wednesday, May 30th, titled Why the Future of Brain Enhancement & Mental Health is Digital & Pervasive (free; requires registration). Other upcoming events here. New research: Study finds continued birth of new neurons (neurogenesis) well into our 70s The more hours you sit per day, the smaller ...
Source: SharpBrains - April 25, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology app brain Brain-health brain-scans brain-stimulation Brainnovations Cognitive-Training meditation Mental-Health Neurogenesis Neurotechnology smartphone Source Type: blogs

Towards a Better Epigenetic Clock
Researchers here report on an improved version of the epigenetic clock. A few carefully defined patterns of DNA methylation, including the original epigenetic clock, correlate quite closely with age. The current commercial implementation of the epigenetic clock, MyDNAge, has a margin of error of two years or so. While the consensus is that the clock reflects biological age, it is still the case that we might ask what exactly is being measured. The answer to that question remains to be established. It is plausible that DNA methylation changes with age are a reaction to all of the forms of cell and tissue damage that drive a...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 24, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

New cross-cultural analysis suggests that g or “general intelligence” is a human universal
By Alex Fradera Intelligence is a concept that some people have a hard time buying. It’s too multifaceted, too context-dependent, too Western. The US psychologist Edwin Boring encapsulated this scepticism when he said “measurable intelligence is simply what the tests of intelligence test.” Yet the scientific credentials of the concept are undimmed, partly because intelligence is strongly associated with so many important outcomes in life. Now Utah Valley University researchers Russell Warne and Cassidy Burningham have released evidence that further strengthens the case for intelligence being a valid ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 24, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cross-cultural Intelligence Source Type: blogs

Study combines MRI brain scans with statistics to better predict cognitive problems after stroke
Conclusions: The brain health index is a new image analysis approach that may usefully capture combined visible brain damage in large-scale studies of ageing, neurovascular and neurodegenerative disease. The Study in Context: Next: Brain scans to identify children at high risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) before symptoms appear 25 Key Resources to Improve Brain Health and Mental Health Five reasons the future of brain enhancement is digital, pervasive and (hopefully) bright 10 neurotechnologies about to transform brain enhancement and brain health What are cognitive abilities and how to boost them? Solving ...
Source: SharpBrains - April 23, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology atrophy brain health index Brain-health brain-injury cerebral small vessel diseases cognition computer-assisted image processing magnetic resonance imaging stroke Source Type: blogs

Insights into Loneliness
This article also notes that research by Sarah Pressman at the University of California, Irvine demonstrates that loneliness reduces longevity by a whopping 70%). Given these startling statistics, it’s important to recognize if one’s feelings of ongoing loneliness are due to work burnout. And if that’s the case, then it may be time to challenge priorities and find a healthier life balance. (Source: World of Psychology)
Source: World of Psychology - April 21, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Family Friends Habits Happiness Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Relationships Alienation Friendship Isolation Loneliness social media social support socializing Technology Source Type: blogs

Does Pruitt Have a Point about Science?
Scott Pruitt, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is loathed by most researchers and environmentalists, but he may yet emerge as science ’s unlikely redeemer.Pruitt is one of the least popular people in America. Before coming to DC, he was the attorney general of Oklahoma, where he described himself as “a leading advocate against the EPA’s activist agenda,”— a claim he made good by suing the Agency no fewer than 14 times.But Pruitt — who in public appears reasonable, quietly-spoken and polite — denies having declared war on the environment, only on ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Terence Kealey, Patrick J. Michaels Source Type: blogs

The $1/Day Standard & Other Problems with DHS ’s Public Charge Rule
ConclusionThe rule would not prevent legal immigrants from accessing welfare if the law allows them to obtain it, setting up a strange dichotomy between our rules at entry and our rules after entry. Under current law, the administration generally cannot prevent immigrants from using welfare in such cases, so no matter how the administration ends up reforming the public charge determinations, Congress should amend the law tolimit government benefits only to citizens. The private sector can —and already is—aiding immigrants when they fall on hard times or need help to get ahead, and the evidenceindicates that sim...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 19, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Lowering nicotine in cigarettes
Follow me on Twitter @mallikamarshall When I was about 10 years old, my mother had me take a puff on an unfiltered Camel cigarette in an effort to discourage me from smoking in the future. Well, needless to say, it worked. After coughing and sputtering for what seemed like hours, I have never touched another cigarette. While I am in no way suggesting that parents follow in my mother’s footsteps (in fact I would strongly discourage it), as a pediatrician and parent myself I want to ensure that children and teens never take that first puff. But in fact, the majority of smokers in the US begin smoking in their youth. Ac...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mallika Marshall, MD Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs

