Which Should We Treat First: Mental Illness or Addiction?
Substance use can alter behaviors, moods, and personalities so severely for people with addiction that without specialized knowledge and experience, it’s difficult to determine underlying causes such as mental illness or trauma. I credit psychological intervention for pushing me into recovery from alcoholism. Addiction is a mental illness, but is it one that needs to be treated before anything else? Or should we be stopping people from hitting their addiction bottom and helping them recover from their comorbid conditions concurrently? What Is Addiction? Before we can discuss treatment, we need to understand what addi...
Source: World of Psychology - February 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Addiction Alcoholism Disorders Mental Health and Wellness Publishers Recovery Substance Abuse The Fix Treatment Mental Illness Substance Abuse Disorder Source Type: blogs

It Doesn't Matter How Fit You Are, Excess Fat Tissue Still Raises the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease
Being physically fit is very much better for long term health than being unfit. But in this era of cheap and attractive calories, it is quite possible to be both physically fit and overweight to some degree. Many people are. Unfortunately, being fit doesn't meaningfully protect against the detrimental effects of excess fat tissue on health and disease risk. If you are carrying more visceral fat tissue, then you have a higher risk of all of the common age-related diseases, when compared with someone of the same level of fitness with less visceral fat tissue. Not so many years ago, metrics based on the ratio of height...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Alternative therapies for cancer
This study was not designed to directly compare non-conventional therapies with conventional ones, and the results do not mean that all unproven remedies are useless. In fact, an unproven treatment may become conventional if rigorous research proves its worth. There are many types of alternative treatments (including herbs, vitamins, homeopathy, yoga, and acupuncture) that might have different effects and have not yet been well studied. Importantly, this study did not examine the interaction of conventional and alternative treatments (which in some cases may cause problems). In addition, this study did not actually find th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Health Source Type: blogs

Reduced Blood Pressure Lowers Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment, but Not Dementia?
Data from a large human trial has shown that control of blood pressure in older individuals, achieved through lifestyle changes and medication, reduces the risk of mild cognitive impairment by 20% or so, but not the risk of dementia. This is a nuanced result; given what is known of the way in which blood pressure interacts unfavorably with a range of mechanisms related to the development of dementia, it is certainly easier to blame the study design, as the authors do here. There is plenty of evidence to show that hypertension damages the brain directly, causing a greater incidence of ruptured capillaries and tiny areas of ...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Facts About E-Verify: Use Rates, Errors, and Effects on Illegal Employment
ConclusionE-Verify has become one of the largest government surveillance programs in the United States. It checks the identification numbers of tens of millions of legal workers per year, and hundreds of thousands of disproportionately larger businesses use the program. Despite this success, most businesses refuse to adopt the program, and most employees are not checked against the system. Only four states have adopted E-Verify mandates covering all private employers, and even these states cannot manage to enforce their mandates. Through erroneous non-confirmations, E-Verify has harmed nearly three quarters of a million le...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 1, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

Benzodiazepines and Addiction
What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 31, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs

