The Swedish Speed Camera Lottery And Healthy Living
Stockholm experimented with rewarding compliance while punishing free-riders: if you drove at or under the speed limit, you were entered into a lottery where the prize fund came from fines that speeders paid. The so-called speed camera lottery is the perfect solution for facilitating behavior change on the roads. But could social gamification improve healthy living and make healthcare systems more sustainable? The Fun Theory Put In Practice Kevin Richardson entered into Volkswagen’s The Fun Theory competition in 2010 with his idea about the speed camera lottery. The concept was so powerful, that a year lat...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 7, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Insurance Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design digital digital health healthcare system healthy lifestyle Innovation Personalized medicine wearables Source Type: blogs

Fighting Hubris in Medicine
By ANISH KOKA The weekend started with a tweet about an elderly man with atrial fibrillation.  Atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia of the heart that predisposes those who suffer with it to strokes.  The strokes are a  result of clots being thrown from the heart into the brain.  The typical treatment for this condition in those deemed high enough risk is to thin the blood to help prevent these clots from forming, and thus reducing the risk of stroke. 101 year old with a history of a stroke stops his Pradaxa. Only other history hypertension. https://t.co/Ai5z519rcX — Anish Koka (@anish_koka) June ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: anish_koka Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Research Links Tau Protein to Cell Death in Alzheimer ’s disease
In this study we provide novel insights into how accumulation of Tau protein may contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.”Although scientists have studied for years what happens when Tau forms aggregates inside neurons, it still is not clear why brain cells ultimately die. One thing that scientists have noticed is that neurons affected by Tau accumulation also appear to have genomic instability.“Genomic instability refers to an increased tendency to have alterations in the genetic material, DNA, such as mutations or other impairments.This means that the genome is not functioning correctl...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - June 6, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's science Alzheimers Prevention alzheimers research brain dna genome health memory memory experiments tau Tau Protein Source Type: blogs

Some Fun myHR Statistics To Make You Think!
As at May 29 the following are what we are being told.Here is the link to the latest one:https://www.myhealthrecord.gov.au/about/my-health-record-statisticsA few numbers: Consumers registered      5,821,864 Clinical Document Uploads          5,864,519So that means that each consumer has on average just 1 clinical document on their record.About 30% only actually have a Shared Health Summary. This means that since 2012 at best 7% of the population have a Shared Health Summary uploaded and some could be 3 or 4 years old!!What is compelling in the stati...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - June 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Analysis of NIGMS Support of Research Organisms
NIGMS is committed to supporting a wide-ranging portfolio of biomedically relevant fundamental research. As we discussed in a previous Feedback Loop post, we see this approach as the best way to increase our understanding of life. For many years, one important dimension of diversity in our scientific portfolio—the organisms scientists use to conduct their research—was limited by technical considerations. However, recent advances such as the decreasing cost of genome sequencing and the development of the CRISPR system for genetic modification now make it possible to use an expanded range of research organisms. ...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - June 5, 2018 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Dr. Kristine Willis and Dr. Jake Basson Tags: Funding Trends Research Administration Research Organisms Source Type: blogs

Africa Is A Hotspot For Digital Health
Digital health in Africa is booming, and that’s the greatest news since the invention of broadband internet connection. The flourishing of disruptive solutions might go down to the fact that instead of relying on traditional infrastructure and a conventional healthcare system, populations in Africa need cheap, easily accessible and genuinely problem-solving technologies. Why, when and how have they got there? Read on! Disrupted infrastructure should be … Africa has the world’s worst health record. The birth-continent of the homo sapiens bears one-quarter of the global disease burden, yet it spends only 1...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 5, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy 3d printing Africa digital digital health digital technology Innovation mhealth mobile mobile health smartphone Source Type: blogs