The Flynn Effect and IQ Disparities Among Races, Ethnicities, and Nations: Are There Common Links? | Psychology Today
@media print { body { margin: 2mm 9mm; } .original-url { display: none; } #article .float.left { float: left !important; } #article .float.right { float: right !important; } #article .float { margin-top: 0 !important; margin-bottom: 0 !important; } }The Flynn Effect and IQ Disparities Among Races, Ethnicities, and Nations: Are There Common Links? | Psychology Todayhttps://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/beautiful-minds/201008/the-flynn-effect-and-iq-disparities-among-races-ethnicities-and-nationsThe Flynn Effect and IQ Disparities Among Races, Ethnicities, and Nations...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - April 19, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

Study of 20,000 finds an income advantage for those judged to be very unattractive
By Alex Fradera Do chiselled features garner better pay? Researchers have previously found that income is associated with attractiveness, leading to the idea of both a beauty premium and an ugliness penalty. A common explanation is discrimination: employers seek out beautiful people and reject or ignore those harder on the eye. But in the Journal of Business Psychology, Satoshi Kanazawa and Mary Still have published research aiming to upset this. The biggest takeaway is that being perceived as very unattractive may not incur an income penalty at all. The researchers drew on a longitudinal study of 20,000 young Americ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - April 19, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Occupational Social Source Type: blogs

Retrospective review of use of mesh or tape for urogynaecological surgery
This report has been produced to investigate activity, summarised within Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data, for the NHS, in England, of patients who have had a urogynaecological procedure for the treatment of urogynaecological prolapse or stress urinary incontinence, including those where mesh, tape or their equivalents have been used. It has been undertaken to assist the NHS and others in establishing a clearer national picture of patients who have had such procedures. These statistics are classified as experimental and should be used with caution. Experimental statistics are new official statistics undergoing evalua...
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - April 18, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: NHS measurement and performance Source Type: blogs

Could ride-hailing platforms solve the problems of transportation in healthcare?
Patients living in rural, suburban or urban areas with poor infrastructure often don’t have the proper means to get to the doctor’s appointment on time. In extreme cases, they could even wait for emergency situations so they can call an ambulance and receive care in a hospital. In the last months, both giant ridesharing companies, Uber and Lyft announced non-emergency medical transportation services, while start-ups, such as Circulation also promise to deal with the issue. Could smartphones and networked services solve transportation in healthcare? Why is getting to the doctor such a hassle? There is a little v...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Hospital lyft medical transportation patient ride-hailing startup uber Source Type: blogs

Ride-Hailing Platforms Could Solve The Problems of Transportation in Healthcare
Patients living in rural, suburban or urban areas with poor infrastructure often don’t have the proper means to get to the doctor’s appointment on time. In extreme cases, they could even wait for emergency situations so they can call an ambulance and receive care in a hospital. In the last months, both giant ridesharing companies, Uber and Lyft announced non-emergency medical transportation services, while start-ups, such as Circulation also promise to deal with the issue. Could smartphones and networked services solve transportation in healthcare? Why is getting to the doctor such a hassle? There is a little v...
Source: The Medical Futurist - April 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Design Hospital lyft medical transportation patient ride-hailing startup uber Source Type: blogs

Who Can Benefit from Virtual Reality CBT?
I have previously written about the possible benefits of using virtual reality (VR) in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Now it seems that virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) has more wide-reaching benefits and can help reduce momentary paranoia and anxiety, as well as improve social cognition in individuals with psychotic disorders. In a February 2018 study published in The Lancet (Psychiatry), researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of personalized virtual-reality based cognitive-behavioral therapy in 116 patients with a DSM IV-diagnosed psychotic disorder and paranoid...
Source: World of Psychology - April 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Janet Singer Tags: Antipsychotic Anxiety and Panic Psychology Psychotherapy Schizophrenia Technology Treatment CBT Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Paranoia Psychosis Psychotic Disorder virtual reality Source Type: blogs