Could A.I. Turn The Tables On The Physician Burnout Epidemic?
There’s an urgent need to lower the staggering levels of physician burnout around the globe as it results in reduced quality of life for the medical community, decreased levels of patient care – and a worsening human resources crisis in the long run. While technology, especially EHRs, are often considered as an essential factor contributing to physician burnout, we expect artificial intelligence to significantly reduce the administrative burden an improve medical professionals’ work experience in the future. < The rough numbers of physician burnout The emotional and mental well-being of medical p...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 31, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine administration administrative AI burnout digital health EHR future health technology Healthcare Innovation medical medical records physician physician burnout Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How to Change Your Psychological Identity
 We all know that addiction, severe depression, and other conditions change our personality. What few know, however, is just how deeply ingrained that change can be, and how difficult (and scary) it can be to try to become “ourselves” again. In this episode, we examine such changes through the experiences of our guest, who overcame depression and addiction, and now helps others do the same. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest David Essel, MS, OM, is a number one best-selling author (10), counselor, master life coach, international speaker and ministe...
Source: World of Psychology - January 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Show Tags: Depression General Recovery The Psych Central Show Addiction David Essel Gabe Howard Personality Vincent M. Wales Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 30th January 2019
Lots of things you may need to know about, this week!Care Quality CommissionMaternity services survey 2018NICE and other guidanceNICEIPG639 -Laparoscopic cerclage for cervical incompetence toprevent late miscarriage or preterm birth, SIGNChildren and young people exposed prenatally to alcohol - StatisticsBreastfeeding at 6 to 8 weeks after birth (Public Health England) ResearchIndicators for monitoring maternal and neonatal qualitycare: a systematic reviewPremature babies have fewer complications if a lowerplatelet count is accepted (NIHR Signal)Review of research published in the New England Journal of...
Source: Browsing - January 30, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Price ’ s Protein Puzzle: 2019 update
Chains of amino acids strung together make up proteins and since each amino acid has a 1-letter abbreviation, we can find words (English and otherwise) in protein sequences. I imagine this pursuit began as soon as proteins were first sequenced, but the first reference to protein word-finding as a sport is, to my knowledge, “Price’s Protein Puzzle”, a letter to Trends in Biochemical Sciences in September 1987 [1]. Price wrote: It occurred to me that TIBS could organise a competition to find the longest word […] contained within any known protein sequence. The journal took up the challenge and publis...
Source: What You're Doing Is Rather Desperate - January 30, 2019 Category: Bioinformatics Authors: nsaunders Tags: bioinformatics computing statistics algorithm amino acid search words Source Type: blogs

“Better Than A Bartender?” Not Necessarily, Suggests Review Of 40 Years Of Research On Criminal Profiling
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski The profession of “criminal profiler” is one shrouded in secrecy, even giving off a hint of danger. Yet when the American psychiatrist James A. Brussel began profiling a particular suspect in the 1950s, law enforcement officers were not entirely inclined to trust him. However, it turned out Brussel accurately defined the suspect’s height, clothing and even religion. This spectacular success was the beginning of the profession of the profiler. The FBI formed its Behavioral Science Unit in 1974 to study serial predators. Since then, the art and craft of criminal profil...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Forensic guest blogger Source Type: blogs

Are Criminal Profilers “Any Better Than A Bartender”? Not Necessarily, Suggests Review Of 40 Years Of Relevant Research
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski The profession of “criminal profiler” is one shrouded in secrecy, even giving off a hint of danger. Yet when the American psychiatrist James A. Brussel began profiling a particular suspect in the 1950s, law enforcement officers were not entirely inclined to trust him. However, it turned out Brussel accurately defined the suspect’s height, clothing and even religion. This spectacular success was the beginning of the profession of the profiler. The FBI formed its Behavioral Science Unit in 1974 to study serial predators. Since then, the art and craft of criminal profil...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Forensic guest blogger Source Type: blogs

Are Criminal Profilers “Any Better Than A Bartender?” Not Necessarily, Suggests Review Of 40 Years Of Relevant Research
By guest blogger Tomasz Witkowski The profession of “criminal profiler” is one shrouded in secrecy, even giving off a hint of danger. Yet when the American psychiatrist James A. Brussel began profiling a particular suspect in the 1950s, law enforcement officers were not entirely inclined to trust him. However, it turned out Brussel accurately defined the suspect’s height, clothing and even religion. This spectacular success was the beginning of the profession of the profiler. The FBI formed its Behavioral Science Unit in 1974 to study serial predators. Since then, the art and craft of criminal profil...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Forensic guest blogger Source Type: blogs

MBH index - School lock downs 2017 - 2018
Number of children who experienced school lock downs in the U.S. 2017-2018 = 4 millionNumber of school lock downs in the U.S. 2017 - 2018 = 6,200Number of school lock downs, on average, per day in U.S. schools 2017 - 2018 = 16Source - Washington Post as reported in The Week on 01/11/19Editor's note:There is growing evidence that school lock down drills are very traumatizing to children which raises the question of whether the benefit of such practices are worth the psychological and social costs.These statistics also make one pause and consider what kind of a society we have become as a result of our love of freely availab...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - January 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