Is Forgetfulness Really the First Sign of Alzheimer's?
...While these statistics are scary, you shouldn’t let them cloud the reality that many of us will age normally and will not develop AD, or any other type of dementia. Certainly, we will have some memory changes as we age. Improvements in our lifestyle may help mitigate some of those. Other changes we’ll just have to live with. So what is normal memory loss and when should we worry? Read the full article on HealthCentral about memory issues and Alzheimer's: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol &n...
Source: Minding Our Elders - June 4, 2018 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 4th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Negative DC Voucher Results Still Don ’t Mean Choice Has Failed
It ’s not a good thing when a random-assignment study—the research “gold standard” because it controls even for unobservable variables like motivation—finds that using a voucher tends to result in lower standardized test scores. All things equal, we’d like scores to go up. But in thesecond of the latest evaluations of the DC Opportunity Scholarship Program, we saw almost exactly the same results as last year: using a voucher resulted in lower math scores that were statistically significant, and reading scores that were lower, but that could have been due to chance.Last year I wrote about...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 1, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Neal McCluskey Source Type: blogs

Ask Me About Digital – Everything You Need To Know
If you are reading this, you have probably seen the sticker ‘Ask Me About Digital’ on your primary care physician’s door. Here’s the summary of what that means. The Medical Futurist launched this initiative to bridge the communication gap between patients and doctors. With the sticker, your physician just encouraged you to ask about information you find online; the health/medical smartphone apps, trackers or sensors you use because your physician knows one thing or two about the digital world and is open to having a conversation about it. The ultimate goal of the Ask Me About Digital initiative is ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 1, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Empowered Patients From Chance to Choice Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design apps Ask Me About Digital communication digital health future health communication Innovation patient-doctor social media technology wearables Source Type: blogs

Higher Blood Pressure Correlates with Higher Healthcare Costs
Risk factors associated with age-related disease and mortality tend to also associate with higher medical costs. Obesity, for example, both shortens life span and increases lifetime medical costs thanks to the impact it has on health. High blood pressure, the condition known as hypertension, is another measure that reliably predicts a higher risk of mortality and poor health in later life. Here researchers run the numbers to show that it also results in higher medical costs, much as expected. Hypertension isn't too far removed from the root causes of aging. High blood pressure is a direct result of arterial stiffeni...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Smart, Pressure Sensitive Stool Helps to Improve Posture and Avoid Sitting Too Long
At Germany’s Fraunhofer Institutes for Industrial Engineering and for Silicate Research, a team has developed a smart stool that monitors a person’s sitting posture and the time spent sitting down. The data is used to motivate users to change their body posture or to get up for a much needed walk. The stool communicates with a smartphone app, computer, or other device that can be used to display sitting statistics and point to an improper posture. The stool itself changes colors to indicate when it’s a good time to go walking and when it’s not yet time to sit back down. The technology was made possi...
Source: Medgadget - May 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Rehab Source Type: blogs

Unencumbered by the thought process
Politics is in some respect a debating society. Of course money and other sources of power and privilege affect what voices get amplified, and tribal loyalties can trump facts and logic in how they are heard. Still, those of us who are rational empiricists can make an effort to judge the quality of arguments.Rep. Diane Black of Tennessee says that pornography is the cause of school shootings.There is no evidence that I know of, and certainly none adduced by Rep Black, that any school shooter in history has even been exposed to pornography, let alone that it has anything to do with their actions. Of course they likely have,...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 30, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

May 29, Louis Thurstone: Today in the History of Psychology (29th May 1887)
Louis Leon Thurstone was born. A world renowned psychometrician, Thurstone was instrumental in advancing the influence of quantitative psychology during the first half of the twentieth century. Thurstone helped develop many groundbreaking statistical methods of psychological measurement and is arguably best remembered for his pioneering work on factor theory and factor analysis.Information via:On This Day in Psychology: A Showcase of Great Pioneers and Defining Moments (Source: Forensic Psychology Blog)
Source: Forensic Psychology Blog - May 30, 2018 Category: Forensic Medicine Source Type: blogs

How Taking a Facebook Break Affects Your Mental Health
Inadvertently, in the wake of recent Facebook data harvesting scandals, Elon Musk and Brian Acton spurring on Facebook users to #DeleteFacebook in past weeks and the resulting Facebook breaks could (potentially) do some good for the average users stress levels. While differences between being deleted, deactivated, or abandoned have yet to be explored, new research is the first to report that the average user can relieve physiological measures of stress by taking a break from Facebook — at least in the short-term. Findings from a 2013 survey in the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, pos...
Source: World of Psychology - May 29, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Mental Health and Wellness Publishers Research Technology break from Facebook Facebook break Stress study Source Type: blogs