Giving Voice to Teachers on World Voice Day —or Any Day
Today is World Voice Day! Occurring annually on April 16, World Voice Day is a great time to spread the word about the marvel of the human voice and the importance of taking care of it. Events held in celebration of the day include concerts, performances, educational workshops and vocal screenings. Why limit this event to just one day? As a speech-language pathologists, we can take advantage of this event to raise awareness and help prevent vocal disorders in a highly at-risk group—classroom teachers. Classroom teachers use their voices an average of 49 hours per week to perform their jobs. Add poor room ac...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 16, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Sue Hume Tags: Audiology Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Voice Disorders Source Type: blogs

Sexual assault in the emergency department: What can you do?
It has been documented that 1 in 3 women will experience rape in her lifetime, and this is most common in women under the age of 25.  Over 95 percent of victims of sexual assault are women worldwide, while in North America estimates place that at 85 percent.  These are the assaults we know about — generous estimates say that, at most, 10 percent of rapes are reported to police or other authorities/health care providers.  2004 CDC statistics indicated there were 57,000 visits to U.S. emergency departments for a presenting complaint of sexual assault — which is still a high number despite flawed me...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 16, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kari-sampsel" rel="tag" > Kari Sampsel, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Source Type: blogs

Apr 12, Alan Kent Malyon: Today in the History of Psychology (12th April 1941)
Alan Kent Malyon was born. A highly respected clinical psychologist, Malyon was a founding figure within the field of lesbian and gay psychology. In 1986 he served as chair of the American Psychological Association Committee on Lesbian and Gay Concerns during which time he set in place enduring initiatives to ensure that gay and lesbian issues were addressed within mainstream psychology. Of all Malyon's many accomplishments arguably his greatest was his successful campaign to have 'egodystonic homosexuality' removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders; a watershed moment in challenging misinforma...
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - April 13, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

Are Shootings More Likely to Occur in Public Schools?
The Parkland shooting, even almost  two months later, remains a very painful topic, and there seem to have been many very important factors at play. One that hasn’t been discussed very much, but probably needs to be examined, is whether the kind of schools students attend makes a difference. At least one author, Stella Morabito atThe Federalist,has discussed this, and has identified many problems that she thinks are associated with public schools ranging from their large sizes to their seeming hostility to Christianity.All of the problems she discusses may be factors —school size has been suspect for ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 11, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Corey A. DeAngelis Source Type: blogs

287(g) Does Not Fight Crime, But It Does Increase Assaults against Police Officers
Fear of immigrant criminality is driving many changes to domestic immigration enforcement programs during the Trump administration.   One of the earliest such changes was the reactivation of the287(g) program that allows state or local law enforcement agencies to enforce federal immigration law after entering into a partnership with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).   The Obama administration substantially scaled back 287(g) afternumerousgovernmentreports found serious flaws in the program.   Gaston County, North Carolina sheriff Alan Cloninger said his sheriff’s office enrolled in 287(g)...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 11, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

NIH-funded postdoc, and Research assistant / Lab manager position available in the O-Lab at Duke
p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px Arial; min-height: 14.0px} p.p2 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 18.0px Arial} p.p3 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 10.0px Arial} span.s1 {font: 12.0px Arial}We are looking for highly motivated early-career researchers to join theO-Lab, led by Prof. Tobias Overath, in the Department of Psychology& Neuroscience at Duke University. Work in our lab investigates how sounds, from simple sinusoids to complex speech signals, are processed in the human brain, using a combination of behavioral (psychoacoustics) and neuroimaging methods (fMRI, EEG, ECoG) to track...
Source: Talking Brains - April 11, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Why All the Hype About NAEP?
Here we go again. The 2017 round of theNation ’s Report Card was released today. The results shouldn ’t surprise anyone – they arealmost entirely flat at the national level. However, that doesn ’t stop educators and education reformers fromspinning the results to fit whatever agendas they might have. Those who defend previous reforms claim thatcomputer-based testing must be to blame for stagnant performance – and that students today are “relatively poorer” than they were in the past. On the other hand, groups calling for additional reform claim that the NAEP results should startle ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Corey A. DeAngelis Source Type: blogs