When a pelvic exam is traumatic
Discussions engendered by the movement connected us to people rather than just to a number, subtly shifting how we as a society think about and process sexual violence. On social media, the hashtag #triggerwarning alerts viewers to potentially disturbing information. However, little discussion has focused on the intersection of trauma and health care. What does research tell us? Studies have found that survivors of sexual assault have higher rates of anxiety compared to the general population. They may also be affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which can make them feel as though they are being re-traum...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Huma Farid, MD Tags: Adolescent health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

Travel Ban Separates Thousands of U.S. Citizens from Their Spouses & Minor Children
President Trump announced the first version of his “travel ban” 2 years ago this weekend. The policy has already separated thousands of U.S. citizens from their spouses and minor children. In its current form, the travel ban blocks visas to nationals of five majority Muslim countries. By the end of this fiscal year, the government is on pace to separate an estimated 15,000 spouses and adopted minor children of U.S. citizens.While the State Department has not publicly revealed the exact figures, prior trends in visa issuances indicate that as of January 1, 2019, the travel ban had already prevented 9,284 spouses...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 29, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: David Bier Source Type: blogs

The Return of Reefer Madness
Alex Berenson ’s recent attempt to generate panic at the prospect that marijuana use may become legalized and normalized, with his book Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence,  even borrows its title from the camp 1930s propaganda film  Reefer Madness.  While not nearly as over-the-top as the film, Berenson certainly exaggerates suggestions that marijuana can cause psychosis.Drawing on the 2017 report of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on “Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommenda...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 28, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

PCP and Family Physician Wait Times increasing 50% in Many Markets
The majority of physicians in the U.S. are now salaried and working for large health systems (see:For the first time ever, less than half of physicians are independent). Also, wait times for an appointment with a family physician or primary care physician (PCP) are increasing (see:PCP wait times are 50% higher than 2014). This can be the source of great frustration for patients (see:Report: 20% of patients have changed doctors because of long wait times). These two facts may or may not be related. Here is an excerpt from the article on physician wait times:The average patient waits 29.3 days to see a family medicine physic...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 28, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Medical Consumerism Public Health Source Type: blogs

Intelligent or Wise?
Good grades are all the rage these days. They’re supposed to measure how intelligent and industrious you are. Students strive for a high GPA, with the goal of being admitted into a top college. When they get that acceptance letter, all that hard work seems to have paid off. Time for celebration! You’ve made it! You’re set for life! Yay! Except when you’re not. Being intelligent and industrious is not everything. It is simply the ability to think logically, understand concepts, know formulas and be able to work hard. But, and this is a big but, studies have shown that there is no correlation between ...
Source: World of Psychology - January 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Linda Sapadin, Ph.D Tags: Brain and Behavior College Student Therapist Students Success & Achievement Academics Intellect Wisdom Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 28th 2019
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Artist ’ s Note-January 2019
Original art and artist’s blurbs are presented in collaboration with the students of the University of Illinois Chicago program in Biomedical Visualization.  by Isabel Romero Calvo Sexual abuse of patients is an extremely serious problem in our health care system that is not widely discussed in part due to negative implications for health care providers. Courageously, the Editorial of AJOB is shedding light on this topic by publishing “Serious Ethical Violations in Medicine: A Statistical and Ethical Analysis of 280 Cases in the United States from 2008-2016” by DuBois in their January 2019 issu...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Art Featured Posts Sexual abuse Source Type: blogs

What is the Therapeutic Alliance?
The Therapeutic Alliance Simply put: the Therapeutic Alliance is the mutual bond between therapist and client, as well as the willingness from the patient to immerse in the treatment experience. While it seems like a little thing, it is the most powerful factor in the process of emotional and psychological healing, according to MentalHelp.net. If you do not trust your therapist, you will not be able to fully open up to them and have honest conversations. Without this openness, there will be no progress made on your past trauma. Without progress made on your past trauma, your addiction will fester again in the future and th...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 25, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Complementary Therapies Comprehensive behavioral treatment Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment behavioral therapy complimentary therapy holistic therapy Therapeutic Alliance therapist Source Type: blogs