Discussing the Dog Aging Project with Matt Kaeberlein
The Life Extension Advocacy Foundation volunteers recently interviewed Matt Kaeberlein on the topic of the Dog Aging Project, a venture that aims to try in dogs some of the more credible and safe interventions shown to modestly slow aging in mice. When initially proposed, senolytics to clear senescent cells were not in that list, but we might hope to see that change in the years ahead. I'm not overly optimistic about the performance of the other possibilities, such as mTOR inhibitors and other candidate calorie restriction mimetic or exercise mimetic pharmaceuticals. In some cases the evidence is good for these items to wo...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 29, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

one flew over
So we had this bird nest in our garage. Our nanny first noticed it a few weeks ago, high up on a shelf something like eight, nine feet up, propped on a shelf against a corner, atop of a pack of Costco bulk terry cloth towels. We've had a broken window in the garage for...I don't know, probably going on a year now (don't judge), and I suppose it was only natural that at some point, a bird might find its way indoors and make itself at home." Whatkind of bird? " a few people at work asked me when I brought it up, but I couldn't really say, since I never actually saw anyonein the nest. For all I knew, the nest could ...
Source: the underwear drawer - May 29, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

I Cured My Neighbors' Alzheimer's
Today I learned an important lesson. But first, let me tell you how I cured a neighbor of Alzheimer's.By Bob DeMarcoAlzheimer's Reading RoomOh happy day. I just learnedfor the first time ever that someone in the Pines finally listened to me.I live in a community where there are a lot of people over 80 years old.The simple statistics tell me thatone in every three will suffer from dementia. If they live long enough,one in every two.Those are the odds.13 Things Every Alzheimer's Caregiver Needs to KnowFor some reason when a person starts showing signs of dementia here, and I suggest they get a full blown evaluation and full ...
Source: Alzheimer's Reading Room, The - May 28, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: alzheimer's Alzheimer's cure alzheimer's symptoms alzheimers care dementia dementia care dementia help for caregivers dementia symptoms health lifestyle memory care memory test Vitamin B12 wellness Source Type: blogs

File under evidence-based instructional interventions: Studying and Constructing Concept Maps: a Meta-Analysis
Studying and Constructing Concept Maps: a Meta-Analysis.Article link.Noah L. Schroeder, John C. Nesbit, Carlos J. Anguiano& Olusola O. AdesopeAbstract A concept map is a node-link diagram in which each node represents a concept and each link identifies the relationship between the two concepts it connects. We investigated how using concept maps influences learning by synthesizing the results of 142 independent effect sizes (n = 11,814). A random-effects model meta-analysis revealed that learning with concept and knowledge maps produced a moderate, statistically significant effect (g = 0.58, p
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - May 26, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Tags: Concept maps intervention meta-analysis Source Type: blogs

Psychology Behind Blondes vs. Brunettes in the #MeToo Movement
Blonde women are arguably the most sexually objectified and stereotyped women, but could this equate to more #MeToo scenarios for blondes? Women often report experiencing increased attention and harassment from strangers as a given when going blonde. With an increased level of sexual attention and harassment, do women with blonde hair (from the bottle or not) have a greater risk of sexual assault than brunettes? My First Day as a First-Time Blonde… Yesterday I was a brunette. Using the magical powers of bleach I am now a first-time “blonde” (#silverhairtrend). It’s only hair…right? I immedi...
Source: World of Psychology - May 25, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Bullying Men's Issues Personal Publishers Research Sexuality Trauma Women's Issues blondes brunettes Dehumanization Objectification Sexual Assault Sexual Harassment Unwanted Attention Source Type: blogs

Counterterrorism Spending
ConclusionThe new Stimson Center  study group report found that the cost of CT spending is gargantuan.  The cost of a government program is only one metric necessary to gauge whether it should exist as we must also consider the benefits it produces.  The number of lives that would have to have been saved for the cost of CT spending to equal the be nefits, whether overall or just on Homeland Security, would have to be outrageously and unreasonably high for this expenditure to make sense.  By diverting government resources from other areas that would have boosted safety, even under the most negative ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 25, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