No Major Lessons from New National Test Scores
Another set of national exam results —theNational Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) —is upon us, and much will likely be made of them. But in the aggregate, what the new scores show is just that things haven’t changed much over the last couple of years, and only as captured by this particular test. Burrowing down and comparing states, subgroups of kids, and smaller jurisdiction s that have implemented different policies, spent more or less, and experienced numerous other things, might suggest some avenues for further exploration, but the only conclusion we can state with any confidence is that not...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Social Communication Disorder and the SLP
Jackson, age 10, is in fifth grade and fits the social communication disorder (SCD) profile. He has difficulty making friends. In an effort to be part of a conversation, he sometimes interrupts or changes the topic abruptly. Jackson doesn’t pick up on nonverbal cues and often misinterprets his classmates’ intentions or feelings. In the classroom, he has difficulty expressing his ideas in an organized way, and he struggles to understand nonliteral language, make inferences and draw conclusions when he reads curriculum materials. His classmates sometimes tease him If you are a speech-language pathologist working ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - April 9, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Phyllis Bonelli Tags: Academia & Research Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Autism Spectrum Disorder social communication disorder social skils Source Type: blogs

SINUVA, a Corticosteroid Releasing Sinus Implant, Now Available for Nasal Polyps
Intersect ENT, based in Menlo Park, California, is releasing in the U.S. its SINUVA sinus implant for treating nasal polyp disease in adults that underwent previous surgical sinus procedures. The device elutes mometasone furoate, a corticosteroid, to reduce inflammation directly at the polyps. The drug is released for approximately 90 days after the SINUVA is implanted in an in-office procedure. “After years of development and multiple clinical studies, we are thrilled to provide physicians with SINUVA to treat patients with nasal polyps. SINUVA offers an alternative to patients who have exhausted routine medic...
Source: Medgadget - April 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Source Type: blogs

Nurses: Moving at the Speed of Trust
Seeking a career in nursing could be characterized as an exercise in trust. We nurses willingly endure a grueling educational experience; place ourselves in the hands of nursing professors and professional nurse preceptors; and otherwise trust that the blood, sweat, tears, and expense of pursuing our goal is worthwhile. In essence, we move at the speed of trust as we enter the universe of a nursing career.Photo by Alternate Skate on UnsplashTrusting OurselvesThe first act of trust intrinsic to our nursing journey is trust in the self. Even while our peers, colleagues, friends, or family may caution us agains...
Source: Digital Doorway - April 9, 2018 Category: Nursing Tags: career career development career management careers healthcare healthcare careers nurse nurse careers nurses nursing nursing careers Source Type: blogs

Postdoctoral position at Center for Language Science, Pennsylvania State University
The Center for Language Science (CLS) at The Pennsylvania State University (http://cls.psu.edu) invites applications for a postdoctoral position. The CLS is home to a cross-disciplinary research program that includes the NSF training program, ‘Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE): Translating cognitive and brain science in the laboratory and field to language learning environments’ that was awarded to The Pennsylvania State University and the University of California, Riverside. The program provides training i n translational research on language learning and bilingualism that includes a...
Source: Talking Brains - April 9, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

GORE CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder Approved by FDA for PFO Closure
The FDA has approved the GORE CARDIOFORM Septal Occluder for patent foramen ovale (PFO) closure procedures that have shown to reduce the chance of stroke in some patients. The CARDIOFORM is already being used in the U.S. for closing of atrial septal defects up to 17 millimeters in size. The catheter-delivered device consists of two discs that make contact with the tissue walls on both sides of the PFO and come together to block the passage of blood between the atria. “The soft and conformable design of Gore’s device is ideal for providing long-term repair of PFOs of any shunt size,” said John Rhodes, MD,...
Source: Medgadget - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Radiology Source Type: blogs

New study once again casts doubt on PSA screening
This study adds to the discouraging screening literature, and again, simply does not support screening of asymptomatic individuals,” he said. Fortunately, Garnick added, men diagnosed with prostate cancer following a PSA test may not have to be treated either in the short or long term. Depending on tumor characteristics, some can opt to have their cancer monitored with active surveillance, which relies on periodic prostate biopsies or MRI to look for new signs that treatment may be necessary. “Hopefully, current research that uses sophisticated genetic testing or biomarkers of prostate cancer may help provide m...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Schmidt Tags: Cancer Health Men's Health Prostate Health Screening Source Type: blogs

The science behind what makes a bestselling book
This post has been cross-posted from the SpringerOpen blog. A team of researchers from Northeastern University, Boston, used a big data approach to investigate what makes a book successful. By evaluating data from the New York Times Bestseller Lists from 2008 to 2016, they developed a formula to predict if a book would be a bestseller. Creating the formula for success The authors evaluated sales numbers and patterns from 2,468 fiction titles and 2,025 non-fiction titles from the New York Times Bestseller Lists 2008-2016 to create their formula for predicting how well a book would sell and whether it would be a bestseller. ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - April 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Lucy Eccles Tags: Publishing Books SpringerOpen Source Type: blogs