" Studies Show " : Or Do They?
This study generates causal estimates but does not directly test for the effect of paid leave on hours worked. Rather, the study examines the likelihood of being employed four quarters after taking leave and findsnosignificant relationship between this variable and paid leave.In a nod to the potential economic tradeoffs of mandating paid parental leave, the Upshot reassures us that: surveys have found  either no effect or a positive effect on productivity and turnover.The cited survey suggests that the overwhelming majority of employers find that paid leave has no effect or a positive effect on productivity, prof...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 25, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Derek Bonett Source Type: blogs

Recruiting Patients for Clinical Trials Via a Smartphone App
Recruiting subjects for clinical trials has been a recurring challenge over the years including concerns that low-income and minorities are underrepresented in them (see:Low-Income, Uninsured Patients Often Excluded from Clinical Trials;Site-Less Clinical Trials as a Possible Means to Democratize Them). Because of this underrepresentation, the results of trials are often less valid. Here's an excerpt from an article on this topic (see: Barriers to Clinical Trial Recruitment and Possible Solutions: A Stakeholder Survey):A staggering number of clinical trials fail to meet recruitment goals, which leads to delays, early t...
Source: Lab Soft News - January 25, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Source Type: blogs

Unsettling Statistics About Radiologist Burnout and Depression
Burnout and depression have become dire epidemics in the medical community, and it ’s unclear if there’s a way to improve physician mental health. Among the specialists grappling with immense stress are radiologists, with 45 percent reporting feelings of burnout, according to a new report from Medscape.The  2019 National Physician Burnout, Depression& Suicide Reportsurveyed over 15,000 physicians across more than 29 specialties. The researchers found that the vast majority of depressed physicians, or over 66 percent, feel that their mental health impacts their workplace behavior. Fourteen percent of th...
Source: radRounds - January 25, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Effective Altruism and Effective Research for Human Longevity
The effective altruism movement is a good example of the sort of thing that can only arise in the modern information-rich environment of easily available data and cheap communication. It is half a reaction against the waste, fraud, and general ineffectiveness that characterizes all too much large-scale philanthropy, and half a chance to meaningfully reexamine what everyday philanthropy can look like in an age of greater communication and knowledge. It is easy to salve the conscience by donating to a group that one believes are going to do good, and most people go no further than this. That allows charities to become ineffi...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Activism, Advocacy and Education Source Type: blogs

Diversity beyond gender  — a new year pledge
You can read the original post Digital Science’s Medium blog. Happy New Year! As we regret our former cheese-based life choices and get back into the swing of things, January is also a time to look forward and make resolutions. 2019 could be a year of great change and uncertainty. One topic never far from our minds is diversity and inclusion, specifically ensuring that ALL people are represented and heard. During this time of change, one way that we can achieve greater representation within research is to each commit to doing one small thing to change the current culture. On Saturday 3rd November 2018 we held a ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - January 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Suze Kundu Tags: Uncategorized Diversity SpotOn SpotOn18 Source Type: blogs

Diversity beyond gender   – a new year pledge
You can read the original post Digital Science’s Medium blog. Happy New Year! As we regret our former cheese-based life choices and get back into the swing of things, January is also a time to look forward and make resolutions. 2019 could be a year of great change and uncertainty. One topic never far from our minds is diversity and inclusion, specifically ensuring that ALL people are represented and heard. During this time of change, one way that we can achieve greater representation within research is to each commit to doing one small thing to change the current culture. On Saturday 3rd November 2018 we held a ...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - January 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: Suze Kundu Tags: Uncategorized Diversity SpotOn SpotOn18 Source Type: blogs