The Phillips Curve Is Dead (except in Federal Reserve and CBO models)
“Is the Phillips Curve Dead?” asked Princeton economistAlan Blinder in a May 3Wall Street Journal article. The former Vice-Chairman of the Fed noted that “the correlation between unemployment and changes in inflation is nearly zero… Inflation has barely moved as unemployment rose and fell.”For a veteran Ivy League Keynesian like Blinder to doubt the Phillips Curve was doctrinal heresy, comparable to a monetarist asking if money matters or a supply-sider wondering aloud if a 91% tax rate is better than a 28% rate.Wall Street Journal columnistGreg Ip later explained the dilemma and expanded it:...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alan Reynolds Source Type: blogs

Immigrant Welfare Consumption: A Response to Richwine
Jason Richwine recently published ashort criticism of a new brief that Robert Orr and I wrote about immigrant and native benefit levels and use rates for means-tested welfare and entitlement programs.   This is another in a long series of blog post responses between those who support different methods for measuring native and immigrant welfare consumption so the response is wonky and does not revolve around a central question.  The title of Richwine’s criticism is “Obfuscating the Immigrant -Welfare Debate.”  Below, Richwine’s comments will be in quotes and my responses will follow.&l...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Alex Nowrasteh Source Type: blogs

Addiction Treatment ‘Science’ and Dead Rats
In my last post I teased that I would write about fake science.  I’ll try to make it interesting. The internet allows everyone to do research about symptoms and treatments for any condition. If not for need for prescriptions, people could act as their own doctors.  But a huge dose of caution is necessary before anyone takes that path. Realize first that doctors don’t treat themselves or even their family members.  The saying that ‘a person representing himself in court has a fool for a lawyer’ applies double in healthcare.  Treating someone close to one’s self introduces a ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - May 23, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jeffrey Junig MD PhD Tags: Education Pharma pharmacology Research treatment alcohol treatment fake science FDA approval nutritional supplements Source Type: blogs

Addiction Treatment 'Science' and Dead Rats
In my last post I teased that I would write about fake science.  I’ll try to make it interesting. The internet allows everyone to do research about symptoms and treatments for any condition. If not for need for prescriptions, people could act as their own doctors.  But a huge dose of caution is necessary before anyone takes that path. Realize first that doctors don’t treat themselves or even their family members.  The saying that ‘a person representing himself in court has a fool for a lawyer’ applies double in healthcare.  Treating someone close to one’s self introduces a ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - May 23, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Education Pharma pharmacology Research treatment alcohol treatment fake science FDA approval nutritional supplements Source Type: blogs

Addiction Treatment, Science, and Dead Rats
In my last post I teased that I would write about fake science.  I’ll try to make it interesting. The internet allows everyone to do research about symptoms and treatments for any condition. If not for need for prescriptions, people could act as their own doctors.  But a huge dose of caution is necessary before anyone takes that path. Realize first that doctors don’t treat themselves or even their family members.  The saying that ‘a person representing himself in court has a fool for a lawyer’ applies double in healthcare.  Treating someone close to one’s self introduces a ...
Source: Suboxone Talk Zone - May 23, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: admin Tags: Education Pharma pharmacology Research treatment alcohol treatment fake science FDA approval nutritional supplements Source Type: blogs

Strangers are more likely to come to your help in a racially diverse neighbourhood
By Alex Fradera The “Big Society” initiative – launched at the turn of this decade by the incoming British government – was a call for politics to recognise the importance of community and social solidarity. It has since fizzled out, and for a while communitarianism fell out of the political conversation, but it has returned post-Brexit, sometimes with a nationalist or even nativist flavour. The US political scientist Robert Putnam’s research is sometimes recruited into these arguments, as his data suggests that racially and ethnically diverse neighbourhoods have lower leve...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Political Social Source Type: blogs

PubMed retractions report has moved
A brief message for anyone who uses my PubMed retractions report. It’s no longer available at RPubs; instead, you will find it here at Github. Github pages hosting is great, once you figure out that docs/ corresponds to your web root :) Now I really must update the code and try to make it more interesting than a bunch of bar charts. (Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate)
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - May 23, 2018 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: R statistics github pmretract pubmed retraction rstats Source Type: blogs

Trump ’s Trade Policy is a Disaster, But Postponing the China Trade War Was Smart
Reactions in the United States to the Trump administration ’s announcement on Saturday that it would refrain from imposing new tariffs on imports from China for the time being have beendecidedly negative. One would expect criticism from the unions, the steel producers, and old economy manufacturing trade associations. After all, many seemed not the least bit concerned about burdening the economy with 25 percent duties on $50-$150 billion of Chinese imports and retaliation of similar scale against U.S. exports, as long as they secured for themselves a small bag of booty in the process. Trump ’s “America-Fi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 21, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Daniel J. Ikenson Source Type: blogs