Tropical Travel Trouble 007 Mega Malaria Extravaganza
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - April 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs

Trauma-informed care: What it is, and why it ’s important
Many years ago, when I was a trainee, I helped take care of patients at a family medicine clinic.* One day, a school-aged brother and sister came in for their annual physicals. They were due for vaccines. Neither wanted any shots, and they were both quite upset. “You’ll do what the doctor tells you, is that clear?” ordered the mother. She and the nurse worked together to hold the sister’s arm down. But just as the nurse was about to deliver the injection, the young girl jerked her arm away and ran to the opposite corner of the room, crying. The brother then ran over and stood in front of her, his ar...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Health care Managing your health care Source Type: blogs

Splitting hairs with hypertension
By SAURABH JHA, MD   Intrigued by many things in my first few days in the U.S., what perplexed me the most was that there seemed to be a DaVita Dialysis wherever I went; in malls, in the mainstreet of West Philadelphia, near high rises and near lower rises. I felt that I was being ominously followed by nephrologists. How on earth could providers of renal replacement therapy have a similar spatial distribution as McDonalds? After reading Friedrich Hayek’s essay, Use of Knowledge in Society, I realized why. In stead of building a multiplex for dialysis, which has shops selling pulmonary edema-inducing fried chicke...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Patients Value-Based Care Source Type: blogs

Moving from RPubs to Github documents
If you still follow my Twitter feed – I pity you, as it’s been rather boring of late. Consisting largely of Github commit messages, many including the words “knit to github document”. Here’s why. RPubs, an early offering from RStudio, has been a great platform for easy and free publishing of HTML documents generated from RMarkdown and written in RStudio. That said, it’s always been very basic (e.g. no way to organise documents by content, tags). There’s been no real development of the platform for several years and of late, I’ve noticed it’s become less reliable. Bugs, ...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - April 4, 2018 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: R statistics this blog github markdown publlishing reports rpubs Source Type: blogs

Are Students Today “Relatively Poorer” Than in 1971?
Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has taken to the pages of theWashington Post to let you know thatyou shouldn ’t listen to people who tell you that “education reform” hasn’t worked well. At least, that is, reforms that he likes—he ignores the evidence thatprivate school choice works because, as far as can be gathered from the op-ed, he thinks such choice lacks “accountability.” Apparently, parents able to take their kids, and money to educate them, from schools they don’t like to ones they do is not accountability.Anyway, I don ’t actually want to re-litig...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - April 2, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 2nd 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Ways We Define Recovery Can Skew Statistics
“Recovery” is not a term reserved only for those who choose and maintain the path of complete abstinence. Inside a theatre, a stark visual appears: “Each year, only 1% of addicts are able to kick heroin and stay clean.” This quickly cuts to images of my former self deliberately counting syringes at the needle exchange site. I see a shadow I recognize as myself in active addiction. I can barely discern my gender, my clothing keenly styled to blend into the streets that I called home. As the lights in the theatre go on, I shift uncomfortably in my seat. “Is that true?” my friend asks, offe...
Source: World of Psychology - March 31, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Addiction Publishers Recovery Research The Fix facts Myths sober Statistics Source Type: blogs

Helping Teens Affected by Parents ’ Substance Use
There are three rules kids grow up with if they live in a home where someone has a problem with alcohol and/or other substances: don’t talk, don’t trust, and don’t feel. Teens make up part of the 8.7 million children in the U.S. age 17 or younger who live in a household with at least one parent suffering from a substance use disorder (SUD) in the past year. Teens in this situation “should talk to someone, friends, other family members, teachers, school counselors, or other trusted adults. There are many avenues to get help. Teens need to know they’re not alone,” said Frances Harding, di...
Source: World of Psychology - March 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Children and Teens Disorders Family Publishers Substance Abuse The Fix Parents substance use disorder teen substance use Trauma treatment programs Source Type: blogs

How Much of the Effect of Calorie Restriction is Due to Suppression of Senescent Cells?
The paper I'll point out today reports on the effects of calorie restriction in mice and humans on markers of cellular senescence, one of the contributing cause of aging. Calorie restriction is well known to slow aging and extend life span in a near all species and lineages tested, with that effect being largest in short-lived species. Mice live up to 40% longer when calorie restricted, but in humans it would be surprising to find an effect larger than five years or so - once firm data is in hand, which is not presently the case. Nonetheless, the short term benefits to health and the changes to cellular metabolism produced...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 28, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