Violent Crime down in U.S. 49% in last 24 years.
From Pew Research Center Fact Tank, 01/03/2019Violent crime in the U.S. has fallen sharply over the past quarter century. The two most commonly cited sources of crime statistics in the U.S. both show a substantial decline in the violent crime rate since it peaked in the early 1990s. One is an annual report by the FBI of serious crimes reported to police in approximately 18,000 jurisdictions around the country. The other is an annual survey of more than 90,000 households conducted by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, which asks Americans ages 12 and older whether they were victims of crime...
Source: Markham's Behavioral Health - January 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: David G. Markham Source Type: blogs

Has U.S. Health Care Spending Finally Stabilized? An Outlook for 2019
By ETIENNE DEFFARGES  The official 2017 statistics from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) are out, and there are some good news: The annual growth rate of health care spending is slowing down, and is the lowest since 2013 at 3.9%—it was 4.3% for 2016 and 5.8% for 2015. The bad news is that our health care cost increases are still well above inflation, and that we spent $3.5 trillion in this area, or 17.9% of GDP. Americans spent $10,739 on health care in 2017, more than twice as much as of our direct economic competitors: This per capita health care spending was $4,700 in Japan; $5,700 in G...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Finance Medicaid Medicare Etienne Deffarges Health insurance healthcare costs Healthcare spending Source Type: blogs

Your Perfect New Excuse For Ordering Unhealthy Food And Drink: “Altruistic Indulgence”
By Christian Jarrett On the way to meet your friend at a cafe you’re confident about sticking to your resolutions for healthier living. It soon goes awry though – no, not because of your weak willpower, but due to your excess empathy. Your friend orders first and plumps for the super indulgent Winter Warmer Chocca Mocha with added marshmallows. You follow suit, sensing that if you’d stuck with your original plans for a skinny coffee, you’d have made your friend feel awful. There is now a name for this behaviour: You just engaged in “altruistic indulgence”, the most appealing of excuses f...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Health Social Source Type: blogs

Behind the recent good news in cancer statistics
Good news is always welcome, especially when talking about something as serious as cancer. And there is plenty of welcome information in the American Cancer Society ’s release of our annual report on“Cancer Statistics, 2019” and its accompanying consumer-oriented version of“Cancer Facts& Figures 2019.” Among the good news in this report: A significant […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - January 21, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/j-leonard-lichtenfeld" rel="tag" > J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

What Can Brain Imaging Tell Us About Violent Extremism?
In this study,Sacred Values included:Palestinian right of returnWestern military forces being expelled from all Muslim landsStrict sharia as the rule of law in all Muslim countriesArmed jihad being waged against enemies of MuslimsForbidding of caricatures of Prophet MohammedVeiling of women in publicWhat were theNonsacred Values? We don't know. I couldn't find examples anywhere in the paper. It's crucial that we know what these were, to help understand the “sacralization” of nonsacred values, which was observed in an fMRI experiment (described later). So I turned to the Supplemental Material ofBerns et al. (201...
Source: The Neurocritic - January 21, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 21st 2019
In this study, scientists screened cells from old animals to identify any RBPs that change upon aging. The screening showed that one particular protein, Pumilio2 (PUM2), was highly induced in old animals. PUM2 binds mRNA molecules containing specific recognition sites. Upon its binding, PUM2 represses the translation of the target mRNAs into proteins. Using a systems genetics approach, the researchers then identified a new mRNA target that PUM2 binds. The mRNA encodes for a protein called Mitochondrial Fission Factor (MFF), and is a pivotal regulator of mitochondrial fission - a process by which mitochondria break u...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 20, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

4 At-Risk Behaviors in Teens & What Parents Can Do
Teens are known to have a penchant for impulsivity and instant gratification. Even scientists have studied these habits and come to the conclusion that teen brains are simply wired for risk. But just what kind of at-risk or high-risk behaviors should parents be on the lookout for? To start with, at-risk behaviors are defined as anything that puts adolescents on the path to future negative consequences such as injury, poor health, incarceration and even death. Since most teens rarely think ahead to the consequences of their actions, it’s up to parents to recognize some of these dangerous behaviors and caution the...
Source: World of Psychology - January 19, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Bullying Children and Teens College Parenting Sexuality Substance Abuse Children At Risk Teen Depression Teen Drug Use Source Type: blogs