Measuring wellbeing inequality: what are appropriate indicators of wellbeing inequality?
New Economics Foundation (NEF) - This working paper explores the strengths and weaknesses of different measures of wellbeing inequality and to make a recommendation of a measure which could be reported by the Office for National Statistics alongside mean wellbeing. It also encourages researchers to reflect on which wellbeing inequality measure they choose and for a broader debate between key stakeholders on appropriate wellbeing inequality measures for different purposes.ReportBlog (Source: Health Management Specialist Library)
Source: Health Management Specialist Library - May 21, 2018 Category: UK Health Authors: The King ' s Fund Information & Knowledge Service Tags: Local authorities, public health and health inequalities Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 21st 2018
In conclusion, the connection between DNA damage and aging is emphasized by the secretion of senescence-associated proteins during cellular senescence, a phenotype which is activated by DNA damage and is common for both human and mice. Though much progress has been achieved, full understanding of these mechanisms has still a long way to go. XPO1 as a Novel Target for Therapies to Enhance Autophagy https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/05/xpo1-as-a-novel-target-for-therapies-to-enhance-autophagy/ Autophagy is the name given to a collection of cellular housekeeping processes that recycle damaged and un...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 20, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Koalas, Chlamydia, Microbiomania, Katie Dahlhausen, John Oliver, Russell Crowe, and me.
This study aimed to use 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from koala feces to characterize the intestinal microbiome of koalas throughout antibiotic treatment and identify specific taxa associated with koala health after treatment. Although differences in the alpha diversity were observed in the intestinal flora between treated and untreated koalas and between koalas treated with different antibiotics, these differences were not statistically significant. The alpha diversity of microbial communities from koalas that lived through antibiotic treatment versus those who did not was significantly greater, however. Beta diversity...
Source: The Tree of Life - May 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Healthcare AI Needs a Breadth and Depth of Data
Today I’m enjoying the New England HIMSS Spring Conference including an amazing keynote session by Dale Sanders from Health Catalyst. Next week I’ll be following up this blog post with some other insights that Dale shared at the New England HIMSS event, but today I just wanted to highlight one powerful concept that he shared: Healthcare AI Needs a Breadth and Depth of Data As part of this idea, Dale shared the following image to illustrate how much data is really needed for AI to effectively assess our health: Thanks @drsanders Amazing Speaker “digitize assets.. #nomoreclicks roadmap of the future AI @H...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: John Lynn Tags: Digital Health Healthcare Healthcare AI Healthcare Analytics Dale Sanders Health Catalyst Healthcare Data HIMSS New England HIMSS Source Type: blogs

Meeting Drug Users Where They ’ re At: US Safe Injection Sites Coming Soon
Amid piles of evidence that the “War On Drugs” approach did little to address Substance Use Disorder (SUD), Americans are beginning to signal that they’re ready to try something different. This month, that signal for something different came in loud and clear from New York City, where Mayor Bill de Blasio championed a plan to open the nation’s first legal safe injection site for intravenous drug users (Neuman, 2018). While de Blasio’s endorsement made a splash in the new cycle, his city is not the only one to seriously consider the approach. Philadelphia, Seattle, Denver and Ithaca, New York ...
Source: World of Psychology - May 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Erin Gilday Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Mental Health and Wellness Policy and Advocacy Recovery Research Substance Abuse Treatment Disease Model Drug Abuse Harm Reduction Heroin Addiction intravenous drug abuse Mayor Bill de Blasio Naloxone nee Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Premarin, whole grains, and why you can ’ t believe headlines
Imagine you have a friend named Justin. He is a schoolteacher. Honest, hardworking, doesn’t smoke, rarely drinks alcohol, sleeps well, doesn’t take drugs, shows up at work every day. He has also chosen to be vegetarian. Another friend of yours, an auto mechanic named Tommy, eats fast food, loves fried chicken, drinks too much beer on the weekends, likes to drive fast cars, and sometimes gets into legal tangles. He smokes cigarettes, though has limited it to only half-a-pack per day. Late weekends, some weekday nights, sleep cut short to just two or three hours. Tommy is not a vegetarian, but likes his burgers r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - May 17, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Beating the Travel Bug & Innovation in Hand Sanitation: Interview with Zoono CSO Dr. Andrew Alexander
While flu season is drawing to a close, transmission of germs can still lead to colds and serious respiratory diseases. In few places are individuals more exposed to a multitude of unique germs and germ carriers than during travel. Unlike some forms of travel, such as buses, where an individual can choose to get off the vehicle or find an alternate transit option, like carpooling, air travel is much less flexible. Based on data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics, in 2010, on average 1.73 million passengers boarded domestic flights every day in the United States. On a plane, individuals are confined in a tight env...
Source: Medgadget - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Source Type: blogs