An Interesting Programmed Aging View on Telomerase and the Epigenetic Clock
The author noted here sees aging as programmed, in the sense that it is an epigenetic program selected for by evolution because shorter life spans prevent population-level ecological issues. His writing is usually a good illustration of how this concept of aging as a selected epigenetic program leads to very different conclusions on the nature of aging as a whole, as well as on any specific research result. In the case of this post, the topic is the role of telomere length and telomerase in aging, and their relationship to the established DNA methylation biomarkers of aging. The mainstream view of epigenetic change ...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 28, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

54-study analysis says power posing does affect people ’s emotions and is worth researching further
By Emma Young Does power-posing –  such as standing with your hands on your hips and your feet spaced well apart – really help to improve your life? Yes – according to Amy Cuddy, one of the pioneers of the idea, at Harvard University (famous for her massively popular TED talk on the subject and her best-selling book Presence). No – according to a critical analysis by Joseph Simmons and Uri Simonsohn at the University of Pennsylvania, published in Psychological Science in 2017. The pair’s statistical analysis of 33 previous studies of potential posture effects led them to a damni...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 28, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Emotion Methods Replications Source Type: blogs

FDA Transparency Blueprint Issued
Most everyone even tangentially related to the pharmaceutical industry knows and understands that right now, transparency is a hot topic. In Winter 2017, The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics published a Special Supplement to Volume 45:4, a written companion to a January 16, 2018 symposium entitled, “Blueprint for Transparency at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.” According to the Letter from the Editor included in the Special Supplement, “guest editors Anna L. Davis, James Dabney Miller, Joshua M. Sharfstein, and Aaron S. Kesselheim and their co-authors have tackled the challenging topic of tra...
Source: Policy and Medicine - March 28, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Stigma, Glenn Campbell, Pat Summitt
So there they were, Pat Summitt and Glen Campbell, sitting there and announcing to the world, I have Alzheimer's.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomI think it is safe to say that a large fraction of the American public were greatly saddened by the news that both Pat Summitt and Glen Campbell have been diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's disease.I can tell you this. On the day when the news was released about Pat Summitt we had a record number of people coming to theAlzheimer's Reading Room via search looking for information on dementia. This continued for a few days.Two articles stood out,What is the Difference Between ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - March 27, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimers announcement dementia Glen Campbell health life life news lifestyle Pat Summitt Source Type: blogs

Making the Case, Once Again, That the Opioid Crisis is a Product of Drug Prohibition, Not Doctors Prescribing to Patients
Martha Bebingerreports for National Public Radio station WBUR about the rise in fentanyl-laced cocaine. She cites numerous accounts of college students using cocaine to stay awake while studying for exams, or while attending campus parties, and then falling into a deep sleep after the initial cocaine rush. Some don ’t wake up. Others get revived by the opioid overdose antidote naloxone.Massachusetts state police recorded a nearly three-fold increase in seizures of cocaine laced with fentanyl over the past year. And the Drug Enforcement Administration lists Massachusetts among the top three states in the US for seizur...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - March 27, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

​Which Type of Digital Parent Are You?
Living in a digital world has changed many aspects of our lives -including the kind of arguments we have with our kids. In days gone by, parents and kids used to argue over chores, curfews and academic performance. Nowadays some of the biggest parenting battles we have are over screen time — how much access to tech should kids have, what should they be doing online and why buying your kid a Wii instead of an Xbox One X or PS4 is a parenting fail. Like it or not the digital world is a major part of our kids’ lives. According to a 2015 study conducted by Pew Research Center, 92% of teen internet users access onli...
Source: World of Psychology - March 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Books Bullying Children and Teens Communication Habits Parenting Students Technology Healthy Boundaries media consumption Smartphones social media Source Type: blogs

Sorry, but imagining you ’re a professor won’t make you smarter (an unsuccessful mass replication of the Professor Prime effect)
It’s another blow for “social priming” but a success for non-adversarial science By Alex Fradera A pre-registered mass replication attempt published in Perspectives on Psychological Science has raised doubts about another celebrated psychology finding. The collaboration between 40 laboratories found scant evidence for the so-called “Professor Prime”, undermining the famous finding that when people imagined themselves as a professor rather than a football hooligan it led them to perform better on a trivia quiz. In the original study, published in 1998, the Dutch researchers Ap Dijksterhui...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 26, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Intelligence Replications Social Source Type: blogs