One of the Ways Researchers Narrow the Search for Drugs to Slow Aging
Small molecule and drug candidate libraries are huge. Much of modern medical research is a process of screening subsets of those libraries in search of molecules that can produce benefits with minimal side-effects. Usually the output of a successful screen is taken as a starting point for further exploration and molecular tinkering, to improve the effect or minimize undesirable side-effects. The great hope for gene therapy is that it will render all of this largely obsolete by offering ways to directly influence a molecular mechanism to a configurable degree without meaningful side-effects. That remains a way off in the fu...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Young Men Who Endorse The Masculine Ideal of Success Enjoy Greater Psychological Wellbeing
By Christian Jarrett Recently it’s been difficult to avoid the mantra that masculinity is toxic. There’s that viral Gillette advert encouraging men to be nicer (provoking a mix of praise, scorn and outrage); and the claim from the American Psychological Association (APA), in its promotion for its new guidelines on working with men and boys, that “traditional masculinity—marked by stoicism, competitiveness, dominance and aggression—is, on the whole, harmful” – a message welcomed by some, but criticised by many others, including Steven Pinker who dubbed it “ludicrous&...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Gender Mental health Source Type: blogs

Third International Conference on End of Life Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice
Here is the program for the Third International Conference on End of Life Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice. Pretty awesome.   Thursday 7 March, 2019 08.30-09.00Registration & Welcome Coffee 09.00-09.10Welcome by the Chair of the Scientific Committee – Kenneth Chambaere (BE) 09.10-09.30Introduction by an external speaker (TBC) Plenary 1: Latest developments in assisted dying around the world 09.30-10.00Developments in European countries – Agnes van der Heide (NL) 10.00-10.30Recent developments and the future of MAiD in Canada – Jocelyn Downie (CAN) 10.30-11.00A review of developmen...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Irving Fisher's Search for Stable Money: What We Can Learn
ConclusionIn thinking about monetary alternatives, there is no better place to start then a review of Irving Fisher ’s work, especiallyThe Purchasing Power of Money.   His insights can guide all those interested in improving the current government fiat money regime and in avoiding the mistakes of the past.  The Fed, in particular, ought to listen to what Fisher had to say about sound money—that is, money of stable purchasing power.  There is no perfect mone tary system, but one needs to understand what a “good system” would look like in order to move in the right direction.  A de...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: James A. Dorn Source Type: blogs

Large Genome-Wide Study Finds Only a Few Genetic Influences on Human Longevity
The influence of genetic variants on natural variations in human longevity is a very complex matter. The evidence to date supports a model in which thousands of genes have individually tiny, conditional effects. Near all associations identified in any given study population have failed to appear in any of the other study populations, and effect sizes for the very few longevity-associated genes that do appear in multiple studies are not large in the grand scheme of things. These variants provide a small increase in the odds of living to be very old, but the individuals bearing them are still diminished and damaged by aging....
Source: Fight Aging! - January 17, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Postdoc position available in the O-Lab at Duke University
We are looking for a highly motivated early-career scientist to join the O-Lab, led by Prof. Tobias Overath, in the Department of Psychology& Neuroscience at Duke University. Work in our lab investigates how sounds, from simple sinusoids to complex speech signals, are processed in the human brain, using a combination of behavioral (psychoacoustics) and neuroimaging methods (fMRI, EEG, ECoG) to track the underlying neural processes. Current projects investigate the transformation from acoustic to linguistic analysis of temporal speech structure, online measures of statistical learning, and optimization of cochlear ...
Source: Talking Brains - January 17, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