Burnout: Don ’t blame the clinicians; blame the system
Physician burnout is the depression of the medical world. We are aware of its presence and the detriment it can cause, but yet, we don’t really like to talk about it. The problem is, just like depression, if we don’t talk about it or seek to address it, it persists and leads to a number of unwanted outcomes including decreased productivity, decreased patient satisfaction, and increase in medical errors. And if you are one of those, who thinks this only occurs to a select few, I want you to rethink that. Most statistics suggest that 50 percent of physicians have experienced burnout at one time or another. Thus, ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 14, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anh-le" rel="tag" > Anh Le, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Are “Fatal” Opioid Concentrations Really Fatal?
When medical examiners conclude that the cause of death is opioid overdose, they rely primarily on the opioid blood concentration level in comparison to a pre-determined “fatal” cutoff. This approach is potentially inaccurate; the fatal ranges used are wide, and they overlap significantly with the ranges for living opioid users.Numerous fatal ranges have been quoted for methadone:220-3040 μg/L (mean, 1371),320-2980 μg/L (mean, 772), and600-3000 μg/L. Baselt’sDisposition of Toxic Drugs and Chemicals in Man found fatal levels of 400-1800 μg/L (mean, 1000) and 60-3100μg/L (mean, 280). The...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 14, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey Miron Source Type: blogs

Unexpectedly Better Results Cause Phase III Trial Failure for Gensight
Clinical trials must produce exactly the expected result or they are declared a failure. A clinical trial can fail by producing unexpected benefit, and this has happened to Gensight Biologics' work on allotopic expression of the mitochondrial NH4 gene, aimed at the treatment of inherited retinal degeneration caused by mutation in NH4. Allotopic expression is a process in which a copy of the correctly formed gene is placed into the cell nucleus, suitably altered to enable transport of the protein produced back to the mitochondria where it is need. In a sane world, this therapy would long ago have been available to an...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 14, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Study suggests your adulthood self-esteem has its roots in the way you were raised as a child
By Christian Jarrett Studies of identical and non-identical twins indicate that our self-esteem is influenced by the genes we inherited from our parents, but also, and perhaps slightly more so, by environmental factors. And according to a new study in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, these environmental influences started playing a lasting role very early in life. Ulrich Orth at the University of Bern has reported evidence that, on average, the higher the quality of a person’s home environment when they were aged between 0 and 6 years – based on warm and responsive parenting; cognitive stimulation;...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 14, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Developmental Mental health Personality The self Source Type: blogs

15-year study: stress did not increase risk of breast cancer among women with a genetic susceptibility to the disease
By Emma Young The idea that stress increases the risk of breast cancer is a persistent one, despite a number of major large-scale findings to the contrary. “Over the past 40 years, women have been exposed to strong messages about the importance of ‘thinking positively’ and reducing stress in their lives, which can add to the burden of guilt in those who develop cancer, who feel they have somehow failed”, note the authors of a new prospective study of women in Australia, published in Psycho-Oncology. Their findings suggest that neither acute nor chronic stressors recorded over a three-year period inf...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 11, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cancer Health Mental health Source Type: blogs