AI-Powered Wheelchair Controlled by Facial Expressions: Interview with CEO of HOOBOX Robotics
Hoobox Robotics, a robotics company based in São Paulo, Brazil, has developed the “Wheelie 7”, a wheelchair controlled using facial recognition technology. Incorporating AI developed by Intel, the technology allows users to control the movements of a motorized wheelchair using just their faces. The technology is envisaged as being particularly helpful for users who cannot use their hands to control a motorized device. The tech consists of a 3D camera that records a user’s facial expressions (no body sensors are required) and an on-board computer that interprets the expressions and sends commands to...
Source: Medgadget - January 16, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Exclusive Rehab Source Type: blogs

What's new in midwifery - 16th January 2018
Some recent things you might need to know aboutNICENICE are consulting on updating the guideline on intrapartum care for healthy women and babies. Their surveillance consultationcloses on 22 January 2019.  StatisticsBirth characteristics in England and Wales:2017. Office for National Statistics - live births by sex, ethnicity and month, maternities by place of birth and with multiple births and stillbirths by age of parents and quarter.Maternity services monthly statistics: September 2018, experimental statistics. NHS.NHS England Atlas of Shared Learning – case studiesImproving the quality of care for ...
Source: Browsing - January 16, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs

Immediately Re-Watching Lecture Videos Doesn ’t Benefit Learning
By Christian Jarrett Given a passage of text to study, many students repeatedly re-read it in the hope the information will eventually stick. Psychology research has shown the futility of this approach. Re-reading is a poor strategy, it’s too passive and it leads the mind to wander. Much better to test yourself on what you read, or explain it to yourself or someone else. Now a paper in Experimental Psychology suggests the same is true of lecture videos – immediately re-watching them doesn’t lead to any greater learning. Leonardo Martin and his team asked 72 participants to watch two lecture videos, ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Educational Source Type: blogs

How to Reduce the Risk of Winter Falls for Aging Adults
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), falls are the leading cause of death from injury among older adults. Thom Disch has a passion for this topic and has been compiling statistics and stories related to this healthcare crisis for over a decade. Thom owns HandiProducts, a web-based business that showcases the dozens of products that he has developed specifically for preventing slips and falls. He also wrote “Stop the Slip,” which is packed with practical tips. Read the full article on HealthCentral for tips and leads to products to reduce falls: Carol Bradley Bursack is the Candid Caregiver Medi...
Source: Minding Our Elders - January 14, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

15-Minute MRI Coming Out of the University of Arizona
Researchers at the University of Arizona ’s College of Engineering are reducing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan time to 15 minutes by using multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), a technology that eliminates many of the time-consuming elements of MRI.The group of researchers led by Nan-kaei Chen, PhD, associate professor of biomedical engineering, were awarded a $2.1 million grant from theNational Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to create faster MRI scans that will be beneficial to patients who struggle to lay still in the machine for 40 minutes to an hour. The five- year project specifically t...
Source: radRounds - January 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Consequences of Mayor de Blasio's Mandated Personal Leave
This week Mayor Bill de Blasio proposedmandating paid personal leave benefits for all employees in New York City. The policy, which applies to both full and part-time workers, would make New York City the first city to mandate personal leave in the country.The policy is billed as benefiting the 500,000 workers in New York City that currently have no personal days off. Although the idea may sound fresh and New Yorkers no doubt like the sound of paid time off, they may be less enthused if they understood the economics of mandated benefits.Currently, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 32 percent of an average U.S. ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - January 11, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Vanessa Brown Calder Source Type: blogs

Commissioning Healthcare Policy: Hospital Readmission and Its Price Tag
By ANISH KOKA MD  The message comes in over the office slack line at 1:05 pm. There are four patients in rooms, one new, 3 patients in the waiting room. Really, not an ideal time to deal with this particular message. “Kathy the home care nurse for Mrs. C called and said her weight yesterday was 185, today it is 194, she has +4 pitting edema, heart rate 120, BP 140/70 standing, 120/64 sitting” I know Mrs. C well. She has severe COPD from smoking for 45 of the last 55 years. Every breath looks like an effort because it is. The worst part of it all is that Mrs. C just returned home from the hospital just days...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Health Policy Hospitals Medicare Anish Koka hospital readmissions HRRP MedPAC Source Type: blogs