How many IVF cycles will it take for me to get pregnant ?
There are some questions which IVF doctors cannot answer accurately, and one of these is the commonest questions patients ask - How many IVF cycles will it take for me to get pregnant?Patients know that IVF doesn't have a 100% pregnancy rate and that they need to be patient. They are prepared to repeat the cycles, and this is a perfectly valid question to ask , because this helps them to prepare mentally and financially for a journey which can be taxing and stressful.However, the frustrating reality is doctors can't answer this simple query accurately for the individual patient. Yes , we can provide group statistics and of...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - May 11, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Exclusive: BeCare Link ’s Innovative App for Multiple Sclerosis Patients
BeCare Link  has created a mobile application (“BeCare MS Link” in the Google Play app store) that connects patients to physicians and researchers to provide unprecedented levels of insight into multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases. As paraphrased from a MS patient: “Much of MS is what is happening in your head, and you need the objective evidence that maybe things are not going as badly as you think.” A typical physician’s visit can only provide a snapshot in time of a patient’s overall well-being and functional status, with a patient’s self-recorded l...
Source: Medgadget - May 10, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Alice Ferng Tags: Exclusive Medicine Neurology Rehab Source Type: blogs

The Digital Future of Pathology
Pathology is the motor that drives healthcare to understand diseases. While it does the job via the same methods as it did for the last 150 years, it’s time to change. Digital technologies could push the field into becoming more efficient and more scalable. They could transform the job of pathologists into a more creative and data-driven profession while allowing patients to receive diagnoses faster and more accurately. Let’s see how the digital future of pathology looks! The foundation of medicine, pathology, has not changed for over 150 years Although the whole edifice of medicine rests on the pathologis...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 10, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine AI artificial intelligence biotechnology deep learning digital digital health medical imaging pathology precision medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

America's Finest: The Critics Respond
In arecent opinion piece for theWall Street Journal I highlighted the plight of America’s Finest, a fishing vessel that, unless it is granted a waiver, will be prohibited from operating in U.S. waters due to its violation of the Jones Act. Although built in Washington state, the ship used steel, amounting to approximately 10 percent of the ship’ s weight, that was cut and bent in the Netherlands. Coast Guard rules related to the Jones Act limit the amount of such foreign-modified steel to 1.5 percent (foreign-made raw steel, in contrast, can be used in unlimited amounts). Unsurprisingly the column has...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Colin Grabow Source Type: blogs

Growth Rate of Spending on Medicine Slows
The IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science recently released a report focused on net spending on medicines in the United States in 2017, with an outlook to 2022. The report notes that spending on medicines grew less than one percent in 2017 – just a mere 0.6 percent. The report further found that the level and growth of spending, the price of new and old drugs, and the allocation of costs among patients, employers, health plans, intermediaries, and state and federal agencies, all “command great attention,” and therefore, the report aims to provide an “objective measure of medicine use” and th...
Source: Policy and Medicine - May 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

More time spent abroad increases “self-concept clarity” – confidence in and clarity about who you are
By Emma Young The idea that taking a gap year allows you to “find yourself” is often derided. But if you spend that time living in one foreign country, it just might. And if you can make it years, even better.  Hajo Adam at Rice University, US, led what his team say is the first empirical investigation of the effects of living abroad on “self-concept clarity” – how clearly and confidently someone defines who they “are”. Since people are increasingly spending time living abroad for work or study – and since other “transitional” life experiences, such as gettin...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 9, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Personality The self Source Type: blogs

Does Marijuana Legalization Cause Pedestrian Fatalities?
A recentreport from the Governors Highway Safety Alliance suggests that the legalization of recreational marijuana in many U.S. states has been associated with increases in pedestrian traffic fatalities. To substantiate this claim, the report cites that:“[t]he seven states (Alaska, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Washington) and DC that legalized recreational use of marijuana between 2012 and 2016 reported a collective 16.4 percent increase in pedestrian fatalities for the first six months of 2017 versus the first six months of 20 16, whereas all other states reported a collective 5.8 percent decrease...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey Miron Source Type: blogs

Device Provides New Way to Visualize Brain Activity
Researchers at the Rockefeller University have developed a tiny headset that can visualize neurons in the brain turning on and off while a mouse explores its environment, or interacts with other mice. The technique could help scientists to track the interactions between brain cells and learn more about what happens in the brains of people with disorders such as schizophrenia. Tracking brain activity in the lab is a challenge, as many imaging techniques require an animal to stay still during imaging, meaning that it isn’t behaving naturally. In addition, it is difficult to identify which neurons play a role in navigat...
Source: Medgadget - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics Neurology Source Type: blogs